Teacher Pay Reform Presentation 120409

456 views
421 views

Published on

David Plank and Jeff Camp made a presentation to the annual meeting of the California School Boards Association in San Diego on December 4, 2009. Their session was entitled "Teacher Pay Reform: Are you ready to innovate?"

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
456
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Teacher Pay Reform Presentation 120409

  1. 1. Thanks for being here today. When we arranged, nearly a year ago, to speak here on the subject of Teacher Pay Reform, we had no idea that the timing would be so urgent or the opportunity so large. School boards typically operate within a certain defined range of influence, and it’s tough to change things in a really fundamental way. This year is different. 1
  2. 2. [Jeff] Moments like this don’t come every day, year or decade. Teacher pay is changing in America. You ran for school board to make change happen. YOU are the person to bring this change to your district. 2
  3. 3. The research is in. Teachers matter more than anything else in a child’s education. Good learning outcomes come first and foremost from effective teaching. As a school board leader focused on making better life outcomes for kids, your challenge, and your opportunity, is how to maximize the effectiveness of your teachers. This means a different mindset than business as usual. If the effectiveness of teachers really matters, what will you do differently to bring out the best in every teacher? 4
  4. 4. How many of you feel that teachers are primarily motivated by money? 5
  5. 5. 6
  6. 6. Changing pay is not a magic answer. Anybody who claims otherwise isn’t paying attention. 7
  7. 7. Still… money matters to people. If you change pay, you WILL have their attention. What you do with that is very much a question of leadership. 8
  8. 8. 9
  9. 9. BIG STATES, SMALL STATES NORTHERN STATES, SOUTHERN STATES URBAN DISTRICTS, RURAL DISTRICTS FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA NEW YORK, MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, INDIANA, ILLINOIS, MINNESOTA, NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA, LOUISIANA, ARKANSAS, TEXAS, COLORADO, ARIZONA AND EVEN CALIFORNIA! 10
  10. 10. In the literature about differentiation of compensation in schools, these are the four “elements” that are usually described. I’m going to use a few slides to shine light on each of these areas. Where I can, I intend to frame this part of my presentation in terms of questions. 11
  11. 11. District level program begun in 2004 Cooperative effort of Denver Public Schools and Denver Classroom Teachers Association Designed to link teacher pay to district mission and attract/retain high quality teachers in DPS Teachers paid on the basis of : 1) knowledge and skills; 2) teaching in hard-to-staff school and subjects; 3) good evaluations; 4) improved student scores on Colorado’s standardized test Depending on option, payments range from $400/year-$2,500/year All ProComp payments pensionable Teachers hired after 1/06 must be in ProComp Program funded by voter-approved local property tax Money set aside in trust jointly administered by district and union 12
  12. 12. District level program begun in 2007 Cooperative agreement between the NYC DOE and the United Federation of Teachers Participating schools must be designated “high need” and have approval of 55% of school faculty $3,000 per teacher group performance awards to schools that show growth on NY’s standardized test Money distributed by school-based Compensation Committee: 2 teachers, the principal, 1 principal designee 13
  13. 13. Nationwide program funded by participating districts Launched in 1999 by Milken Foundation; now part of National Institute for Excellence in Education Organized around 4 elements: 1. Multiple career paths (career teacher, master and mentor teachers) 2. Ongoing professional growth 3. Accountability through evaluation 4. Performance-based compensation 14
  14. 14. District level program funded by parcel tax (2008) Cooperative effort of the SFUSD and the UESF Program will: 1) raise beginning teachers’ salaries to nearly $50,000 per year; 2) raise all teachers salaries by $4,000-$6,000; 3) provide teachers in hard-to-staff schools ($2,000) and subjects ($1,000); 4)give one-time bonus of $2,500 and $3,000 after 4th and 8th years to stem attrition; 5) add 50 master teachers for $2,500 a year; 6) increase the number of PAR coaches; 7) give 20 schools that make the most progress a block grant of $30,000 15
  15. 15. 16
  16. 16. 17
  17. 17. Race To The Top Teacher quality and teacher distribution are key issues State grants MOUs with participating districts Teacher Incentive Fund Federally funded program begun in 2006 Funded at $99m annually through 2009 In 2010 budget, could be funded as high as $446m Competitive grant process for states and districts Program goals: 1) improve student achievement by improving principal and teacher effectiveness, and 2) increase the number of effective teachers in hard-to-staff schools RFP to be released soon 18
  18. 18. 19
  19. 19. 20
  20. 20. 21
  21. 21. 22
  22. 22. [Jeff] Moments like this don’t come every day, year or decade. Teacher pay is changing in America. You ran for school board to make change happen. YOU are the person to bring this change to your district. 23
  23. 23. 24
  24. 24. 25
  25. 25. Mostly, those who have taken the plunge say the water’s fine. 26

×