Climate change action strategies

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Climate change action strategies presented to BOMA Cleveland luncheon on Feb. 24, 2009.

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Climate change action strategies

  1. 1. Climate Change Action Strategies Brad Chase bchase@cmnh.org February 24, 2009
  2. 2. Outline • About GCBL - Climate Change Project • Cleveland Carbon Fund • CO2 Emissions Overview – US, Ohio, NEO • Building Sector CO2 Emissions • Action Plans, BOMA Goals • CMNH – Inventory, Energy Audit, Actions • Questions 2
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  7. 7. Partners 7
  8. 8. Cleveland Carbon Fund • Community Partners – Sustainability program and goals – Commitment to reducing emissions and promoting Fund within organization and with customers – Contact bchase@cmnh.org for more information 8
  9. 9. CO2 Emissions Overview 9
  10. 10. Source: http://media.learningfundamentals.com.au/combating-global-warming-map.jpg CO2 Stabilization Triangle 10
  11. 11. CO2 Stabilization Wedges Examples of Wedges: 1. Efficient vehicles 2. Reduced use of vehicles 3. Efficient buildings 4. Efficient coal power plants 5. Gas instead of coal power plants 6. Capture CO2 at baseload power plant 7. Nuclear power for coal power 8. Wind power for coal power 9. PV power for coal power 10. Capture CO2 at H2 plant 11. Capture CO2 at coal-to- synfuels plant 12. Wind H2 in fuel-cell car for gasoline in hybrid car Source: Princeton Stabilization Wedges, http://www.princeton.edu/~cmi/resources/stabwedge.htm 11
  12. 12. US emits 7 billion tons of CO2 equivalents per year (excluding land use and forestry changes) Source: Map, Vulcan Project . Data, WRI, CAIT 2000. 12
  13. 13. Perspective… The United States emits 20% of world’s CO2 emissions. 13
  14. 14. “The Midwest is responsible for 5 percent of global GHGs – a contribution larger than all countries, except China, Russia, and India”1 Ohio: 280 – 300 Million Tons of CO2 e emissions 1. Charting the Midwest: An Inventory and Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in America’s Heartland, World Resources Institute, October 2007, p.2. 14
  15. 15. U.S. Energy Use INDUSTRY 25% TRANSPORTATION 27% BUILDINGS 48% Source: Energy Information Administration Statistics (Architecture 2030) 15
  16. 16. Collateral Benefits of Action • Climate Change is the big issue, but sustainable development practices can help achieve other goals related to: – Air emissions – Stormwater runoff – Materials conservation – Land and habitat conservation – Save $ – Economic and community development 16
  17. 17. Northeast Ohio Emissions 17
  18. 18. Northeast Ohio CO2 Emissions by Sector 18
  19. 19. 7-County Buildings Emissions 19
  20. 20. Energy Pricing Trends Solar Photovoltaic Industry: Solar PV industry outlook and economics Deutsche Bank, May 27, 2008 20
  21. 21. How many nuclear plants would we need in 2030? http://www.gcbl.org/energy/regional-agenda/climate-change/transition-plans/energy-transition-plan/can-nuclear-power-meet-our-needs-for-co2- free-powe 21
  22. 22. U.S. mid-range abatement curve (McKinsey – 2030) Abatement cost <$50/ton Cost Commercial Residential Afforestation buildings – buildings – Real 2005 dollars per ton CO2e of cropland HVAC HVAC equipment equipment 90 Coal power plants– efficiency efficiency CCS rebuilds with EOR Industrial Residential Fuel economy process Coal mining – Solar CSP buildings – Active forest Distributed packages – Light improve- Methane management Shell solar PV 60 trucks ments mgmt retrofits Residential electronics Commercial Commercial Nuclear buildings – Residential buildings – new- Combined water Control build 30 Residential heat and heaters systems buildings – power Lighting 0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.2 Potential Onshore wind – Gigatons/year -30 Onshore wind – Industry – Low penetration CCS new Industry – High penetration builds on Combined carbon- heat and Biomass power – intensive -60 power Cofiring processes Cellulosic Manufacturing – biofuels Existing power Car hybridi- HFCs mgmt Coal power plants – CCS plant zation -90 Residential new builds with EOR conversion buildings – efficiency Onshore wind – Medium New shell improvements Coal-to-gas Commercial penetration improvements shift – dispatch of electronics Conservation -120 Winter existing plants tillage Commercial cover crops buildings – Coal power plants – CFL lighting Reforestation CCS rebuilds -230 -220 Commercial buildings – Commercial LED lighting buildings – Afforestation of Natural gas Coal power New shell pastureland and petroleum plants – CCS Fuel economy improvements systems new builds packages – Cars management Source: McKinsey analysis 22
  23. 23. BOMA Goals • Decrease energy consumption 30% by 2012 • Benchmark with Energy Star • Education • Perform energy audit • Extend equipment life • Lead in community • Position as leaders and solution providers 23
  24. 24. Energy Star Program • Homes are at least 15% more energy efficient than homes built to the 2004 International Residential Code (IRC), and include additional energy-saving features that typically make them 20–30% more efficient than standard homes. • “Tried and True” approach. • Utilize existing and proven technologies to achieve: – Effective Insulation – High Performance Windows – Building and Duct Sealing – Efficient HVAC Systems – Efficient Products – Third Party Verification (Builder Option Package – choose climate specific solutions) Commercial and industrial facilities are scored on a 1- 100 scale and those facilities that achieve a score of 75 or higher are eligible for the ENERGY STAR, indicating that they are among the top 25% of facilities in the country for energy performance. Source: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=new_homes.nh_features 24
  25. 25. Energy Star Program Results Energy Star Program Key Indicators Indicator 2000 2006 Products Sold 600 million 2 billion + Product Categories 40 50+ Qualified Products Product Models 11,000 40,000 Public Awareness 40% 68% Retailers (partners) 25 900 New Homes Built 25,000 725,000 New Homes Home Builders 1,600 3,500 Buildings Rated 4,200 30,000 Commercial Buildings Buildings Labeled 545 3,200 Energy Saved (kWh) 62 billion 170 billion Annual Results Net Savings (USD) $5 billion $14 billion 25
  26. 26. Energy Star Program 2007 Energy Star Homes by State Over 120,000 new homes earned the ENERGY STAR in 2007. This is equivalent to: Eliminating the emissions from 60,000 vehicles Saving 355,680,000 lbs of coal Planting 97,000 acres of trees Saving home owners $54 million on their utility bills Source: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=qhmi.showHomesMarketIndex 26
  27. 27. Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) HERS Index Reference Home Reference Home is assigned a HERS Score Index of 100, while a net zero energy home is assigned a HERS Index of 0 Reference Home 2006 International Energy Basis Conservation Code (IECC) Each 1% increase in energy Scale efficiency corresponds to a 1-point decrease in HERS Index Energy Use Heating, cooling, water heating, Considered lighting, appliances, and onsite power generation* ENERGY STAR HERS Index of 85 in climate zones Requirement 1–5 HERS Index of 80 in climate zones 6–8 Approved by the RESNET Board of Status Directors. 27
  28. 28. Cleveland Museum of Natural History Carbon Footprint Energy Audit Action Steps 28
  29. 29. CMNH Carbon Footprint (2007) Energy Consumption eCO2 (MMBtu) (Metric Tonnes) % Scope 1 Other On-Campus Stationary 9,373.3 495.9 10.88% Direct Transportation 129.9 9.3 0.20% Refrigerants - 322.3 7.07% Scope 1 Totals 9,503.22 827.55 18.15% Scope 2 Purchased Electricity 35,352.60 2,951.60 64.73% Scope 2 Totals 35,352.60 2,951.60 64.73% Scope 3 Faculty/ Staff Commuting 2,375.30 170.8 3.75% Volunteer Commuting 300.3 21.6 0.47% Faculty/Staff Air Travel 913.1 179.9 3.95% Other Directly Financed Travel 646.8 46.5 1.02% Solid Waste - 70.2 1.54% Scope 2 T&D Losses 3,496.40 291.9 6.40% Scope 3 Totals 7,731.90 780.9 17.12% TOTAL 52,587.80 4,560.1 100.00% GreenCityBlueLake Institute Analysis utilizing Clean Air-Cool Planet Calculator 29
  30. 30. CMNH Electricity Audit CMNH Hours of Operation vs. Electricity Consumption 600 600,000 2008 Hours of Operation 500 2008 kWh 500,000 18 yr Average kWh 2007 kWh 2005 kWh 400 400,000 Hours of Operation kWh 300 300,000 200 200,000 100 100,000 0 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Month 30
  31. 31. CMNH Electricity Audit • Lighting Load (25% of total) 31
  32. 32. CMNH Electricity Audit • Motors / HVAC (65% of total) 32
  33. 33. CMNH Electricity Audit • Plug Load (10% of total) 33
  34. 34. CMNH Action Steps 34
  35. 35. Questions 35
  36. 36. How effective do you think the carbon credits or renewable energy credits can be? 36
  37. 37. How effective do you think the carbon credits or renewable energy credits can be? 37
  38. 38. What impact can we make by planting trees or by not cutting them down to vacuum up the CO2 in the atmosphere? • Each acre of land can absorb between .5 and 5 tons of CO2 per year depending on plantings and soil 38
  39. 39. How significant is the removal of tropical rainforests and other forests compared to automobile exhaust in terms of rising CO2 levels? 39
  40. 40. Brad Chase bchase@cmnh.org http://www.gcbl.org 40

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