(Disruptive) innovations: education and society

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F. Questier, (Disruptive) innovations: education and society, lecture for Chinese Summerschool 'European languages, culture and educational systems', Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 07/07/2014

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(Disruptive) innovations: education and society

  1. 1. (Disruptive) innovations: education and society Prof. dr. Frederik Questier 布鲁塞尔自由大学暑期学校 Vrije Universiteit Brussel Summer School “European languages, culture and educational systems” 07/07/14
  2. 2. 布鲁塞尔自由大学暑期学校 Vrije Universiteit Brussel Summer School
  3. 3. This presentation can be found at http://questier.com http://www.slideshare.net/Frederik_Questier
  4. 4. 4 How can we educate our students for the unknown future?
  5. 5. 5 The only constant in life is change
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7 What is the biggest change you expect during your (professional) life?
  8. 8. 8 The best way to predict the future is to invent it. (Alan Kay, 1971)
  9. 9. 9 William Gibson
  10. 10. 10 Information Society ?
  11. 11. 11 Knowledge Society
  12. 12. 12 Evolution of organizations Source: Jessica Lipnack and Jeffrey Stamps, Virtual Teams http://www.netage.com/pub/books/VirtualTeams%202/CHAPTERS%20PDF/chapter02.pdf
  13. 13. 13 Network society
  14. 14. 14 Everything gets connected & software enhanced
  15. 15. 15 Evolution of the internet? Web 2.0: Social Web 3.0: Semantic Mobile and Ubiquitous Darknet: anonymous & encrypted Internet of things Global brain – intelligence
  16. 16. 16 “On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog” Peter Steiner New Yorker 2000
  17. 17. 17 In China: “On the Internet, everybody knows you're a dog” This vision might be closer to today's Internet reality!
  18. 18. 18 Transparency + Privacy
  19. 19. 19 "The most fundamental way of helping other people, is to teach people how to do things better or how to better their lives. For people who use computers, this means sharing the recipes you use on your computer, in other words the programs you run."
  20. 20. 20 1980's: Stallman defined “Free Software” The freedom to ➢ use ➢ study ➢ distribute ➢ improve the program
  21. 21. 1998: “Open Source” sounds better as “Free Software”?
  22. 22. 22 The software Freedoms require access to the source code → “Open Source Software” Free Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) Source code: if encrypt(password) == encryptedpassword, then login=1, end Compiled code: 001001011101010011001100001111011000110001110001101
  23. 23. 1991 comp sci student Usenet posting to the newsgroup "comp.os.minix.": “I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones.”
  24. 24. 6117 persons, 659 companies have contributed to Linux kernel
  25. 25. "Congratulations, you're on the winning team. Linux has crossed the chasm to mainstream adoption." ➢ Jeffrey Hammond, principal analyst at Forrester Research, LinuxCon, 2010 “Linux has come to dominate almost every category of computing, with the exception of the desktop” ➢ Jim Zemlin, Linux Foundation Executive Director, 2011 “Linux is the benchmark of Quality” ➢ Coverity Report 2012
  26. 26. Linux powers 92% of the top 500 Super Computers
  27. 27. Android, a mobile version of Linux, has overall largest market share
  28. 28. FLOSS browsers dominate!
  29. 29. Most used web browser by country June 2013, according to Statcounter
  30. 30. Most used web browser by country June 2014, according to Statcounter
  31. 31. 33
  32. 32. 36 You will have to compete with amateurs! An enthusiastic amateur beats a bored professional “Karl Marx was perhaps the original prophet of the Professional Amateurs economy: labour – forced, unspontaneous and waged work – would be superseded by self-activity”
  33. 33. 37 You will have to compete with free!
  34. 34. 38
  35. 35. 39 3D printing
  36. 36. 40
  37. 37. 41 2045 Technological Singularity?
  38. 38. 42
  39. 39. 43
  40. 40. 44 Start of transhumanism?
  41. 41. 45
  42. 42. 46
  43. 43. 47 How can we educate our students for the unknown future?
  44. 44. 48 “Schools we have today were designed around commonsense assumptions that had never been scientifically tested” R. Keith Sawyer
  45. 45. 49
  46. 46. 50
  47. 47. 51 innovation? Politics Education Science 1km/h 10km/h 100km/h
  48. 48. 52
  49. 49. 53 information scarcity → information abundance ! Total information is now doubling every year !
  50. 50. 54 Surveys How much of the knowledge you need for your job is in your own head? >75% | 75-50% | 50-25% | 25-10%
  51. 51. 55 Surveys How much of the knowledge you need for your job is in your own head? 1986 75% → 2010 10%
  52. 52. 56 The longer one studies, the more one comes to realize how much one does not know
  53. 53. 57 % tested genius in Divergent Thinking (used to generate creative ideas by exploring many possible solutions) Source: Breakpoint and Beyond by George Land and Beth Jaman
  54. 54. 58
  55. 55. 59 Demand for new skills? ➢ Social skills ➢ communicating, networking, teamwork ➢ international, intercultural ➢ Creativity ➢ Entrepeneurship ➢ Information technology skills ➢ Handle information overload ➢ ... ➢ ➢ Learning to learn → Life Long Learning!
  56. 56. 60 Knowledge -> Skills -> Competences Competences are the ability to use ➢ knowledge ➢ skills ➢ attitudes in new, complex, authentic situations
  57. 57. 61 ?
  58. 58. 62
  59. 59. 63 Discrepancy? What are students used to? What is their classroom experience? control no control action passive instant feedback little, late feedback rich media poor media always online offline social interactions working together = cheating
  60. 60. 64
  61. 61. 65
  62. 62. 66 Why change the way we teach and learn? We have new scientific knowledge about teaching and learning
  63. 63. 67 how ?
  64. 64. 68 Evolution in learning theories Behaviourism Learning = change of behaviour Stimulus → response Learner is passive receiver of knowledge Mind = black box Cognitivism Focuses on how the brain works Metacognition, learning strategies Motivation Constructivism Knowledge is actively constructed by the learner New knowledge is linked to prior knowledge Learners discover themselves facts and relationships Social Constructivism Social interaction plays a fundamental role Discussions lead to deeper understanding and increased motivation Constructionism Constructing an artifact or something that can be shared leads to better learning Connectivism Learning is a process of connecting nodes or information sources Knowledge and learning may reside in non-human appliances Try to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts Know-what & Know-how → Know-where
  65. 65. 69 Educational innovation? Traditional learning New Learning teacher oriented student oriented (passive) knowledge transfer (active) knowledge construction; interaction focus on knowledge focus on competences individual learning collaborative learning focus on course contents teacher = expert teacher = coach teacher directs also self-directed learning selective education adaptive education students focus on good scores attention for (intrinsic) motivation surface learning deep (natural) learning also focus on learning process (learning to learn, reflection)
  66. 66. 70 Educational innovation? Traditional learning New Learning abstract, school-like examples & tasks authentic contexts evaluation by teacher self/co/peer-assessment, ... summative evaluation + formative evaluation (learning from mistakes and feedback) linear curriculum flexible curriculum independent courses and disciplines connexion, integration, interdisciplinarity supply oriented demand oriented uniform education differentiated education (adapted to e.g. learning styles) classroom flexible learning environment (also online & virtual) course materials powerful learning environments formal learning + informal learning behaviorism and cognitivism Social constructivism (and connectivism)
  67. 67. 71 How can we improve teaching and learning with ICT? Don't apply traditional teaching methods in new technologies! Substitution? (dropping your coursebook online) Transformation!
  68. 68. 72 Seek the synergy! Theories about learning and technologies have evolved towards very similar concepts
  69. 69. 73 One Laptop Per Child
  70. 70. 74 Model Jonassen for (constructive) learning environments → Technologies can support the intentional construction, in a collaborative way, of complex contextualized artifacts and the conversation and reflection about it
  71. 71. 75 Active/Manipulative - Collaborative - Complex - Constructive - Contextualized - Conversational - Intentional - Reflective Case kitCase kit (Ugent, Jan Velghe)(Ugent, Jan Velghe)
  72. 72. 76 Active/Manipulative - Collaborative - Complex - Constructive - Contextualized - Conversational - Intentional - Reflective
  73. 73. 78 Active/Manipulative - Collaborative - Complex - Constructive - Contextualized - Conversational - Intentional - Reflective
  74. 74. Pharmacy simulations
  75. 75. ICT supported
  76. 76. ICT supported
  77. 77. 83
  78. 78. 84 Chinese students in my course forum
  79. 79. 85
  80. 80. Class conferencing software
  81. 81. 89
  82. 82. 90
  83. 83. 91
  84. 84. Open educational resources (OER) digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and self-learners to use and reuse for teaching, learning and research
  85. 85. Believing that OER can widen access to quality education, particularly when shared by many countries and higher education institutions, UNESCO champions OER as a means of promoting access, equity and quality in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  86. 86. 97
  87. 87. 98
  88. 88. 99
  89. 89. 100
  90. 90. 101
  91. 91. 102 55550 Flemish primary and secondary teachers on sharing site
  92. 92. 103
  93. 93. 104
  94. 94. 105
  95. 95. 106
  96. 96. 107
  97. 97. 108
  98. 98. 109
  99. 99. 110
  100. 100. 111
  101. 101. 112
  102. 102. 113
  103. 103. 114
  104. 104. 115
  105. 105. 116 Learning Analytics Gephi export, learning interactions, R. Carlos, F. Questier, C. Zhu
  106. 106. 117 We all can learn from Learning Analytics! ➢ The Learning Analytics Cycle, by Doug Clow, http://dougclow.wordpress.com/2011/02/28/the-learning-analytics-cycle/
  107. 107. 118 Tin Cap API
  108. 108. 119
  109. 109. 谢谢 Questier.com Frederik AT Questier.com www.linkedin.com/in/fquestie www.diigo.com/user/frederikquestier www.slideshare.net/Frederik_Questier
  110. 110. Copyright acknowledgements ➢ Screenshot http://www.chamilo.org/ ➢ Figure study CC-by-nc-sa by Tony2 (NOT IN USE!) ➢ Question! CC-by by Stefan Baudy ➢ http://users4.jabry.com/vortex/misc/DivergentThinking.gif ➢ Edupunk: http://blogs.pstcc.edu/drbrown/files/2009/11/Picture-4.png ➢ Flipped-Classroom-CC-BY-NC-SA-2-by-ransomtech ➢ http://cogdogblog.com/2012/07/17/mooc-hysertia/ ➢ http://www.onlinecollege.org/2012/08/21/25-tips-make-most-mooc/
  111. 111. 122 DARE TO SHARE
  112. 112. This presentation was made with 100% Free Software No animals were harmed

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