How to develop, maintain and
  share open source software in a
  scientific environment


Lisbeth Bergholt
GoOpen april 20...
Outline

• Met.no's software and data policy

• Case study: Diana – DIgital ANAlysis
  – Why make Diana Open Source?
  – H...
Software and data policy

 All data and software produced at met.no
 are payed for by the public and should be
 freely ava...
• Web Map Services      • Software
  – Data available as     – https://svn.met.no
    layers in WMS




                  ...
Open Source Project – Case Study
Diana -DIgital ANAlysis
  ●   application to visualise
      and edit meteorological
    ...
How did the Diana project start?

• 1998
  – Weather charts were drawn by
    hand
  – The avalible digital
    visualiasa...
Buy or develop an application?

• Comercial application
  – Expensive
  – Difficult to maintain
  – Legal limitations
• De...
Diana

• Developed at met.no
• Small development group
• Developed in close dialog
 with the users
  – Forecasters
  – Sci...
How to share Diana?

Others were interested in Diana.
How should we marked it?

• Comercial application?
  – Costumers wou...
Diana released under the GPL license

• Others can use, develop and distribute
  the code
• Others can sell the software a...
How to make an Open Source project?

• Choose a license
• Code review
  – Third party components – incompatible
    licens...
• 2005 – first version of GPL Diana
  – Too difficult to compile and install
  – Too difficult to use
  – To many inhouse ...
Status – who uses Diana?

• Formal cooperation with the Swedish
  Meteorological Institute
• Storm Weather Center
• Other ...
Snowball effect at met.no

• More Open Source projects
• Met.no uses Open Source software
  wherever possible
• Met.no enc...
Snowball effect outside met.no

• yr.no sets the bar for open data policy in
  Norwegian public institutions




         ...
Thank you




            Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
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GoOpen 2010: Lisbeth Bergholt

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GoOpen 2010: Lisbeth Bergholt

  1. 1. How to develop, maintain and share open source software in a scientific environment Lisbeth Bergholt GoOpen april 20th 2010
  2. 2. Outline • Met.no's software and data policy • Case study: Diana – DIgital ANAlysis – Why make Diana Open Source? – How to make Diana Open Source? – Experiences with running an Open Source project Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  3. 3. Software and data policy All data and software produced at met.no are payed for by the public and should be freely available to the public Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  4. 4. • Web Map Services • Software – Data available as – https://svn.met.no layers in WMS Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  5. 5. Open Source Project – Case Study Diana -DIgital ANAlysis ● application to visualise and edit meteorological data ● Used by forecasters and scientists Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  6. 6. How did the Diana project start? • 1998 – Weather charts were drawn by hand – The avalible digital visualiasation tools were not tailored for operational use – There was a need for an application to visualise and edit meteorological data Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  7. 7. Buy or develop an application? • Comercial application – Expensive – Difficult to maintain – Legal limitations • Develop an application – Takes time – Easier to maintain – Can we manage? • Use an Open Source application – There was none available Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  8. 8. Diana • Developed at met.no • Small development group • Developed in close dialog with the users – Forecasters – Scientist • Tailored for met.no's use • Ongoing development • 2001 - operational Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  9. 9. How to share Diana? Others were interested in Diana. How should we marked it? • Comercial application? – Costumers would expect support – Diana would need customization • Open Source? – No formal obligations – Customization done by users – Contributions Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  10. 10. Diana released under the GPL license • Others can use, develop and distribute the code • Others can sell the software and support • They can not include the code in other programs under an incompatible license For details on the GPL licence see: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  11. 11. How to make an Open Source project? • Choose a license • Code review – Third party components – incompatible licenses? – Documentation – Generalize the code & interfaces • Web site – diana.met.no • Email address – diana@met.no Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  12. 12. • 2005 – first version of GPL Diana – Too difficult to compile and install – Too difficult to use – To many inhouse data formats • 2010 – Diana version 3.19.1 – Possible to install and use – Bug reports and feedback – Contributions – Still not a professional project Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  13. 13. Status – who uses Diana? • Formal cooperation with the Swedish Meteorological Institute • Storm Weather Center • Other Norwegian and foreign institutions and businesses Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  14. 14. Snowball effect at met.no • More Open Source projects • Met.no uses Open Source software wherever possible • Met.no encurages developers to participate in Open Source projects • Open Data Policy Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  15. 15. Snowball effect outside met.no • yr.no sets the bar for open data policy in Norwegian public institutions Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
  16. 16. Thank you Norwegian Meteorological Institute met.no
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