Book Review:eMOTION! REPORTS.comAutomotive/Aerospace Industries Systemic Intelligencewww.emotionreports.comRonis ReviewThe...
The Pentagon’s New Map: War andPeace in the Twenty-First CenturyBy: Thomas P.M. Barnett, Ph.D.A Review:By Sheila R. Ronis,...
Ronis ReviewThe Pentagon’s New MapBy: Thomas P.M. BarnettCopyright 2004 eMOTION! REPORTS.comPage 3 of 3The entire work des...
“Eliminating the disconnectedness that defines the Gap goes far beyondsimply defeating those forces willing to use violenc...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Book Review by Dr. Sheila Ronis, Walsh College: The Pentagon's New Map - Dr. Thomas P.M. Barnett

553

Published on

Visioning for the U.S. Government is a difficult process. No one entity hasthe responsibility to define the long term vision of the country. This hasbeen argued for many years amongst those of us who discuss the role theUnited States needs to define for itself with the end of the Cold War and aworld emerging in the 21stCentury that is very different. But, little progresshas ever been made. Until now. In a brilliantly lucid manor, Dr. ThomasP.M. Barnett, senior strategic researcher and professor at the U.S. Naval WarCollege, has defined what that vision of a “future worth creating” should bein his new book, The Pentagon’s New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-First Century.The map he is referring to is the map of the world divided into two regions;those who represent countries whose populations are connected or movingtoward connection to the global economy, internet, etc., and those who arestill unconnected. It is not the usual discussion of helping the “have-not”countries through foreign aid or humanitarian assistance. It is a discussionof the “have” or “emerging have” countries, what Dr. Barnett refers to as“the Core and New Core” countries working together to bring the rest of theworld of “have not” countries, what he refers to as “the Gap” into the globaleconomy and the world’s rule sets.

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
553
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Book Review by Dr. Sheila Ronis, Walsh College: The Pentagon's New Map - Dr. Thomas P.M. Barnett"

  1. 1. Book Review:eMOTION! REPORTS.comAutomotive/Aerospace Industries Systemic Intelligencewww.emotionreports.comRonis ReviewThe Pentagon’s New MapBy: Thomas P.M. BarnettCopyright 2004 eMOTION! REPORTS.comPage 1 of 1The Core and theGap: A Review of Thomas Barnett’sThe Pentagon’s New Map: War andPeace in the Twenty-First CenturyBy Sheila Ronis, Ph.D.The University Group, Inc.Eurofighter Typhoon: A Profile Courtesy EADS 2004
  2. 2. The Pentagon’s New Map: War andPeace in the Twenty-First CenturyBy: Thomas P.M. Barnett, Ph.D.A Review:By Sheila R. Ronis, Ph.D.,The University Group, Inc.Visioning for the U.S. Government is a difficult process. No one entity hasthe responsibility to define the long term vision of the country. This hasbeen argued for many years amongst those of us who discuss the role theUnited States needs to define for itself with the end of the Cold War and aworld emerging in the 21stCentury that is very different. But, little progresshas ever been made. Until now. In a brilliantly lucid manor, Dr. ThomasP.M. Barnett, senior strategic researcher and professor at the U.S. Naval WarCollege, has defined what that vision of a “future worth creating” should bein his new book, The Pentagon’s New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-First Century.The map he is referring to is the map of the world divided into two regions;those who represent countries whose populations are connected or movingtoward connection to the global economy, internet, etc., and those who arestill unconnected. It is not the usual discussion of helping the “have-not”countries through foreign aid or humanitarian assistance. It is a discussionof the “have” or “emerging have” countries, what Dr. Barnett refers to as“the Core and New Core” countries working together to bring the rest of theworld of “have not” countries, what he refers to as “the Gap” into the globaleconomy and the world’s rule sets.Ronis ReviewThe Pentagon’s New MapBy: Thomas P.M. BarnettCopyright 2004 eMOTION! REPORTS.comPage 2 of 2
  3. 3. Ronis ReviewThe Pentagon’s New MapBy: Thomas P.M. BarnettCopyright 2004 eMOTION! REPORTS.comPage 3 of 3The entire work describes the fact that the Core countries of the U.S.,Western Europe and Japan, and the New Core countries such as China,India, Brazil, and Mexico, operate under one set of international securityrules and the countries in the Gap, such as much of the Middle East, parts ofAsia, South America, and the Caribbean, and most of Africa, operate under adifferent set of rules, and in some instances, no rules at all. His researchover the years indicated that almost all of the conflict in the world occurs inthe Gap.Dr. Barnett comes to the conclusion that the “enemy” of the 21stCentury islack of connection to globalization – economically, politically, militarily andsocially. His discussions integrate them all. They explain, far better thanthe current administration, why what the United States is doing in Iraq andAfghanistan is the right thing to do. It explains what the next administrationmust do regardless of who is resident in the White House and who is electedto Congress – that is “shrink the Gap” and “grow the Core.”It also explains why the Bush Administration’s preemption policies shouldnot distress most of the world. Dr. Barnett says, “the strategy of preemptionis not new, nor will it be universally applied. Mutually Assured Destruction,deterrence, and collective security inside the Core are not altered one whitby the Bush Administration’s new strategy of preemption, because it simplydoes not apply to the Core – only to the Gap. Inside the Core we have a hostof official mechanisms, both bilateral and multilateral, to deal with anysecurity issues that arise. September 11 did not change any of that rule set,nor does the global war on terrorism. When the Bush Administration talkspreemption, it is talking about actors and regimes in the Gap that we mustprudently assume might be undeterrable, simply because they do not live inthe same world or adhere to the same security rule sets that we do. Our goalin using the preemption strategy is not to destroy the Core’s security rule setbut to extend it.”During a fourteen year career filled with unusual assignments, Dr. Barnettgives us a view of the personal and professional challenges that he hasexperienced in the journey that brought him to understand what the worldneeds in this 21stcentury world of globalization to bring about a peacefulfuture. His explanations include an understanding of war “in the context ofeverything else,” the way systems scientists look at the world. He says,“Disconnectedness defines danger.”
  4. 4. “Eliminating the disconnectedness that defines the Gap goes far beyondsimply defeating those forces willing to use violence to achieve or maintainit, because these terrorists are nothing more than parasites feeding off thispolitical and economic isolation. Once that isolation is ended, andbroadband connectivity is achieved for the masses, the forces of terror andrepression can no longer hold sway. Will they ever disappear completely?Absolutely not. But, they will have to take their acts truly underground, offthe net, and into the world of illegitimacy. That is how you turn a “heroic”terrorist into a common criminal: you surround him with a society deeplyconnected to the larger world of rules, opportunity, and hope. You renderhim an outcast among his own. You shame him out of existence. What youcannot do is simply catch him and kill him, because there will always bemore. Over time, your violence will be delegitimized and his honored,unless yours is employed on behalf of a society growing in connectivity.Your effort must be intimately identified with that growing connectivity;your war must be in the context of everything else.”Dr. Barnett’s strategy hinges on four flows; people, energy, money andsecurity. These flows are required to “balance” the forces in the world in amarket-based way. As long as these flows are not disrupted, the chances tomake progress toward reducing the Gap and growing the Core are improved.The Pentagon’s New Map is only pre-orderable for now at the followingweb-site. It will be available after April 26, when it will be published byG.P. Putnam’s Sons, New York. Find it on the web at:www.thomaspmbarnett.comThis work should be translated into every major language around the world,though the wit and wisdom may be difficult to translate. It is a must read,not only for policy analysts in the beltway and every American, but forevery citizen of the world who cares about the future.Ronis ReviewThe Pentagon’s New MapBy: Thomas P.M. BarnettCopyright 2004 eMOTION! REPORTS.comPage 4 of 4

×