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Energy 101:2012 Candidate Briefing       Fresh Energy Candidate Education                 August 2012
About Fresh EnergyFresh Energy works daily for a future where energyproduction stimulates local economies, efficientlyharn...
About Fresh EnergyFresh Energy provides research, advocacy, and innovativepolicy models while engaging citizens to take ac...
Our policy staff      Ross Abbey                   J. Drake Hamilton  transportation, solar         global warming solutio...
Agenda                  AGENDA             Energy in Minnesota    Minnesota’s energy policy foundation   The future of ene...
Agenda     Energy in Minnesota
Where does Minnesota’s energy come from?                     Primary energy consumption across all sectors                ...
Sources of MN Electricity by fuel typeMinnesota electricity generation           Source: Energy Information Administration...
Minnesota imports a lot of fuels for electricityMinnesota has no oil wells, naturalgas, uranium, or coal mines.The cost of...
Wyoming’s Powder River Basin coal mine Source: Sierra Club
Energy efficiency in the United StatesCosts of different types of power
Residential Building Energy Code adoption in the MidwestAs of June 2012:                   *                              ...
Energy codes raise the standards for all buildingsMinnesota’s code is currently roughly equivalent toIECC 2006 and the sta...
CapX2020 is a jointinitiative of 11 utilities inMinnesota and thesurrounding region toexpand the transmissiongrid to ensur...
How much does Minnesota spend on oil?In recent years, Minnesota has ―exported‖ about $2,000 per person per year for       ...
Alberta landscape before and after
Uncertain future for gas prices; volatility and increases likely           Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration ...
Agenda         Minnesotas energy          policy foundation
Minnesotas energy policy foundation• 2007 Next Generation Energy Act• Requirements that electric and  natural gas utilitie...
Next Generation Energy ActState goal to reduce greenhouse gasemissions economy-wide to at least:  15 percent below 2005 l...
Progress toward state goalsRenewable Electricity Standard (RES)  •   Utilities are on track or exceeding RES goals.  •   M...
Progress toward state goalsEnergy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS)  •   Utilities are on track or exceeding the efficie...
Minnesota has a great wind resource      Percent of electricity from wind power, 2011
Wind power improves Minnesota’s economy                   In 2010 alone, wind power                   projects            ...
The Clean Air Act1970•    became law to protect human health and     welfare1990 •   bipartisan update signed by President...
The Clean Air ActNationwide, coal-fired power are responsible for atleast 21,000 premature deaths each year. Burningcoal e...
The Clean Air Act and human health and welfareThere are no nationwidelimits on carbon and sootemissions from powerplants.T...
The Clean Air Act―The Clean Air Act has preventedmore than 1.8 million childrespiratory illnesses and more than300,000 pre...
OMB review of Clean Air Act impacts from 1990-2020The benefits of Clean Air Actregulations exceed the costs by30 to 1.Poll...
Minnesota has demonstrated feasibility2006 Minnesota Mercury Emissions Reduction  Act:• six big units at Minnesota’s large...
Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC)Rate regulators for electric and natural gasutilities. • least-cost planning an...
Agenda         The future of energy         policy in Minnesota
Federal wind production tax creditThe federal Production TaxCredit, which promotes winddevelopment in Minnesota, requirere...
Minnesota has a great solar resource                                  Germany, despite its                                ...
Capitalizing on Minnesota’s solar resource• Minnesota has better solar economics  than 31 other states, including the rest...
Solar PV costs are dropping fast$/W                            MW of panels manufactured         Source: PV module cost cu...
Reducing our reliance on oilWe need to• improve the efficiency of cars,• transition to next generation of ―fuels,‖• suppor...
Vehicle efficiency
Next generation of fuels?
Minnesota driving trends                                                             Minnesota Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT...
How we pay for our roadsSource: Fresh Energy, based on MnDOT data
Minnesota’s senior population-growth spurt       Census Bureau forecast December 2009, assuming constant immigration.     ...
2030 Forecasted Population                                                65 Years of Age or Older                        ...
Improving rail connectionsSource: MnDOT 2010 State Rail Plan
light rail transit   commuter railbus rapid transit        streetcar
The Twin Cities needs new transit momentumMiles of transitways (existing or underconstruction)
The connected Twin Cities Minnesota needs
Agenda      Public support for   Minnesota’s energy future
Polling dataFrom a statewide telephone poll of 400 registeredMinnesota voters, conducted January 9-15, 2012 bythe bipartis...
Polling data
Voters in all regions support more                               public transit.                                        Su...
Democrats, independents, and Republicans              back building public transit.                                  Suppo...
Strong statewide support for Southwest Light Rail funding            Region                                 Support       ...
There are no regional differences in                  support for increased use of solar…                                 ...
…and partisan differences are                             relatively modest.                          Support for Solar En...
Similarly, support for increased wind                   energy use cuts across regions…                                   ...
…and also across party lines.                   Support for Wind Energy by Party Identification                           ...
Voters would rather reduce               the need for fossil fuels by expanding                      the use of renewables...
Voters of all parties see jobs                            benefits from clean energy.                          Job Impact ...
Voters across the state prefer a                            clean energy candidate.                                       ...
More than seven in ten voters prefer a candidate        who would promote renewable energy over                        fos...
Q&Awww.fresh-energy.org
Fresh Energy         www.fresh-energy.org@freshenergy // facebook.com/freshenergytoday
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Policy 101: Energy in Minnesota

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  • Source: EIA primary energyconsumption estimates (2010)http://www.eia.gov/state/seds/hf.jsp?incfile=sep_use/total/use_tot_MNcb.html&mstate=Minnesota
  • Is this is right location?
  • New CAFÉ standards for 2025 = 54.5 mpg. Savings of more oil than U.S. imports from Saudia Arabia and Iraq every year.
  • Implications re services needed – especially transitAs well as impact on fiscal capacity
  • 38% of all freight in MN travels on rail—privately financed systemTotal investment needs: $6.2 to $9.5 billion of which 1/3 to ½ from private freight companies
  • Tell story of what’s to come, need for additional funding, and essential need for strong and vocal business leadership.This map shows progress toward the planned 2030 system of transit lines, which we think should be built within 10 years (low interest rates, reap benefits sooner at lower costs). Building the full transit network the Twin Cities needs to thrive will require additional funding as current funding will not be able to complete this map. The Counties Transit Improvement Board and the Metropolitan Council are currently exploring options for funding the full system—more details and options will be available soon.Importance of business leadership—thank Minneapolis Chamber (Todd Klingel), St. Paul (Matt Kramer), and Twin West (Bruce Nustad). We know from this session’s work on Southwest, that it essential that individual business leaders join in the chorus from the Chamber leaders.
  • Tell story of what’s to come, need for additional funding, and essential need for strong and vocal business leadership.This map shows progress toward the planned 2030 system of transit lines, which we think should be built within 10 years (low interest rates, reap benefits sooner at lower costs). Building the full transit network the Twin Cities needs to thrive will require additional funding as current funding will not be able to complete this map. The Counties Transit Improvement Board and the Metropolitan Council are currently exploring options for funding the full system—more details and options will be available soon.Importance of business leadership—thank Minneapolis Chamber (Todd Klingel), St. Paul (Matt Kramer), and Twin West (Bruce Nustad). We know from this session’s work on Southwest, that it essential that individual business leaders join in the chorus from the Chamber leaders.
  • Source: Public Opinion Strategies and Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates poll conducted January 14-17, 2012; commissioned by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce, the St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Twin West Chamber of CommerceThe poll question: “Now, a proposal is being considered that would dedicate 25 million dollars in already planned state spending to move forward with the Southwest Light Rail line that would extend from Minneapolis to Eden Prairie and connect to the other three existing rail lines. These funds would help the state secure an additional 625 million dollars in federal matching funds that combined with planned state and local spending could build the new rail line.“Knowing this, would you support or oppose dedicating 25 million dollars in state funds to move forward with the Southwest Light Rail line?”
  • Transcript of "Policy 101: Energy in Minnesota"

    1. 1. Energy 101:2012 Candidate Briefing Fresh Energy Candidate Education August 2012
    2. 2. About Fresh EnergyFresh Energy works daily for a future where energyproduction stimulates local economies, efficientlyharnessing clean, homegrown electricity sources like windand solar power.One where pollution is a thing of the past, where the energywe need doesn’t harm the people we love.And one that reflects Midwesterners’ love and respect forour lakes, prairies, and forests—for our sake and beyond.
    3. 3. About Fresh EnergyFresh Energy provides research, advocacy, and innovativepolicy models while engaging citizens to take action onenergy issues.Fresh Energy is a 501(c)(3) organization and does notparticipate or intervene in elections for public office in anyway.Our candidate education activities are completelynonpartisan.
    4. 4. Our policy staff Ross Abbey J. Drake Hamilton transportation, solar global warming solutions Ethan Fawley Alison Lindburg transportation clean energy, efficiency Kate Ellis Michael Nobleclean energy, efficiency executive director Erin Stojan Ruccolo clean energy, efficiency
    5. 5. Agenda AGENDA Energy in Minnesota Minnesota’s energy policy foundation The future of energy policy in Minnesota Public opinion research Q&A
    6. 6. Agenda Energy in Minnesota
    7. 7. Where does Minnesota’s energy come from? Primary energy consumption across all sectors [trillion BTUs] Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity imports Uranium Biomass Wind BiofuelsSource: Energy Information Administration data 2010
    8. 8. Sources of MN Electricity by fuel typeMinnesota electricity generation Source: Energy Information Administration data 1990-2010
    9. 9. Minnesota imports a lot of fuels for electricityMinnesota has no oil wells, naturalgas, uranium, or coal mines.The cost of coal delivered to Minnesota hasincreased on average 11.8 percent every yearsince 2004.
    10. 10. Wyoming’s Powder River Basin coal mine Source: Sierra Club
    11. 11. Energy efficiency in the United StatesCosts of different types of power
    12. 12. Residential Building Energy Code adoption in the MidwestAs of June 2012: * Code Level / Equivalence No Mandatory Statewide Code 2006 IECC 2009 IECC 2012 IECC 2009 Adopted by Major Municipality * Upgrading to 2012
    13. 13. Energy codes raise the standards for all buildingsMinnesota’s code is currently roughly equivalent toIECC 2006 and the state is in the process ofupgrading to the IECC 2012 with amendments.These proposed changes will save newlyconstructed Minnesota residences at least 20percent in energy consumption and 30 percent forcommercial buildings.
    14. 14. CapX2020 is a jointinitiative of 11 utilities inMinnesota and thesurrounding region toexpand the transmissiongrid to ensure continuedreliable and affordableservice.
    15. 15. How much does Minnesota spend on oil?In recent years, Minnesota has ―exported‖ about $2,000 per person per year for oil. 18 16 14 12Billions of Dollars 10 8 6 4 2 0 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Source: US Energy Information Administration’s State Energy Data System
    16. 16. Alberta landscape before and after
    17. 17. Uncertain future for gas prices; volatility and increases likely Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (the agency tasked with forecasting energy trends)
    18. 18. Agenda Minnesotas energy policy foundation
    19. 19. Minnesotas energy policy foundation• 2007 Next Generation Energy Act• Requirements that electric and natural gas utilities double to triple energy efficiency savings• 25 percent by 2025 Renewable Electricity Standard
    20. 20. Next Generation Energy ActState goal to reduce greenhouse gasemissions economy-wide to at least: 15 percent below 2005 levels by 2015 30 percent below by 2025 80 percent below by 2050
    21. 21. Progress toward state goalsRenewable Electricity Standard (RES) • Utilities are on track or exceeding RES goals. • Minnesota has 2,500 megawatts of installed wind energy—enough to power 700,000 Minnesotan homes. • According to statewide utility reporting in 2012, there has been almost no rate impact due to compliance with RES. Many utilities stated that they would have added wind in any scenario because it is the least-cost resource.
    22. 22. Progress toward state goalsEnergy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) • Utilities are on track or exceeding the efficiency goals. • Increased energy efficiency reduces rates for consumers. • Xcel alone has saved the equivalent of constructing nine new coal plants, reducing rates for consumers. • Energy efficiency is the cheapest form of energy. • Based on utility reporting, for every $1 utilities spent on conservation, their customers save $4. It’s hard to get that level of return with almost any other investment.
    23. 23. Minnesota has a great wind resource Percent of electricity from wind power, 2011
    24. 24. Wind power improves Minnesota’s economy In 2010 alone, wind power projects • contributed $7 million in land lease payments, • contributed over $6 million in property tax payments, • provided diversified income for Minnesota’s farm families, and • supported at least 2,000 direct and indirect jobs.
    25. 25. The Clean Air Act1970• became law to protect human health and welfare1990 • bipartisan update signed by President Bush to tackle new air pollution problems2011 and 2012 • scientific findings call for modernizing standards to include mercury, soot, ozone, and carbon
    26. 26. The Clean Air ActNationwide, coal-fired power are responsible for atleast 21,000 premature deaths each year. Burningcoal emits large amounts of  mercury  ozone pollution  carbon dioxide  sootSource: National Research Council
    27. 27. The Clean Air Act and human health and welfareThere are no nationwidelimits on carbon and sootemissions from powerplants.The Clean Air Act of 1990required theEnvironmental ProtectionAgency to limit pollutantsthat harm human healthand welfare.
    28. 28. The Clean Air Act―The Clean Air Act has preventedmore than 1.8 million childrespiratory illnesses and more than300,000 premature deaths.‖ Senator Dave Durenberger, April 2011
    29. 29. OMB review of Clean Air Act impacts from 1990-2020The benefits of Clean Air Actregulations exceed the costs by30 to 1.Pollution controls are 0.3percent of the country’s overallGDP, but save millions ofAmericans from debilitating andexpensive illnesses that resultfrom unlimited pollution.
    30. 30. Minnesota has demonstrated feasibility2006 Minnesota Mercury Emissions Reduction Act:• six big units at Minnesota’s largest coal plants required to achieve 90 percent reduction in mercury• Clean Air Act now applies similar standards nationwide
    31. 31. Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC)Rate regulators for electric and natural gasutilities. • least-cost planning and integrated resource planning • Minnesota Emissions Reductions Projects (MERP) • baseload diversification studies under way to compare costs for oldest, least-efficient power plants
    32. 32. Agenda The future of energy policy in Minnesota
    33. 33. Federal wind production tax creditThe federal Production TaxCredit, which promotes winddevelopment in Minnesota, requirereauthorization by Congressbefore it expires at the end of2012.Wind development supports atleast 2,000 construction andmanufacturing jobs, as well asmillions of dollars annually in taxpayments to local governmentsand payments to landowners.
    34. 34. Minnesota has a great solar resource Germany, despite its inferior solar resource, recently set a world record for solar photovoltaic (PV) production, producing 22 gigawatts of energy (equivalent to the output of 20 nuclear plants). On that day, they were able to produce 50 percent of their electricity from solar PV.
    35. 35. Capitalizing on Minnesota’s solar resource• Minnesota has better solar economics than 31 other states, including the rest of the Midwest (before incentives).• Solar supports 6,000 Minnesota jobs, including 2,200 jobs at 33 component and panel manufacturers in over 30 towns.• Yet compared to other states, Minnesota has done relatively little to attract solar investment.• Minnesota ranks near the bottom in per- capita investment, while states with worse solar economics (like New Jersey and Oregon) are attracting 10 to 30 times the investment.
    36. 36. Solar PV costs are dropping fast$/W MW of panels manufactured Source: PV module cost curve 1976-2011. BNEF Bazilian et al (2012), Fig. 1
    37. 37. Reducing our reliance on oilWe need to• improve the efficiency of cars,• transition to next generation of ―fuels,‖• support transportation options and development patterns that reduce the need to drive
    38. 38. Vehicle efficiency
    39. 39. Next generation of fuels?
    40. 40. Minnesota driving trends Minnesota Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Trend and Projections 100 90 VMT 80 20 year linear trendlineIn the Minnesota, 10 year logarithmic trendlineabout 29 miles are 70 VMT (in billions)driven per capita per 60day. 50 40Peak was 30.4 milesin 2004. 30 20Per driver, that’s 10about 39 miles perday. 0 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Year Source: Minnesota Department of Transportation TDA and OIM
    41. 41. How we pay for our roadsSource: Fresh Energy, based on MnDOT data
    42. 42. Minnesota’s senior population-growth spurt Census Bureau forecast December 2009, assuming constant immigration. Source: Retired State Demographer Tom Gillaspy
    43. 43. 2030 Forecasted Population 65 Years of Age or Older Aging population most pronounced in more rural 2030 Pop 65 or older 1,000 counties 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 2030 Percent 65 or older 11% - 15% 16% - 20% 21% - 25% 26% - 30% 31% - 35% 21% 36% - 40% Economic RegionsSource: Minnesota State Demographic Center, April 2007
    44. 44. Improving rail connectionsSource: MnDOT 2010 State Rail Plan
    45. 45. light rail transit commuter railbus rapid transit streetcar
    46. 46. The Twin Cities needs new transit momentumMiles of transitways (existing or underconstruction)
    47. 47. The connected Twin Cities Minnesota needs
    48. 48. Agenda Public support for Minnesota’s energy future
    49. 49. Polling dataFrom a statewide telephone poll of 400 registeredMinnesota voters, conducted January 9-15, 2012 bythe bipartisan research team of Fairbank, Maslin,Maullin, Metz & Associates and Public OpinionStrategies.The margin of sampling error for the full statewidesamples is +/- 4.9 percent; margins of error forsubgroups within the sample will be larger.
    50. 50. Polling data
    51. 51. Voters in all regions support more public transit. Support for Transit by Region Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 91% 100% 81% 78% 77% 80% 60% 40% 21% 20% 19% 9% 20% 3% 1% 0% 0% 0% Northeast Northwest South Twin Cities(% ofSample) (9%) (17%) (21%) (54%) Q14f. I would like to read you some ideas related to energy that might be proposed by people in Minnesota. Please tell me whether it sounds like something you would support or oppose: Building more public transit, like rail and buses. Split Sample.
    52. 52. Democrats, independents, and Republicans back building public transit. Support for Transit by Party Identification Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 91% 100% 78% 65% 80% 60% 28% 40% 22% 9% 20% 7% 0% 0% 0% Democrat Independent Republican(% ofSample) (33%) (47%) (20%) Q14f.I would like to read you some ideas related to energy that might be proposed by people in Minnesota. Please tell me whether it sounds like something you would support or oppose: Building more public transit, like rail and buses. Split Sample.
    53. 53. Strong statewide support for Southwest Light Rail funding Region Support OpposeHennepin/Ramsey 69% 26%Outer Suburbs 59% 34%Southern Minnesota 57% 37%Western Minnesota 52% 39%Northeastern 59% 37%MinnesotaSource: Public Opinion Strategies and Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates pollconducted January 14-17, 2012; commissioned by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber ofCommerce, the St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Twin West Chamber ofCommerce
    54. 54. There are no regional differences in support for increased use of solar… Support for Solar Energy by Region Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 90% 87% 85% 85% 100% 80% 60% 40% 11% 11% 10% 10% 20% 4% 4% 3% 0% 0% Northeast Northwest South Twin Cities(% ofSample) (9%) (20%) (21%) (50%) 5i. Here is a list of specific sources of energy. Please tell me whether you would support or oppose increasing use of that source of energy to meet your state’s future needs: Solar
    55. 55. …and partisan differences are relatively modest. Support for Solar Energy by Party Identification Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 99% 100% 83% 76% 80% 60% 40% 20% 14% 20% 3% 3% 1% 0% 0% Democrat Independent Republican(% ofSample) (33%) (42%) (24%) 5i. Here is a list of specific sources of energy. Please tell me whether you would support or oppose increasing use of that source of energy to meet your state’s future needs: Solar
    56. 56. Similarly, support for increased wind energy use cuts across regions… Support for Wind Energy by Region Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 89% 88% 100% 83% 82% 80% 60% 40% 17% 13% 12% 11% 20% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% Northeast Northwest South Twin Cities(% ofSample) (9%) (20%) (21%) (50%) 5f. Here is a list of specific sources of energy. Please tell me whether you would support or oppose increasing use of that source of energy to meet your state’s future needs: Wind
    57. 57. …and also across party lines. Support for Wind Energy by Party Identification Total Support Total Oppose Undecided 97% 84% 100% 68% 80% 60% 30% 40% 13% 20% 3% 2% 2% 2% 0% Democrat Independent Republican(% ofSample) (33%) (42%) (24%) 5f. Here is a list of specific sources of energy. Please tell me whether you would support or oppose increasing use of that source of energy to meet your state’s future needs: Wind
    58. 58. Voters would rather reduce the need for fossil fuels by expanding the use of renewables. Which of the following do you think should be the highest priority for meeting America’s energy needs: Reducing our need for oil and coal by increasing energy efficiency and expanding 67%our use of clean, renewable energy that can be generated in the US Drilling and digging for more oil and coal 26% wherever we can find it in the US Both/Neither/DK/NA 10% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 7. Which of the following do you think should be the highest priority for meeting America’s energy needs…
    59. 59. Voters of all parties see jobs benefits from clean energy. Job Impact of Clean Energy by Party Identification Creat Jobs No Effect Cost Jobs All/None/DK 100% 81% 76% 80% 54% 60% 33% 40% 14% 14% 9% 20% 6% 5% 5% 3% 3% 0% Democrat Independent Republican(% ofSample) (31%) (47%) (22%)9. Which of the following comes closer to your point of view: Increasing the use ofclean, renewable energy sources like wind and solar power…
    60. 60. Voters across the state prefer a clean energy candidate. Candidate Preference by Region Clean Energy Fossil Fuels Both/Neither/DK/NA 72% 72% 68% 67% 80% 60% 33% 40% 24% 23% 20% 20% 9% 7% 5% 0% 0% Northeast Northwest South Twin Cities(% ofSample) (8%) (20%) (22%) (50%) 12. In thinking about the election for State Legislature in your area later this year, for which of the following candidates would you be most likely to vote?
    61. 61. More than seven in ten voters prefer a candidate who would promote renewable energy over fossil fuels. A candidate who wants to promote more use of clean, renewable energy – like wind and solar power A candidate who wants to continue to rely ontraditional domestic sources of energy – like coal, natural gas or nuclear – to meet energy needs Both/Neither/DK/NA12. In thinking about the election for State Legislature in your area later this year, for whichof the following candidates would you be most likely to vote?
    62. 62. Q&Awww.fresh-energy.org
    63. 63. Fresh Energy www.fresh-energy.org@freshenergy // facebook.com/freshenergytoday
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