Clarity about learning
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Clarity about learning

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    Clarity about learning Clarity about learning Presentation Transcript

    • Nexus International School Putrajaya Clarity about the Learning Dr Rosemary Martin Monday 19th September
    • Learning IntentionPrinciples and practices of establishingclarity about learning in the classroom
    • Clarity about the Learning: the Keystone of AfL● Learning intentions● Relevance● Examples and modelling● Success criteria● Checking for understanding Both teacher and learners need to be clear about what is being learnt.
    • Learning intentions can come from:● The curriculum goals● IGCSE prescriptions● Diagnostic assessment information● Other assessment that has been identified as a learning need (EG learner profiles/skills)● Reflective discussions between teachers and learners that indicate the next learning step.
    • Levels of Learning● Learning intentions can be:● Global – e.g. to write a report● Or specific – e.g. to structure a report● Or more specific - e.g. to write the introduction to a report in order to summarise what the report is about.
    • Levels of learningLevels of learning covered within eachclassroom are very much dependent onlearners’ needs. The learning should bein manageable “chunks” that thelearners can handle.
    • A maths example● Global - e.g. statistics● Specific – e.g. to draw a line graph● More specific – e.g. to mark axes on a line graph
    • A science example● Global – e.g. light and sound waves● Specific – e.g. how to measure light and sound waves● More specific – e.g. to use a cathode oscilloscope
    • A history example● Golbal – e.g. the revolutionary process● Specific – e.g. The Russian Revolution● More Specific – e.g. The causes of the Russian Revolution
    • A Skills ExampleGlobal – e.g. to learn collaborativelySpecific – e.g. to work in groups of fourMore specific – e.g. to listen to each otherand make sure that everyone has a chanceto be heard.
    • Transparency of Learning IntentionsIn order for a learning intention to be sharedeffectively it needs to be clear andunambiguous, explained by the teacher in away that makes sense to the learners – inlearner-friendly language.
    • Don’t confuse the learning with the task!● The learning intention is what you want the learners to recognise, understand or be able to do.● The instructions for the activities and tasks outline the activities that the learners will carry out in order to learn.
    • Judging the quality of learning intentions …● To make a list of words which could replace “said” Write a learning intention that captures that learning behind this activity.
    • Judging the quality of Learning Intentions● To estimate the length of a horse Reword this as a learning intention that is“context free”.
    • Judging the quality of learning intentions● Learning to make a kaleidoscopeRewrite this so that it captures the deeperideas inherent in the learning.
    • Establish Relevance● Discuss with the learners why they are learning this at all.● How is the learning relevant in their lives? When might they use or need this learning?● Share with them how it fits into the bigger picture of their learning.
    • Model the process or look at an exemplar● This provides learners with an opportunity to see what the learning might look like● Learners have an opportunity to discern what ‘quality’ is or is not● It can be used to co-construct success criteria● Learners appreciate the guidance that exemplars or modelling provide.
    • Marshall and DrummondIt is simply about making the learning explicitby focusing learners’ attention onunderstanding quality.Learning is improved when notions of qualityare combined with modelling.
    • Success Criteria – why bother?● They show the learners what they are aiming for and how to get there● Learners can self and peer assess independently from the teacher● Learners are clear about what it is they are going to be evaluated or assessed on● Learners have something to refer to when they want to check if they are on track or not.
    • Process and Product Criteria● Process – How will learners go about achieving the learning intention?● Product - How will they know that they have achieved it?● Whether learners require process or product criteria or both depends on the learning being covered.
    • Learners should help to define the Success Criteria whenever possible.● It involves them in the definition of process and quality● They are being asked to link the learning intention with the criteria – they are making connections● Thinking about what the learning might entail is a much more challenging learning experience than being told.
    • Learning Intentions, Success Criteria and Task need to be separated but aligned.● The learning intention is what you want the learners to recognise, understand or be able to do● The Success criteria answer the question ”how will we know that we have achieved this?” or “How will we go about this learning?”● The instructions for the tasks or activities describe the activities that the learners will carry out in order to learn. These will change according to the context of the learning.
    • Alignment● L.I. We are learning how to describe a particular event in detail● S.C. ● Focus on a particular event ● Give details of setting and atmosphere ● Cover only relevant aspects of the event ● Pace your writing to suit the event ● Use precise verbs and adjectives Task: Choose an important event in your story about the swimming sports and rewrite in detail
    • Lack of Alignment● L.I. We are learning how to describe a particular event in detail● S.C. ● Give details of setting and atmosphere ● Use language appropriate to audience ● Make sure spelling and punctuation are correct ● Write at least one page. Task: Re-write your story about yesterday’s swimming sports
    • Check that learners understand● Give frequent opportunities for learners to check their understanding (or correct their misunderstandings!) with you or one another● Give learners time to think before responding to a question● Model the use of thinking tine and shared understanding if necessary.
    • Display Learning Intentions and Success CriteriaThese need to be visually displayed forevery lesson so that you and thelearners can refer to them during thelesson.
    • Recap.● Clarify L.I. at planning stage● Create a climate where learners expect a learning intention● Explain LI in learner speak and display it● Discuss the relevance of the learning● Model the process or look at an exemplar● Invite learners to share in writing the success criteria● Keep checking that the learners understand● Ensure that learners refer to the LI and SC when working on the task.
    • Suggestions for group discussions● How might planning and classroom practice s change to incorporate principles of clarity?● How can we plan for units of work to include global and specific learning intentions?● Are we teaching according to learners’ needs?● How can we plan so that teaching is flexible to learners’ needs?● Have we broken the learning down into manageable “chunks” for learners – each one of them as a separate learning intention?● Are our plan books “live” documents?