Diffusion equationhydrology2014
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Diffusion equationhydrology2014

on

  • 142 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
142
Views on SlideShare
142
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Diffusion equationhydrology2014 Diffusion equationhydrology2014 Presentation Transcript

  • R. Rigon R. Rigon Ubiquitous Diffusion JacksonPollok,FreeForm,1949,Moma
  • !2 Objectives •See where diffusion equations appears in hydrology: •The case of Richards’ equation and its extensions •The case of snow thermodynamics ! All presented in a somewhat confuse way ... ! Sorry for the mixed English and Italian …. R. Rigon Introduction
  • R. Rigon Richards ++ R. Rigon
  • !4 Four phases Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !5 Four phases However, we neglect, at the moment, ice. Soil Water Air Massa Volume VagMag La colonna di neve Mw Vw M⇤ V⇤ R. Rigon Back to the basics
  • !6 V a r i a z i o n e d i contenuto d’acqua nel suolo nell’unità di tempo Divergenza del flusso volumetrico attraverso il contorno del volume infinitesimo Richards,1931 !6 ⇤ w ⇤t = ⇥ · ⌃Jv(⇥) L’equazione di continuità Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !7 Legge di Darcy-Buckingham Flusso volumetrico attraverso il contorno del volume infinitesimo Conducibilità idraulica x gradiente del carico Buckingham,1907,Richards,1931 !7 ~Jv = K(✓w)~r h ]Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !8 Il carico idraulico è una energia per unità di volume e si misura in unità di lunghezza h = z + Carico idraulico campo gravitazionale forze capillari - pressione Richards,1931 !8 Legge di Darcy-Buckingham Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !9 Per semplificare possiamo pensare vi sia una relazione biunivoca tra pressione e contenuto d’acqua del suolo ⇤ (⇥) ⇤t = ⇤ (⇥) ⇤⇥ ⇤⇥ ⇤t C(⇥) ⇤⇥ ⇤t Capacità idraulica dei suoli !9 Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !10 La capacità idraulica è proporzionale alla distribuzione dei pori !10 Interpretations R. Rigon
  • !11 FORME PARAMETRICHE DELLA SWRC: QUELLA PIU’ USATA E’ QUELLA di van Genucthen Che ha cinque parametri !11 Se ⌘ ✓w ✓r s ✓r = h 1 1 + (↵ )n im ✓r s ↵ n m Parameterisations R. Rigon
  • !12 si ottiene: K(Se) = KsSv e ⇤ 1 1 S1/m e ⇥m⌅2 (m = 1 1/n) o, esprimendo il tutto in funzione del potenziale di suzione: K(⇥) = Ks 1 ( ⇥) mn [1 + ( ⇥) n ] m ⇥2 [1 + ( ⇥) n ] mv (m = 1 1/n) FORME PARAMETRICHE DELLA CONDUCIBILITA’ IDRAULICA !12 Parameterisations R. Rigon
  • !13 What I mean with Richards ++ First, I would say, it means that it would be better to call it, for instance: Richards-Mualem-vanGenuchten equation, since it is: Se = [1 + ( ⇥)m )] n Se := w r ⇥s r C(⇥) ⇤⇥ ⇤t = ⇥ · K( w) ⇥ (z + ⇥) ⇥ K( w) = Ks ⇧ Se ⇤ 1 (1 Se)1/m ⇥m⌅2 Water balance Parametric Mualem Parametric van Genuchten C(⇥) := ⇤ w() ⇤⇥ R. Rigon To sum-up
  • !14 What I mean with Richards ++ Extending Richards to treat the transition saturated to unsaturated zone. Which means: R. Rigon Extensions
  • !15 Richards equation is part of a more general equation that can be obtained by considering also saturated soil/aquifers* * see for instance, Lu and Godt, 2012, Chapter 4 - Freeze and Cherry, 1979, pg 51 Since the rate of gain/loss of water mass is in general: <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> where: <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon Extensions
  • !16 Allora l’equazione generale è ancora C(⇥) ⇤⇥ ⇤t = ⇥ · K( w) ⇥ (z + ⇥) ⇥ purchè (usando la parametrizzazione di van Genuchten): R. Rigon Extensions
  • !17 Le equazioni sono non lineari e richiedono il metodo di Newton con doppia iterazione interna (nested Newton) per essere risolte R. Rigon Phase Transition
  • R. Rigon Freezing soil GinoSeverini,BlueDancer,1912-Gugghenaimmuseum,Venice R. Rigon
  • !19 The Cryosphere, 5, 469–484, 2011 www.the-cryosphere.net/5/469/2011/ doi:10.5194/tc-5-469-2011 © Author(s) 2011. CC Attribution 3.0 License. The Cryosphere A robust and energy-conserving model of freezing variably-saturated soil M. Dall’Amico1,*, S. Endrizzi2, S. Gruber2, and R. Rigon1 1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy 2Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich, Switzerland *now at: Mountain-eering srl, Via Siemens 19, Bolzano, Italy Received: 29 June 2010 – Published in The Cryosphere Discuss.: 11 August 2010 Revised: 18 May 2011 – Accepted: 19 May 2011 – Published: 1 June 2011 Abstract. Phenomena involving frozen soil or rock are im- portant in many natural systems and, as a consequence, there is a great interest in the modeling of their behavior. Few models exist that describe this process for both saturated and unsaturated soil and in conditions of freezing and thawing, and numerical physically-based (Zhang et al., 2008). Em- pirical and semiempirical algorithms relate ground thawing- freezing depth to some aspect of surface forcing by one or more experimentally established coefficients (e.g. Anisimov et al., 2002). Analytical algorithms are specific solutions to What about soil freezing ? see also Dall’Amico Ph.D thesis: http://eprints-phd.biblio.unitn.it/335/ The long story of soil freezing R. Rigon
  • !20 Two cases is hydraulic head [L] of water<latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon in vadose and saturated conditions
  • !21 Two equations (just one here) first principle potential energy kinetic energy internal energy energy fluxes at the boundaries second principle more details onhttp://abouthydrology.blogspot.com/2013/04/beyond-and-side-by-side-with-numerics.html Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !22 Four phases Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !23 Water is •often in unsaturated conditions •in pores •it is known that it does not freeze until very negative temperatures are obtained •a relationship (the Soil Water Retention Curves needs to be invoked between water head and water content to close the equations) Back to the basics R. Rigon
  • !24 Unsaturated conditions means that capillary forces acts, i.e. we have to account for the tension forces that accumulate in curves surfaces Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !25 Unsaturated conditions Young-Laplace equation pw = pa wa ⇤Awa(r) ⇤Vw(r) = pa wa ⇤Awa/⇤r ⇤Vw/⇤r = pa wa 2 r := pa pwa(r) Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !26 In unsaturated conditions the equilibrium condition: Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !27 In unsaturated conditions the equilibrium condition becomes Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !28 So, skipping a few passages The situation at the freezing point is the opposite, and represented by the blue arrow Freezing point depression Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !29 Because, the smaller the pores, the larger the freezing point depression ! larger pores freezes before than smaller pores Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !30 Because by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation there is a one-to-one relations between the size of the pores and the temperature depression, and because there is also a one-to-one relationship between the size of the pores and the pressure there is a one-one relation among T and Beyond the Stefan problem R. Rigon
  • !31 Unsaturated unfrozen Unsaturated Frozen Freezing starts Freezing procedes Capillarity (and other stuff) R. Rigon
  • !32 pw0 = pa wa ⇥Awa(r0) ⇥Vw = pa pwa(r0) pi = pa ia ⇥Aia(r0) ⇥Vw := pa pia(r0) pw1 = pa ia ⇥Aiar(0) ⇥Vw iw ⇥Aiw(r1) ⇥Vw Two interfaces (air-ice and water- ice) should be considered!!! Curved interfaces with three phases Four phases … well interfaces are phases too, indeed R. Rigon
  • !33 Now we have enough information to write the right equations ! Perhaps If we do not get lost in simplifications Making it short R. Rigon
  • !34 A further assuption To make it manageable, we do a further assumption. Mainly the freezing=drying one. Considering the assumption “freezing=drying” (Miller, 1963) the ice “behaves like air” and does not add further pressure terms Freezing=Drying R. Rigon
  • !35 Unfrozen water content soil water retention curve thermodynamic equilibrium (Clausius Clapeyron) + ⇥w = pw w g pressure head: w(T) = w [⇥w(T)] How this reflects on pressure head Freezing=Drying R. Rigon
  • !36 Unsaturated unfrozen Unsaturated Frozen Freezing starts Freezing procedes Soil water retention curves Freezing=Drying R. Rigon
  • !37 Soil water retention curves Freezing=Drying R. Rigon
  • !38 Soil water retention curves Freezing=Drying R. Rigon
  • !39 T := T0 + g T0 Lf w0 ice content: i = ⇥w ⇥i w ⇥ ⇥w = ⇥r + (⇥s ⇥r) · ⇤ 1 + ⇤w0 Lf g T0 (T T⇥ ) · H(T T⇥ ) ⇥n⌅ m liquid water content: Total water content: depressed melting point Modified Richards equations = ⇥r + (⇥s ⇥r) · {1 + [ · ⇤w0] n } m Water and ice mass budget R. Rigon
  • !40 U = Cg(1 s) T + ⇥wcw w T + ⇥ici i T + ⇥wLf w U t + ⌥⇥ • (⌥G + ⌥J) + Sen = 0 ⌃G = T (⇥w0, T) · ⌃⇤T J = w · Jw(⇥w0, T) · [Lf + cw T] 0 assuming freezing=drying U = hgMg + hwMw + hiMi (pwVw + piVi) + µwMph w + µiMph i no expansion: ρw=ρi assuming:0 no flux during phase change Eventually: 0 assuming equilibrium thermodynamics: µw=µi and Mw ph = -Mi ph conduction advection Energy Equation Water and ice energy budget in soil R. Rigon
  • !41 ⇤ ⌃⇧ ⌃⌅ ⇤U( w0,T ) ⇤t ⇤ ⇤z ⇥T (⇤w0, T) · ⇤T ⇤z J(⇤w0, T) ⇥ + Sen = 0 ⇤ ( w0) ⇤t ⇤ ⇤z ⌥ KH(⇤w0, T) · ⇤ w1( w0,T ) ⇤z KH cos + Sw = 0 1D representation: Finally the “right” equations Water and ice mass and energy budget together R. Rigon
  • R. Rigon R. Rigon Turner,SnowStorm,1842 Snow
  • !43 Il manto nevoso Neve, Ghiaccio, Permafrost Acqua (Liquida) Ghiaccio Aria Massa Volume Vag ViMi Mag La colonna di neve Mw Vw M⇤ V⇤ R. Rigon Introduction
  • !44 Il manto nevoso Il manto nevoso (snow-pack) è: ! - un mezzo poroso (come mostrato nella slide precedente) ! Generalmente composto da strati, più o meno omogenei, di differente spessore e da tipi differenti di neve ! Gli strati sono composti da cristalli e grani che sono, di solito, legati da qualche tipo di coesione. R. Rigon Introduction
  • !45 Massa dell’acqua liquida Massa del vapore Massa del ghiaccio Massa della neve Massa dell’aria Notazione di base M⇤ = Mag + Mw + Mi M⇤ = Mv + Mw + Mi R. Rigon Introduction
  • !46 Notazione di base I volumi con gli stessi indici delle masse V⇤ = Vag + Vw + Vi Vtw = Vv + Vw + Vi R. Rigon Introduction
  • Densità del ghiaccio ice density !47 Densità apparente della neve snow bulk density Notazione di base ⇢i := Mi Vi ⇢⇤ := M⇤ V⇤ = M⇤ Vag + Vw + Vi R. Rigon Introduction
  • !48 Notazione di base Contenuto volumetrico d’acqua nella neve(adimensionale) Volume fraction of liquid water in snow pores ✓w := Vw Vag + Vw + Vi Contenuto volumetrico adimensionale di ghiaccio nella neve Volume fraction of frozen water (ice) in snow ✓i := Vi Vag + Vw + Vi R. Rigon Introduction
  • !49 Porosità della neve Notazione di base Saturazione (relativa) della neve ⇤ := Vag + Vw Vag + Vw + Vi S⇤ := ✓w ⇤ R. Rigon Introduction
  • !50 Notazione di base Equivalente in acqua della neve Volume dell’acqua derivante dalla completa fusione della neve su un area orizzontale corispondente. h⇤ = ✓ ✓w + (1 ⇤) ⇢i ⇢w ◆ V⇤ A = ✓ ✓w + (1 ⇤) ⇢i ⇢w ◆ hsn hsn := V⇤ A h⇤ := Vw(A) + ⇢i ⇢w Vi(A) A R. Rigon Introduction
  • !51 Proprietà termiche della neve Si assume che il flusso di calore segua la legge di Fourier: ~Jh = Kh ~rT Flusso di calore W m-2 Conducibilità termica W m-1 K-1 Gradiente di Temperatura K m-1 R. Rigon Thermal conductivity
  • !52 Proprietà termiche della neve La conducibilità termica Kh è una misura della abilità di un materiale di trasmettere calore. un buon conduttore di calore ha un alto valore di K, un isolante ha un basso valore di K (in W/m K). Neve Fresca 0.03 (meglio della lana di vetro!) Neve vecchia 0.4 Ghiaccio 2.1 ~Jh = Kh ~rT   La neve attenua i cambiamenti termici dell’atmosfera. Per esempio un cambio di 1 grado di temperatura dell’aria in 15 minuti, cambia la temperatura a 20 cm di profondità nella neve di soli 0.1 gradi e di 0.01 gradi ad un metro.   R. Rigon Thermal conductivity
  • !53 Proprietà termiche della neve ~Jh = Kh ~rT Kh cresce con il metamorfismo della neve. Ad esempio, Sturm, 1997 fornisce questa formula parametrica: Kh = 0.138 1.01 ⇢ ⇤ +3.233 ⇢2 ⇤ R. Rigon Thermal conductivity
  • !54 Temperatura Generalmente nel manto nevoso si presentano due situazioni: ! - E’ presente una variazione di temperatura tra la sommità della neve e il il terreno su cui si posa: la temperatura è normalmente dominata dalla temperatura in superficie e il terreno si trova generalmente a 0 C .... a meno che non si sia in presenza di permafrost. ! - Non è presente alcun gradiente: la neve si trova in uno stato isotermo R. Rigon Thermal conductivity
  • !55 Temperatura La neve è un buon isolante termico. Si generano gradienti di temperatura anche molto elevati in prossimità della superficie. R. Rigon Phenomenology
  • !56 050100150 SnowDepth[cm] ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● ● ●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ●●●●●●● ● ●● ●● ●● ● ● ●●● ●●●●● ●● ●●● ●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●●●●● ● ● ● ● ●●●●●●●●● ●● ●●● ●●●●●● ● ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● ● ● ●●●● ●●● ● ● ● ●●●●●●●●● ● ●●●●● ● ●●● ●●●● ●●●●●●● ● ● ● ●● ●● ● ● ● ● ● ●●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ●● ●● ●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ●● ● ● ● ●●● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ● ● ● ● ● ●●●● ● ● ●●●●●●●●●●●●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● ● ● ● ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● ●●●●●●●●●●●●●● ● ●● ● ●●● ● ●●●●●●●●●● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ● ● ●●●●● ●● ●●●● ●●● ●● ● ●●● ●●● ● ● ● ●●● ●●●●●●●● ● ● ● ●● ● ● ●● ● ●●● ● ● ● ● ● ●● ● SnowD sim Flux to ground Nov 97 Feb 98 May 98 Aug 98 Nov 98 0306090120150 Fluxtoground[W/m^2] ● SnowD meas estateinverno circa 50 W/m2circa 5 W/m2 Temperatura with and without R. Rigon Phenomenology
  • !57 Scambi di energia attraverso i flussi turbolenti Conduzione di calore verso il terreno Percolazione di acqua verso il terreno Bilancio di radiazione dU⇤ dt = Rn lw + Rn sw H s Ev + G + Pe Variazione di energia dU⇤ dt = Cp dT⇤ dt Capacità termica della neve Variazione di temperatura della neve Il bilancio di energia della neve R. Rigon Energy budget
  • !58!58 energy fluxes at the boundary phase transition Variazione di energia della neve Il bilancio di energia interno Neve R. Rigon Energy budget
  • !59!59 phase transition Variazione di energia della neve Flussi di energia al contorno Il bilancio di energia interno Neve Energy budget
  • !60!60 Transizioni di fase Variazione di energia della neve Flussi di energia Il bilancio di energia interno Neve Energy budget
  • !61 Il flusso di calore trasportato dalla precipitazione è calcolato supponendo che la precipitazione abbia la stessa temperatura dell’aria e quello trasportato dall’acqua di fusione supponendo che questa sia alla temperatura di 0°C. Una nota sulla precipitazione R. Rigon Precipitation and Energy
  • !62!62 raffreddamento/riscaldamento per conduzione raffreddamento/riscaldamento per avvezione (principalmente di acqua liquida) Il bilancio di energia interno Neve Energy budget
  • !63!63 Dove il termine di flusso è dato dal termine riscaldamento/raffreddamento per conduzione: raffreddamento /riscaldamento: il flusso di calore Neve Energy budget
  • !64!64 gradiente di temperatura raffreddamento /riscaldamento: il flusso di calore Dove il termine di flusso è dato dal termine riscaldamento/raffreddamento per conduzione: Neve Energy budget
  • !65!65 conducibilità termica Questa è la teoria di Onsager che porta alla legge di Fourier gradiente di temperatura raffreddamento /riscaldamento: il flusso di calore Dove il termine di flusso è dato dal termine riscaldamento/raffreddamento per conduzione: Neve Energy budget
  • !66!66 L’energia interna della neve variazione dell’energia interna della neve Neve Energy budget
  • !67!67 Una parte dipende dalla temperatura variazione dell’energia interna della neve L’energia interna della neve nelle sue parti Energy budget
  • !68!68 Una parte dipende dalla quantità della sostanza Una parte dipende dalla temperatura variazione dell’energia interna della neve L’energia interna della neve nelle sue parti Energy budget
  • !69 Lo scioglimento del manto nevoso Tradotto in termini del bilancio di energia. Per T < 0 Variazione dell’energia interna del ghiaccio <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon Energy budget
  • !70 Lo scioglimento del manto nevoso Tradotto in termini del bilancio di energia. Per T > 0 Variazione dell’energia interna dell’acqua ... ma in questo caso bisognerebbe fare dei distinguo ... <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon Energy budget
  • !71 Lo scioglimento del manto nevoso ` Variazione dell’energia interna del sistema complessivo acqua + ghiaccio Variazione di entalpia del sistema acqua + ghiaccio dT dt = 0T = 0 dp dt = 0 <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon Energy budget
  • !72 Lo scioglimento del manto nevosoLo scioglimento del manto nevoso Le porzioni relative nel volume di controllo di ghiaccio e neve sono determinate dai rispettivi volumi. ! Questi ultimi sono, evidentemente funzione della storia energetica della neve. dT dt = 0T = 0 dp dt = 0 dU⇤ dt = dH dt R. Rigon Phase Transition
  • !73 Lo scioglimento del manto nevoso Nei layer non superficiali, si ha conduzione del calore secondo la legge di Fourier (se si trascura la percolazione) <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> <latexit sha1_base64="tYHCApFiY8slQcKMwQxwGacE74A=">AAAA+3icSyrIySwuMTC4ycjEzMLKxs7BycXNw8XFy8cvEFacX1qUnBqanJ+TXxSRlFicmpOZlxpaklmSkxpRUJSamJuUkxqelO0Mkg8vSy0qzszPCympLEiNzU1Mz8tMy0xOLAEKBcQLKBvoGYCBAibDEMpQZoACoHJDdElMRqiRnpmeQSBCG4e0koahuYNHQGhyStfknfsPQoQZGaHyggyo4BQAVIE48g==</latexit> R. Rigon Phase Transition
  • !74!74 le due equazioni di conservazione della massa e dell’energia vengono risolte congiuntamente per la massa di neve Poichè le equazioni sono accoppiate dM⇤ dt = P Ev Gp in superficie all’interno della neve in superficie all’interno della neve R. Rigon Equations
  • !75 Ma i metodi di soluzione rimangono i medesimi Le equazioni sono non lineari e discontinue alla transizione di fase richiedono il metodo di Newton con doppia iterazione interna R. Rigon Phase Transition
  • !76 Grazie per l’attenzione! G.Ulrici-,2000? R. Rigon The End