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Health Information Exchange and eHealth - Creating Sustainable Healthcare Systems - Asia Pacific Region 2010
 

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A Frost & Sullivan whitepaper in partnership with HP Enterprise Services.

A Frost & Sullivan whitepaper in partnership with HP Enterprise Services.

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    Health Information Exchange and eHealth - Creating Sustainable Healthcare Systems - Asia Pacific Region 2010 Health Information Exchange and eHealth - Creating Sustainable Healthcare Systems - Asia Pacific Region 2010 Document Transcript

    • Health Information Exchange and e-Health—Creating Sustainable Healthcare SystemsAsia Pacific Region 2010 A Frost & Sullivan White Paper in Partnership with HP Enterprise Services
    • Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 3 Sustainability ................................................................................................... 4TABLE OF CONTENTS We Are All Stakeholders ................................................................................... 4 Health Information Exchange ......................................................................... 5 Underlying Challenge ...................................................................................... 5 Transforming Health Data into Knowledge-Driven Solutions ......................... 6 Key Issues and Healthcare Sustainability in Asia Pacific Countries ................ 6 Maintaining a Sustainable Health System ....................................................... 6 Juggling Healthcare Initiatives......................................................................... 7 Health Information Exchange and e-Health .................................................... 7 Viewing e-Health as an Enterprise System ...................................................... 7 Issues ............................................................................................................... 7 Convergence of e-Health and Health IT Priorities .......................................... 7 Leveraging Health Data................................................................................... 8 Access to Health Data..................................................................................... 8 Health Data Exchange .................................................................................... 9 Near-Term Opportunities ................................................................................ 9 Enabling Public Health Initiatives ................................................................... 9 Consumer Empowerment ................................................................................ 10 Stakeholder Roles ............................................................................................ 10 Barriers to Consumer Empowerment ............................................................... 10 Associated Benefits.......................................................................................... 10 Overview ......................................................................................................... 11 Transforming Health Data into Knowledge-Driven Solutions .......................... 11 Future Directions ............................................................................................ 12 Paradigm Shift ................................................................................................. 12 Sustainability................................................................................................... 12 New Business Models ...................................................................................... 13 Principal Drivers .............................................................................................. 14 Access and Security ......................................................................................... 14 Consumer Empowerment ................................................................................. 14 Acknowledgement of Collaborating Organizations......................................... 15 2 Frost & Sullivan
    • A sustainable health system relies on our ability to transform health data into knowledgeand knowledge into action to achieve cost-effective health outcomes on individual andpopulation levels. A sustainable healthcare system is one that meets current consumerdemands without reducing its capacity to provide for future generations.Advances in information and communication technologies have progressed enough toenable the electronic exchange of health data between service providers, consumers,and community stakeholders. The exchange of health information facilitates prevention,wellness, and chronic disease management. Health information exchange (HIE) is madepossible through e-health, the electronic exchange of patient data via healthinformation networks.EXECUTIVE SUMMARYA country’s economic growth is interminably intertwined with the health of itspopulation. A critical point is reached, however, when healthcare spending becomes aneconomic burden to individuals, communities, governments, and society at large. At thatjuncture, the sustainability of a country’s healthcare system is threatened and its economicgrowth endangered.The underlying challenge is to offer the right healthcare product/service to the right person atthe right place and time at the right price to achieve optimal health outcomes. HIE and e-health can meet this challenge as advancements in information, communication, and medicaltechnologies have dovetailed to create the tools. The missing element is a definitiveprocess—one that HP describes as a 360-Degree Healthcare Continuum.In 2010, Frost & Sullivan and HP sponsored a global exercise to lay the foundation for anopen dialogue on e-health, HIE, and sustainability. In focus groups and surveys, C-levelexecutives—representing a cross-section of stakeholders—shared their insights on keyissues, priorities, and processes, leveraging health data and consumer empowerment in theirindividual countries.In the Asia Pacific region, findings reflected the unique stakeholder environment in whichthese executives contend in 14 countries. These decision-makers cited healthcare financing,consumer demand for healthcare services exceeding the supply, and access to care aspredominant issues—those most important to achieving a sustainable health system in theirindividual countries.The decision-makers viewed e-health as an enterprise-wide capability, with electronicmedical/health/personal records, online medical information, and public health monitoringcritical to establishing HIE’s intrinsic role in achieving better health outcomes. Stakeholdercollaboration in planning and policy-making was vital in measuring ROI in terms of societalcosts and benefits versus total health.HIE is an intermediate endpoint leading to sustainable health systems. Frost & Sullivan 3
    • SUSTAINABILITYThere is a strong relationship between population health and economic growth anddevelopment. A healthy population may be considered a prerequisite for economicproductivity, prosperity, and sustainability.Health spurs community economic development directly and indirectly. Direct economicdevelopment results from healthcare services delivered by medical and non-medicalproviders. Those services would be paid for by consumers and private and governmentthird-party payers, with the latter bringing new dollars into the community. Indirecteconomic growth results from productivity levels driven by a healthy population.We Are All StakeholdersWe reach a critical point when spending on health and health-related conditions becomesa significant economic burden for individuals, families, businesses, and society at large. Theoperative words are “significant economic burden.” Spending is driven by a complex mazeof consumer demographics, expectations, and care-seeking behaviors on one hand; providersettings, practice protocols, and use of technologies for screening, diagnosis, treatment, andhealth maintenance are on the other hand. Economic burden relates to value—ability to pay,willingness to pay, and expected outcomes. Expected outcomes are measured in terms ofsafer care and healthier, productive lives.As stakeholders, we all share in the responsibility to maintain a sustainable health systemand a productive economy. Contributions to maintaining a sustainable health system takedifferent forms. For example, individuals are responsible for living healthy lifestyles andadopting healthy behaviors to maintain and/or improve health. Employers are responsiblefor providing a safe and healthy work environment; they may offer benefits such as healthand/or disability plans, prevention and wellness programs, and paid leaves.Government policy-makers and agencies are responsible for regulating and monitoringpublic health safety, funding entitlement programs, approving new medical/drugtechnologies, and so on. Government and private third-party health insurers, as payers,focus on risk, actuaries, reimbursement, costs, and cost efficiencies. In varying degrees, eachstakeholder is concerned with health and healthcare spending related to prevention andwellness, access to care, quality of care, and the inherent value in maintaining a betterquality of life.Stakeholder collaboration now has the potential to positively ease the complex maze ofhealthcare spending. Advances in information and communication technologies have mergedwith medical device innovations to capture real-time health data across physical boundaries.These technologies, with the essential infrastructure (broadband and/or private networks),provide the mechanisms to achieve sustainable health systems. Stakeholder utilization andcollaboration will provide the means via health information exchange. Frost & Sullivan 4
    • Health Information ExchangeHP describes the health information exchange process as a critical part of the 360-DegreeHealthcare Continuum—“moving pieces” centered on the following core priorities:knowledge distribution, consumer empowerment, performance improvement, streamlinedbusiness practices, and leveraged infrastructure and applications (see Figure 1).The Continuum accommodates diversity in healthcare financing (government versusprivate), access to care (multiple entry points), electronic practices (automatedprocesses to manage workflows, communications, and recordkeeping), and provision of care(in-person and real-time virtualization). It is solution-based to build and reinforcestakeholder trust; provide measurable, cost-effective results; and demonstrate value.The Continuum, however, does not infer linear functions. It involves a dynamic flowof health data that need to be transformed into knowledge to devise solutions—solutions to achieve cost-effective health outcomes on individual and population levels tofoster sustainability.Figure 1: The 360-Degree Healthcare Continuum Population Eligibility Health Community and Analysis and Family Enrollment Support Services Systems Co Emponsumer Customer Public Health werm Contact ent ca ed ns Systems Systems and pli ag tio Services Ap ever Streamlined Processes Business L 360-Degree Healthcare Continuum Payment Quality and Systems and Pe pr Benchmarking Im Incentives rfo ov rm em an ent ge wled ce Kno ribution Health Benefit D ist Information Design and and Electronic Consulting Health Services Records Care Pharmacy Management Management Source: HPUnderlying ChallengeThe challenge is not technology-oriented or technology-driven. The underlying challenge isin restructuring stakeholder relationships to support health information exchange thatgenerates health solutions. The underlying challenge is to provide health solutions that offerthe right product/service to the right person at the right place and time at the right price.To this end, HP and Frost & Sullivan partnered to explore and lay the foundation foran international dialogue on health system sustainability, e-health, and health Frost & Sullivan 5
    • information exchange in North America, Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), and the KEY ISSUESAsia Pacific countries.TRANSFORMING HEALTH DATA INTO KNOWLEDGE-DRIVEN SOLUTIONS “… costIn 2010, C-level executive stakeholders—representing government and private management—cutorganizations, healthcare providers (hospitals and physicians), third-party payers, and down of the expenseassociations (physician and consumer)—were invited to share their perspectives, insights, from governmentand plans by participating in an online survey. Questions focused on the five elements in insurance foundationHP’s 360-Degree Healthcare Continuum. …”One-hundred twelve organizations completed the survey. Findings were analyzed People’s Republicindependently and then compared to similar questions posed to chief information of Chinaofficers (CIOs) during a series of focus groups and interviews conducted by Frost & Sullivanindustry analysts in our North America, EMEA, and Asia Pacific offices in late 2009 andearly 2010. “… demand exceedsThis paper focuses on the insights and perceptions shared by 28 C-level executives from six supply; access to careAsia Pacific countries (Australia, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and People’s Republic through secondaryof China). This number comprises 11 survey respondents and 17 CIOs from the region who care hospitals;participated in focus groups and interviews. Survey respondents included ministers of reimbursementhealth, hospital providers, and government healthcare agencies/payers. The majority through medicaldescribed themselves as “C-level decision-makers.” insurance …”Of note, insights and responses appeared to be influenced by the extent of universal Indiahealthcare coverage in each country and the extent of governmental regulations, oversight,and financing of healthcare initiatives. “… demand due toKEY ISSUES AND HEALTHCARE SYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY IN ASIA population aging andPACIFIC COUNTRIES communityC-level executives were asked their opinions on issues affecting sustainability of the expectations; costhealthcare system in their individual countries and what issues their organizations were control; workforcespecifically addressing. Asia Pacific executives expressed thoughts similar to those of their shortages …”counterparts from North America and the EMEA countries. AustraliaComments focused on cost management, consumer demand outstripping the supplyof health services, access to care, and manpower constraints. In developing countries,health information technology (IT) was mentioned as a function of government policyand planning, requiring a national commitment and financial support to build a country-wide infrastructure.Maintaining a Sustainable Health SystemRecent Frost & Sullivan interviews of key healthcare thought leaders support publishedfindings that access to care, prevention and wellness activities, quality of healthcare, andcost management are the four principal ingredients to maintaining a sustainable healthsystem whether or not universal health coverage has been implemented. Survey Frost & Sullivan 6
    • participants were asked to rank these factors on a four-point scale of importance, with “4”being most important. Cost management received the highest average ranking (3.8),followed by prevention and wellness (3.6), access to care (3.5), and quality of care (3.4).Their counterparts in North America and the EMEA countries ranked quality of care asmost important.Juggling Healthcare InitiativesC-level executives were asked what advice they would give to those struggling to balancehealthcare initiatives to improve access to care and patient outcomes (quality healthcare)with cost-management directives. Survey respondents and focus group participants werereluctant to share their insights. Only ministers of health and government officialsresponded, advising that “healthcare quality comes at a cost,” while recognizing that eachcountry and region faces different challenges.HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE AND E-HEALTHViewing e-Health as an Enterprise SystemSixty-five percent of Asia Pacific survey respondents believed that e-health was bestdescribed as an enterprise system that did not follow a linear adoption and utilizationpathway. Of note, 75 percent of participants believed electronic medical records, electronichealth records, and public health monitoring were basic minimum requirements for asustainable health system. Less than half (46 percent) believed administrative functions suchas eligibility, claims, and processing were essential (see Figure 2).Figure 2: Minimum e-health components for health system sustainability Electronic Medical Records 75% Electronic Health Records 75% Public Health Monitoring EMRs and EHRs Prevention & 63% Physician Education & Training and Public Health 63% Wellness Activities Monitoring were 63% Clinical Decision Support considered essential 56% Personal Health Records e-Health components 50% Online Medical Information for a sustainable 50% Clinical Workflow health system. Comparison of 50% Patient Outcomes 50% Eligibility Claims & ProcessingIssuesC-level executives broadly described issues related to e-health and health informationtechnology in their survey responses and focus group discussions. Human manpowerconsiderations (capacity and motivation), affordability, and system development weremore of a concern than policy planning and data integrity. Unlike North American andEMEA survey participants, Asia Pacific respondents did not consider outcomedemonstration an issue.Convergence of e-Health and Health IT PrioritiesSurvey participants did not distinguish between e-health and health informationpriorities over the next 12 to 18 months. The need for government support was a central Frost & Sullivan 7
    • theme. In the less-developed countries, establishing hospital information systems wasviewed as critical.Figure 3: e-Health priorities Infrastructure Expansion IT Adoption and Utilization e-Health IT APPs Expansion Policy and Planning IT e-Health IT EMR/EHR Implementation Adoption and Utilization e-Health Integration and Collaboration ITLEVERAGING HEALTH DATAAccess to Health DataAs in North America and the EMEA countries, the debate over who should have access tohealth data continues. Concerns center on maintaining data integrity, security, andconfidentiality and the place of “raw” health data in a personal health record. Surveyrespondents were asked to select from nine groups those who should have open access tohealth data.Figure 4: Access to health data results Non-medical Healthcare Providers 0% Thumbs Down Private Insurance Companies 14% Healthy Consumers 29% Government Agencies 43% Caregivers 57% Public Health Agencies Thumbs Up 57% Primary Care Doctors 71% Medical Specialists 71% Patients 71% Hospitals 86% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%Clear lines were drawn. More than 85 percent of participants believed hospitals shouldhave open access to health data, with 71 percent extending open access to patients, primarycare doctors, and medical specialists. No one felt that non-medical health providers shouldhave access. Frost & Sullivan 8
    • Health Data ExchangeIn a similar vein, there are countless debates on who should be responsible for sharing,storing, and maintaining health data and then “control” after health information is shared.Should there be industry standards for health data exchange? Should data be shared in realtime? How does one accommodate integration demands?Using a seven-point scale to gauge level of responsibility, survey respondents believednational and local/regional government agencies should have a more responsible role thanhealthcare providers in sharing, storing, and maintaining health data. This finding was indirect contrast to that of North American and EMEA respondents.Figure 5: Health data exchange results Internet Provider 2.0 Thumbs Down Each Patient 2.2 Private Company 3.5 Health Info. Network of Hospitals 4.8 Each Patient’s Healthcare Provider Thumbs Up 5.0 Local/Regional Govt. Agency 6.0 National Government Agency 6.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7Near-Term OpportunitiesFrost & Sullivan conducted focus group discussions that support published research findingsshowing multiple ways health data can be leveraged to improve and facilitate access to care,quality of care, and cost-management activities in the near term. These include chronicdisease management, clinical decision support, consumer empowerment, consumer healthpromotion, healthcare policy development, patient safety, public health programs, andoperational efficiencies.Survey respondents believed leveraging health data for healthcare policy development,patient safety, and public health programs could have a greater impact than chronic diseasemanagement, clinical decision support, and consumer awareness. The process could befacilitated with clear governance and concerted action by all stakeholders.Enabling Public Health InitiativesIn terms of public health initiatives, respondents felt health data could be leveragedto equally support evidence-based medicine, serve to target health policy priorities,and support health promotion more than to design and develop behavioral health andwellness programs. Frost & Sullivan 9
    • CONSUMER EMPOWERMENTOn one level, healthcare economists have suggested that the absence of consumerinvolvement has contributed to rising healthcare costs and led individuals to ignore theirhealth. On another level, “consumer connectivity” has been aligned with higher treatmentplan compliance and less risky health behaviors.Stakeholder RolesOrganizations have engaged in four main activities to encourage individuals to take controlof their health: developing employee health education programs, developing consumerhealth literacy programs, sponsoring wellness activities (for example, weight control andnutrition programs), and sponsoring online blogs and health portals.Asia Pacific survey respondents suggested that developing consumer health literacyprograms and sponsoring wellness activities would be given higher priority in theirorganization. Frost & Sullivan believes this finding is consistent with the governmentrepresentation of the participants and the lower health literacy levels of the populationsthat the majority of executives serve.Barriers to Consumer EmpowermentHealthcare providers have suggested that there are a number of barriers to consumerempowerment, including: computer literacy, Internet access, health literacy, mobile phoneaccess, and the movement of consumers between health organizations.When asked to rank these four barriers, survey participants were most concernedwith health literacy and least concerned with mobile phone access. This finding wasconsistent across the North American and EMEA regions. It also supports other researchhighlighting the significance of the consumers’ understanding of “data” versus having anabundance of data.Associated BenefitsSurvey respondents were in agreement that consumer empowerment would fosterconsumer awareness of healthy behaviors and lead to more participation in preventionactivities. As a result, consumers would make healthier lifestyle choices and possibly bemore compliant with treatment protocols. The net effect would be improved quality of care.Our principal research objective was to explore and lay the foundation for an internationaldialogue on health system sustainability, e-health, and health information exchange,recognizing two important factors. First, the convergence of advances in information,communication, and medical device technologies enabling the electronic exchange of healthdata between service providers, consumers, and community stakeholders is a relatively newphenomenon. Second, the intrinsic value of the research findings would be found in how theinformation was used by stakeholders to support HIE and the transformation of health datainto solutions to create and maintain sustainable healthcare systems. Frost & Sullivan 10
    • In the Asia Pacific countries, ministers of health recognize the process of transforminghealth data into knowledge to achieve tangible, cost-effective health outcomes as works inprogress. Developed countries (such as Australia and New Zealand) are moving towardmore advanced stages of development and implementation than developing countries (forexample, India and China). In the developing countries, there are competing demands forlimited government financial resources to support healthcare initiatives.OverviewAustralia, New Zealand, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, and China have distinctive populations,cultures, political and economic dynamics, and divergent healthcare systems. Within thisframework, national governments initially funded infrastructure development to provide andsupport access to healthcare for rural populations in their individual countries. Envision“Lego Lands” (ecosystems) of health and healthcare activities and practices supported byseparate paper and electronic processes and modes of communication. Within eachcountry, region-specific Lego modules may be under consideration, in development, invarying stages of implementation, or in operation as HIT silos.Transforming Health Data into Knowledge-Driven SolutionsFrost & Sullivan has found that HIT planning and decision-making in the Asia Pacificcountries are tempered by ROI expectations based on societal cost/benefit ratios. Adoptionand utilization of electronic processes vary by the scope of universal healthcare servicesand payment for services by provider (hospital versus physician specialty) and by practicesetting. The Asia Pacific countries face challenges similar to those faced by individual statesin the United States. There, some are more advanced than others, state government fundingis limited, and collaborative partnerships are being pursued to help create sustainablehealth systems.In India, for example, 50 percent of the population is younger than 25 years of age, and 42percent of the population (500 million people) lives below the global poverty line on lessthan US $1.25 per day. Although the Indian constitution acknowledges each state’s primaryduty as improving the level of nutrition and health of its residents, 80 percent of healthcaremanpower resources and services are in the private sector and located in the cities. Inaddition to marketing itself to the middle and upper classes in India, private healthorganizations have targeted medical tourist populations. About 450,000 foreign patientsvisit India annually for medical treatment.After the SAARS epidemic, the Chinese government recognized the importance of havingan integrated health IT infrastructure in the country’s 18,000+ hospitals and 5,000+outpatient clinics. Yet the government allocated less than 1 percent (an estimated $700million) of its national health budget on health IT in 2004. In 2009, IBM opened HealthcareIndustry Solution Labs in China to work with the Chinese to enact widespread healthcarereform initiatives, including software integration solutions.In Australia, 2010 healthcare reform established the National Health and HospitalsNetwork, which will be funded nationally but run locally. The Commonwealth will assume Frost & Sullivan 11
    • 100 percent funding and policy responsibility for general practice, primary care, and agecare services. Medical Locals will be set up to coordinate services in local areas. Data onaccess to care, performance, safety, and quality of care will be measured and shared to driveimprovements across the system. In a 2009 global survey of primary care physicians, morethan 90 percent of practices in Australia and New Zealand reported having advancedelectronic health information capacity (14 functions).FUTURE DIRECTIONSParadigm ShiftThe health system of the future demands a paradigm shift as stakeholders move fromfragmented health information systems to an integrated and automated exchange of healthinformation in real time and as silos of health IT resources dissolve.Frost & Sullivan envisions connectivity across Asia Pacific countries as government-fundedprimary care services are supplemented by more private insurance offerings for specialtyprocedures and attract medical tourism. Connectivity will be fostered by stakeholderpartnerships forged to deliver health, wellness, and healthcare services. Telehealth andtelemedicine programs will become a mainstay of health systems, and medical tourism willbe funded as a new industry and economic growth opportunity.Connectivity also will be fueled by real-time exchange of health information, withconsumers taking a proactive, responsible role in improving or maintaining their health.Personalized medicine will weave its root in chronic disease management as monitoringmoves into the community and home. Electronic personal health records (e-PHRs) willshare equal prominence with electronic medical records (EMRs).Figure 6: Health system of the future From... To... Fragmented Health Information Integrated & Automated Less Invasive, Preventative, Invasive Diagnosis & Treatment Image Based Provider Centric Focus Patient Centric Centralized—Hospital Monitor De-Centralized-Shift to Community One Size Fits All Approach Personalized Medicine Therapeutics/ Tools “Theranostics’ Diagnostics/Devices Treating Sickness Objective Preventing Sickness—”Wellness”SustainabilityA sustainable health system is dependent upon its capacity to absorb current and futuredemands for its capabilities. Sustainable health systems will be achieved as “results-management” policies replace “cost-savings” directives. Return on investment (ROI) will bemeasured in terms of total costs versus total value. Frost & Sullivan 12
    • A sustainable health system is one that provides the right service (prevention, screening,diagnosis, or treatment) to the right person at the right time in the right venue at the rightcost. This will be based on health data exchanged between integrated national, regional, andlocal health information networks.In turn, integrated health information networks achieve sustainability through collaborationand stakeholder partnerships in which the benefits derived justify the investment. Althoughthere are relatively few network providers, there are hundreds of hardware and softwarevendors that offer a variety of legacy-compatible systems and application modules thatcontribute to an integrated network of EMRs, EHRs, and PHRs. Most of these offerings are“customized” to meet individual provider needs and preferences.As healthcare providers across segments move to establish or expand their health ITapplications and data integration activities, decision-makers will be looking for solutionsthat are quantitative and predictive in informing their business decisions—not transactionalpurchases. Frost & Sullivan believes providers will turn to vendors that offer planningservices and solutions derived from cross-industry strategic partnerships that will spurimplementation, adoption, and utilization and help dissolve health IT silos.For example, the HP Digital Hospital is a holistic approach to integrate and manageinformation, medical, communication, and building technologies to improve processes,enhance safety, and improve quality of care.New Business ModelsFrost & Sullivan Asia Pacific industry analysts reported an increase in cross-industrymergers and acquisitions as vendors move from offering fragmented products to integratedsolutions. Traditional communication and telecommunication providers believe the healthindustry offers new opportunities. Traditional health providers are looking to shareinvestment risk and increase market share.One example is HP’s acquisition of EDS. This created an entity that serves organizationsacross the health and life sciences value chain to improve business and health outcomesthrough the capture, management, and integration of information. By providing an extensive,integrated portfolio of products, solutions, services, and partnerships, HP has enabledhealth and life sciences organizations to lower costs, speed innovation, function moreefficiently, and improve the quality of care. As a result, HP is positioned as a valuedtechnology leader, providing the healthcare marketplace with innovative solutions thatimprove operational efficiencies while delivering a higher quality of care.On another level, the HP Digital Hospital solution uses a holistic approach to integrate andmanage information, medical, communication and building technologies to improveprocesses, enhance safety, improve quality of care, and enable customized healthcare. HP’sDigital Hospital was born out of a groundbreaking project delivered by HP, Cisco andIMATIS at St. Olavs Hospital (Trondheim, Norway). Frost & Sullivan 13
    • Principal DriversFrost & Sullivan analysts have ranked, in order of impact, four principal drivers for e-healthand HIE in the Asia Pacific region: government directives for greater operational efficienciesin hospitals; desire to improve quality of care and public safety; government andtransindustry collaboration to expand infrastructure and spur EMR/EHR adoption; andprivate/public collaboration to expand telemedicine and medical tourism.The degree of impact will reflect each country’s evaluation of the ROI and estimatedinvestment risk associated with different solutions.Access and SecurityHealth systems of the future will require health information networks that have real-time,intuitive, automated processes to distinguish access permit levels among users, identifysecurity breaches, and implement immediate corrective actions. The HIE module of the HPCare Network Solution uses standard security protocols that support user authorization,authentication, non-repudiation, encryption, and administration.Privacy management measures support opt-in/opt-out and provider-specific privacy models,hold patient privacy preferences, and hold business rules for restricting databases onsensitive data classes. Identity management measures validate providers’ credentials toaccess data; provide delegated administration to link the same clinician to multipleorganizations; provide role-based access to give users different capabilities within a clinicalsetting; validate members’ access to clinical records; and serve as an extension of theexisting provider/citizen portal security.Consumer EmpowermentAt an accelerated rate, individuals will assume more ownership of their health data in orderto navigate through the dynamic maze of modern healthcare to choose the “right” product.Medical providers will continue to adopt more patient-centric approaches in diagnosis,treatment, and care management.Government and private payers will focus on more consumer-oriented benefit plans andhealth promotion activities, including support of employer-sponsored wellness programs.Consumers will need simple ways to process and assimilate this information.The need for information and transparency is greatest when an individual or familymember has been hospitalized. The HP Digital Hospital provides an innovative solution:Each patient bed is equipped with a patient portal, providing interactive entertainment andeducation, along with bedside computing and communication. Healthcare self-service kiosksare also available. Frost & Sullivan 14
    • SUMMARYA new age in health information exchange has emerged that enables stakeholders inAsia Pacific countries to collaborate and create sustainable health care systems.Information, communication and medical technologies have converged to provide the tools.The challenge is to devise the process. As an intitial step, C-level stakeholders from sixAsia Pacific countries have shared their insights and perspectives to build a foundation thatwill bring the right product/service to the right person at the right place and time at the rightprice to achieve optimal health outcomes. Frost & Sullivan 15
    • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS NORTH AMERICA CANADA UNITED STATES Alberta Health and Wellness Acute Care, Inc. Alzheimer Society B.C. Arizona Association of Community Health Centers Brain Injury Association of NS Baptist Health System Cancer Care Nova Scotia Barnes-Kasson Hospital Central East Local Health Integration Network Baylor UT Houston Center AIDS Research Eastern Health Bowdle Health Care Covenant Health (Edmonton) Broadstone Memorial Hospital Headwaters Health Care Centre Cass Regional Medical Center Interior Health Authority DCH Health System Local Health Integration Network Florida Agency for Health Care Administration London Health Sciences Centre Good Samaritan Hospital Manitoba Blue Cross Hawaii Primary Care Assn. National Indian & Inuit CHR Organization Healthcare Care Access San Antonio North Simcoe Muskoka Local Health Humana, Inc. Integration Network Indian Health Service Regina-Qu’Appelle Health Region Iowa Medicaid Enterprise SAHO Kaiser Permanente (2) Saskatoon Health Region Maine Primary Care Assn. South East Local Health Integration Network Martin Memorial Mayo Clinic Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus Canada McLaren Regional Medical Center Stanton Territorial Health Authority National Center for Health Care Informatics Sunrise Health Region Oklahoma Healthcare Authority Trillium Health Centre Palo Alto Medical Assn. Western Health Permian Regional Medical Assn. MEXICO Regence BlueCross BlueShield Medicina a Distancia Rhode Island Health Center Assn. UMAE HTO 21 IMISS Riverwood Healthcare Center EMEA Signature Hospital Corporation AIMAR (Italy) Society of Hospital Medicine EACCI (Europe) State of Colorado European Fundraising Assn. (Belgium) St. Joseph–Martin Herzog Hospital (Israel) Saint Luke’s Health System Institute of Social Medicine (Macedonia) St. Mary’s of Michigan Ministry of Health (Cyprus) St. Vincent’s Health Services Ministry of Health (Romania) TennCare NHS 24 (UK) Texas Benefit NHS Yorkshire and the Humber (UK) VA Puget Sound HealthCare System Nuffield Hospital (UK) WakeMed Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria) Welch Community Hospital Técnicas de Salud (Spain) University of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) Frost & Sullivan 16
    • ASIA/PACIFICAIIMS (India) Ministry o Health (Cambodia)Apollo Hospitals Enterprise, Ltd. (India) Ministry of Health (India)Asia Gateway China Sichuan Provincial Hospital for WomenCenter for Health Systems and Policy Research and Children (China)and Development (Indonesia) South Australia Health (Australia)CICH, University of Melbourne (Australia) Zhongshan Hospital (China)DHHS (Australia) Frost & Sullivan 17
    • Silicon Valley 331 E. Evelyn Ave. Suite 100 Mountain View, CA 94041 C O N TAC T Tel 650.475.4500 Fax 650.475.1570 US San Antonio 7550 West Interstate 10, Suite 400, San Antonio, Texas 78229-5616 Tel 210.348.1000 Fax 210.348.1003 London 4, Grosvenor Gardens, London SWIW ODH,UKAuckland Tel 44(0)20 7730 3438Bangkok Fax 44(0)20 7730 3343BeijingBengaluru 877.GoFrostBogotá myfrost@frost.comBuenos Aires http://www.frost.comCape TownChennaiColomboDelhi / NCRDhakaDubaiFrankfurtHong KongIstanbulJakartaKolkataKuala LumpurLondonMexico CityMilanMoscowMumbaiManhattanOxfordParis ABOUT FROST & SULLIVANRockville CentreSan Antonio Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, partners with clients to accelerate theirSão Paulo growth. The companys TEAM Research, Growth Consulting, and Growth TeamSeoul Membership™ empower clients to create a growth-focused culture that generates,Shanghai evaluates, and implements effective growth strategies. Frost & Sullivan employs over 45Silicon Valley years of experience in partnering with Global 1000 companies, emerging businesses, and theSingapore investment community from more than 35 offices on six continents. For more informationSophia Antipolis about Frost & Sullivan’s Growth Partnership Services, visit http://www.frost.com.SydneyTaipeiTel Aviv For information regarding permission, write:Tokyo Frost & SullivanToronto 331 E. Evelyn Ave. Suite 100Warsaw Mountain View, CA 94041 18