Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Freshfields analysis of airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals
Freshfields analysis of airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals
Freshfields analysis of airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Freshfields analysis of airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals

72

Published on

So the private sector owns and operates airports – nothing new there. But airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals have risen over the last two years, making airports a hot tip for …

So the private sector owns and operates airports – nothing new there. But airport privatisations, asset sales and PPP deals have risen over the last two years, making airports a hot tip for infrastructure investors. What’s driving this? And why?

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
72
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.     So the private sector owns and operates airports – nothing new there. But airport privatisations, asset sales and  PPP deals have risen over the last two years, making airports a hot tip for infrastructure investors. What’s driving  this? And why? Airports cause headaches for governments  Governments know that fit­for­purpose airport infrastructure promotes trade and tourism. But with their short­term  electoral cycle mind­sets, they tend not to want to tackle the long­term funding needs of airport development. After all,  the benefits often won’t materialise until that government has left office. Airport investment, then, is best left to those  with the expertise to invest appropriately to increase capacity when demand rises. That’s why governments offload  the risks to private sector owner­operators.    Governments that grant long­term concession rights to private owner­operators transfer the burden of financing  development and operational costs to the private sector. The concessions may oblige owner­operators to add  terminals as passenger numbers grow and to maintain International Air Transport Association service standards.  This in turn improves passenger experience.     It’s also a moneymaking opportunity. Many governments, particularly in the EU, privatise their airports to help cut  their public deficits. They realise airports are one of their most marketable assets. Vinci recently agreed to pay the  Portuguese government €3.08bn to get national airport operator ANA, which came with a 50­year concession right to  operate 10 of Portugal’s airports. Governments also often demand a share of an airport’s gross revenues during the  concession.    Greece also recently announced plans to privatise 37 of its regional airports. Plus, it wants to divest its 40 per cent  stake in Athens International Airport. And Slovenia, to avoid a bailout from the EU, plans to privatise Ljubljana Airport.  So it seems more capital­constrained governments may become tempted – or obliged, even – to privatise their  airports. What makes a good investment?  Attract the best airlines Strong customer and revenue profiles present instant cash­generating assets. And  ‘hub’ airports, where major airlines choose to base their operations, meet these  criteria – say, Heathrow for British Airways and Dubai for Emirates Airlines. These  airports attract most investor attention.  Airlines are vital because most of an airport’s revenues are from the aviation fees it  charges airlines (for take­off, landing, aeroplane parking, and so on). To attract the  best airlines, airports must offer a high quota of origin and destination traffic.  Specifically, customers who are willing to pay a premium for direct flights, who will  subsidise connecting passengers who expect cheaper fares.     Where customers prefer to fly from will help determine where airlines choose to  base themselves. Hub airports often have good connecting transport infrastructure,  which airlines know will attract customers.    Air traffic growth follows economic growth. In 2007, for example, 240 million  passengers passed through UK airports. Since then, that figure has dropped 19  million to 221 million. But the decline isn’t uniform across all airports. Hubs have  proved more resilient. It is the UK’s regional airports – Exeter, Doncaster, Blackpool,  for example – that now struggle as demand for flights from these airports has fallen.  In contrast, traffic remains high at Heathrow because it’s where airlines concentrate  their efforts when the business cycle contracts.     An airport’s success is linked to the success of the airlines that use it as a hub. The  collapse of Malev, the Hungarian state airline, in February 2012, meant an instant  loss of 40 per cent of the passenger numbers at Budapest airport, leaving a large  gap in the airport’s revenues. Mitigate currency risk  Airports that serve international destinations can raise largely dollar­ or euro­based  revenue from international airline customers. And this gives those airports access to  global financial markets and foreign currency debt without government help to        Airports – why so interesting all of a sudden? Cash­strapped governments  that wish to cash in their  airports plus up­and­coming  countries that wish for better  airports make for an active  sector. Alex Carver, Partner Many governments,  particularly in the EU,  privatise their airports to help  cut their public deficits. We can expect to see more  airports privatised across the  world.
  • 2. What’s the future for airport deals?  mitigate foreign exchange risk. So airport financings can succeed in emerging  markets where international lenders might otherwise be unwilling to lend, as the  success of the Pulkovo Airport PPP in St Petersburg, Russia, shows. Competition and regulatory risk Exclusivity is a big concern for investors. The government will usually need to agree  not to allow competing transport infrastructure within a certain geographical radius.  Investors also want as much certainty as possible, for example, around the level of  aviation fees, which in many countries the aviation authority sets and periodically re­ bases. Also, financiers may want to see long­term airport use agreements with key  airlines, locking them into using the airport under agreed pricing formulas for 10–15  years.    Low­cost air travel has increased competition and brought with it lower fares.  Coupled with increasing fuel prices, this means airlines need to fight harder to  make profits. So there’s a trend for airlines, perhaps following Ryanair’s lead, to  negotiate harder with airports over aviation fees, to try to control costs.    Airport owners that try to raise fees to fund redevelopment will need to show how the  proposed upgrade would give the airlines a good return on investment. Shopping malls on the end of runways Investors become more comfortable once satisfied that an airport will retain good  airlines that will attract customers willing to spend at the airport. And airports offer  scope for additional revenue streams from duty­free shops, advertising, cafés,  restaurants, hotels and parking. So, airport financings can often succeed without  relying on government demand risk mitigation guarantees. A buoyant M&A market  M&A deals have risen. And this looks set to continue with EBITDA­benchmarked  asset values also on an upward trend, moving towards pre­financial crisis levels  when London City Airport was sold for 29 x EBITDA. In the UK, Ferrovial’s sales (forced by Competition Commission rulings) of Gatwick  in 2010 for £1.5bn (12 x), Edinburgh in 2012 for £807m (16 x) and Stansted in 2013  for £1.5bn (15.6 x) illustrate this upward trend.     As highlighted above, various factors can influence the valuation of an airport.  However, the price paid for Stansted is particularly interesting because passenger  numbers have in fact been in decline for the past six years. Some experts don’t view  Stansted as the same quality as Edinburgh. Stansted is one of many airports that  competes in the south east, and most of its traffic is from low­cost airlines. Whereas  Edinburgh Airport is the only airport that serves Edinburgh, and it includes national  airlines.    The prices Ferrovial’s airport sales achieved surely encouraged Abertis’s and  Hochtief’s recent decisions to divest all or part of their airport portfolios. Hochtief  agreed in May 2013 to sell its airport unit, Hochtief AirPort GmbH, to Canada’s Public  Sector Pension Investment Board for €1.1bn. Abertis, with stakes in 29 airports  across the globe, is in the process of divesting its airport business in separate lots,  including an imminent sale of its 90 per cent stake in London Luton Airport. More and more privatisations We can expect to see more airports privatised across the world. And these won’t be  confined to cash­strapped eurozone countries either. Japan recently announced a  privatisation programme for up to 94 of its airports.  The US has by far the most airports in the world – 503 commercial airports. It has  been the slowest to embrace privatisation due to federal legal restrictions making  the economics of such transactions effectively impossible. With a pilot programme  under way to remove key regulatory hurdles, the US could become a buoyant market  for airport investors in the next few years. PPPs for new airport capacity There is a growing market for PPP deals. To date, most have been brownfield deals  to redevelop and expand existing airports. Here, investors and their lenders have an  asset that can generate revenue during the riskier construction phase. Europe has  had a few notable PPPs in the airports sector – the Athens Airport PPP in 1996,  Cyprus Airports PPP in 2006 and the ongoing Zagreb Airport PPP. A growing number  of airport authorities across the US are also turning to PPP procurements, which do  not need pilot programme approval. In developing economies with limited airport capacity yet greater growth potential,  the market for PPPs is likely to be greatest. The Philippines and Vietnamese  governments each launched PPP procurements at major international airports. India  used PPPs to upgrade its two main airports at Delhi and Mumbai and to build  greenfield airports in Bangalore and Hyderabad. Such has been the commercial  success of these airports that more PPPs are likely. Many governments in Africa are  also using PPPs to develop, or upgrade, airport capacity.    Qatar is planning a PPP to buy a major new airport for Doha with a capacity of up to 
  • 3.   To sum up  48 million passengers a year, with intentions to create a regional hub to rival Dubai.  Turkey, with its ambitions to become a top 10 world economy, wants to create a  major international airport hub. Having already carried out three PPPs – Ataturk  Airport in 2005, Sabiha Gokcen Airport in 2008 and Izmir Airport in 2011 – in May  2013, it awarded a tender to build what is projected to be the world’s largest airport,  able to handle up to 150 million passengers a year.    Russia and Brazil, two fast­growing economies that will host Olympic Games (Sochi  2014 and Rio 2016) as well as football world cups, are also in a rush to modernise  and expand their airports. The Pulkovo Airport PPP, which closed in 2011, was the  first PPP in Russia to close without state guarantees. A further 24 airports in Russia  have been highlighted as needing investment, so more PPPs are likely. Passenger  numbers in Brazil have doubled in a decade, and growth at the rate of 10 per cent a  year is expected to continue. Estimates suggest Brazil needs to at least double its  airport capacity by 2030. With little incentive for governments to own airports and advantages in transferring  the risks to the private sector, opportunities to invest in airports look set to remain  high. The prices investors paid for the rights to build, own or manage airports in  recent years suggests confidence in airports as an asset. Of course, there are risks.  But the right airport seems, in many investors’ eyes, an asset worth paying a  premium for.  Alex Carver   Partner   London  Keith Gamble   Senior associate   London  Contacts Follow us  Twitter     Linkedin     Xing     RSS     Email    

×