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GDS International - Next - Generation - Healthcare - Summit - US - 2
 

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Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise

Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise

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    GDS International - Next - Generation - Healthcare - Summit - US - 2 GDS International - Next - Generation - Healthcare - Summit - US - 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the EnterpriseHow it WorksAirStrip is a secure, HIPAA-compliant, and FDA-cleared means for physicians to use their own PDA, Smartphone or other supported device to access virtual real-time waveforms and other patient data from the existing Clinical Information System (CIS) anytime, anywhere. Providers use their own handheld equipment,and pay for their own cellular data plans or use Wi-Fi. Hospitals make the connection to existing equipment and systems possible through network infrastructureby working with AirStrip Technologies to install and maintain the necessary software.AirStrip is currently being used to improve care in these simple ways: 1) When concerning waveform patterns, bedside alarms, or other patient data are noted, nurses call upon physicians who use AirStrip to make a visual interpretation, engage in collaborative discussion, and render an opinion on safe and effective patient management. 2) Providers proactively use AirStrip to periodically assess the status of their monitored patients to help expedite workflow. 3) Providers use AirStrip to facilitate timely remote consultation and access to specialty consultation. 4) Providers use AirStrip to reassure patients and families and enhance satisfaction when they must be away from the bedside temporarily. 5) Leaders use AirStrip to support consultative visual assessment that may be needed for chain of command procedures when providers disagree with one another on patient assessments or treatment plans. 6) Hospitals use mobile capabilities to retain specialty referrals in house or in system, improve patient flow, and ensure that patient care is expedited.AirStrip mobilizes information to help providers enhance the health and safety of patients, improve access to care, transform and expedite workflow, andstrengthen financial performance. However, benefits realization is directly correlated to effective use of the product.Where it WorksAirStrip OB is actively used to manage laboring patient in hundreds of hospital labor and delivery units. With AirStrip Patient Monitoring, hospitals are nowpoised to use AirStrip in Medical, Surgical, Coronary, Burns, Trauma, Neuro, Pediatric, and Neonatal ICUs, ED, PACU, PCU, and Telemetry Units. Hospitals can alsouse AirStrip to digitize and mobilize 12- and 15-lead ECGs from pre-hospital through the ED, cath lab, and inpatient levels of care.Critical Success FactorsWhen considering a program to measure effective use of AirStrip, we must consider the degree of physician adoption, the extent that product use is embeddedin the nursing/physician/patient care workflow, and the degree of compliance with established policies and procedures for its effective use. Service line volumewill be a significant driver since the size of the numerator and denominator will have a marked impact on the reliability of results.This document summarizes the anticipated benefits that could reasonably be expected based on the full intended use of the products, and suggests metrics toconsider for measuring the extent of effective use. The choice of metrics selected by an organization will vary based upon the critical success factors above.©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 1 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
    • AirStrip OB Area of Workflow Impacted Beneficiary-Benefit ROI Basis Suggested MetricsTeamwork & Communication Patient Greater patient satisfaction leads to: Clinical 1 2  More timely treatment leads to better  Higher HCAHPS scores  Adverse Outcome Index (AOI) ,RN/MD communication outcomes for mom and baby  Increased reimbursement from CMS  Weighted Adverse Outcome Score (WAOS) RN concerned about a waveform or other  Shorter wait times (ED, L&D, NST)  Increased market share 1,2 1,2 data  Greater access to (remote) providers  Severity Index (SI) RN notifies physician Greater physician satisfaction leads to:  Birth Trauma (AHRQ) 3 Physician uses AirStrip Hospital  Reduction in splitter behavior  Decision to Incision Time , 4 5 Treatment plan developed  Better patient flow  Lower physician turnover rates  Cesarean section rates 6  Safer (information supported) handoffs  Reduced vacancy costs  Uterine rupture 7MD/MD communication  First to market PR opportunity  Length of stay 8 Physician request for second  Multidisciplinary review of strip data More competent nurses provide better  Readmission rate (selected) opinion/consult increases likelihood of accuracy patient care  5 Minute APGAR 9 MD notifies consultant  Offers checks and balances on individual  Neonatal ABG Consultant uses AirStrip performance; Remote capability allows specialty referrals to  Unattended deliveries (selected) Treatment plan developed  Greater access to PMD, MFM experts for stay in system, regardless of geography, and  NICU admission rate consults, staff training and development increases revenue for service line  NICU average LOSRN/MD/Supervisor/Expert  Supports competency development and  NICU days per 1,000 births Uncertainty about interpretation or time to maintenance activities Multitasking by employed physicians means review competencies  When physicians multitask- greater greater revenue to hospital at lower cost Financial Notifies expert productivity at no additional cost  Per physician admission volume Expert uses AirStrip  Stage 1 Meaningful Use - Physician-friendly Multitasking by non-employed physicians  Number of billables (i.e.: 59051) Offers immediate feedback/training  Automated audit trail to EHR data means greater revenue to them  Internal referral volume  Data retrieval & readable displays of  Voluntary turnover & vacancy rates Providers disagree with interpretation of med & allergy lists; VS; Clinical Labs; Enhanced triage in ED, L&D means greater (MD/RN) colleague and/or plan of care Patient lists; Demographics efficiency and increased capacity  Perinatal claims rate Invoke chain of command  Clinical decision support w/Real time  Avg indemnity & expense incurred Supervisors use AirStrip waveforms; Graphing (I&O, VS) & Better clinical outcomes lead to fewer malpractice cases and lower costs  % perinatal cases w/indemnity incurred Treatment plan developed Prioritization support (color coded flags)  % perinatal cases w/expense incurred Providers spend time more appropriately  Market share and payer mix Nurse  Gain confidence and competence with making them more efficientWorkflow Enhancer End User Experience clinical decision-making Meaningful Use – average physician spends  RN/MD/Pt/Community SatisfactionPhysician  Enhances trust, rapport w/physician 4.8 hours per month (range 2.6-6.9) engaging  Physician Experience Survey Wants to know, “Do I have time to…”  Professional development support with data meaningfully via AirStrip.  Nursing Experience Survey Proactively uses AirStrip  Time studies More efficient work plan developed Physician  No. of inbound routine calls by MDs Virtual bedside effect drives satisfaction and  Controls own destiny, can make own visual loyalty by patients and physicians  Patient wait times in ER, L&D Wants to know, “How is my patient doing” assessment rather than over-reliance on a  Time to sign off on NSTs 59025 Proactively uses AirStrip colleague’s assessment. Physician self service leads to fewer MD calls  Physician commute time to hospital Self-service model  Professional development support to nurses to check status and nets more RN  Product Utilization  Enhances trust, rapport w/nurses which time at the patient’s bedside. Also enhances  Number of Logins leads to greater satisfaction nursing job satisfaction.  Hours per month per MD  Supports sign in/out and handoffs  Quality versus quantity of views©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 2 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
    • AirStrip Cardiology Area of Workflow Impacted Beneficiary-Benefit ROI Basis Suggested MetricsPrehospital Through CathLab Patient Improved ability to achieve core measures Clinical 10 12  Lower morbidity and mortality enhances likelihood of achieving full incentive  EMS to Balloon Time 13EMS/ED communication  Shorter wait times (EMS Transport, ED, payment under Value-Based Purchasing.  AMI 7a – (Median) time to Fibrinolysis EMS responds to CP patient call Cath Lab, ICU Transfer) 11  AMI 8a -Time to PCI (Door to Balloon EMS performs 12 lead ECG in the field  Greater access to (remote) providers Demonstrated improvement of AMI core Time) 14 Lifenet powered by AirStrip activated  Shorter cardiac rehab stay measures under RHQDAPU enhances  AMI 30-Day Mortality Rate , 15 16 Cardiology consult network activated  Fewer complications and long term reputation, influences community perception,  AMI 30-Day Risk Readmission STEMI determination made treatment needs market share, and payer negotiation position.  Average number of minutes before Transport plan developed outpatients with CP/AMI who needed Cath Lab team activated prn Hospital Improved throughput reduces costs and specialized care were transferred to STEMI Patient arrives at Cathlab or ED  More timely and effective AMI program maximized staff efficiency receiving center. 17 impacts cost, reputation, and revenue  Average number of minutes beforeMD/MD communication  Better STEMI patient flow Remote capability allows specialty referrals to outpatients with CP/AMI got an ECG. 18 Physician request for second  Safer (information supported) handoffs stay in system, regardless of geography, and  Length of time spent in cardiac rehab , 19 20 opinion/consult  First to market PR opportunity increases revenue for service line MD notifies consultant  Improved utilization of resources Financial Multitasking by employed physicians means  Reduced costs for MS-DRG 280-281 cases Consultant uses AirStrip greater revenue to hospital at lower cost Treatment plan developed Nurse  Increased referral volume MS-DRG 246-251  Administrative time savings with  Voluntary turnover & vacancy rates – Multitasking by non-employed physiciansED/CathLab/ICU/Tele/Med-Surg/OP/Home automation of call processes physicians and nurses means greater revenue to them GE Muse Network in place  Improved job satisfaction  Market share and payer mix Serial ECG access powered by AirStrip Enhanced triage in ED, Cath Lab means Physician End User Experience greater efficiency and increased capacityMD/Patient communication  Improved visual display of ECG enhances  RN/MD/Pt/Community Satisfaction Physician follows up with patient following accuracy of diagnosis emergently and Better clinical outcomes lead to fewer  Physician Experience Survey discharge stackability improves comparative analysis malpractice cases and lower costs  Nursing Experience Survey Physician uses AirStrip to view serial ECGs  More timely diagnoses enabled  Time studies to prep for the call  Improved job satisfaction Providers spend time more appropriately  No. of time spent on outbound calls to making them more efficient activate cath lab teamInterhospital transfer Community  Patient wait times in ED STEMI referral center notifies STEMI  Access to better STEMI care networks Physician self service leads to fewer MD calls  Time to sign off on ECG consults receiving center to nurses to check status and nets more RN  Product Utilization STEMI receiving center MD uses AirStrip to time at the patient’s bedside. Also enhances  Number of Logins evaluate and triage patient nursing job satisfaction.  Hours per month per MD STEMI referral center MD can monitor  Quality versus quantity of views patients retrospectively following transfer©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 3 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
    • AirStrip Patient Monitoring Area of Workflow Impacted Beneficiary-Benefit ROI Basis Suggested MetricsTeamwork & Communication Patient More timely treatment facilitated when Clinical/Access/Process MeasuresRN/MD communication  More timely treatment leads to better logistics obstacles are removed (Varies with patient population) RN concerned about a waveform or other outcomes  Mortality reduction for ICU patients with 24 25 26 27 data  Greater access to (remote) providers Fewer communication delays and breakdowns SAPS II > 50 , , , RN notifies physician among clinicians will result in better outcomes  Shorter mean hospital LOS for ICU patients 28 Physician uses AirStrip Hospital with SAPS > 70 23 Treatment plan developed  Stage 1 Meaningful Use Better clinical outcomes lead to fewer clinical  Rate of patients who died after ICU 29  Automated audit trail to EHR data complications, fewer malpractice cases, and dischargeMD/MD communication  Data retrieval & readable displays of lower costs of care delivery  Rate of patients who were readmitted 30 Physician request for second opinion or med & allergy lists; VS; Clinical Labs; within 48 h of ICU discharge clinical consultation by specialist Patient lists; Demographics Faster achievement of all stages of meaningful  Rate of patients who were readmitted to MD notifies consultant  Clinical decision support w/Real time use and clinical decision support requirements ICU at any time during the same hospital 31 Consultant uses AirStrip waveforms; Graphing (I&O, VS) & admission. Treatment plan developed Prioritization support (color coded flags) Multidisciplinary visual assessments of visual  APACHE III score at ICU discharge , , 32 33 34  Increased capacity of existing clinicians data lead to better patient care  Rate of delayed ICU admissions 35RN/MD/Supervisor/Expert  Provide clinical support to satellite facilities  Rate of delayed ICU discharges 35 Uncertainty about interpretation OR Time  Access to virtual provider networks without Remote capability allows specialty referrals to 35  ICU Canceled operating room cases to review competencies added demands on existing physical plant stay in system, regardless of geography, and 35 increases revenue for service lines  ICU ED by-pass hours Notifies expert  Physician-friendly, rapid achievement of  Medication order/adjustment delays Expert uses AirStrip global clinical decision support goals: (especially amiodarone and sotalol) 36 1) Access to data and data sharing - Multitasking by employed physicians means Offers immediate feedback/training  Case count/No. of minutes PACU mobility is a pre-requisite (Stg 1 MU) greater revenue to hospital at lower cost 37 ALSO Anesthesia Sign out delays. Proactively assessing work of subordinates 2) Understanding clinical practice and Multitasking by non-employed physicians  Case count/No. of minutes PACU Surgeon 21 22 , making the data available in a 38 means greater revenue to them Patient Waiting to be Re-evaluated. Supervisor uses AirStrip meaningful way for users, especially Offers immediate feedback/training physicians (Stg 1 & 2 MU) Providers spend time more appropriately Financial 3) Guiding choices - incorporating EBM in making them more efficient  Reduction in number of, indemnity and Providers disagree with interpretation of the offering (Stg 2 & 3 MU) expense incurred for communication- colleague and/or plan of care 4) Knowledge-based prompting - Virtual bedside effect drives satisfaction and related med mal cases involving: providing views of data and rules that Invoke chain of command loyalty in nurses and physicians  Clinical status changes (RN-MD-Both) promote proactive, rather than Supervisors use AirStrip  Handoffs reactive interventions (Stg 3 MU) Treatment plan developed Physician self service leads to fewer MD calls  Patient transfers to nurses to check status and nets more RN  Failure of attending-attending handoffs NurseWorkflow Enhancer time at the patient’s bedside. Also enhances  Failure of residents to notify attending  More timely support from physicians when 39Physician nursing job satisfaction. surgeons of critical events. patient care issues arise Wants to know, “Do I have time to…”  Less time verbally describing visual data Proactively uses AirStrip Competency assessment/enhancement End User Experience lowers risk of communication errors More efficient work plan developed support leads to better clinicians, who in turn  RN/MD and (possibly) patient satisfaction provide better patient care.  Physician Experience Survey Physician Wants to know, “How is my patient doing”  Useful time spent by MDs interacting  Controls own destiny, can make own visual Proactively uses AirStrip assessment rather than over-reliance on a with EHR data with and without AirStrip Intervenes with call to bedside nurse prn  Nursing Experience Survey colleague’s assessment. Treatment plan developed  Time studies  Ease of access to relevant EHR data©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 4 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
    • AirStrip Patient Monitoring  Better support for actual workflow and  Time to MD sign off on treatment plans multitasking requirements of role  Time of waveform event to medication 40  Professional development support order, and med administration  Enhances trust, rapport w/nurses which  Product Utilization leads to greater satisfaction  Number of Logins  Supports sign in/out and handoffs  Hours per month per MD  Quality versus quantity of views Community  Access to more robust care networks©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 5 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
    • Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the EnterpriseReferences1 Mann, S., Pratt, S., Gluck, P., Nielsen, P., Risser, D., Greenberg, P., Marcus, R., Goldman, M., Shapiro, D., Pearlman, M., Sachs, B. 2006. Assessing Quality in Obstetrical Care:Development of Standardized Measures. Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. September 2006 Volume 32 Number 9. Joint Commission on Accreditation of HealthcareOrganizations.2 Nielsen, P., Goldman, M., Mann, S., Shapiro, D., Marcus, R., Pratt, S., Greenberg, P., McNamee, P., Salisbury, M., Birnbach, D., Gluck, P., Pearlman, M., King, H., Tornberg, D.,Sachs, B. 2006. Effects of Teamwork Training on Adverse Outcomes and Process of Care in Labor and Delivery. A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Obstetrics andGynecology. Vol. 109, No. 1, January 2007. American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.3 Russo, C. A. (Thomson Reuters) and Andrews, R.M. (AHRQ). Potentially Avoidable Injuries to Mothers and Newborns During Childbirth, 2006. HCUP Statistical Brief #74. June2009. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb74.pdf4 Bloom SL, Leveno KJ, Spong CY, Gilbert S, Hauth JC, Landon MB, Varner MW, Moawad AH, Caritis SN, Harper M, Wapner RJ, Sorokin Y, Miodovnik M, Osullivan MJ, Sibai BM,Langer O, Gabbe SG; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network. 2006. Decision-to-incision times and maternal andinfant outcomes. Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Jul;108(1):6-11.5 de Regt, RH, Marks, K., Joseph, D., Malmgren, J. Time From Decision to Incision for Cesarean Deliveries at a Community Hospital. Obstetrics & Gynecology March 2009 - Volume113 - Issue 3 - pp 625-629.6 Sakala, C., Corry, M. 2008. Evidence-Based Maternity Care: What It Is and What It Can Achieve. Childbirth Connection, Reforming States Group, and Milbank Memorial Fund,New York, NY.7 Zinberg, S., Bowes, W., Sachs, B., Myers, E., Wall, E., Menacker, F., Zhang, J., Atkins, D., Helfand, M., Guise, J-M. Uterine Rupture Terminology Conference: September 5, 2002.To achieve consensus on terminology used in VBAC evidence report. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=erta71&part=A1105478 Malkin, JD., Keeler, E., Broder, M.S., Garber, S. Postpartum Length of Stay and Newborn Health: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Pediatrics 2003 111: e316-e3229 Martin, G., Hankins, G., et al. 2006. Policy Statement: The Apgar Score. Organizational Principles to Guide and Define the Child Health Care System and/or Improve the Healthof All Children American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Fetus and Newborn and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on ObstetricPractice.10 Cannon CP, Gibson CM, Lambrew CT, Shoultz DA, Levy D, French WJ, Gore JM, Weaver WD, Rogers WJ, Tiefenbrunn AJ. Relationship of symptom-onset-to-balloon time anddoor-to-balloon time with mortality in patients undergoing angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction. JAMA. 2000;283:2941–2947.11 Rokos, I., French, W., Koenig, W., Stratton, S., Nighswonger, B., Strunk, B., Jewell, J., Mahmud, E., Dunford, J., Hokanson, J., Smith, S., Baran, K., Swor, R., Berman, A., Wilson,B., Aluko, A., Gross, B., Rostykus, P., Salvucci, A., Dev, V., McNally, B., Manoukian, S., King, S., Torrance, S. (2009) Integration of Pre-Hospital Electrocardiograms and ST-ElevationMyocardial Infarction Receiving Center (SRC) Networks. Impact on Door-to-Balloon Times Across 10 Independent Regions J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. Intv. 2009;2;339-346.©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 6 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise
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    • Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise27 Zanier, E. Ortolano, F., Ghisoni, L., Colombo, A., Losappio, S., Stocchetti, N. (2007). Intracranial pressure monitoring in intensive care: clinical advantages of a computerizedsystem over manual recording. Critical Care Vol 11 No 1.28 Thomas, E. 09/04 – 09/08. Measuring the Value of Remote Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Monitoring. AHRQ Grant preliminary data. R01 HS 015234. Grant concluded 09/2008.29 Campbell, A., Cook, J., Adey, G., Cuthbertson, B. 2008. Predicting death and readmission after intensive care discharge. British Journal of Anaesthesia 100 (5): 656–62 (2008).30 Campbell, A., Cook, J., Adey, G., Cuthbertson, B. 2008. Predicting death and readmission after intensive care discharge. British Journal of Anaesthesia 100 (5): 656–62 (2008).31 Campbell, A., Cook, J., Adey, G., Cuthbertson, B. 2008. Predicting death and readmission after intensive care discharge. British Journal of Anaesthesia 100 (5): 656–62 (2008).32 Campbell, A., Cook, J., Adey, G., Cuthbertson, B. 2008. Predicting death and readmission after intensive care discharge. British Journal of Anaesthesia 100 (5): 656–62 (2008).33 Knaus WA, Draper EA, Wagner DP, Zimmerman JE (1985). "APACHE II: a severity of disease classification system". Critical Care Medicine 13 (10): 818–29.34 Knaus WA, Wagner DP, Draper EA, Zimmerman JE, Bergner M, Bastos PG, Sirio CA, Murphy DJ, Lotring T, Damiano A, et al. (1991). "The APACHE III prognostic system. Riskprediction of hospital mortality for critically ill hospitalized adults". Chest 100 (6): 1619–36.35 Berenholtz, S., Dorman, T., Ngo, K., Pronovost, P. 2002. Qualitative Review of Intensive Care Unit Quality Indicators. J of Critical Care, Vol 17, No 1 (March), 2002: pp 1-15.36 Hsia, D. 2003. Treatment to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death. Clinical Highlights. AHRQ Publication No. 03-P022, May 2003. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/suddcard.htm37 Lee, R. 2010. Evidence Based Management: Use of Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Delay Codes as a Quality Measure and Process Improvement Initiatives for the Inpatientand Ambulatory Surgery Units. Maryland Patient Safety Center (MPSC) 2010 Annual Conference Solution Submission. Retrieved online athttp://www.marylandpatientsafety.org/html/education/solutions-031910/documents/processRedesign/Evidence_Based_Management.pdf38 Lee, R. 2010. Evidence Based Management: Use of Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Delay Codes as a Quality Measure and Process Improvement Initiatives for the Inpatientand Ambulatory Surgery Units. Maryland Patient Safety Center (MPSC) 2010 Annual Conference Solution Submission. Retrieved online athttp://www.marylandpatientsafety.org/html/education/solutions-031910/documents/processRedesign/Evidence_Based_Management.pdf39 Greenberg, C., Regenbogen, S., Studdert, D., Lipsitz, S., Rogers, S., Zinner, M., Gawande, A. 2007. Patterns of Communication Breakdowns Resulting in Injury to SurgicalPatients J Am Coll Surg 2007;204:533–540. American College of Surgeons.40 Tang, Z., Mazabob, J., Weavind, L., Thomas, E., Johnson, T., A Time-Motion Study of Registered Nurses’ Workflow in Intensive Care Unit Remote Monitoring. AMIA 2006Symposium Proceedings Page - 759©2010. AirStrip Technologies, Inc. Last Update 3/23/2011. 8 Measuring Effective Use of AirStrip Across the Enterprise