• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
State department releases final environmental impact statement on keystone xl pipeline
 

State department releases final environmental impact statement on keystone xl pipeline

on

  • 140 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
140
Views on SlideShare
140
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    State department releases final environmental impact statement on keystone xl pipeline State department releases final environmental impact statement on keystone xl pipeline Document Transcript

    • Climate Change, Energy, Keystone XL, Pipelines State Department Releases Final Environmental Impact Statement on Keystone XL Pipeline EcoWatch | January 31, 2014 4:35 pm | Comments The State Department today released the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline project. The controversial project would carry as much as 830,000 barrels of tar sands oil per day from Alberta, Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast. The State Department’s Final Supplemental EIS concluded that the pipeline wouldn’t increase the rate of extraction of tar sands and thus isn’t likely to significantly increase carbon pollution.
    • “The idea that this pipeline would pose little environmental risk is laughable. If built it will transport the dirtiest fuel on the planet across six states and hundreds of waterways,” said Phil Radford, executive director of Greenpeace. “The risk of oil spills and increase in pollution that this pipeline will cause is unacceptable. “Building this pipeline would be like adding 37 million new cars to U.S. roads. There is nothing insignificant about that. Why invest in oil infrastructure at all, when the cost of renewable energy like wind and solar continues to plummet?” The Final Supplemental EIS provides a technical assessment of the potential environmental impacts related to the proposed pipeline and responds to the more than 1.9 million comments received since June 2012. “Tens of thousands of people across North America, from tribal leaders to ranchers, farmers and landowners, have spoken out, stood up and even been arrested to stop this environmental threat and protect their critical water supplies,” said actress and activist Daryl Hannah. “It is clear that the President must stop this project and invest in clean energy in the interests of a livable planet and future generations.” Last June President Obama warned of the dangers of climate change and said the Keystone XL pipeline would only be in the national interest if it “does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution.” The State Department and independent experts have already determined that the Keystone XL will vastly increase tar sands development in Alberta, Canada. Acclaimed climate scientist Dr. James Hansen has said Keystone would be “game over” for avoiding catastrophic climate change. “Keystone XL will transport nearly a billion barrels of highly toxic tar sands oil through America’s heartland each and every day for 50 years or more—only to have much of it refined and exported,” said Bill Snape, senior counsel with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Along the way it will crush some of the last habitat for endangered species like the swift fox and whooping crane. It’ll pollute water used by millions of people and emit as many greenhouse gases as 51 coal-fired power plants.” Last year the Center for Biological Diversity released a report on the risks posed to endangered species by Keystone XL and a video highlighting the dangers of oil pipelines—a key point given the State Department’s estimate that the 1,700 Canada-to-Texas Keystone XL pipeline will spill at least 100 times during its lifetime. In response to the release of the Final Supplemental EIS and the fact that Canadian officials knew about it days before, Chris Lehane, a top adviser to clean energy philanthropist Tom Steyer, had this to say: “In addition to the fact that they ignored the science, interagency criticism, basic economics of the industry and TransCanada’s own recent admission that the pipeline is the key to opening up the tar sands, the fact that a foreign oil company and foreign government were given critical intelligence ahead of everyone else tells you all you need to know about how useless this EIS is for Secretary Kerry.” If such insider information had been leaked by a public corporation, it would generate an insider trading investigation. Given that a foreign oil company and its lobbyists appear to have received proprietary information before it was shared with the American people demands an answers. We call on the State
    • Department Inspector General to open up an investigation immediately. Where there is smoke there is fire.” The Final Supplemental EIS does not approve or deny the proposed project. It’s now up to the Presidential Permit review process to focuses on whether the proposed Keystone XL pipeline serves the national interest. The review process will take into consideration the following factors: energy security; environmental, cultural and economic impacts; foreign policy; and compliance with relevant federal regulations and issues. In making the final decision, the State Department, as identified in Executive Order 13337, will consult with the Departments of Defense, Justice, Interior, Commerce, Transportation, Energy, Homeland Security and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A 30-day public comment period will begin on Feb. 5, and close on March 7. The public and interested parties are encouraged to submit comments. Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL and CLIMATE CHANGE pages for more related news on this topic. http://ecowatch.com/2014/01/31/state-department-final-eis-keystone-xl/ New Keystone XL Pipeline Application On May 4, 2012, the Department of State received a new application from TransCanada Corp. for a proposed pipeline that would run from the Canadian border to connect to a pipeline in Steele City, Nebraska. The new application includes proposed new routes through the state of Nebraska. The Department’s responsibility, under Executive Order 13337, is to determine if granting a permit for the proposed pipeline would serve the national interest. The Department is considering this new application on its merits. Consistent with the Executive Order, this involves consideration of many factors, including energy security, health, environmental, cultural, economic, and foreign policy concerns. UPDATE On February 5, 2014, the Federal Register published a Notice that invited members of the public to comment on any factor they deem relevant to the national interest determination that will be made for the Presidential Permit application. This began a 30-day public comment period that will close on March 7, 2014. There are two ways to submit comments on the national interest determination. Members of the public are encouraged to submit comments to regulations.gov . Comments may also be mailed directly to: U.S. Department of State Bureau of Energy Resources, Room 4843 Attn: Keystone XL Public Comments
    • 2201 C Street, NW Washington, DC 20520 Comments are not private and will be made public. Comments can only be submitted via regulations.gov and by mail to the address indicated above. The Department continues to review the Presidential Permit application for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline in a rigorous, transparent, and objective manner. On January 31, 2014, the Department of State:  Released a Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the 2012 Presidential Permit application for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. The Final SEIS is available at: http://keystonepipeline-xl.state.gov/finalseis/index.htm;  Published a Fact Sheet regarding the release of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. The Fact Sheet is available at http://keystonepipelinexl.state.gov/documents/organization/221283.pdf;  Published a Media Note announcing the release of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. The Media Note is available at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2014/01/221112.htm;  Posted independent engineering assessments and associated documents prepared by Battelle and Exponent. The documents are available at http://keystonepipelinexl.state.gov/proj_docs/engineering/index.htm;  Posted additional information regarding potential organizational conflicts of interest disclosed by Environmental Resources Management (ERM), which is the Department’s third-party contractor. The documents are available at http://keystonepipelinexl.state.gov/admindocs/conflicts/index.htm; and  Posted the Environmental Report prepared for TransCanada Keystone Pipeline LP by exp Energy Services and submitted to the Department of State on September 7, 2012. The Report is available at http://keystonepipeline-xl.state.gov/proj_docs/environmental/index.htm. The Presidential Permit review process now focuses on whether the proposed Project serves the national interest, which involves consideration of many factors including: energy security; environmental, cultural, and economic impacts; foreign policy; and compliance with relevant federal regulations and issues. During this time, the Department will consult with, at least, the eight agencies identified in Executive Order 13337: the Departments of Defense, Justice, Interior, Commerce, Transportation, Energy, Homeland Security, and the Environmental Protection Agency. http://www.keystonepipeline-xl.state.gov/ Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)
    • Home > Final SEIS Note: If you have trouble viewing any of the PDFs on this site, please download the latest version of Adobe Reader or reload the latest version if it is already installed on your computer. Executive Summary Executive Summary [3675 Kb] Volume 1: Chapters 1-2 0.0 Volume I Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [806 Kb] 1.0 Introduction [34 Kb] 1.1 Background [514 Kb] 1.2 Overview of Proposed Project [238 Kb] 1.3 Purpose and Need [73 Kb] 1.4 Market Analysis [5327 Kb] 1.5 Agency Participation [231 Kb] 1.6 Tribal and SHPO Consultation [27 Kb] 1.7 Environmental Review of Canadian Portion [42 Kb] 1.8 Preparation of Publication [132 Kb] 1.9 Permits, Approvals, and Regulatory Requirements [197 Kb] 2.0 Description of the Proposed Project and Alternatives [448 Kb] 2.1 Overview of the Proposed Project [8002 Kb] 2.2 Description of Reasonable Alternatives [6679 Kb] Volume 2: Chapter 3 0.0 Volume II Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [1170 Kb] 3.0 Affected Environment [110 Kb] 3.1 Geology [5365 Kb] 3.2 Soils [1720 Kb] 3.3 Water Resources [3963 Kb] 3.4 Wetlands [3090 Kb] 3.5 Terrestrial Vegetation [3984 Kb] 3.6 Wildlife [1613 Kb] 3.7 Fisheries [767 Kb] 3.8 Threatened and Endangered Species [1334 Kb]
    • 3.9 Land Use, Recreation, and Visual Resources [742 Kb] 3.10 Socioeconomics [4215 Kb] 3.11 Cultural Resources [1090 Kb] 3.12 Air Quality and Noise [651 Kb] 3.13 Potential Releases [535 Kb] Volume 3: Chapter 4 0.0 Volume III Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [777 Kb] 4.0 Environmental Consequences [117 Kb] 4.1 Geology [302 Kb] 4.2 Soils [696 Kb] 4.3 Water Resources [343 Kb] 4.4 Wetlands [631 Kb] 4.5 Terrestrial Vegetation [2866 Kb] 4.6 Wildlife [414 Kb] 4.7 Fisheries [402 Kb] 4.8 Threatened and Endangered Species [1017 Kb] 4.9 Land Use, Recreation, and Visual Resources [878 Kb] 4.10 Socioeconomics [2236 Kb] 4.11 Cultural Resources [477 Kb] 4.12 Air Quality and Noise [1474 Kb] 4.13 Potential Releases [2016 Kb] 4.14 Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change [2528 Kb] 4.15 Cumulative Effects Assessment and Extraterritorial Concerns [5503 Kb] 4.16 Summary of Impacts [217 Kb] Volume 4: Chapters 5-8 0.0 Volume IV Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [777 Kb] 5.0 Alternatives [134 Kb] 5.1 No Action Alternative [1536 Kb] 5.2 Route Alternatives [3314 Kb] 5.3 Comparison of Alternatives [717 Kb] 6.0 List of Preparers [190 Kb] 7.0 Distribution List [227 Kb] 8.0 Index [408 Kb]
    • Volume 5: Comments and Responses Part 1 0.0 Volume V Front Cover and Title Page [388 Kb] Volume V Comments and Responses Part 1 [5712 Kb] Volume 6: Comments and Responses Part 2 0.0 Volume VI Front Cover and Title Page [391 Kb] Volume VI Comments and Responses Part 2 [4979 Kb] Volume 7: Appendices A-G 0.0 Volume VII Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [773 Kb] Appendix A Governor Approval of Keystone XL Project in Nebraska [153 Kb] Appendix B Potential Releases and Pipeline Safety [500 Kb] Appendix C Supplemental Information to Market Analysis [4065 Kb] Appendix D Waterbody Crossing Tables and Required Crossing Criteria [9510 Kb] Appendix E Programmatic Agreement and Record of Consultation [6681 Kb] Appendix F Scoping Summary Report [186 Kb] Appendix G Construction Mitigation and Reclamation Plan [7665 Kb] Volume 8: Appendix H 0.0 Volume VIII Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [773 Kb] Appendix H1-H2 Errata and Biological Assessment [32211 Kb] Appendix H3-H4 Letters and Biological Opinion [27446 Kb] Volume 9: Appendices I-M 0.0 Volume IX Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [773 Kb] Appendix I Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan and ERP [14765 Kb] Appendix J Big Bend to Witten 230-kV Transmission Project Routing Report [2818 Kb] Appendix K Historical Pipeline Incident Analysis [1609 Kb] Appendix L Oil and Gas Wells within 1320 ft of Proposed Right-of-Way [1758 Kb] Appendix M Soil Summary for Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska [1449 Kb]
    • Volume 10: Appendices N-P 0.0 Volume X Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [773 Kb] Appendix N1 Supplemental Information for Compliance with MEPA [4020 Kb] Appendix N2 Figures [12893 Kb] Appendix N3 Attachments 1-3 [4143 Kb] Appendix O Socioeconomics [1809 Kb] Appendix P Risk Assessment [648 Kb] Volume 11: Appendices Q-Z 0.0 Volume XI Front Cover, Title Page, and Table of Contents [773 Kb] Appendix Q Crude Oil Material Safety Data Sheets [435 Kb] Appendix R Construction Reclamation Plans and Documentation [10037 Kb] Appendix S Pipeline Temperature Effects Study [1307 Kb] Appendix T Oil Spill Modeling [182 Kb] Appendix U Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions [2328 Kb] Appendix V Literature Review [1464 Kb] Appendix W Past Present and Future Project Descriptions [282 Kb] Appendix X Canadian Env Assessment Act and KXL Review [3069 Kb] Appendix Y Estimated Criteria Pollutants Noise and GHG [758 Kb] Appendix Z Compiled Mitigation Measures [903 Kb] http://keystonepipeline-xl.state.gov/finalseis/index.htm