GDS International - Next - Generation - Healthcare - Payers - Summit - US - 8

399 views
331 views

Published on

Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
399
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

GDS International - Next - Generation - Healthcare - Payers - Summit - US - 8

  1. 1.                  Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made    Easier                  WHITE PAPER  www.sybase.com 
  2. 2.   Contents:  Time, Motion, and Health Care: A Case Study .......................................................................................... 2 What Is So Transformative about Mobility? ............................................................................................. 3 Mobilizing Health Care: Changing the Way People Work......................................................................... 4 Accelerating Delivery of More Accurate Care .......................................................................................................4 Taking Health Care to the Patient .........................................................................................................................5 Building an Integrated Health Care Environment ..................................................................................... 6 Planning for Mobility Throughout the Health Care Organization ............................................................. 7 Notes .....................................................................................................................................................................9                      Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier        
  3. 3. Time, Motion, and Health Care: A Case Study  In today’s clinical setting, electronic medical records (EMR) are rapidly replacing paper and becoming the  central touch point for everyone involved in patient care.  When the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center adopted an EMR system, they  recognized early on that mobile access to the EMR was an essential part of the equation. Initially, access  was available through computers at nurses’ stations and, in a first step toward mobility, through COWs  (Computers on Wheels). A COW is a cart equipped with a wireless computer. Health care providers could  wheel COWs to the patient’s bedside as needed, view medical records, and enter data.  Once their EMR was fully implemented using a COW strategy for mobile access, the medical center  conducted a detailed time and motion study to understand exactly what people did with the technology  during a typical work day. They made some interesting discoveries. For instance, they learned that it took a  nurse on average 30 seconds to log into the system, and during a typical shift, nurses logged in 45 times.  COWs had some disadvantages. Nurses parked them in hallways, adding to the problem of hallway clutter.  COWs also proved to be dangerous obstacles when parked next to a bed during a medical emergency.   UCSF decided to conduct a pilot study. They equipped a number of health care workers with highly portable  tablet PC type devices called mobile clinical assistants (MCAs). Then they conducted the same time and  motion study on these workers. This is what they discovered:1  Equipping health care workers with more mobile devices resulted in better patient data that was more  current in the EMR, and a better use of the health care providers’ time. This one example provides a  glimpse of the true power of mobility in health care. Let’s see why.   2    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier     
  4. 4. What Is So Transformative about Mobility? Although the UCSF Medical Center case focuses on how nurses work, it reveals the fundamental advantages of a more mobile clinical environment. These advantages extend way beyond the nursing staff. Everyone interacting with medical information, including doctors, technicians, specialists, and even patients themselves, benefits from the advantages revealed in the UCSF Medical Center study. However this study shows something more. It shows how mobility is uniquely able to make clinical processes more efficient, and it shows how those process improvements translate directly into higher quality health care. People working in the clinical environment have instant access to medical information and to each other. Mobile devices are convenient and always on. Because of this, health care providers are more likely to enter relevant information immediately, and they spend less time doing it. These, then, are the key attributes of mobility that taken together, enable it to transform the clinical environment: These same advantages extend to patients as well, making them more active participants in their own health care. Mobile applications enable them to view their own health records, be informed about their prescriptions, and in some cases participate in remote patient monitoring. So how does a truly mobilized clinical environment really work? Let’s take a closer look.    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier    3   
  5. 5. Mobilizing Health Care: Changing the Way People Work By providing better access and insight into information, as well as greater convenience for providers and patients, mobility not only streamlines the delivery of health care, but it results in higher quality care and better outcomes. The following scenarios illustrate these points. Accelerating Delivery of More Accurate Care Early one evening a middle‐aged business man visiting a town in upstate New York climbs into a taxi cab. The cab proceeds to take him to his destination. While riding in the cab, the man becomes disoriented and starts behaving strangely.  The cab driver grows concerned and decides to take the man to a regional medical center that is located in the town. By the time they arrive, the man has difficulty getting out of the cab. The driver helps him out, and as they walk into the emergency room, the man falls and hits his head on a hand rail.  Several EMTs who happen to be there lift the man onto gurney and wheel him into the ER. The taxi driver leaves. The ER personnel see a semi‐conscious patient with a bleeding head wound. The man is unable to communicate. Nurses examining him find his wallet. They identify him, and from his health insurance card they identify his primary care physician, who happens to have a practice in New York City where the man lives.  This regional medical center is connected to a large state‐wide EMR network. In less than one minute they have his complete electronic medical record displayed on an MCA device at the patient’s bedside. They quickly discover this man is a diabetic and suspect he is hypoglycemic. The EMR shows he has had episodes similar to this in the past. The attending physician orders a glucose IV. The man responds quickly, and within 15 minutes he is able to explain that he neglected to eat lunch or dinner, which no doubt triggered the episode. The ER physician is concerned about the nasty gash on the man’s head, and he wants to be sure there are no other neurological complications. He orders a CT scan, although there is no radiologist on duty at this hour to read the results. This however, is not a problem. The regional medical center uses a teleradiology service that provides preliminary reads on CT scans within 30 minutes, any time day or night. As the man’s head wound is cleaned and bandaged, the attending physician receives the preliminary radiologist’s read of the CT scan. He reviews the report and the images on his iPad while talking to the patient. There are no additional problems, and the man is feeling completely normal.  One hour and 30 minutes after arriving at the ER bleeding and uncommunicative, the man is released. The doctor gives him the name of a good restaurant and orders him to go eat dinner. By the time the man leaves   4    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier     
  6. 6. the building, the doctor and nurses have used their mobile devices to document the entire event directly in this man’s electronic medical record. Taking Health Care to the Patient Mobility can also make people more active participants in their own health care, as shown in the following scenario. Soon after the diabetic man from the previous episode returns home, he hears from his doctor’s office. The office had received automatic notification from the EMR system that he was treated in an emergency room. They inform him that his doctor has a little gift for him and that he needs to stop by the office to get it. When he arrives at the office, he is given a continuous glucose monitor. It is a small device that fits in his pocket, and it has a blue tooth transmitter that enables it to communicate with a mobile application they have him download to his smartphone. They help him configure the devices and set up the application. They show him how to apply the sensor, which needs to be replaced every few days. This device continuously monitors his glucose level. Several times each day his phone automatically logs into his EMR and uploads the glucose readings to a special chart in the record. If his glucose levels go too low, an alarm goes off. The doctor orders him to log into his EMR from his phone whenever he eats something and mark it on the chart. The doctor also suggests he look at the chart at least once each day. The idea is to get him to pay closer attention to what he eats and to see how it affects his glucose levels.  After using the glucose monitor for two weeks, the man becomes highly aware of everything he eats, and he becomes more tuned in to early warning signs of low blood sugar. Long after he no longer needs the glucose monitor, he is able to avoid hypoglycemic episodes.        Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier    5   
  7. 7. Building an Integrated Health Care Environment Mobile networks and devices give medical professionals faster access to critical information, reduce transition times, and enable them to spend more time on patient care. New mobile technology allows them to pay more attention to their patients and offer more personal care—even if that care is delivered remotely.  Patients themselves, many of whom are already mobile technology users, can directly tap into the benefits of healthcare mobility as well. In fact, many are demanding at least minimal mobile capabilities from their healthcare providers, even if they are as simple as automatic appointment and prescription refill reminders, easy access to test results, or email answers from their physician.  The following illustration shows how mobility can impact the way health care is delivered across the clinical setting and beyond.    6    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier     
  8. 8. Planning for Mobility Throughout the Health Care Organization As more powerful mobile devices come to market, and with higher speed service carrier networks, innovation in health care mobility is going to accelerate.  New mobile medical devices will take increasing advantage of new device capabilities such as:    More camera‐ and image‐enabled applications   Real‐time anywhere video conferencing   Accurate voice recognition that vastly alters  Peoplefirst:   the data input capabilities of smartphones and  Deploying Mobility Across  other mobile devices   New device form factors  the Enterprise   More integration between mobile devices and  Peoplefirst, operated by Kindred back end information systems (handhelds,  Helathcare Services, is one of the mobile monitoring devices, diagnostic  largest contract rehabilitation service equipment, EMR and imaging systems)   businesses in the U.S. Employing  Higher speed networks  over 8,000 people, most of whom work directly with patients, Peoplefirst  Unified collaboration applications specifically  delivers rehabilitation therapy in more designed for both synchronous and  than 600 locations. asynchronous medical consults This means that planning for mobility is planning for  Typically a Peoplefirst therapist mightchange. Any mobile solution that becomes part of the  see 10 patients in one day. Therapists would make hand-written notes onhealth care work flow must be flexible enough to  each patient, and at the end of theaccommodate new technology as it arises. Mobile  day, that information would be keyedsolutions must also be able to integrate devices with  into the billing systerm. Looking forhealth care information systems.   ways to free therapists from time theyHow do you prepare for mobility across the health care  were spending on administrativeorganization? In the same way that IT infrastructure and  tasks, Peoplefirst created a customsystems depend on strategic planning and development  applcation called Point-of-Careto effectively serve work flow processes, organizations  Mobile. This app, which runs on handheld PDA type devices, enablesneed to think about mobility strategically. Mobility is  therapists to enter treatmentnot just a loose collection devices and applications. It is  information directly into the medicala system that supports and integrates a wide variety of  record while meeting with the patient.devices and applications. When planning for mobility, there are two fundamental considerations all  After piloting the application to test itsorganizations must keep in mind:  effectiveness and security, Peoplefirst  Security: Compliance is critical with respect to  used a platform strategy to deploy Point-of-Care Mobile to 8000 mobile any devices or systems that hold or transmit  devices. confidential information. This is especially so in    health care where many regulations govern  how organizations manage confidential  information.  In addition to having security policies in place, organizations need to consider the tools and  functions they will use to extend their security policies to the mobile network right down to the  device level.    Platform: Many organizations approach mobility by adopting devices and applications on a pilot  and departmental basis. This can quickly lead to an unmanageable situation because every device    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier    7   
  9. 9. or application has its own configuration and management tools. A platform strategy allows an  organization to plan for its mobility holistically, so that all devices (even new, “over the horizon”  technology) can be managed from one console using one set of management tools. A platform  strategy is essential for maintaining control over a mobile environment with many devices types  and diverse security requirements. As mobility becomes a more important part of the clinical setting, technology managers will need to address device manageability and data security. For more information about building secure and manageable mobile solutions, click here, or contact a Sybase or SAP representative.       8    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier     
  10. 10. Notes 1 Motion Computing (2009). “White Paper – USCF Medical Center Study.” http://www.motioncomputing.com/about/news/case_study_C5_UCSF.pdfSYBASE, INC.  WORLDWIDE HEADQUARTERS ONE SYBASE DRIVE DUBLIN, CA 94568‐7902 USA Tel: 1 800 8 SYBASE  www.sybase.com   Copyright © 2011 Sybase, Inc. All rights reserved. Unpublished rights reserved under U.S. copyright  laws. Sybase, and the Sybase logo are trademarks of Sybase, Inc. or its subsidiaries. All other    Mobility Advantage: Health Care Made Easier  trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ® indicates registration in the United    9  States. Specifications are subject to change without notice.  3/09.   

×