Cloud computing in context

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BCS Meeting, Leeds, 8th July 2010 …

BCS Meeting, Leeds, 8th July 2010

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  • 1. Copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd Cloud Computing in Context BCS Meeting, Leeds, 8 th July 2010 Dale Vile Research Director Freeform Dynamics Ltd www.freeformdynamics.com
  • 2. About Freeform Dynamics
    • Industry analyst firm
      • Track IT industry developments and offerings
      • Track the use of IT in business and evolving requirements
      • Advise both end user organisations and suppliers
    • Research approach
      • IT vendor and service provider briefings
      • Large scale studies - face to face, telephone and online
    • Community research programme
      • Investigate strategy, business case, architecture, best practice
      • Vendor patronage model allows free distribution
      • Media partnerships for both input and output
  • 3. Objective in a nutshell INSIGHT/ADVICE Make the right decisions and get the most from technology investments INSIGHT/ADVICE Offer the right solutions to the right clients to drive sustainable business WIN/WIN Overall aim to enable mature customer/supplier relationships
  • 4. Coverage by requirement, not product category SOHO, SMB TO ENTERPRISE
  • 5. Audience focus
    • Help busy IT and business professionals to evaluate the relevance of emerging ideas and technologies
    • No agendas, no evangelism, just straightforward insight
    Mainstream users and buyers ‘ Normal’ organisations and individuals
  • 6. Cloud computing
    • Industry hype or revolution in IT?
    • Lots of conflicting agendas
    • Lots of different views
    Platform as a Service Software as a Service Community Cloud Infrastructure as a Service Public Cloud Elastic Cloud Private Cloud
  • 7. “ Two men say they’re Jesus; one of them must be wrong” Dire Straits, Industrial Disease Cloud Computing Q. What is cloud? A. Depends who you ask and what they are trying to sell
  • 8. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? (Infrastructure) Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010 Traditional ISP hosting | |
  • 9. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? (Hosted Apps) Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010
  • 10. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? (Messaging) Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010 | Huge investment by vendors, ISPs and Telcos Well established In consumer and SMB business | Fast growing, proven demand |
  • 11. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010
  • 12. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? (Technology) Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010
  • 13. Current state of affairs It’s a bit of a mess !
  • 14. IT Pro perceptions of what qualifies as ‘cloud’
    • Emphasis on hosted services, not technology
    • Physical elasticity of services is key
      • Scale capacity up and down based on demand
      • Number of users up and down at will
      • Add and remove features and functionality at will
      • Multi-tenancy architecture important for software services
    • Commercial flexibility of services is key
      • Pay for what you use; changes quickly reflected in billing
      • Can stop using service at any time without penalty
    • Variation in emphasis on IaaS, PaaS and SaaS
  • 15. “ How do we make the move to the cloud?”
    • Putting the cart before the horse
    • Cloud is not an end, it is a means to an end
    • And it is not the only means!
  • 16. The stars aligning? Cloud
  • 17. It’s really about ….
  • 18. Back to basics
    • Objectives
      • Reduced cost and risk
      • Improved service levels
      • Reduced burden on IT
    • Key considerations
      • Workload characteristics
      • Integration requirements
      • Security and compliance
      • Operational requirements
  • 19. Horses for courses
    • Different applications and workloads will naturally run in different places
    • Hybrid and overspill requirement exist.
    • Bottom line: It doesn’t make to sense to force-fit everything to a single deployment model
    HOSTED ON-PREMISE SHARED/DYNAMIC DEDICATED/STATIC
  • 20. Are you running any of these workloads or use cases on third party servers, via dynamic on-demand hosting? LIVE SYSTEMS WITHIN IT DEPT Online survey of 312 IT professionals, May 2010
  • 21. Are you running any of these workloads or use cases on third party servers, via dynamic on-demand hosting [to a significant degree]? LIVE SYSTEMS WITHIN IT DEPT Online survey of 312 IT professionals, May 2010
  • 22. Are you running any of these workloads or use cases on third party servers, via dynamic on-demand hosting [to a significant degree]? Online survey of 312 IT professionals, May 2010
  • 23. For each of these workloads or use cases, to what degree do you run them on your in-house server infrastructure? Online survey of 312 IT professionals, May 2010
  • 24. SaaS Suitability Quadrant (Large Scale Requirements)
    • The suitability of ‘software as a service’ depends on the context
    • Costs, risks and constraints can easily arise
    Already using SaaS in this context Consider SaaS suitable in theory Consider SaaS to be unsuitable IT Management Survey, 2008, 202 UK respondents
  • 25. Use of SaaS, to any degree in any context (Picture derived from detailed responses of 202 IT managers to a range of specific questions relating to if and how SaaS is used)
  • 26. Lots of hosted service options, lots of potential ON-DEMAND SERVICE CATEGORIES Business application services It is in this area that the term ‘Software as a Service’ (SaaS) was originally coined. Services at this level are typically focused on the delivery of complete business functionality, e.g. CRM, ERP, etc. Hosted productivity tools Services here are more concerned with horizontal capability ranging from desktop suites for end users, through to modelling, development and project management tools for analysts and developers. Hosted comms/collaboration Spearheaded initially by hosted email and web conferencing, the number of services offerings in this area has exploded to include full unified communications and/or social media (directories, blogs, wikis, etc). Trading community services As supply chain automation has gathered momentum in some industry sectors, services have emerged aimed at facilitating the way in which customers and suppliers collaborate and transact electronically. Plug-in services A myriad of services exist which do not provide complete business functionality but ‘plug into’ existing applications to enhance or extend them. Examples include everything from mapping to credit checking. Application platform services As an alternative to consuming pre-built services from external providers, application platform services provide development and runtime environments allowing custom applications to be built and hosted online. Operational services This often overlooked but highly important category is where we find services concerned with online backup, archiving, security (e.g. email filtering), etc., and even full blown monitoring and management tools.
  • 27. SaaS due diligence
    • Provider
      • Stability, maturity, culture, etc
      • Resources, facilities and policies
    • Service
      • Software foundation, e.g. ‘standard’ package versus home grown
      • Interoperability provided out of the box, e.g. desktop tools, mobile, etc
      • Ability to configure, customise, extend, integrate (standard vs proprietary)
      • Scope: not just functionality, but backup, recovery, archiving, support, etc
      • Administration, operation, provisioning, security (including who does what)
      • Data storage, management, import, export, auditing, compliance, etc
      • End of life, inc migration of process definitions /business rules as well as data
    • Commercial
      • Contract terms
      • TCO, lifetime costs
  • 28. Tips from ‘Cloud for Dummies’
    • Don’t dismiss or try to avoid cloud
      • It isn’t a massive revolution, but there is some good stuff going on
    • Beware of sweeping generalisations
      • Cloud can mean all kinds of things, and no one size fits all
      • Context is everything, know your own requirements
    • Don’t get suckered into industry/supplier agendas
      • Everything is not moving to ‘the cloud’, and won’t do in our lifetimes
      • Think cloud as part of the answer rather than the only answer
      • Use your own requirements and objectives as the point of reference
    • Don’t make assumptions
      • Work through the logic and the numbers yourself
      • Do your due diligence – cloud does not magic all problems away
    • Focus on the underlying trend towards service-centricity
  • 29. Copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd Cloud Computing in Context BCS Meeting, Leeds, 8 th July 2010 Dale Vile Research Director Freeform Dynamics Ltd www.freeformdynamics.com
  • 30. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd, online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010 Hosted server infrastructure Other infrastructure based services Hosted email/messaging Hosted comms (web conferencing, VoIP, unified comms) Hosted business apps (e.g. office tools, CRM, project mgmt, etc) Other hosted services On premise solutions
  • 31. Would you regard the following as legitimate examples of cloud computing? (Hosted Comms) Source and copyright 2010 Freeform Dynamics Ltd. Online survey of 401 IT professionals, April 2010