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GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3
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GDS International - Next - Generation - Manufacturing - Summit - Europe - 3

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Standardize Best Practices to Improve Agility and Global Operations

Standardize Best Practices to Improve Agility and Global Operations

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  • 1. Manufacturing BPMStandardize Best Practices to ImproveAgility and Global Operations JANUARY 2009
  • 2. Table of ContentsExecutive Summary ....................................................................................... 3What is BPM? ................................................................................................ 4 BPM as a Management Discipline ........................................................................ 4 BPM as a Technology Platform............................................................................. 4 BPM as an Implementation Style .......................................................................... 6Benefits of BPM ............................................................................................. 6 1. Innovation Through Analysis ............................................................................ 6 2. Efficiency Through Automation ........................................................................ 6 3. Standardization & Compliance ......................................................................... 7 4. Agility .............................................................................................................. 7 5. Performance Visibility and Continuous Improvement ........................................ 7BPM Applied to Manufacturing....................................................................... 7 Examples of Manufacturing Business Processes .................................................. 8 End-to-End Manufacturing Processes ................................................................... 9 Unified Design and Runtime Environments ..........................................................10 Complex and Adaptive Flows...............................................................................11 Integration to Enterprise Systems ........................................................................11Manufacturing BPM for the Global Enterprise .............................................. 12 Monitoring Global Performance ...........................................................................12Conclusion ................................................................................................... 14About Apriso ................................................................................................ 15 © 2009, 2010 Apriso Corporation This white paper, the software described in it, and other program materials are copyrighted works of Apriso Corporation, with all rights reserved. Trademark Information Apriso and FlexNet are registered trademarks of Apriso Corporation. Limitation of Liability The information in this document represents to the best of our ability the product functionality of Manufacturing Execution, Manufacturing Operations Management and other software products. These materials are subject to change without notice. These materials are provided by Apriso Corporation for informational purposes only, without representation or warranty of any kind. Apriso Corporation shall not be liable for errors or omissions with respect to the materials. The only warranties for Apriso Corporation products and services are those that are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services, if any. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. Version 1006.0.2 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 3. Executive SummaryOver the past decade, a key lesson learned on the shop floor has been increasingly applied tothe office environment: It all comes down to establishing an optimal process and thenreplicating widely. Maintaining quality, reducing costs, meeting customer commitments,improving agility and enforcing compliance with policies and regulations all demand carefuldocumentation, monitoring, and optimization of end-to end processes.In the office setting, Business Process Management (BPM) technology has brought about anew way to look at the business, not as a collection of independent functional departments andsupporting systems, but as end-to-end flows spanning traditionally stove-piped boundaries. Itstands to reason that BPM could apply equally well to manufacturing.Streamlining a process begins with modeling and mapping the process flow to reveal optimalpaths from beginning to end, which is then followed by analyzing and measuring businessperformance on an end-to-end perspective. Once optimization with BPM gains a foothold onexisting processes, it can then serve as a foundation to accelerate future process improvement.But, realizing the benefits of improved processes requires more than just mapping them. Theymust be modeled and executed in rapid fashion, to simulate actual operating conditions to trulyevaluate potential improvements and benefits. Software technology can accelerate thisprocess by actually executing your process models: coordinating and synchronizing resourcesand materials; routing tasks to people; machines and backend business systems; integratingdata across the stovepipes; executing business rules; responding to events; and monitoringprocess performance, all in real-time.Today, BPM technology has evolved to provide all of these functionalities within an officeenvironment, as an integrated platform, becoming a critical enabler of business innovation andoptimization at the corporate level. Yet, despite its success in the office environment, thistechnology remains rare across manufacturing operations, where BPM remains largelysynonymous with simple process modeling.Traditional Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) only provide elementary processmanagement, such as documenting routings, recipes and other types of processes involved inproduction operations. They don’t have the ability to actually execute and monitor processesfrom an end-to-end or lifecycle perspective, to then enable direct remedial action onexceptions from a central process management console. This shortcoming is due, in part, tothe traditional ‘plant-level’ perspective of MES, and the fact that most MES’s only focus onproduction, or even more narrowly on specific forms of production automation, versus acrossoperations to include activities such as quality, maintenance and material logistics. True BPMtherefore becomes a natural fit to enforce process execution and control user interactionsacross business processes.3 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 4. This paper will explore the unique challenges and benefits of implementing a BPM-basedtechnology platform to optimize and manage manufacturing operations processes.Suggestions are provided on how to best evaluate potential manufacturing BPM softwaresolutions, including which features and benefits can provide the highest return on investment inthe fastest possible timeframe.What is BPM?BPM as a Management DisciplineBPM is a new way of conceptualizing the business. It means viewing the business from anend-to-end process perspective, cutting across the various business systems, functions andorganizations involved in the process. The process model or map is a unified, end-to-enddescription of process activities that flow from beginning to end. It describes the flow logicexplicitly in a graphical manner, from which it can be readily understood, analyzed andpossibly improved, even though the technical implementation of that logic may be hiddeninside disparate business applications, programmable logic controllers and machines, orworse, the minds of key personnel.BPM as a discipline also advocates an end-to-end perspective in measuring businessperformance. The process is only as good as its weakest link, so metrics of time, cost andquality must be based on end-to-end measures. Those are the measures your customers andsuppliers judge you by, and the ones most directly affecting your company’s financial bottomline. BPM technologies provide simple mechanisms to monitor these metrics in dashboards,drill down to root cause analysis and remediate problems, in real-time.Lastly, BPM as a management discipline anticipates change. In fact, the major reason formodeling the process – extracting the flow logic hidden inside the applications, machines andhuman participants – is to be able to change it more easily, and to understand the impact ofthose changes.BPM as a Technology PlatformBut BPM is more than just a management discipline. It is also a software technology. Thetechnology of BPM makes the process model more than just a “plan.” It is a template thatdefines the possible paths allowed from beginning to end; enforced by an automation enginethat executes each step in the proper sequence. That software automates the flow asdescribed by the process model, routing and tracking human tasks, enforcing business rules,querying and updating various backend business systems.Key principles of BPM as a management discipline, such as an integrated end-to-end view,building for change, and continuous performance improvement, are reflected in BPM as atechnology platform. A true BPM platform requires a unified process design environment ableto orchestrate the actions of all the disparate user roles, business systems, and other actors in4 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 5. the end-to-end process. That, in turn, requires a unified data model that is applicable end-to- end as well. Building for change means that it must be easy to modify the executable process design, and quickly deploy it as a new version. In some cases, adaptive processes can accommodate variation and change even without versioning and redeployment. The BPM technology platform contains four key components: 1. Modeling component – An analysis and design time component for non-IT users to document current (as-is) processes, describe proposed to-be processes, and project expected performance improvement using simulation analysis. 2. Design component – Used by IT to add implementation detail to the model, if needed, allowing it to be executed on a process engine. 3. Workflow engine and task manager – The engine controls the sequence of process steps, both human and automated, as dictated by the rules encapsulated in the design. It presents assigned tasks to users, and maintains an audit trail of all steps in the process. While the process is running, the engine logs snapshots of runtime data used for performance analysis. 4. Monitoring and remediation, also called Business Activity Monitoring, or BAM – Aggregation of key performance indicator (KPI) data logged by the process engine (and possibly directly from the systems themselves), with display in user configurable dashboards of charts and tables, linked for drilldown root cause analysis. Unlike standalone BAM, BAM integrated with BPM is able to trace problems to specific steps in the process and provide a mechanism for remediation from a central management console. Figure 1 illustrates the components of a BPM platform. The boundaries between modeling – a “business” function – and executable design – traditionally an IT function – are blurring, as BPM technologies make process design functions increasingly available to non-IT users. 1. Model and analyze 4. Monitor and remediate Modeling BAM Runtime data 3. Execute and interact Executable Design Process Engine Workflow Policies/Rules Integration 2. Design and deploy SOA Middleware User User User Machine ERP PLM ControlFigure 1: BPM as a technology platform combines process modeling with executable design, anautomation engine, workflow task management, an integration framework and BAM. 5 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 6. While modeling focuses on the activity flow, or “orchestration,” the complete executable designmust also specify task assignments and user interface, enforcement of policies and rules, andinterconnection of both backend systems (ERP, PLM, etc.) and controllable machinery throughthe integration layer, today mostly based on Services Oriented Architecture (SOA). The abilityto define all of these aspects of the process within a single unified design environment,leveraging a unified data model, separates BPM from older styles of less agile softwaretechnology. Similarly, the BPM runtime, which includes an orchestration engine, human taskmanagement, integration middleware and adapters, and BAM, also provides a unifiedenvironment spanning all aspects of the automated process.The technology of BPM is not just for IT. While IT people use the BPM technologies to do the“heavy lifting” of process design, industrial engineers, process control engineers, warehousemanagement specialists and other “process engineers” that own business areas in a plant arethe end users of both the BPM tools and the run-time process solutions that result.BPM as an Implementation StyleA third aspect of BPM is worth mentioning: business empowerment. The tools employed inthe BPM technology platform are intended to empower non-IT users and eliminate codewithout sacrificing power and flexibility in the automated process solution. Process modelingand even much of executable design should be business functions not dependent on an ITdeveloper. While IT rightfully retains a critical role in the process implementation lifecycle – forsystem integration, advanced customization, testing and deployment – many functionsrequiring developers in traditional implementation styles can be performed with relatively littleIT involvement by using BPM. This is an important contributor to BPM’s agility, particularlywhen IT resources are in short supply.Benefits of BPMBPM has brought five distinct classes of benefits to the office workplace, all relevant tomanufacturing operations:1. Innovation Through AnalysisBy surfacing buried process logic in a diagram, process modeling creates a shared visuallanguage for documenting the process end-to-end, analyzing its strengths and weaknessesand proposing various to-be improvements before committing to implementation. Because ofthe stove-piped nature of single-function organizations and systems, the BPM process modelfrequently provides the only end-to-end description of the process in existence.2. Efficiency Through AutomationBy automating the flow of tasks, tracking deadlines, and managing task priorities, BPM makesprocesses run faster with less wasted time, more efficient utilization of resources, and greatercoordination end-to-end. This lowers operational costs, while increasing customer satisfaction.6 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 7. 3. Standardization & ComplianceOn the shop floor, routings and recipes just represent processes “as planned.” By makingplans executable, BPM ensures they represent the processes “as executed.” Standardoperating procedures and compliance with regulations are enforced. Policies can bemaintained as business rules and reused in multiple processes. Moreover, because processmodels can be shared through a repository, a best practice in one plant can be replicatedthroughout the enterprise. MES & MOM Defined4. Agility A ManufacturingBPM allows new processes to be implemented more quickly, and allows existing processes to Execution System (MES)be tweaked and customized more easily. One reason is that the activity flow logic has been is a dynamic information system that drives themade explicit in the process model, not buried inside application code. Once externalized, execution of manufactur-process logic is easy to customize and easy to change, usually without any code. BPM ing operations within the confines of productionprovides customization through configuration – without custom code – so solutions are capacity and capabilities.upgradeable, transportable and supportable long-term. Modern SOA middleware provides a Traditional MES systems were designed to work at acommon way to integrate disparate backend systems, with BPM as the central controlling single plant.intelligence and tracking mechanism. The combination of BPM and SOA encourages reuse of A ManufacturingIT assets, including legacy assets, in multiple processes throughout the enterprise. All of Operations Managementthese factors enhance agility. (MOM) may be described as an ‘enterprise MES’, comprising a manufactur-5. Performance Visibility and Continuous Improvement ing IT system built on aBPM allows you to monitor performance as it really counts – from an end-to-end perspective – unified platform to execute plant operations enterpriseand gives you a platform for remedial action in real-time. BPM’s BAM component lets you wide. A MOM goesdefine rules that continuously monitor process KPIs and alert users when values begin to go beyond production to include quality, ware-off track. These alerts don’t just point to the source of trouble, but let you take corrective house, maintenance andaction directly from the management console. That’s because BPM is more than a plan. It’s labor. A MOM synchronizes thesethe underlying framework of end-to-end process control. Metrics collected by BAM can also be manufacturing activitiesfed back to the modeling/analysis tool to further optimize process performance, critical to across the enterprise and the supply chain ifBPM’s philosophy of continuous improvement. necessary, and is designed for deployment and integration acrossBPM Applied to Manufacturing multiple locations, geographies and cultural divides.The previous discussion applies to BPM as it is usually applied – in the back office or frontoffice, but rarely on the shop or warehouse floor. Nevertheless, the opportunities to applythose features and benefits to manufacturing operations are numerous.In a manufacturing enterprise, the three key value chain functions of planning, designing andbuilding are typically supported by distinct IT systems. (See Figure 2): Enterprise ResourcePlanning (ERP) supports transactions related to product planning, sourcing, sales and otherbusiness matters. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) supports product definition andstructure. Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) support factory production on the shopfloor. A more complete view of manufacturing operations, such as that taken by Apriso’s7 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 8. FlexNet, extends MES with support for labor, quality, warehouse and maintenance operations.This enlarged scope is part of a larger discipline referred to as Manufacturing OperationsManagement (MOM).Examples of Manufacturing Business ProcessesManufacturing operations include many types of processes involving a wide range ofdepartments and roles. Examples include:  Production processes – Process routings and recipes; weighing, mixing, processing and packaging; standard operating procedures; assembly work instructions  Warehouse processes – Material receiving procedures, material replenishment of production lines and other warehouse and inventory management processes.  Quality processes – At-line sampling and inspection control, containment procedures, Six Sigma, ISO 9000, corrective and preventive actions, change management with regulatory compliance.  Maintenance processes – Maintenance procedures and work instructions, such as periodic device control and calibration.  IT processes – Information integration workflows, such as reporting production (good quantity, scrap quantity, machine time) against order to ERP.  Supply chain processes – Orchestration of enterprise manufacturing processes, including collaboration with departments and trading partners.  Lean processes – Value Stream mapping, best practices standardization and other Lean initiatives to reduce waste.  Kanban processes – Manages supply replenishment from the point of consumption in production to sourcing in the supply chain. Figure 2: Manufacturing process management is Gartner’s term for linking operations execution with ERP and PLM.8 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 9. End-to-End Manufacturing ProcessesIt is vital to understand that “process” in the full context of manufacturing operations is morethan production routings and recipes, which are examples of just production processes. Aplatform for true operations execution should include quality, maintenance, labor and otherfunctions, to then integrate cross-functional tasks such as material synchronization or Just inTime inventory planning strategies. Manufacturing BPM emphasizes viewing processes end-to-end, not as disconnected single-function procedures. End-to-end processes inherentlycross functions, departments and actors within the enterprise. Bringing all of these activitiestogether under the umbrella of a single BPM framework is critical to optimizing operationalperformance.End-to-end processes are beyond the scope of most Manufacturing Execution Systems. Aspreviously mentioned, a typical MES process is a routing or recipe for production activities.Routings interconnect pieces of equipment supporting the process as materials are movedfrom one location to another and either produced or assembled. Routings encapsulate thework instructions, setup, calibrations and materials required to do the job, and may includeadditional tasks like QA inspections. (See Figure 3).Once a routing is complete it will dictate the next work center the material (Lot, Serial, WorkOrder) needs to move to. Unfortunately, the realities of the shop floor are not only morecomplex than a typical routing can support, but are constantly changing as well. Routings arefocused on the primary piece of equipment to be used at the time of the job. They do notconsider the skills and the subtleties required to move material around the shop floor.The actual end-to-end process involves more than just the routing. Production activities arepart of the process, but they execute in a process context that also involves logistics, materialshandling, maintenance and quality. Manufacturing BPM looks at the complete process and allthe stakeholders. Production is just one “swim lane” in the end-to-end model (See Figure 4).In BPM, the model defines how actions are executed and decisions are made, and whereresponsibility is handed off between functions. Such a model also provides a more flexible andaccurate description of equipment setup and materials acquisition than a typical MES routing. Production OP-010 / Equip_1 Equip_1 OP-020 / Equip_2 Equip_2 •Setup •Setup •Tools •Tools •Calibrations •Calibrations •Material Req’ts •Material Req’ts •Inspection Req’ts •Inspection Req’ts •Work Instructions •Work Instructions •Move Location •Move Location Figure 3: Routings or “plans” represent just the production aspects of the end-to-end process.9 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 10. Figure 4: End-to-end operations processes involve multiple departments and systems.With a routing, these tasks are tied to the particular machine, but in reality they are performedby different personnel using different equipment. Thus the actual production process is farmore than machine setup, but must coordinate a range of resources, expertise and demandsacross the plant.To be a world-class manufacturer, you need a system that truly represents how operations areexecuted and allows you to visualize measure and improve your processes, end-to-end. Youneed a system based on manufacturing BPM.Unified Design and Runtime EnvironmentsApplying BPM to operations execution requires more than just tools for modeling cross-functional activities. It also demands a unified environment for defining all aspects of processexecution – activity flow, user interface, policies and rules, integration, BAM, staging anddeployment – as well as a unified runtime environment for all of these aspects as well.A manufacturing operations solution built from a unified data model, such as Apriso’s FlexNet,can provide such an environment. Featuring a unified data model, the FlexNet platform offersone user interface to build, manage and maintain business processes, which is typically notpossible with other MES offerings today.For example, most software providers define production routings in the MES, but specifymachine control and SCADA in separate applications and quality workflows in a third system.Often these systems were originally designed as standalone components. As such, they canhave different architectures, data models, user interfaces and programming models. Whilethese vendors may provide some loose integration of their applications under a common“branding,” such architecture cannot achieve the objectives of true BPM.10 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 11. Complex and Adaptive FlowsWithin a BPM platform applied to the manufacturing environment, process actions can betriggered from virtually any source: human action, machine, web service or inbound XMLmessage. Most traditional MES products can only model linear production routings; however,BPM can enable the modeling of real-world end-to-end activity flows, offering multiple optionsfor conditional branching, parallel splits and merging.Historically, applications like PLM and ERP have implemented an oversimplified static view ofprocess routings (also called process plans). But in the BPM world, the routing is where therubber meets the road in production, where system behavior is determined by the precise stateof the process – the process step, the state or context of the user or machine. Thus, withBPM, routings or process plans mean much more than they used to in the PLM/ERP world.Moreover, the end-to-end process goes beyond routings to include activities in other parts ofthe plant.With manufacturing BPM, process definitions must also adapt to exceptions and change. Forexample, a released process might need to be modified quickly to handle an active productionorder. Because manufacturing BPM externalizes the flow logic in a diagram, you can build aprocess to add a new step such as in-line rework to a released process, test and deploy it as anew version, and move in-process items from the open work order to the new deployedversion, often in less than an hour.Integration to Enterprise SystemsBeyond human tasks, BPM must integrate directly with databases, enterprise applications, andplant machinery in a unified fashion. When evaluating potential manufacturing BPM solutions,it is advisable to select a system that can support the execution of SQL queries to populateuser screens or govern flow logic, as part of the integration with backend business systems.For example, an ideal solution will integrate directly with ERP from SAP, Oracle and otherleading vendor applications to import order details or execute both ERP transactions and thoseprocesses that directly control machinery on the shop floor.Moreover, manufacturing BPM is used not just at the plant level, but also to facilitatecollaboration with customers and supply chain partners. Best in class providers will supportpopular integration middleware (e.g., IBM Web Sphere, Microsoft BizTalk and SAP XI) for B2Bmessage delivery; the process is controlled by BPM, not the middleware. That is becauseprocess success depends on more than reliable message passing, and is equally affected bythe actions of people, machinery, and other asynchronous events. Traditionally, integrationtechnology has focused on individual short-running transactions, not the end-to-end processwhere the real business logic resides and where real business performance is determined.BPM treats the end-to-end process as an integrated system, and is better able to automateB2B interactions.11 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 12. Manufacturing BPMfor the Global EnterpriseWhen selecting a BPM platform for creating and managing manufacturing processes, you mustconsider the global framework typical of today’s manufacturing environments. Creating aprocess to run efficiently in one location is important, but hardly sufficient when production,warehousing and quality control processes may span multiple locations, continents, time zonesor languages.Process models – templates for actual process execution – are mission-critical and must becarefully governed at the enterprise level. That includes testing and staging from developmentto test, pilot and production servers. In today’s manufacturing enterprise, you need nativeBPM tools to support model sharing and lifecycle management not only across development,QA and production, but across various plant locations and centralized centers of excellence.Effective manufacturing BPM solutions can streamline the management, control and change ofmanufacturing operations to ensure that the right documents and work instructions are at theright place when needed. This importance becomes even more critical with global processes,ensuring they are deployed to individual workstations or throughout the enterprise withoutrecoding or bringing the system down. Best practices developed and refined in one locationcan then be deployed throughout the company.When configurations across the enterprise need to be updated, best in class solutionsautomatically gather that information into some sort of package, so that it can then manage thedeployment to multiple locations, simplifying an otherwise tedious and time-consuming task.Making manufacturing process solutions upgradeable, transportable and supportable long-term requires attention to global deployment just as much as initial design (see Figure 5).Another factor to consider includes whether or not a history is maintained on “as-designed”and “as-deployed” data, to then support electronic revision control and approval (throughelectronic digital signatures, as needed) while supporting global deployment of best practices.In addition, the system needs to support internal governance concerns and challenges, suchas documenting approval for new process deployments.Monitoring Global PerformanceEvaluating a global “best-in-class” process requires some sort of global performance visibilityand measurement, which can be found within aggregated events and log data. Thisinformation can provide a source to display Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), ideally withingraphical management dashboards of charts and alerts. Also referred to as Business ActivityMonitoring (BAM), some vendors may implement BAM as a standalone technology. However,it is much more powerful when integrated within a BPM platform.12 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 13. Process Authoring Tests COE Deploy Deploy Deploy Develpoment Test Master Environment Environment Environment Deploy Production Plants Lathrop, CA Sandomierz, Poland Vas to, ItalyFigure 5: An effective approach to global process management starts with a Center ofExcellence, providing centralized management of process deployment and governance at theenterprise levelOne reason is that performance problems identified by BAM can be traced to a particular stepin the process, facilitating rapid resolution. Real-time feedback is available as problems occur.Employees on the shop floor can track their own performance, in real-time. Simply viewing aperformance issue won’t allow rapid resolution.An even bigger reason is that BPM provides a platform to fix problems identified by BAM.Investigative and corrective workflows can by initiated from the BAM dashboard as a manualor automated response. For example, BPM can reroute work for exception handling,automatically notify customers and suppliers or take any other user-specified corrective action.Moreover, the results of corrective action can be fed back into revised process designs andrapidly implemented for continuous performance improvement.Integrating BAM with BPM, however, requires the BAM tool to support BPM values such as anintuitive business-oriented user interface and the flexibility to vary metric definitions by workcenter and product. Manufacturing BPM provides the framework for capturing application andmachine events and a graphical process context for them, but BAM needs to be able tocorrelate those events for use in calculating metrics, filter and aggregate them in metrics andKPIs, link them in drilldown views, analyze historical trends, and manage the actions triggeredwhen KPIs drift out of their target range.13 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 14. ConclusionInnovation, efficiency, compliance, agility and end-to-end performance visibility – not tomention cost savings, IT simplification and reuse, and shared best practices … these provenbenefits of BPM in the office environment are needed just as badly in manufacturingoperations. Production requirements are diverse and continually changing, demandingconfiguration of manufacturing processes to be quick and easy to change. True BPM providesthat.Agility and innovation are improved when business and IT collaborate based on a commonview of the solution. True BPM is business empowering, with a single process model sharedby process modelers and developers.Compliance and standardization demand execution flows based on rules, with audit trails andKPI monitoring. True BPM provides this, without losing the ability to adapt on the fly.Optimizing cost and performance requires managing the process end-to-end, includingintegration with ERP and PLM. True BPM provides a unified integration platform, instrumentedwith BAM for end-to-end monitoring and real-time remediation.In manufacturing execution, end-to-end processes are more than routings and recipes, andBPM means more than just modeling. It means execution of the model and monitoringperformance end-to-end. Solutions now exist to apply this expanded scope of manufacturingBPM to offer a dynamic platform for operations execution capable of capturing the benefitshighlighted within this paper.14 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM)
  • 15. About AprisoApriso Corporation is a software company dedicated to providing competitive advantage for itscustomers. It does so by enabling organizations to adapt quickly and easily to market changesand unexpected events. Since 1992, Apriso has been helping companies improvemanufacturing performance by providing visibility into, control over and synchronization acrossmanufacturing operations – both within and in coordination across –plants and the productsupply network. Some of the world’s largest and most successful manufacturers haveleveraged Apriso’s unique combination of software solutions and expertise to transform theirmanufacturing operations to achieve and sustain manufacturing excellence.As an adaptive platform for manufacturing operations management, FlexNet managesproduction, quality, warehouse, maintenance and labor processes to provide visibility into,control over and synchronization across global manufacturing operations. Built with a nativeBusiness Process Management (BPM) framework that incorporates a unified data model,FlexNet applications enable continuous improvement and rapid response to market changes.FlexNet delivers a global view of manufacturing operations by utilizing a Service OrientedArchitecture (SOA) to ease integration with enterprise applications, such as ERP and PLM,while interfacing with the shop floor and automation equipment.Apriso serves 180+ customers in 40+ countries across the Americas, Europe and Asia. Itscustomers include General Motors, Lear, Honeywell, LOréal, Trixell, Lockheed Martin, BectonDickinson, Saint-Gobain, Novelis and Essilor. For more information, please go towww.apriso.com.15 Manufacturing Business Process Management (BPM) www.apriso.com

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