Who lives in New Orleans and the metro area now? www.gnocdc.org A product of Nonprofit Knowledge Works Elaine Ortiz
Less than a high school degree for the population 25 years and older <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not...
Bachelor’s degree or higher  for the population 25 years and older <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not s...
Median household income 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 1999 and 2010 is not significant ...
Poverty rate for the population for whom poverty status is determined <ul><li>n.s.= On the 1999 bar, n.s. indicates change...
Children in poverty for the population under 18 years old for whom poverty status is determined <ul><li>n.s.= On the 1999 ...
Households without access to a vehicle in the three most populous parishes, the metro, and the United States <ul><li>n.s.=...
Population not U.S. citizens at birth in the three most populous parishes, the metro, and the United States <ul><li>n.s.= ...
Homeowners without a mortgage in owner-occupied housing units <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not signif...
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Who Lives in New Orleans and the metro area now?

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These slides go along with the brief entitled "Who Lives In New Orleans and the Metro Area Now?", which examines 2010 demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau and identifies significant changes since the Census 2000 in parishes across the metro area. Included are data on poverty, income, educational attainment, access to vehicles, the foreign born population, and homeowners without a mortgage.

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  • This presentation includes 2010 socioeconomic data from the American Community Survey (ACS) released by the U.S. Census Bureau on September 22, 2011. It also include Census 2010 data that was released in August 2011 for homeowners without a mortgage. A downloadable spreadsheet of all data included in this brief is available on our website – www.gnocdc.org. Please note that data from the ACS 2010 is available only for the three most populous parishes of Jefferson, Orleans, and St. Tammany as well as the New Orleans metro. Data for all seven parishes in the metro is available from the Census 2010.
  • Educational attainment is an important determinant of household incomes, workforce skills, and regional resiliency [1]. The proportion of adults 25 years and older with less than a high school education declined across all three of the largest parishes, leading to a metro-wide decrease from 22 percent in 2000 to 16 percent in 2010. In the city of New Orleans, the share of adults with less than a high school degree fell from 25 percent to 16 percent, nearly as low as the United States average. [1] Paul M. Romer, &amp;quot;Economic Growth,&amp;quot; in The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics available at http://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/EconomicGrowth.html; Paul R. Krugman, The Age of Diminished Expectation: U.S. economic policy in the 1990s (Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1990); and Robert Atkinson and Howard Wial, &amp;quot;Boosting Productivity, Innovation, and Growth through a National Innovation Foundation&amp;quot; (Washington: Brookings Institution, 2008).
  • The steep decline locally in the share of adults without a high school degree in has been coupled with a sharp increase in the share with a bachelor’s degree or higher. In the city of New Orleans, 33 percent of adults 25 and older had a college degree in 2010, up from 26 percent in 2000, and a full five percentage points higher than the U.S. average of 28 percent for 2010. The metro area share of adults with a bachelor’s degree has also increased, from 23 to 27 percent.
  • While the Great Recession pushed household income down 9 percent nationwide between 1999 and 2010, the median income in the city of New Orleans is unchanged at $37,726. The median household income for the metro is also unchanged at $46,134. Meanwhile, median household incomes in Jefferson Parish have fallen by 7 percent since 1999 to $46,559 and are unchanged in St. Tammany Parish at $59,350.
  • Individuals living below the poverty level indicate the economy is not providing all residents with the ability to meet their most basic needs, including food, housing, and transportation. The poverty rate in the New Orleans metro declined from 18 percent in 1999 to 15 percent in 2007, but then increased to 17 percent in 2010, such that it is now (statistically) the same as it was back in 1999. In New Orleans itself, the 2010 poverty rate of 27 percent is also statistically the same as it was in 1999 after falling to 21 percent in 2007.   The 2010 poverty rates in Jefferson and St. Tammany parishes do represent real change since 1999, although the trends are in opposite directions. Poverty rates increased from 14 to 16 percent in Jefferson Parish, and declined from 10 percent to 8 percent in St. Tammany. Meanwhile, the 2010 poverty rate of 15 percent for the nation is higher than in both 2000 and 2007.
  • Like the overall poverty rate, child poverty rates in Orleans Parish and the metro area dropped in 2007 and have since increased again to their 1999 level. The Orleans Parish child poverty rate fell from 41 percent in 1999 to 32 percent in 2007, and then shot back up to 42 percent in 2010. The metro area child poverty rate dipped to 21 percent in 2007 but ended up at 26 percent in 2010—the same as in 1999. St. Tammany’s 9 percent child poverty rate for 2010 is also statistically unchanged from1999. Meanwhile, the child poverty rate has increased from 20 to 25 percent in Jefferson Parish between 1999 and 2010, and from 17 percent to 22 percent in the United States.
  • Post-Katrina, the share of Orleans Parish households without access to a vehicle has dropped from 27 percent in 2000 to 19 percent in 2010. Nonetheless, at 19 percent, New Orleans’ share is more than twice as high as in neighboring parishes and the nation, indicating the importance of a robust public transportation system and city assisted evacuation plan.
  • A rising foreign-born share of the population may reflect expanding economic opportunities for both high-skilled and low-skilled workers [2]. The foreign-born share of the population grew in all three of the most populous parishes since 2000, indicating that the New Orleans metro may be emerging as an important gateway for immigrants. Metro-wide the foreign-born share of the population increased from 5 percent in 2000 to 7 percent in 2010. In Jefferson Parish the foreign-born share jumped from 7 percent to 13 percent, and is now on par with the United States. In Orleans and St. Tammany, the share has increased by about two percentage points to 6 percent and 4 percent respectively. [2] Audrey Singer and others, &amp;quot;The Geography of Immigrant Skills: Educational Profiles of Metropolitan Areas&amp;quot; (Washington: Brookings Institution, 2001), accessed September 22, 2011 at http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2011/06_immigrants_singer.aspx
  •   Homeowners without a mortgage own their homes free and clear of any type of loan. A high share of such homeowners may indicate many residents living in the same house for long periods of time and fewer foreclosures. The proportion of metro area homeowners without a mortgage has increased from 34 to 36 percent between 2000 and 2010, driven by changes in Orleans, Jefferson, and St. Bernard parishes [3]. Increases were especially pronounced in Orleans and St. Bernard, where the shares of homeowners without a mortgage shot up from 33 to 39 percent and from 42 to 49 percent, respectively. One reason for the surge may be that homeowners who returned used insurance or Road Home proceeds to pay off their mortgage principal. These three parishes received the largest number of Road Home grants.   St. Charles, St. John, and St. Tammany gained households — and new homebuyers — since 2000. The share of homeowners without a mortgage fell in St. Charles and St. John, and held steady in St. Tammany. The share of homeowners without a mortgage also fell in Plaquemines Parish, from 57 percent in 2000 to 43 percent in 2010. Nonetheless, Plaquemines’ share of homeowners without a mortgage remains high relative to the metro and the United States. The share of homeowners in the U.S. without a mortgage has also declined since 2000, falling from 33 percent to 30 percent. (3) Data for homeowners without a mortgage is from the Census 2010 SF1 file released for Louisiana in August 2011, and thus we include information for all seven parishes in the metro.
  • Who Lives in New Orleans and the metro area now?

    1. 1. Who lives in New Orleans and the metro area now? www.gnocdc.org A product of Nonprofit Knowledge Works Elaine Ortiz
    2. 2. Less than a high school degree for the population 25 years and older <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Bachelor’s degree or higher for the population 25 years and older <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Median household income 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 1999 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Poverty rate for the population for whom poverty status is determined <ul><li>n.s.= On the 1999 bar, n.s. indicates change between 1999 and 2007 is not significant; on the 2007 bar, n.s. indicates change between 2007 and 2010 is not significant; and on the 2010 bar, n.s. indicates change between 1999 and 2010 is not significant. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3, American Community Survey 2007, and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Children in poverty for the population under 18 years old for whom poverty status is determined <ul><li>n.s.= On the 1999 bar, n.s. indicates change between 1999 and 2007 is not significant; on the 2007 bar, n.s. indicates change between 2007 and 2010 is not significant; and on the 2010 bar, n.s. indicates change between 1999 and 2010 is not significant. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3, American Community Survey 2007, and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Households without access to a vehicle in the three most populous parishes, the metro, and the United States <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Population not U.S. citizens at birth in the three most populous parishes, the metro, and the United States <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and American Community Survey 2010. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Homeowners without a mortgage in owner-occupied housing units <ul><li>n.s.= Difference between 2000 and 2010 is not significant at 95% confidence interval. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from Census 2000 SF3 and Census 2010 SF1. </li></ul>

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