HIV Required Training

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Required staff training

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  • great. i will share it with my HIV friends on stdpal.com. This is online community for our people living with HIV
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HIV Required Training

  1. 1. HIV/Hepatitis B Puyallup School District
  2. 2. YEAH, YEAH, WE’VE HEARD IT A HUNDRED TIMES! WE KNOW ALL ABOUT AIDS! BUT WE ALSO KNOW SOMETHING ELSE... WE’RE GONNA LIVE FOREVER!
  3. 3. Reported Cases of AIDS in the United States
  4. 4. Reported Cases of AIDS in Washington State
  5. 5. AIDS: The Global Epidemic <ul><li>The World Health Organization says more than 40 million people have been infected with the AIDS virus since 1981. Lowest estimate by region: </li></ul>26 MILLION 1,000,000 1.8 MILLION 540,000 5.8 MILLION 400,000 15,000 700,000 640,000
  6. 6. STAGES OF HIV INFECTION HIV Positive { S ymptomatic HIV Positive Serious, debilitating symptoms leading to death Asymptomatic HIV-Positive Infected with the virus but have no symptoms (and often not aware they are HIV positive) AIDS
  7. 7. STAGES OF HIV INFECTION <ul><li>STAGE 1 STAGE 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Acute infection and </li></ul><ul><li>seroconversion </li></ul><ul><li>3 weeks to 3 months </li></ul><ul><li>after exposure to HIV </li></ul><ul><li> STAGE 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Pulmonary TB </li></ul><ul><li>Invasive Cervical Cancer </li></ul><ul><li>Neurological disease </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary Infectious Diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary Cancer </li></ul><ul><li>CD4T Cell Count less than 200 </li></ul><ul><li>Time After Exposure Unknown </li></ul><ul><li>Asymptomatic infection </li></ul><ul><li>2 to 12 years after exposure </li></ul><ul><li>to HIV </li></ul>
  8. 8. How HIV Destroys The Immune System Step 1: HIV “ Attacks” Step 2: HIV Attached to Helper T-Cell Step 3: HIV invades (Enters) Helper T-Cell Step 4: HIV Multiplies Step 5: HIV Breaks Away Genetic Material Genetic Material
  9. 9. “ HIV TRANSMITTED IN BODY FLUIDS” <ul><li>H ow is the Virus Transmitted? </li></ul><ul><li>by exchanging </li></ul><ul><li>with a person </li></ul><ul><li>who is infected with HIV </li></ul><ul><li>Blood </li></ul><ul><li>Semen </li></ul><ul><li>Vaginal Secretions </li></ul>
  10. 10. HEPATITIS <ul><li>Viral infection of the liver causes intestinal “flu-like” symptoms and jaundice (in adults). </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis is caused by more than one type of virus but the most common types are Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B. </li></ul>
  11. 11. The Five Forms of Viral Hepatitis <ul><li>Hepatitis A (HAV) </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis B (HBV) </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis C (HCV;Non-A, Non-B) </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis D (HDV;Delta hepatitis) </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis E (HEV;Non-A, Non-B) </li></ul>
  12. 12. Hepatitis B <ul><li>HEPATITIS B VIRUS- SYMPTOMS- </li></ul><ul><li>damages the liver </li></ul><ul><li>blood borne infection </li></ul><ul><li>TRANSMISSION- </li></ul><ul><li>sexual contact </li></ul><ul><li>blood exposure to </li></ul><ul><li>open wounds </li></ul><ul><li>blood exposure to </li></ul><ul><li>mucous membranes </li></ul><ul><li>PROGRESSION- </li></ul><ul><li>acute hepatitis - 25% </li></ul><ul><li>carriers - 6-10% of acutely infected adults, 90% of newborns infected with HBV may develop chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and 25% are infectious to others </li></ul><ul><li>Mild to severe to fatal </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of appetite, fatigue, </li></ul><ul><li>nausea, vomiting, </li></ul><ul><li>abdominal pain and </li></ul><ul><li>jaundice </li></ul>
  13. 13. How HEPATITIS A Differs From HEPATITIS B <ul><li>MODE OF TRANSMISSION </li></ul><ul><li>BLOOD </li></ul><ul><li>FECES </li></ul><ul><li>SALIVA </li></ul><ul><li>FOOD/WATER </li></ul><ul><li>COURSE OF DISEASE </li></ul><ul><li>LENGTH OF ILLNESS </li></ul><ul><li>COMPLICATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>CARRIER STATE </li></ul><ul><li>SYMPTOMS </li></ul><ul><li>INTESTINAL FLU-LIKE ILLNESS </li></ul><ul><li>LIVER DAMAGE </li></ul><ul><li>JAUNDICE </li></ul><ul><li>HEPATITIS A HEPATITIS B </li></ul><ul><li>VERY RARE YES </li></ul><ul><li>YES NO </li></ul><ul><li>NO RARELY </li></ul><ul><li>YES NO </li></ul><ul><li>1-2 WEEKS OR MONTHS TO </li></ul><ul><li>RARELY, YEARS </li></ul><ul><li>SEVERAL MONTHS </li></ul><ul><li>RARE CHRONIC LIVER DISEASE & CANCER CAN BE FATAL </li></ul><ul><li>NO YES </li></ul><ul><li>YES YES </li></ul><ul><li>NO YES </li></ul><ul><li>YES, ADULTS YES </li></ul>
  14. 14. How are HIV and HBV Similar? Different? <ul><li>MODE OF TRANSMISSION </li></ul><ul><li>BLOOD </li></ul><ul><li>SEMEN </li></ul><ul><li>VAGINAL FLUIDS </li></ul><ul><li>SALIVA </li></ul><ul><li>TARGET IN THE BODY </li></ul><ul><li>RISK OF INFECTION </li></ul><ul><li>AFTER NEEDLESTICK </li></ul><ul><li>EXPOSURE TO INFECTED BLOOD </li></ul><ul><li>HIGH NUMBER OF VIRUSES IN BLOOD </li></ul><ul><li>VACCINE AVAILABLE </li></ul><ul><li>HBV HIV </li></ul><ul><li>YES YES </li></ul><ul><li>YES YES </li></ul><ul><li>YES YES </li></ul><ul><li>MAYBE NO </li></ul><ul><li>LIVER IMMUNE SYSTEM </li></ul><ul><li>6-30% 0.5% </li></ul><ul><li>YES NO </li></ul><ul><li>YES NO </li></ul>
  15. 15. Hepatitis B - Prevention <ul><li>Vaccine - Recommended for persons at risk of exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Immune Globulin - Following exposure, temporary protection </li></ul><ul><li>Proper Use of Condoms, Lubricant and Spermicide (Not 100% Safe) </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use Drugs or Share Needles Ever </li></ul><ul><li>Universal Precautions </li></ul>
  16. 16. “ UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS” <ul><li>The term “universal precautions” refers to a method of infection control in which all human blood and other potentially infectious materials are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV and HBV. Universal precautions do not apply to feces, nasal secretions, sputum, sweat, tears, urine, or vomitus unless they contain visible blood. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Requirements for Confidentiality Regarding HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B <ul><li>Students and Employees cannot be required to: </li></ul><ul><li>be tested </li></ul><ul><li>reveal their HIV/HBV status </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing of information about a person’s HIV/HBV status may occur only following written permission. </li></ul>Strictly Confidential
  18. 18. Disclosure <ul><li>An employee who knows of another person’s HIV/HBV status may NOT share that information with anyone without the permission of that person or the parent of a person under 14 years of age. </li></ul><ul><li>Violation of confidentiality by District employees is a misdemeanor and may place a person at risk of civil suit if such breach of confidentiality results in harm to the person who is HIV or HBV positive. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Discrimination <ul><li>EMPLOYEES </li></ul><ul><li>Employers may not discriminate against an HIV/HBV infected person in: </li></ul><ul><li>employment   leave   job assignment </li></ul><ul><li>recruitment  hiring  fringe benefits </li></ul><ul><li>transfers   layoffs </li></ul><ul><li>rate of pay  terminations </li></ul><ul><li>STUDENTS </li></ul><ul><li>Students with HIV/HVB infection may not be discriminated against in: </li></ul><ul><li>placement  evaluation   activities </li></ul><ul><li>access to school equipment   course of study </li></ul>

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