“Challenges and Breakthroughs for Women’s Shelters in Asia”

Kaohsiung, Taiwan

© Materials from this slide may not be rep...
The Singapore model keeping it real
© Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
Development of Model of Integrated Response
to Family Violence
1. SPF piloted coordinated response to family violence in
o...
Development of Model of Integrated Response
to Family Violence

4. MCYS and SPF took lead - developed protocols for
multi-...
Engaging Men who Abuse in Singapore
1. Men who abuse entered violence programme via
voluntary and mandated routes.
2. 2 pa...
PAVE’s engaging men who abuse programme
modelled after:

1. DAIP model - Duluth, Minnesota
- Takes blame off victim, place...
PAVE’s engaging men who abuse programme
modelled after:
2. Confronting Abusive Beliefs ProgrammeVancouver
- Changing behav...
PAVE
1. Philosophy - using men’s group and individual
counselling
a) to help men understand and end their violence;
b) wor...
PAVE

3. With greater exposure &
experience in engaging men
who abuse, able to indigenize
to Singapore’s
multi-lingual, mu...
Individual counselling programme
1. Engaging men who abuse (MWA) on voluntary and
mandated tracks. No couple counselling.
...
Men’s Group programme
1. Combining men on voluntary and mandated tracks
served us well.
a) Voluntary ones learn “disadvant...
Useful variables to enhance men’s
programme
1. Build into programme structure checks with
spouse/partners on progress of M...
Useful variables to enhance men’s
programme
3. Enhanced scheme for very high risk cases.
a) Prisons flag out BPO cases for...
Useful variables to enhance men’s
programme
4. Counselling Order (CGO) cases
- Non compliance and non-attendance, accounta...
What motivates men who abuse to seek &
remain in programme
1. Desire to save marriage & ensure children grow in
a complete...
What motivates MWA to seek & remain in programme

2. Recognition that violence is wrong.

- More spontaneously expressed b...
What motivates MWA to seek & remain in programme

3. Court mandate
- Compliance draws more benefits.
4. Impending court tr...
PAVE variation

The 4 Rs
1. Re-tell
2. Re-define/ Re-frame
3. Re-learn
4. Re-do

© Materials from this slide may not be re...
The change process: What warrants
attention in engagement
1. Early intervention - “habituation” increases insensitvity
to ...
PAVE variation
The change process: What warrants attention in
engagement

4. Addressing the impact of violence on victims ...
Our Learning Journey providing training on
Engaging Men who Abuse

An area of practice that is
perceived as ……
1. “dark” (...
Learning from the men
Workers’ experience -

a) Painful
b) Challenging - dealing with
DMBC;
c) Heart-warming
d) Enlighteni...
Learning from the men …
“Nobody can change us.
Only we can change
ourselves. You plant a seed,
tomorrow I won’t see the
tr...
What is the right model for
engaging men who abuse?
1. Learn from tried and tested
models. Hold men
accountable for violen...
What is the right model for
engaging men who abuse?
3. Work in tandem with key
stakeholders for holistic
intervention, esp...
Key approach to helping
men stop their violence in
intimate relationship is to
provide the platform for it.

Be their brid...
Shieh shieh

© Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission ...
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Engaging Singapore men who abuse; development of Model of Integrated Response to Family Violence

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  1. 1. “Challenges and Breakthroughs for Women’s Shelters in Asia” Kaohsiung, Taiwan © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  2. 2. The Singapore model keeping it real
  3. 3. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  4. 4. Development of Model of Integrated Response to Family Violence 1. SPF piloted coordinated response to family violence in one division with 2 VWOs. Victims reporting family violence immediately linked to the VWOs for follow up. 2. Success of pilot programme led to implementation island-wide. 3. Amendments to Women’s Charter in May 1997. Definition and coverage of family violence expanded. Greater enforcement power. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  5. 5. Development of Model of Integrated Response to Family Violence 4. MCYS and SPF took lead - developed protocols for multi-systems network involving other key systems eg Family Court, SSAs, MOE, MOH, Prisons. 5. Different platforms for dialogue - national, community level. 6. Gaps that came with multi-disciplinary partnerships. Nonetheless, platforms created to reflect on management of family violence issues & practice. 7. More contact points for referrals. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  6. 6. Engaging Men who Abuse in Singapore 1. Men who abuse entered violence programme via voluntary and mandated routes. 2. 2 paths - a) Individual counselling b) Men’s treatment groups 3. Training available for frontline professionals. Inadequate for specialised area of need. 4. VWOs interested in this area of work did own research. Looked to established models/programmes. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  7. 7. PAVE’s engaging men who abuse programme modelled after: 1. DAIP model - Duluth, Minnesota - Takes blame off victim, places accountability for abuse on offender; - Believes that beliefs and attitudes possessed by men who batter can be changed through an educational process; - Co-ordinated community response; - Changes societal conditions that support men’s use of tactics of power and control over women; - Specialises in men’s groups : Male-female cofacilitation. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  8. 8. PAVE’s engaging men who abuse programme modelled after: 2. Confronting Abusive Beliefs ProgrammeVancouver - Changing behaviors, cognitions or affect requires change in beliefs; - Takes into account cultural & social contexts that sustain beliefs & deter belief change; - Change facilitated when beliefs are confronted in group setting; - Replace abusive beliefs with respectful ones; - Male-female co-facilitation. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  9. 9. PAVE 1. Philosophy - using men’s group and individual counselling a) to help men understand and end their violence; b) work towards replacing negative beliefs with positive ones; c) build more respectful relationships. 2. Matched with programme for survivors and child witnesses a) to empower them in identifying risks, warning signs, mobilising internal and external resources; b) develop safety plans, make positive choices. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  10. 10. PAVE 3. With greater exposure & experience in engaging men who abuse, able to indigenize to Singapore’s multi-lingual, multi-ethnic and multi-religious backdrop. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  11. 11. Individual counselling programme 1. Engaging men who abuse (MWA) on voluntary and mandated tracks. No couple counselling. 2. Adapted content - forms cornerstone of men’s programme 3. Add - context of social/cultural/religious beliefs; motivational interviewing, linking them up with resources for holistic intervention. 4. Maximum of 8 mandated & 24 voluntary sessions. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  12. 12. Men’s Group programme 1. Combining men on voluntary and mandated tracks served us well. a) Voluntary ones learn “disadvantage”/ cost of having PPO and CGO. Preventive element. b) Those mandated inspire voluntary ones by discussing more useful/ constructive strategies “before things get worse”. c) Motivation of men attending programme voluntarily a major shift in setting new benchmarks for change. 2. Irregular attendance and recidivism a constant reality. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  13. 13. Useful variables to enhance men’s programme 1. Build into programme structure checks with spouse/partners on progress of MWA. Useful ongoing evaluation & reality check. 2. 2004 - SPF mooted and piloted Joint House Visit programme in partnership with PAVE. - Allowed police and social workers to make joint visits, post incarceration; - Good deterrence for re-offending; offer of community support; - Source of inter-disciplinary mutuality. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  14. 14. Useful variables to enhance men’s programme 3. Enhanced scheme for very high risk cases. a) Prisons flag out BPO cases for SSA follow up prior to release; b) Provides upstream community support, both for MWAs and survivors. c) Platform for exchanges on dangerousness of MWA. If MWA have low insight & plans to commit further hurt, develop more concrete community watch programme. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  15. 15. Useful variables to enhance men’s programme 4. Counselling Order (CGO) cases - Non compliance and non-attendance, accountable to court, subject to court reviews. - Cost - keep returning to Court. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  16. 16. What motivates men who abuse to seek & remain in programme 1. Desire to save marriage & ensure children grow in a complete family. - Culturally, perceived as more damaging to children if they are from “incomplete family”. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  17. 17. What motivates MWA to seek & remain in programme 2. Recognition that violence is wrong. - More spontaneously expressed by men who seek help voluntarily. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  18. 18. What motivates MWA to seek & remain in programme 3. Court mandate - Compliance draws more benefits. 4. Impending court trial - To prove help being sought. 5. To prove a point © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  19. 19. PAVE variation The 4 Rs 1. Re-tell 2. Re-define/ Re-frame 3. Re-learn 4. Re-do © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  20. 20. The change process: What warrants attention in engagement 1. Early intervention - “habituation” increases insensitvity to use of violence & consequences. 2. Therapeutic relationship: critical element in intervention 3. Holding the men accountable © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  21. 21. PAVE variation The change process: What warrants attention in engagement 4. Addressing the impact of violence on victims - dealing with “collective & cumulative amnesia” (Dobash, Dobash, Cavanagh & Lewis 2000). 5. Building men’s capacity for empathy. 6. Keeping victims’ safety in focus: the need for ongoing risk assessment 7. Groupwork. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  22. 22. Our Learning Journey providing training on Engaging Men who Abuse An area of practice that is perceived as …… 1. “dark” (in content) 2. difficult (in process) & 3. bleak (in potential outcomes). © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  23. 23. Learning from the men Workers’ experience - a) Painful b) Challenging - dealing with DMBC; c) Heart-warming d) Enlightening - best philosophers & poets; …… cont © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  24. 24. Learning from the men … “Nobody can change us. Only we can change ourselves. You plant a seed, tomorrow I won’t see the tree. I water the tree but need to clear the weeds too.” e) (Actually) enjoyable. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  25. 25. What is the right model for engaging men who abuse? 1. Learn from tried and tested models. Hold men accountable for violence & ensure victim safety. Clear philosophy, concrete foundation. 2. Indigenise to local context. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  26. 26. What is the right model for engaging men who abuse? 3. Work in tandem with key stakeholders for holistic intervention, especially in high risk situations. 4. On-going research & streamlining of practice model needed to ensure relevance. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  27. 27. Key approach to helping men stop their violence in intimate relationship is to provide the platform for it. Be their bridge to building respectful relationships. © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.
  28. 28. Shieh shieh © Materials from this slide may not be reproduced in any format, for any purpose, without written permission from PAVE.

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