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Aegis Mobility Distracted Driving Solutions

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Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Award - Customer Value Leadership for Aegis Mobility's Solutions for Distracted Driving

Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Award - Customer Value Leadership for Aegis Mobility's Solutions for Distracted Driving

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  • 1. Customer Value Leadership Distracted Driving Solutions Nandini Tare
  • 2. Solutions for Distracted Driving TABLE OF CONTENTS SOLUTIONS FOR DISTRACTED DRIVING ................................................................................ 3 INDUSTRY PROBLEM OVERVIEW ..................................................................................... 3 MARKET DRIVERS AND CHARACTERISTICS................................................................ 3, 4 MANAGING RISK AND LIABILITY FOR CORPORATIONS ................................................. 4 SOLUTION CONSIDERATIONS ................................................................................... 4, 5 LEADING ENTERPRISE-CLASS CAPABILITIES .................................................................. 5 AUTOMATED REPORTING ........................................................................................ 5, 6 QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN EVALUATING SOLUTIONS ...................................................... 6 POLICY FLEXIBILTY? ...................................................................................................... 6 DEVICE SUPPORT? ........................................................................................................ 6 TRIGGER METHODS? ................................................................................................ 6, 7 ADMINISTRATION, ANALYTICS AND REPORTING? ........................................................ 7 EXPERIENCE AND REFERENCES? ................................................................................... 7 2
  • 3. “Corporations concerned with risk and liability due to driver negligence, vicarious liability, direct negligence and punitive damages are the industry’s earliest adopters of technology solutions to enforce safe driving policies.” SOLUTIONS FOR DISTRACTED DRIVING INDUSTRY PROBLEM OVERVIEW The increasing prevalence and growing capabilities of smartphones have increased the frequency with which today’s drivers are tempted to take their minds off their driving. This is often made even more dangerous when drivers also take their eyes off the road and their hands off the wheel. When you consider that smartphones – capable of texting, browsing the Internet, emailing and playing videos – account for more than half of the U.S. mobile phone market today and are on course to replace the desktop computer as the primary Internet portal, it becomes clear that distracted driving is an escalating threat to safety. In fact, the National Safety Council estimates that at least 24% of crashes in 2010 involved drivers using cell phones, which puts it on par with drunk driving as a leading cause of accidents, injury and death. Now more than ever, the potential for distracted driving poses an ominous challenge to any company’s risk management program and poses one of the greatest risks of injury or death for young drivers. The growing level of public support for combating distracted driving can be seen in public opinion polls and in the more than 200 pieces of related legislation that have been passed or introduced since 2009. Accidents due to the use of cell phones in vehicles cause $50–100 billion annually in damages in North America alone and are one of the largest preventable sources of injury and loss of life. MARKET DRIVERS AND CHARACTERISTICS Corporations concerned with risk and liability due to driver negligence, vicarious liability, direct negligence and punitive damages are the industry’s earliest adopters of technology solutions to enforce safe driving policies. In the event of a distracted driving accident, mere compliance with federal regulations and state laws will not absolve a company of liability, nor will it shield a business from a bankrupting verdict. And this is not a hypothetical risk. In the last 10 years, courts have seen an “explosion” of distracted driving cases. In the last five years, juries – emboldened by a “profits over safety” trial theme – have rendered numerous multi-million dollar verdicts. Over 50 million licensed drivers in North America drive for more than 20% of the time during their employment and comprise the greatest liability for enterprise risk management programs. While most corporations have paper policies and training programs in place, non-compliance with policy is high. Insurance, academic and government research shows that 50–70% of employees violate policy on a weekly basis and 80–90% violate policy on a monthly basis. The exposure for corporations is immense, as employees who violate policy are 4–23 times more likely to have an accident or a nearaccident event. 3
  • 4. Solutions for Distracted Driving While corporations driven by concern for risk and liability have been the industry’s earliest adopters, parents concerned with the safety of their children as young drivers are also good candidates for technology solutions to enforce safe driving practices. There are approximately 10 million young drivers aged 16–19 in North America who are at greatest risk. Such drivers are least able to drive effectively in the presence of distractions and, unfortunately, are most likely to be tempted to text, tweet, browse or talk on their mobile devices while driving. MANAGING RISK AND LIABILITY FOR CORPORATIONS Smart risk management can save lives, reduce injuries, and limit a company’s accidentrelated costs. Employers have a legal duty to provide their employees with a reasonably safe workplace. This includes developing adequate safety rules and policies, and warning of potential hazards of which the employer is or should be aware. Vehicles are not simply for driving anymore – the modern workplace includes the mobile office, and distracted driving is a recognized hazard, if not an extremely dangerous problem. Toward this end, an employer has a duty to exercise reasonable care to control the activities of its employees when they are acting on behalf of or for the company and/or are using an employer’s “chattel.” “The various choices of solutions both active and passive, offered by Aegis Mobility meets enterprise requirements for monitoring safe use of mobile phones in vehicles.” - Nandini Tare, Industry Analyst, Frost & Sullivan Developing a safe driving policy which addresses the responsible use of mobile devices is a necessary first step in managing the risks associated with distracted driving. The National Safety Council (NSC) warns that “employers should set policies that exceed existing rules, regulations and laws.” The practical goal is to limit distracting behaviors; the aspirational goal is to eliminate them. However, a policy without some means to monitor, audit and enforce that policy will actually increase liability, not limit it. Details of an employer’s cell phone policies can be used as evidence. An employer must demonstrate that a policy has been enforced. The policy must be more than words on paper. Legal precedence has shown that “[a] wrongful act committed by an employee while acting in his employer’s business does not take the employee out of the scope of employment, even if the employer expressly forbids the act.” Under this rubric, the only way to escape liability is to take all reasonable steps towards preventing the offending conduct. SOLUTION CONSIDERATIONS Fortunately, there are now a variety of technology solutions to help companies prevent distracted driving. Companies can ensure that mobile devices are used safely and in compliance with federal, state and/or local laws. For practical purposes, these technologies can be categorized into two groups: “Active” controls and “Passive” controls. Active controls require software installed on the mobile device, and give the employer the ability to determine which features function while the employee is driving. 4
  • 5. Passive controls do not require software installed on the mobile device; instead, they utilize data from fleet management and wireless billing systems to empirically measure employee use of a mobile device while driving. LEADING ENTERPRISE-CLASS CAPABILITIES As enterprise organizations seek to improve safety for their employees and to reduce risk and liability related to distracted driving, the capabilities of the solution to provide for simple administration, to deliver analysis of “big data” and to report on that data in a clear and meaningful manner is critically important. Aegis provides the industry’s leading web-based portal (FleetSafer® Crossroads) for administration and reporting. Crossroads offers Device Activity and Driver Event reports. DEVICE ACTIVITY SUMMARY The Device Activity report summarizes the deployment status of all devices that have been provisioned in the system. Once a device registers with Aegis servers, it is counted as Registered. If a device stops contacting Aegis servers, after three days it transitions to Recent, seven days – Idle, and after 60 days, Inactive. Sections of the bar chart or table are dynamically selectable to drill down to devices within an activity status. DEVICE ACTIVITY DETAILS Historical device activity reports can be exported and used for cost allocation, device reconciliation and asset tracking. You can easily export a list of devices that have registered with Aegis servers in the past 60 days. Driver event reports include calls and ptt calls (made/received) and text messages (sent/received), plus: Fiddles (manual interaction with device) Tampers (attempts to defeat the screen block) Passenger override button presses For each event type, time, location and other details are reported. Crossroads presents event summaries in charts, event counts in tables and event plots on maps. AUTOMATED REPORTING Aegis provides a unique Automated Infraction Reporting and Improvement (AIRI) system which allows customers to set up actions to be taken based upon changes in key performance indicators. 5
  • 6. Solutions for Distracted Driving For example, if an enterprise policy allows zero usage of mobile devices while driving, any fiddle or tamper events may automatically be reported to the employee with a warning, perhaps with a copy of the message sent to the employee’s manager. As a second example, if an enterprise policy allows no usage other than handsfree voice calls, but also encourages employees to limit the frequency and duration of such calls, thresholds may be set such that an automatic reminder is sent to an employee if they exceed an average of 10 calls in a day, or if all their handsfree calls in a day exceeds 60 minutes. The AIRI system allows enterprise organizations to implement their safe driving policies in a software system that automatically monitors, reports and enforces compliance with company policy. The end result is the safest environment for employees (and other drivers) and the lowest risk and liability for the corporation vis-à-vis distracted driving due to mobile device use. QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN EVALUATING SOLUTIONS When evaluating which technology solution is best for any given company, employers should consider these questions: POLICY FLEXIBILITY? Different employers have different policies. Some have “zero tolerance” policies that prohibit any and all use of mobile devices while driving. Others have hands-free policies that prohibit texting, emailing and browsing, but permit inbound and outbound hands-free phone calls. Therefore, when considering technology solutions it is important to choose a vendor that offers maximum flexibility with regard to policy configurations, device types, and implementation options. DEVICE SUPPORT? The rapid proliferation of mobile devices has led to significant fragmentation in terms of device types. Be sure to develop a solid understanding of the devices that are covered by various vendors. Also make sure to understand how the same application can behave differently on different device types. Finally, ask questions about each vendor’s roadmap plans for developing additional device features and their plans for iOS support. TRIGGER METHODS? Large enterprise requirements are highly diverse and spread across many different types of vehicles, drivers and devices. Covering this fragmented environment demands technology designed with maximum flexibility and multiple trigger options (software only and hardware assisted). Software-only triggers (GPS-based) are desirable because they work in any type of vehicle and they do not require additional capital investment in 6
  • 7. hardware systems. Hardware-assisted triggers require an incremental capital investment in hardware and may not work in all types of vehicles, but do offer real-time (2-3 sec) indication of driving state. Ideally, a single vendor can offer both. ADMINISTRATION, ANALYTICS AND REPORTING? A proper technology solution should give the company the ability to easily set up and administer employee drivers. It should also allow the business to see how driving behavior is actually being modified (e.g., number of distractions averted, safe driving hours logged, etc.). Such data informs the level of compliance and enables corrective guidance and improvement actions when necessary. Additionally, alerts and notifications based on threshold triggers for key metrics provide the enterprise with the ability to implement automatic rules-based enforcement of policy that ensures conformance, reducing risk and liability. EXPERIENCE AND REFERENCES? Ultimately, the most important consideration when making a decision is to select a vendor that has successfully deployed software solutions in support of others so that the company can ask these other customers questions about the technology and their experience with it. 7

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