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Whooping cough study may offer clue on surge   ny times.com
 

Whooping cough study may offer clue on surge ny times.com

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    Whooping cough study may offer clue on surge   ny times.com Whooping cough study may offer clue on surge ny times.com Document Transcript

    • Whooping Cough Study May Offer Clue on Surge - NYTimes.com http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/26/health/study-finds-vaccinated-baboons-can-still-carry-whooping-cough.html?emc=eta1&_r=3&[4/23/2014 7:29:46 PM] Search All NYTimes.com Research Fitness & Nutrition Money & Policy Views Health Guide Inside Health Enlarge This Image Matthew Ryan Williams for The New York Times An older vaccine with longer-lasting protection was found to have side effects. Whooping Cough Study May Offer Clue on Surge By SABRINA TAVERNISE Published: November 25, 2013 Baboons vaccinated against whooping cough could still carry the illness in their throats and spread it, research published in a science journal on Monday has found. The surprising new finding has not been replicated in people, but scientists say it may provide an important clue to a puzzling spike in the incidence of whooping cough across the country, which reached a 50-year high last year. The whooping cough vaccines now in use were introduced in the 1990s after an older version, which offered longer-lasting protection, was found to have side effects. But over the years, scientists have determined that the new vaccines began to lose effectiveness after about five years, a significant problem that many researchers believe has contributed to the significant rise in whooping cough cases. The new study, published on Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers another explanation. Using baboons, the researchers found that recently vaccinated animals continued to carry the infection in their throats. Even though those baboons did not get sick from it, they spread the infection to others that were not vaccinated. “When you’re newly vaccinated you are an asymptomatic carrier, which is good for you, but not for the population,” said Tod J. Merkel, the lead author of the study, who is a researcher in the Office of Vaccines Research and Review in the Food and Drug Administration. Scientists said the finding was surprising, and could be a signpost for investigators as they try to improve the vaccines for people. “If Dr. Merkel is correct, then we need to develop better acellular vaccines,” said Dr. Stanley Plotkin, an emeritus professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania. The new vaccines are known as acellular, as they contain purified proteins, instead of Well Aspirin Benefits Some at Risk for Colon Cancer April 23, 2014, 4:32 PM High Altitudes May Aid Weight Control April 23, 2014, 5:30 AM The Limits of ‘No Pain, No Gain’ April 23, 2014, 12:01 AM The Lure of Forbidden Food April 21, 2014 New Painkiller Rekindles Addiction Concerns April 21, 2014 Health & Fitness Tools BMI Calculator What’s your score? » 1. THE UPSHOT The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest 2. Court Backs Michigan on Affirmative Action MOST EMAILED RECOMMENDED FOR YOU HOME PAGE TODAY'S PAPER VIDEO MOST POPULAR Health WORLD U.S. N.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS Search Health FACEBOOK TWITTER GOOGLE+ SAVE EMAIL SHARE PRINT REPRINTS Log In Register Now HelpSUBSCRIBE NOWU.S. Edition
    • Whooping Cough Study May Offer Clue on Surge - NYTimes.com http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/26/health/study-finds-vaccinated-baboons-can-still-carry-whooping-cough.html?emc=eta1&_r=3&[4/23/2014 7:29:46 PM] A version of this article appears in print on November 26, 2013, on page A15 of the New York edition with the headline: Whooping Cough Study May Offer Clue on Surge. Get 50% Off The New York Times & Free All Digital Access. Whooping Cough Vaccination and Immunization Get Free Email Alerts on These Topics Monkeys and Apes Merkel, Tod J complete bacteria that have been killed. “A great deal of thought and discussion is being devoted to that at the moment,” he said. The current vaccines, usually administered in infancy, preschool and adolescence, protect well in early childhood. But by adolescence, the protective effects wane quickly. Doctors often recommend boosters. Death from whooping cough can occur in infants, but is unusual in adults. The current whooping cough vaccines were developed after a surge in concerns from parents that their children were getting fevers and having seizures after receiving the old vaccine. Those worries added fuel to general skepticism about vaccines that had led some parents to choose not to have their children vaccinated. But scientists say the problem of surging whooping cough cases has more to do with flaws in the current vaccines than with parents’ resistance. The new finding suggests yet another weakness of the vaccine — that even people recently vaccinated may be continuing to spread the infection without getting sick. “The baboon model has provided an illuminating insight into the epidemic as we are coping with it today,” said Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University, who was not involved in the study. Ads by Google what's this? Lumosity Brain Games Challenge memory and attention with scientific brain games. www.lumosity.com Log in to discover more articles based on what you‘ve read. What’s This? | Don’t Show 3. RAW DATA An Apple a Day, and Other Myths 4. FRANK BRUNI Autism and the Agitator 5. Under Russia, Life in Crimea Grows Chaotic 6. MAUREEN DOWD A Saint, He Ain’t 7. MILITARY ANALYSIS Russia Displays a New Military Prowess in Ukraine’s East 8. In Policy Shift, F.C.C. Will Allow a Web Fast Lane 9. Upsetting the Gentility That the South Lays Claim To 10. Boy Who Hid in Plane’s Wheel Well Beat Long Odds in Surviving 5 ½-Hour Flight ELSEWHERE ON NYTIMES.COM Square feet: 84. Possessions: 305. Symbolism meets modern life Should we remove wall-to-wall carpeting? Ads by Google what's this? 2013 Best Skin Tighteners An Unbiased Review List of The Top Performing Skin Tighteners In 2013 www.skincaresearch.com/FaceLifting Free Obituary Search 1) Enter anyone's name 2) Find their obituary instantly! SAVE EMAIL SHARE
    • Whooping Cough Study May Offer Clue on Surge - NYTimes.com http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/26/health/study-finds-vaccinated-baboons-can-still-carry-whooping-cough.html?emc=eta1&_r=3&[4/23/2014 7:29:46 PM] ancestry.com/Obituaries Spinal Stenosis Symptoms If You Have These (5) Early Warning Signs You Have Spinal Stenosis. topicologist.com © 2013 The New York Times Company Site Map Privacy Your Ad Choices Advertise Terms of Sale Terms of Service Work With Us RSS Help Contact Us Site Feedback