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Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation
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Open Data Cities - SpacEx presentation

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Presentation that I gave about the Open Data Cities project that I lead for FutureEverything at SpacEx Gallery in Exeter on the 18th June 2011

Presentation that I gave about the Open Data Cities project that I lead for FutureEverything at SpacEx Gallery in Exeter on the 18th June 2011

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  • I lead the Open Data Cities and DataGM programme for FutureEverything. I am also very interested in how people can create, take ownership of, augment and challenge official data.\n
  • FutureEverything is based in Manchester UK and has been established for 16 years. It started out being a festival of mostly music and art and has since developed into a cutting edge, international conference looking at the societal impact of technology and mapping various future outcomes, an international art and technology award and year a round digital innovation lab.\nThe Open Data Cities project is one such lab that was born out of the then ‘Futuresonic’ conference in 2009\nDISRUPTIVE - I think the project came about because of that\n
  • This is Manchester - often what likes to consider itself as the ‘Original Modern’ City. The worlds first industrial city. A city where the individual was subsumed into the industrial machine and the system of capital - Which lead to this\n
  • This is a map that Frederich Engels created whilst he was working in his father’s mill in Ancoats, Manchester. It is through this mapping of the inequities of the industrial city that prompted him to write ‘The Plight of the Working Classes’. Which through his friendship with Karl MArx lead to Das Kapital and the Communist Manifesto\nThe Open Data Cities project arose out of a question. How would cities evolve if all information was openly available. Would a city evolve in the same way? Would the asymmetries that we find in the cities of today still exist and would they be diminished, shifted or exaggerated.\n\n
  • The infrastructure of the city has traditionally been seen as the material, the roads, the buildings, parks and lakes. With the Open Data city we are looking for and at the immaterial. 'Immaterials' (Matt Jones), formless dimensions in our daily environments such as data and wifi clouds. The data dimension is immaterial, it affects everything, and yet we cannot reach out and touch it.\nThis dimension of the immaterial effects the way that the city operates.\n
  • This immaterial, the data could be considered the lifeblood of the modern technologised city. It tracks evidences and informs\nData is the plural of datum\n\n
  • Example of the immaterial viewed by Aaron Koblin. Interpreted.\nThis is what Amsterdam looks like on Queens Day. These were tracks of SMS messages - Visualised by artist Aaron Koblin - It interprets the underlying data structure. It suggests another world. A glimpse of the data dimension \n
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  • So as far as the Open Data Cities project was concerned.\nDefining what the city. This would have a number of impacts\n1. Addressing what what we perceived to be the functioning city - Work, rest and play\n2. More people potentially greater market for products that are developed out of Open Data.\n3. This was for all of Greater Manchester than just one borough\n4. Have to talk to 10 local authorities and the pan-regional public bodies\n
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  • FutureEverything sees itself as a grassroots organisation and although it has an international presence and works with many institutions, companies and public bodies, it is sustained by the various communities that engage with it.\nCommunity focus was key and it was essential that the project engaged with, created and spoke to as many communities as possible. These could be loosely described as ‘Data Users’ - People who would eventually create services and applications out of data that would be released. It was essential to engage with and sustain this community as we had to prove demand in the system for data release.\n‘Data Managers’ - People who had day to day contact with data. Often the people who we thought would know about data didn’t. We had a great deal of help from people who dealt with FOI requests\n‘Executive’ - Initially these people were difficult to engage. It was through persistence and being awarded a small amount of funding that we managed to get their ear.\nWe did not try and engage member as we were wary of making open data in Greater Manchester a party political issue.\n
  • What are the costs of maintaining a closed system?\nDeveloping narratives that are relevant to each community so that they understand the benefits\nDealing with the arguments such as those tabled by the command and control brigade\n
  • What are the costs of maintaining a closed system?\nDeveloping narratives that are relevant to each community so that they understand the benefits\nDealing with the arguments such as those tabled by the command and control brigade\n
  • What are the costs of maintaining a closed system?\nDeveloping narratives that are relevant to each community so that they understand the benefits\nDealing with the arguments such as those tabled by the command and control brigade\n
  • What are the costs of maintaining a closed system?\nDeveloping narratives that are relevant to each community so that they understand the benefits\nDealing with the arguments such as those tabled by the command and control brigade\n
  • What are the costs of maintaining a closed system?\nDeveloping narratives that are relevant to each community so that they understand the benefits\nDealing with the arguments such as those tabled by the command and control brigade\n
  • The establishing of the Open Data Manchester community was key to opening up data. The idea that there was a community of people who were eager to create stuff was appealing to a number of data holders. We were particularly keen on getting hold of data that would have potential ‘quality of life’ impact and would get positive press coverage. TfGM - formerly GMPTE - dipped their toe in the water and made their entire bus timetable database open. Which through a hackcamp created a number of transport applications. This eventually encouraged TfGM to commit to making other data open.\n
  • A lot of data that gets released is in a format that - even though is machine readable - needs a lot of work on it to make it useable\nThese are some of the public transport related datasets for Manchester. \n
  • The project has now evolved into DataGM. Which is a partnership led by Trafford Council and FutureEverything\n
  • Mapnificent from Berlin - open data isn’t constrained by geography. Stefan, who designed Mapnificent said that he had never been to Manchester, but would like to visit\n
  • The creation of a sustainable ecology that promotes release of data\nMuch of the work we do with DataGM and the Open Data Cities project is to sustain this ecology which is the area below the pink dotted line\n
  • Not all data is commercial organisations create huge databases that map trends and inform strategy - should we have access to this - other data.\nWhen we public tasks such as the traditional 10 yearly long form census are ending should citizens have access to the data from commercial sources that will replace it. After all this data will inform public policy\n
  • Crowdflow.net. This was data that no-one knew was being collected. If you owned an Apple iPhone you probably weren’t aware that the phone was tracing your every movement by identifying which and WiFi networks and phone transmitters the phone was logging into. When this file was found a group in Germany designed a script that could allow people to donate their data which allowed this mapping. Closed data being opened\n
  • The citizen as data node - In this example, the citizen isn’t a data node but it is a commercial model that creates business by aggregating comments from people\nThis is a simple way that people increase value by submitting data/information\n
  • Enthusiasts with the right equipment download a script and donate their data to FlightRadar24.com - The data collected isn’t publicly available\n
  • Why is citizen generated data so important.\nIt allows data to be collected that would otherwise not be there. The yawning gap of statistical evidence - Pachube pronounced patchbay\n
  • Fukishima - Platforms such as Pachube came into their own after the recent tsunami. With the subsequent meltdowns at Fukashima Pachube radiation monitoring nodes were created that augmented and challenged the official radiation figures being released\n
  • Artists and designers exist in the domain of constant interpretation. The arts can be disruptive, allowing problems, challenges and opportunities to be viewed in new ways; engaging and informing audiences - creating debate. They can inform a conceptual shift in the way that problems are approached and allow a more agile rather than process based way of working. The Feltron reports are a visualisation of one persons decisions, relations and travels released every year.\n
  • Allowing new ways of interpretation\nNatalie Miebach - Duet of blizzards and hurricane Noel\nGathering weather observations from specific ecosystems using very simple data-collecting devices, Miebach translates meteorological data into woven sculptures and wall pieces that function both as musical scores and weather almanacs. Data doesn’t always have to manifest itself in the digital domain\n
  • As far as the initial question as to whether cities would evolve differently if all information was made open. The answer at the moment is that the asymmetries would still exist and they could become amplified. It is incumbent on ourselves to make sure that this doesn’t happen. FutureEverything amongst others, is working on ways that can enhance Data Literacy in communities through working with artists, designers and educationalists. As we move into a world where being able to understand and navigate through this data becomes more important, these data skills will become essential.\n
  • Transcript

    • 1. Open Data Cities - SpacExJulian Tait @JulianlstarFutureEverything - http://futureeverything.org
    • 2. Welcome to ManchesterThe Original Modern City
    • 3. The city and its infrastructure
    • 4. What is Data?"Data are often viewed as the lowestlevel of abstraction from whichinformation and then knowledge arederived"- Wikipedia
    • 5. Aaron Koblin
    • 6. Three Data TypesPublic Data - Data that is collected by public bodies on ourbehalf to carry out their functionNon Public Data - Data that is collected on proprietary and/or closed systemsCitizen Generated Data - Data that we create, that isspecific to ourselves.
    • 7. Conceptual overadministrative model of city Rochdale 206,500 Bolton Bury 262,400 183,300 Oldham 217,273 Wigan 305,500 Salford 218,000 Tameside Manchester 215,500 483,800 Trafford 211,800 Stockport 281,000Population 2.6 million
    • 8. Three questions...Manchester a leader in service andapplication innovationThe City Region create a uniqueopportunity to develop Open DataCreation of a more equitable city
    • 9. Project principles...Data to be made Open and freelyavailableAddressing the whole city regionPragmatism over definedmethodology
    • 10. THREE COMMUNITIES Data users Data managers Executive Not members
    • 11. OpenData Cities
    • 12. THE COST OF A CLOSED SYSTEMOpenData Cities
    • 13. THE COST OF A CLOSED SYSTEM Greater Manchester £4-5 million?OpenData Cities
    • 14. Building momentum
    • 15. Sometimes things dont relate
    • 16. PartnershipTraffordManchesterSalfordBuryRochdaleBoltonWiganStockportOldhamTamesideTfGMNHSFire and RescuePoliceDeveloper CommunityFutureEverything
    • 17. Non-public data
    • 18. Non-public data made public
    • 19. Citizen generated dataThe citizen as data node
    • 20. Citizen generated data - closed
    • 21. Citizen generated data - open...and the internet of things
    • 22. Art and data
    • 23. Will asymmetries still exist? YESOpenData Cities

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