Healthcare By 2015 Mar 2009

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  • IBM Confidential Paint a picture of the global healthcare industry in 2015 I trust you will find this fresh, compelling, and even provocative Our research team interviewed healthcare thought leaders worldwide We also conductive extensive secondary research
  • Healthcare By 2015 Mar 2009

    1. 1. Healthcare 2015: Win-Win or Lose-Lose? A portrait and a path to successful transformation Presented by Sal P. Causi, P. Eng. Business Development Executive - Healthcare March 12th, 2009
    2. 2. Growing crisis - - IBM’s prescription <ul><li>Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation? </li></ul><ul><li>Prescriptions </li></ul><ul><li>Transforming Value </li></ul><ul><li>Transforming Patient Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Transforming Care Delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Implications and Recommendations </li></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Outline of Healthcare 2015
    3. 3. Healthcare systems must address major issues and questions in the search for an affordable, sustainable, value-based system <ul><li>Many healthcare systems are being pushed to a crisis stage, fueled by unrelenting pressures related to cost, quality, and access </li></ul><ul><li>Regardless of the ability to pay, consumers on a worldwide basis are demanding more healthcare services </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare funders/purchasers are demanding value for their money </li></ul><ul><li>Value will remain elusive without an accountability framework and aligned incentives across key stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>The status quo is no longer a viable option - w ithout major changes, many countries will “hit the wall” (i.e., reach a crisis stage) in the next decade </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tough choices will have to be made to avoid hitting the wall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Even tougher choices may have to be made if a country allows its healthcare system to hit the wall </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Stakeholders – consumers, providers, funders, suppliers, societies, and governments – must prepare to transform healthcare systems and be held more accountable Summary
    4. 4. Canada and most of its provinces are no exception – concern about the ‘healthcare monster’ <ul><li>Health spending has been growing faster than revenue in all provinces and faster than inflation and economic growth </li></ul><ul><li>Nova Scotia data predicts that given a 9% growth in health expenditures, and a 4% growth in overall revenues, by 2024, health will more than consume all provincial revenue </li></ul><ul><li>Ontario is spending 38% of all its revenue on health. If you project recent trends into future, 6 of 10 provinces will be at over 50% by 2020. Ontario is tracking to hit 50% in 2020. (Fraser Institute, Oct 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>In BC , projections have 71% of the provincial budget going to health by 2017 </li></ul><ul><li>Conference Board study also points to the unsustainability of health care spending in Ontario – 70% of total revenues by 2022 (Conference Board of Canada, November 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Drugs and home care are fastest growing items - - 20% of health spend going to drugs, was $47 per Canadian in 1975, in 2005 it was $770 (in 2005 constant dollars). </li></ul><ul><li>Concern that the “monster” be tamed if we are to ensure sustainability of the system </li></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    5. 5. Drivers, Challenges – “the Perfect Storm” is brewing Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Productivity Quality of Care “ Baker Norton & IOM” – Preventable adverse events, redundant testing, nosicomal infections BC Treasury estimates “Health” will take 71% of public dollars in 10 yrs Waiting & Access Healthcare Transformation Imperative An Ageing workforce plagued by paper intensive, ad hoc processes - Recruitment, Retention, Retraining Multiple co-morbidities – +60% of costs, +70% of ED Visits, 80% of 60+ residents, lifestyle influenced Chronic Disease
    6. 6. Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Change in health expenditure as a share of GDP, OECD countries, 1990 and 2005 % GDP 1990 2005 <ul><li>2003. </li></ul><ul><li>OECD average for 1990 excludes Slovak Republic as expenditure data is not available. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: OECD Health Data 2006, June 2006. </li></ul>Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    7. 7. Health care threatens to consume large percentages of the overall provincial revenues – e.g. Nova Scotia Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Assumptions: Health Grows at 9% per annum All other Dept.'s receive proportionate share of remaining revenues in years 1-4 In year 4 when Health consumes all revenue growth, all other departments' budgets permanently frozen In year 4 when Health consumes all revenue growth, initial revenue deficits applied to restructuring fund 1st Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    8. 8. Provincial / Territorial health expenditures have continued to rise from 1975-2007 Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    9. 9. Total Health Expenditure as a Proportion of GDP, 2006 Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Y.K.: 13.3% N.W.T: 7.6% Nun.: 27.5% Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    10. 10. Health care sustainability raises real concerns <ul><li>The viability of our health care system - - repercussions for access, quality and willingness of Canadians to rely on the publicly funded system </li></ul><ul><li>Crowding out spending on other provincial responsibility - - education, social support, economic and transportation infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Economic competitiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Chaoulli case – illustrative of sustainability related stresses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The case suggest that confining residents to publicly funded services runs against charter rights if the public system does not offer reasonable access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It highlights our conflicting values - social solidarity vs. our individual rights to buy what we need – the ‘consumer value’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is likely just the first of numerous legal interventions on policy questions </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    11. 11. Five drivers make healthcare fundamentally different from the past Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    12. 12. Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    13. 13. Counterbalancing the drivers for change are key inhibitors that threaten to maintain the healthcare status quo Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    14. 14. In 2015, countries will find themselves in one of four scenarios based on how they address the drivers and overcome the inhibitors Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    15. 15. What the lose-lose scenario could look like in Canada <ul><li>Growing access and quality issues </li></ul><ul><li>Provincial governments applying blunt cost reduction measures </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer push back through the legal system e.g. Chaoulli case </li></ul><ul><li>Canadians lose confidence in our publicly funded health care system </li></ul><ul><li>The Canadian middle class increasingly view their health care as second rate and their longstanding support for a universal/public system breaks down </li></ul><ul><li>Significant numbers of consumers purchase health services outside the public system </li></ul><ul><li>Increasingly publicly funded health care becomes the care of last resort, care users turn to when they cannot afford to pay for it themselves or when any private insurance coverage they might have had is depleted. </li></ul><ul><li>Many disillusioned and overburdened health care providers in the publicly funded system will move to privately funded care, thus adding to a self-reinforcing dynamic of the decline of publicly funded health care in this country </li></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    16. 16. These questions can help a country (or province) assess its capacity to transform Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation? Category Questions Sample Metrics Funding <ul><li>Will enough be available? </li></ul><ul><li>Will it be prioritized and spent well? </li></ul><ul><li>% Public/private spending </li></ul><ul><li>% of GDP </li></ul>Consumers <ul><li>What is the overall health status? </li></ul><ul><li>What are societal expectations and attitudes? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the willingness to change behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>How many “literate health activists” are there? </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy life expectancy at birth (HALE) </li></ul><ul><li>Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) </li></ul>Government <ul><li>Does the government have the leadership, political will, and stability to drive significant change? </li></ul><ul><li>Do government policies and regulations enable transformation? </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to prioritize and follow through </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on accountability in funding arrangements </li></ul>Healthcare Industry <ul><li>Are key stakeholders willing to change? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the healthcare infrastructure (e.g. facilities and IT) appropriately robust? </li></ul><ul><li>Incentives reward a longer term view </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to share data </li></ul>
    17. 17. Countries that successfully transform their healthcare systems (i.e., “win-win” scenario) will demonstrate three changes <ul><li>Focus on value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumers, providers, and payers will increasingly direct healthcare purchasing, delivery of healthcare services, and reimbursement monies based on value </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop better consumers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumers will make better lifestyle choices and become wiser purchasers of healthcare services, frequently with the help of health infomediaries </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create better options for promoting health and providing care </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumers will increasingly seek out more convenient, effective, and efficient means, settings and providers </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Healthcare in Crisis: Win-Win or Lose-Lose Transformation?
    18. 18. Transforming Value Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    19. 19. Perspectives on value from the healthcare system differ among stakeholders but must be balanced and reconciled for a win-win Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Consumers Society Payers Provider Incentives Financial incentives to treat and to do more, not to prevent Wellness and prevention High quality, cost-effective acute & chronic care Fix me regardless of cost or cause Healthcare is a societal right Today Minimize unit costs and shift costs Future Help keep me well Provide appropriate, cost-effective, high quality care when needed Transparent cost/quality information Able to accept value-based reimbursement Healthcare is a societal right – but available funds must be prioritized well across the hierarchy of needs Value Based Transformation Supply Demand Transforming Value
    20. 20. Healthcare systems must balance and resolve these differences by establishing and addressing the needs of stakeholders Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Market Service Societal Rights Finite Needs Transforming Value Hierarchy of Healthcare Needs Model Funding Gap Virtually Infinite Needs
    21. 21. Transforming Patient Responsibility Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    22. 22. In assuming more responsibility for their healthcare, consumers will make wiser health and wellness decisions as patients and purchasers <ul><li>In developed/developing countries, citizens are increasingly assuming greater responsibility for managing and paying for their healthcare services and for their personal health management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keys to this enhanced responsibility include – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Comparison shopping for healthcare based on readily available, reliable cost and quality information </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Information access (e.g. through interoperable EHRs and PHRs) will enable providers and consumers to practice personalized medicine and to make better choices during care delivery </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rise of the “health infomediary” for both the well and the chronically ill and for a much broader socioeconomic segment of the population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Better health through better choices will become a reality through the proliferation of healthy living education and social responsibility programs </li></ul></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Transforming Patient Responsibility
    23. 23. Transforming Care Delivery Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    24. 24. By 2015, individualized care will increasingly be delivered at more convenient locations, by more affordable and effective healthcare teams <ul><li>In developed and developing countries, healthcare consumers will seek out more convenient, effective, and efficient healthcare means, settings, and providers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Payers – governments, third-party health insurers, etc. – will direct its citizens and customers, respectively, to these alternative options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current examples include medical tourism, integrative medicine, and retail healthcare, on-line healthcare </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The shift in consumer attitudes toward venues of healthcare delivery will be accompanied by a corresponding shift in how, where, and who provides preventive, acute, and chronic care services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In general, there will be a shift from episodic and acute care to more patient-centered, value-based, longitudinal care by healthcare teams </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There will be better management of chronic conditions, especially as more acute diseases evolve into chronic diseases through advancements in detection and treatment </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Transforming Care Delivery
    25. 25. In 2007 in the developed world, healthcare services are typically acute and provided locally by physicians in outpatient and hospital settings Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Transforming Care Delivery Patients Care Delivery Age Group Setting Socio- economic Status Access Location Provider Service Infants Adolescent Adult Men Adult Women Senior Men Senior Women Rural Suburban Urban High Medium Low In Person Telephonic Electronic Home Outpatient Setting Hospital Emergency Department Long Term Care Internet Call Center Risk Assessment Prevention Acute - Diagnosis Acute - Treatment Chronic - Diagnosis Chronic - Treatment Traditional Providers Public/Private Insurers Alternate Providers Midlevel Provider Health Infomediary Catchment Area Local Regional National International
    26. 26. By 2015, payers, providers, and suppliers will focus more on market segmentation and channel management Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Care Delivery Patients Health Status Setting Socio- economic Status Catchment Area Access Location Service Provider Transforming Care Delivery Consumers Will Seek Out More Healthcare Delivery Channels Healthy Minor Ailments At Risk Acutely Ill Chronically Ill Catastrophic-ally Ill Rural Suburban Urban High Medium Low In Person Telephonic Electronic Home Outpatient Setting Hospital Emergency Department Long Term Care Internet Call Center Wellness Risk Assessment Prevention Acute Care Chronic Care Complement-ary Care Traditional Providers Public/Private Insurers Alternate Providers Midlevel Provider Health Infomediary Local Regional National International
    27. 27. New healthcare business models are emerging to fill the cost, quality, convenience and access gap Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Wellness Centers Acute Care Wellness/ Prevention Chronic Care Ambulatory ICUs Centers of Excellence Medical Tourism Telemedicine Retail Clinics Concierge Medicine Ambulatory Surgery Centers Medical Home Analysis >> New healthcare requirements, delivery models, capabilities, and reimbursement Specialty Hospitals
    28. 28. Medical tourism is beginning to subject healthcare delivery to global competitive pressures Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Source: PlanetHospital Note: Prices do not account for travel or accommodations costs. Expenses can also increase if there are complications with the procedure. United States rates reflect Medicare reimbursements for hospital services but not for medications or anesthesia. Transforming Care Delivery Procedure United States Mexico Costa Rica India Thailand Singapore Angioplasty $33,000 $13,125 $14,500 $7,800 $9,200 $12,500 Heart bypass $37,000 $14,400 $13,600 $6,650 $11,000 $13,500 Hip replacement $45,000 $9,400 $13,000 $6,500 $8,000 $9,000 Knee replacement $21,000 $10,500 $9,500 $6,500 $8,500 $10,000 Laparoscopic hysterectomy $19,000 $4,275 $6,500 $2,238 $4,500 $4,500 Laparoscopic prostatectomy $27,500 $16,800 $11,500 $5,900 $9,500 $16,000
    29. 29. Since the late 90’s, we have worked with customers to advance IT to support transformation. Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Quebec Provincial EMPI Implementation Drug Info System: e-scripts Mother-Child Network (20 sites) Laval EHR (11 sites) Blood Management Network (88 sites) Ontario Trillium Project Office & Help Desk Trillium Provider & Consumer Portal St Michael’s Hospital Alliance KGH & St T. Elgin Wireless Nurse Call MOH EMPI & DI/PACS Strategy SSHA Change Mgt National Paediatric Wait Time System CAMH Strategic Outsource The Ottawa Hospital Clinical Portal LHIN 4 IT Strategy TEN DI PACS Infrastructure Child Health Network (50+ sites) British Columbia Chronic Disease Toolkit Pan-Cdn Public Health Health Data Warehouse Fraser DI/PACS Fraser Emergency Dept Process “Gold Standard” Manitoba WRHA DI PACS Infrastructure Health Surveillance Network Alberta Provincial EHR (Orion) Deployment Drug Info System: e-scripts Hip & Knee Process Re-design Calgary Clinical Implementation Calgary Strategic Outsource New Brunswick DI/PACS Strategy DI/PACS Infrastructure Federal Healthcare 2015 e-Therapeutic Portal Saskatchewan Saskatoon Primary Care Governance Health Security Architecture Drug Information System: e-scripts
    30. 30. Health jurisdictions can employ a set of practical, relevant, broadly-applicable recommendations to address the challenges of this transformation Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Vision and Plan <ul><li>Where do we want to be? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we get there? </li></ul>Case for Change <ul><li>Why Change? </li></ul><ul><li>Lose-Lose Scenario </li></ul>Principles <ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Affordability </li></ul><ul><li>Practicality </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Equity </li></ul><ul><li>… </li></ul>Universal Coverage IT-Enabled Innovation & Best Practices <ul><li>Improve quality and cost </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate clinical and administrative waste </li></ul><ul><li>Improve productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Inform and empower consumers </li></ul><ul><li>Make informed transformation decisions </li></ul><ul><li>Trigger insights that can lead to innovations </li></ul>Implications and Recommendations
    31. 31. Successful transformation will require active participation, collaboration and changes by all stakeholders Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Implications and Recommendations Value Consumer responsibility Care delivery Health systems <ul><li>Develop a vision, principles and metrics that enable and reward a shared perspective on value </li></ul><ul><li>Provide universal insurance for core services, including preventive and primary care </li></ul><ul><li>Reward good behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Remove barriers to innovation while still protecting consumers and other stakeholders </li></ul>Care delivery organizations (CDOs) <ul><li>Focus on high-value services </li></ul><ul><li>Develop teams of caregivers </li></ul><ul><li>Implement interoperable EHRs to help enable high-value services </li></ul><ul><li>Help inform and empower consumers by providing transparency into pricing and quality </li></ul><ul><li>Develop channels and care venues that are closer to the patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement interoperable EHRs to support information exchange across venues </li></ul>Physicians and other clinicians <ul><li>Utilize evidence-based, standardized processes and care plans </li></ul><ul><li>Help develop meaningful outcomes data </li></ul><ul><li>Develop collaborative partnerships with patients </li></ul><ul><li>Help consumers take more responsibility for their health </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Expect interoperable EHRs to support information exchange among caregivers </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the opportunities that come with change </li></ul>Consumers <ul><li>Expect pricing and quality information </li></ul><ul><li>Become a smart shopper </li></ul><ul><li>Utilize a health infomediary </li></ul><ul><li>Take responsibility for living a healthy lifestyle . </li></ul><ul><li>Create and maintain a personal health record (PHR) </li></ul><ul><li>Document advanced healthcare directives . </li></ul><ul><li>Expect and demand new delivery models and coordination of care across these new models </li></ul>
    32. 32. Successful transformation will require active participation, collaboration and changes by all stakeholders. (continued) Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Implications and Recommendations Value Consumer responsibility Care delivery Funders <ul><li>Develop a viable transition plan to value-based reimbursement . </li></ul><ul><li>Help consumers navigate the health system </li></ul><ul><li>Help provide personalized information and advice to help consumers maintain and improve their health status </li></ul><ul><li>Align incentives with preventive and proactive chronic care , and with innovative, cost-effective approaches </li></ul>Suppliers <ul><li>Collaborate with CDOs to develop offerings that help provide better longer term outcomes or lower prices for equivalent outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Help identify the right patients and providers and then educate them to achieve better results across all steps of the care process </li></ul><ul><li>Help enable new models through simplification and miniaturization; mobile devices; and personalized solutions packages </li></ul>Society <ul><li>Clearly recognize the need for tough decisions, prioritization & tradeoffs </li></ul><ul><li>Actively participate in efforts to improve value </li></ul><ul><li>Stress prevention and personal accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Expect and promote healthy lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>Keep pressure on the healthcare system to change and meet the needs of its customers </li></ul>Governments <ul><li>Emphasize value, accountability and alignment of incentives </li></ul><ul><li>Require results reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a funding strategy for the infrastructure and for independent research </li></ul><ul><li>Help protect security/privacy of electronic health information </li></ul><ul><li>Require insurance coverage for everyone, with subsidies for those who need them </li></ul><ul><li>Change and set policies, regulations and legislation in order to remove barriers (e.g. the patchwork of licensure regulations) and to enable and promote the right actions </li></ul>
    33. 33. Care delivery organizations (e.g. health regions) must envision the future healthcare environment and transform Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Implications and Recommendations Factor From (typical of today’s healthcare) To (to successfully transform) Accountability Safety, quality but with few incentives or penalties, focus on removing “bad apples” Value, evidence-based standardized processes, outcomes, access Incentives Mostly financial to maximize reimbursement Outcomes, follow evidence-base standards, patient satisfaction Information Management Predominantly paper-based, fragmented Electronic, interoperable, accessible, secure and private, real time decision support at the point of care Innovation New medical technologies, research in academic medical centers Keeping people healthy; improving overall value and quality of care; better coordination of care; more rapid adoption of best practices and methods Basis for Competition Geographic coverage, reputation, broad array of services, new technologies Differentiated value (cost, quality, access); specialized; channels/sites closer to the patient Focus of System Acute, reactive, episodic Predictive, preventive, chronic; life-long, coordinated management; personalized
    34. 34. And care delivery organizations should begin positioning themselves to serve their future customers <ul><li>Determine how to differentiate from competitors , both traditional and non-traditional alike </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Being “all things to all people” will no longer suffice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be prepared to compete in an environment of price and quality transparency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluate growth plans in light of possible changes in the healthcare environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizations cannot solely focus on how to maximize revenue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Future revenue streams, types of services or the desired relationships with patients/consumers must be considered </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Segment future customers and develop a channel strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize new buying influencers such as health infomediaries </li></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Implications and Recommendations
    35. 35. And care delivery organizations should begin positioning themselves to serve their future customers (cont.) <ul><li>Develop teams of caregivers matching the skill level and location of the caregivers to deliver patient-centric and coordinated care </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Staffing shortages, high costs, the need to develop partnerships with patients, and the need for new services are mounting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>While physicians will continue to be important, midlevel providers will provide more preventive, chronic, and routine acute care </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop and follow evidence-based, standardized processes and care plans </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As value takes on more importance and quality become more transparent, organizations will see an increasing need to reduce variation in processes and care plans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implement interoperable electronic health records (EHRs) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizations will not be able to implement the standardized processes and care plans without robust EHR capabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practitioners must have EHRs to access to relevant patient information and medical content when treating patients </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Implications and Recommendations
    36. 36. Conclusion <ul><li>The stakes are very high </li></ul><ul><li>The consequences of failing to address the challenges to health care sustainability are daunting </li></ul><ul><li>But health care jurisdictions that are successful in transforming will reap huge benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Harnessing remarkable new technologies and treatments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New levels of personal engagement in their health and health care </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The healthiest citizenry in history </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competitive advantage in a global economy </li></ul></ul>Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    37. 37. This Transformation requires substantial change in Process, People and IT. Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009 Background Productivity Waiting & Access Quality & Safety Chronic Disease Mgt. Value Realization Physician/Clinician Integration Technology Fusion Workforce Transformation Clinical & Business Process Optimization Value Realization Physician/Clinician Integration Technology Fusion Workforce Transformation Clinical & Business Process Optimization Common Elements/Underlying Principles Governance & PMO Infrastructure Clinical Care Supported by Technology; People, Process and Product Knowledge
    38. 38. Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009
    39. 39. As well as IBM’s focus on Life Sciences Healthcare 2015 | Jun 8, 2009

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