Kinds of tension...
1. Physical
2. Emotional
3. Psychological
 Tension tied to familiar, safe, and
mostly certain: Roller...
1. How do you define “progress”?
2. Are you optimistic about the future? If so, why? If not, why not?
3. What do you see a...
A bunch of starlings build a nest in the attic of a
family’s house, gaining access to the attic through a
torn vent screen...
Identifying Unstated Assumptions
*Every time you link a claim
with a reason, you make a
silent assumption that may
need to be articulated,
examined, and su...
Where do our assumptions about our
world come from?
How do they shape the way that we
respond to and—most importantly—
int...
One thing that informs our thinking (and
our assumptions): stories and repeated
story patterns....
“A hero ventures forth from the world of
common day into a region of supernatural
wonder: fabulous forces are there
encoun...
 The Odyssey
 The Lion,TheWitch, andTheWardrobe
 The Matrix
 StarWars
 Finding Nemo
 Spider Man
 Toy Story II,Toy S...
#1. The Call
The call to adventure is the point in a person's
life when they are first given notice that
everything is goi...
The Road of Trials
The road of trials is a series of tests, tasks,
or ordeals that the person must undergo to
begin the tr...
The Crossing of the First Threshold
This is the point where the person actually crosses into
the field of adventure, leavi...
The Belly of the Whale
The belly of the whale represents the final separation from the
hero's known world and self. It is ...
The Meeting with the Goddess
The meeting with the goddess represents the point in
the adventure when the person experience...
Atonement with the Father
In this step the person must confront and be initiated by
whatever holds the ultimate power in h...
Apotheosis
To apotheosize is to deify. When someone dies a
physical death, or dies to the self to live in spirit, he or
sh...
Refusal of the Return
So why, when all has been achieved, why come back to normal life with all
its cares and woes?
The Ma...
Beyond the Blockbuster
1960-1972 Hollywood blockbuster, mega-budget
films lost billions of dollars
1980—By 1980, large Hol...
#1. A Nixon-sponsored tax scheme
#2. Studios found ways to
integrate their business with
television, cable, record
compani...
#3. A new generation of film directors
emerged....and they succeeded financially:
The French Connection (1971)
The Godfa...
Who knew?
Studio decision makers decided to focus their
efforts on making mega-pictures, or
“blockbusters.”
Must-see movies...
Huge budgets
Popular, risk-averse topics
Massive merchandizing
Simple Scripts
Multiplexes
Economies of Scale
Calculated Releases
New acquisition mentality
“Keeping Up” and being “with it”
“Cultural buzz” and media-driven spectacle
“Flexibility wit...
“Since the late 1910s, Hollywood
cinema has constituted the world’s
primary tradition of visual
storytelling, and despite ...
“All art forms have certain
structural templates.”
•“A film’s main characters [...] should
pursue important goals and face...
•Actions should be bound into a tight chain of
cause and effect.
•Major events should be foreshadowed
(‘planted’), but not...
“If you want proof that contemporary Hollywood is
formula-ridden, look no further than Syd Field’s
‘Paradigm,’ with turnin...
~David Bordell
The 3-Act Structure
Act One: Introduces the problems faced
by the hero, ending with the crisis and the
promise of major co...
 What are the elements (or parts) that each of
these movie trailers have in common?
 Think, for example, in terms of mus...
http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi49546009/
http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3690267417/
http://www.cinemagia.ro/trailer/deep-impact-impact-nimicitor-3669/
http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi1665335321/
http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi2897608985/
 http://www.disastermovie.net/
Note the
contrast:
What else do you see as similar to each of these?
Font? Light? Content? Color?
Which one is entertaining?
Which one is terrifying?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20
101018/sc_livescience/2010tiedf...
http://inwildness.ning.com/forum
Individual
Laws
Society
Ethics
Individual
Society
Intersection = the overlap of two worlds, that specific to the narrative world of
characters/heroes and quest and that tie...
THE PROBLEM tied to climate-related disaster movies: this situation wherein the
emphasis on judgment is erased or overshad...
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Hollywood and climate change
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Hollywood and climate change

433
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
433
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hollywood and climate change

  1. 1. Kinds of tension... 1. Physical 2. Emotional 3. Psychological  Tension tied to familiar, safe, and mostly certain: Roller Coaster  Tension tied to familiar, safe, and somewhat uncertain: Turbulence on an airplane  Tension tied to the unfamiliar, unsafe and uncertain: lost in the woods and being chased by a bear
  2. 2. 1. How do you define “progress”? 2. Are you optimistic about the future? If so, why? If not, why not? 3. What do you see as threats to the environment? 4. Do you believe there is a connection between climate change and human behavior? 5. If you believe that climate change exists and that there is a connection between this change and human behavior, do you feel that the response among most individuals, communities, and countries has been sufficient? If so, how and why? If not, why do you think it has not been sufficient and what more needs to be done?
  3. 3. A bunch of starlings build a nest in the attic of a family’s house, gaining access to the attic through a torn vent screen. Soon the eggs hatch, and every morning at sunrise the family is awakened by the sound of birds squawking and wings beating against rafters as starlings fly in and out of the houses to feed the hatchlings. After losing considerably morning sleep, the family repairs the screen. Unable to get in and out, the parent birds are unable to feed their young. The birds die within a day. Is this cruelty to animals? Respond with either, “Yes, because...” or “No, because...” and provide 2-3 reasons (beginning with “because”).
  4. 4. Identifying Unstated Assumptions
  5. 5. *Every time you link a claim with a reason, you make a silent assumption that may need to be articulated, examined, and supported. Claim with reason: It was OK for the family to patch the screen and kill the starlings because the starlings are pests. Unstated assumptions:
  6. 6. Where do our assumptions about our world come from? How do they shape the way that we respond to and—most importantly— interpret situations, issues, and problems? How do our assumptions prevent us from working together to acknowledge, understand, and begin to solve problems?
  7. 7. One thing that informs our thinking (and our assumptions): stories and repeated story patterns....
  8. 8. “A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.” ~ Joseph Campbell
  9. 9.  The Odyssey  The Lion,TheWitch, andTheWardrobe  The Matrix  StarWars  Finding Nemo  Spider Man  Toy Story II,Toy Story III  UP!  Harry Potter
  10. 10. #1. The Call The call to adventure is the point in a person's life when they are first given notice that everything is going to change, whether they know it or not. Refusal of the Call Often when the call is given, the future hero refuses to heed it. This may be from a sense of duty or obligation, fear, insecurity, a sense of inadequacy, or any of a range of reasons that work to hold the person in his or her current circumstances.
  11. 11. The Road of Trials The road of trials is a series of tests, tasks, or ordeals that the person must undergo to begin the transformation. Often the person fails one or more of these tests, which often occur in threes.
  12. 12. The Crossing of the First Threshold This is the point where the person actually crosses into the field of adventure, leaving the known limits of his or her world and venturing into an unknown and dangerous realm where the rules and limits are not known. Supernatural Aid Once the hero has committed to the quest, consciously or unconsciously, his or her guide and magical helper appears, or becomes known.
  13. 13. The Belly of the Whale The belly of the whale represents the final separation from the hero's known world and self. It is sometimes described as the person's lowest point, but it is actually the point when the person is between or transitioning between worlds and selves. The separation has been made, or is being made, or being fully recognized between the old world and old self and the potential for a new world/self. By entering this stage, the person shows their willingness to undergo a metamorphosis, to die to him or herself.
  14. 14. The Meeting with the Goddess The meeting with the goddess represents the point in the adventure when the person experiences a love that has the power and significance of the all-powerful, all encompassing, unconditional love that a fortunate infant may experience with his or her mother. Woman as the Temptress At one level, this step is about those temptations that may lead the hero to abandon or stray from his or her quest, which as with the Meeting with the Goddess does not necessarily have to be represented by a woman.
  15. 15. Atonement with the Father In this step the person must confront and be initiated by whatever holds the ultimate power in his or her life. In many myths and stories this is the father, or a father figure who has life and death power. This is the center point of the journey. For the transformation to take place, the person as he or she has been must be "killed" so that the new self can come into being. Sometime this killing is literal, and the earthly journey for that character is either over or moves into a different realm.
  16. 16. Apotheosis To apotheosize is to deify. When someone dies a physical death, or dies to the self to live in spirit, he or she moves beyond the pairs of opposites to a state of divine knowledge, love, compassion and bliss. It is a period of rest before the hero begins the return. The Ultimate Boon The ultimate boon is the achievement of the goal of the quest. It is what the person went on the journey to get. All the previous steps serve to prepare and purify the person for this step, since in many myths the boon is something transcendent like the elixir of life itself, or a plant that supplies immortality, or the holy grail.
  17. 17. Refusal of the Return So why, when all has been achieved, why come back to normal life with all its cares and woes? The Magic Flight Sometimes the hero must escape with the boon, if it is something that the gods have been jealously guarding. It can be just as adventurous and dangerous returning from the journey as it was to go on it.
  18. 18. Beyond the Blockbuster 1960-1972 Hollywood blockbuster, mega-budget films lost billions of dollars 1980—By 1980, large Hollywood studios were earning incredible, almost unimaginable profit... 1. WHAT HAPPENED? 2. WHAT ARETHE LASTING EFFECTS OFTHIS SUCCESSON OURTHINKING?
  19. 19. #1. A Nixon-sponsored tax scheme #2. Studios found ways to integrate their business with television, cable, record companies, and home video. (More on this in a moment.)
  20. 20. #3. A new generation of film directors emerged....and they succeeded financially: The French Connection (1971) The Godfather (1972) American Graffiti (1973) Jaws (1975) Saturday Night Fever (1977) Star Wars (1977) Jaws earned $260 million (or 5,510,223,600 kroner today) Star Wars earned $307 million (or, 52,371,740.41 kroner today)
  21. 21. Who knew? Studio decision makers decided to focus their efforts on making mega-pictures, or “blockbusters.”
  22. 22. Must-see movies... Huge budgets Popular, risk-averse topics Massive merchandizing
  23. 23. Simple Scripts Multiplexes Economies of Scale Calculated Releases
  24. 24. New acquisition mentality “Keeping Up” and being “with it” “Cultural buzz” and media-driven spectacle “Flexibility within limits”
  25. 25. “Since the late 1910s, Hollywood cinema has constituted the world’s primary tradition of visual storytelling, and despite decades [of change], the tradition has remained true to its fundamental premises.” Here’s how—
  26. 26. “All art forms have certain structural templates.” •“A film’s main characters [...] should pursue important goals and face forbidding obstacles. •Conflict should be constant, across the whole film and within each scene.
  27. 27. •Actions should be bound into a tight chain of cause and effect. •Major events should be foreshadowed (‘planted’), but not so obviously that the viewer can predict them. •TENSIONshould rise in the course of the film UNTIL A CLIMAX RESOLVES ALL THE ISSUES.” ~The Way Hollywood Tells It: Story and Style in Modern Movies
  28. 28. “If you want proof that contemporary Hollywood is formula-ridden, look no further than Syd Field’s ‘Paradigm,’ with turning points absolutely required on pages 25-27 and 85-90.”
  29. 29. ~David Bordell
  30. 30. The 3-Act Structure Act One: Introduces the problems faced by the hero, ending with the crisis and the promise of major conflict...30 pages Act Two: Consists of an extended struggle between the protagonist and his or her problem, and it ends at a point of even more sever testing for the hero...60 pages Act Three: Shows the protagonist solving the problem...30 pages
  31. 31.  What are the elements (or parts) that each of these movie trailers have in common?  Think, for example, in terms of music, plot, light, color, speed, close-ups, establishing shots, character types, etc.
  32. 32. http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi49546009/
  33. 33. http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3690267417/
  34. 34. http://www.cinemagia.ro/trailer/deep-impact-impact-nimicitor-3669/
  35. 35. http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi1665335321/
  36. 36. http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi2897608985/
  37. 37.  http://www.disastermovie.net/
  38. 38. Note the contrast:
  39. 39. What else do you see as similar to each of these? Font? Light? Content? Color?
  40. 40. Which one is entertaining? Which one is terrifying? http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20 101018/sc_livescience/2010tiedforwarm estonrecordsofarhttp://articles.latimes.com/print/2010/aug/04/ opinion/la-oe-mckibben-climate-20100804
  41. 41. http://inwildness.ning.com/forum
  42. 42. Individual Laws Society
  43. 43. Ethics Individual Society
  44. 44. Intersection = the overlap of two worlds, that specific to the narrative world of characters/heroes and quest and that tied often implicitly to the world of the audience/viewer But, climate change the controversy about what causes it (and thus what causes climate time to accelerate) complicates this otherwise neat equation considerably. “The heroic quest is the privileged medium for this self-presentation. It, more than any other form, is the narrative of preoccupation” (43). The hero in the heroic quest affects time? “…every narrative combines two dimensions in various proportions, one chronological and the other nonchronological. The first may be called the episodic dimension, which characterizes how the story as made out events. The second is the configuralational dimension, according to that which the plot construes significant wholes out of scattered events. “Here I am borrowing from Louis O. Mink the notion of a configurational act, which he interprets as a ‘grasping together.’ I understand this act to be the act of the plot, as eliciting a pattern of succession. This act displays the character of a judgment or, more precisely, a reflective judgment in the Kantian sense of this term. “To tell and follow a story is already to reflect upon events in order to encompass them in successive wholes. This dimension is completely overlooked in the theory of history proposed by antinarrativist writers. They tend to deprive narrative activity of its complexity and, above all, of its twofold characteristic of confronting and combining both sequence and pattern in various ways.”
  45. 45. THE PROBLEM tied to climate-related disaster movies: this situation wherein the emphasis on judgment is erased or overshadowed by the implicit fact that to tell a story is to “reflect upon events in order to encompass them in successive wholes” means that, when we are being told a story, we assume that it is one told from a point in the future of the inset story, after all problems have been resolved, even though we experience a kind of anxiety and tension regarding how it will, in the end, end. This denies not only the narrative and narrative activity of its “complexity” but it also causes people in this world hearing about climate-related problems to practice the same kind of passive, simple thinking about problems: we assume, since we are being told about the problems, they will (and, truly, already have) be worked out. “The temporal implications of this twofold structure of the plot are so striking that we may already conjecture that narrative does more than just establish humanity, along with human actions and passions, ‘in’ time; it also brings us back from within- time-ness to historicality, from ‘reckoning with’ time to ‘recollecting’ it. As such, the narrative function provides a transition from within-time-ness to historicality” (44). These two temporal markers are key to our relationship to climate-change and how we formulate stories and narratives of and about it: are with within this time or are we after it, reflecting on it; are we reckoning with it or are recollecting it? I suspect it’s both, in most cases. If we are within it, we assume—as is customary when it comes to experiencing narratives—that this uncomfortable position with respect to the plot will soon give way to a more privileged post-plot position common to recollection.

×