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Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests
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Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests

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  • 1. Venture Capital Fund Carried Interests Background and Selected Issues July 2001 1352819
  • 2. Background: Typical Fund Structure Institutional Sponsor Individual Fund Managers (if any) General Partner, L.L.C. Investors General Limited Partner Partners Fund, L.P. Portfolio Companies 2
  • 3. Definition of “Carried Interest” The Carried Interest is a share of fund net profits allocated to the General Partner that is disproportionate to the General Partner’s capital commitment to the fund 3
  • 4. Typical Fund Capitalization Capital Committed by Investors: 99% Capital Committed by General Partner: 1% 4
  • 5. Typical Allocation of Fund Net Profits • Proportionate Allocation: – 80% to all Partners (including the General Partner) in proportion to their respective capital commitments • Carried Interest Allocation: – 20% to the General Partner 5
  • 6. Range of Carried Interest Rates • The vast majority of General Partners have a 20% carried interest – Very few have a carried interest of less than 20% Different rule for in-house corporate venture funds, where carry often is less than 20% – A modest number of “top-tier” General Partners have a carried interest of 25-30% 6
  • 7. Range of Carried Interest Rates – Occasionally, the carried interest rate is contingent upon performance Example: Carried interest rate is 20%, unless the IRR to Limited Partners exceeds 25%, in which case carried interest rate is 30% 7
  • 8. Appearances Can Be Misleading • Stated carried interest percentages are not the whole story – There are a number of key provisions that can modify the economic value of the stated carried interest percentage 8
  • 9. Selected Modifications • Hurdle Rate • Floor • Calculation of “Net Profits” 9
  • 10. “Hurdle Rates” Some fund agreements allocate carried interest profits to the General Partner only after the Limited Partners have achieved a specific IRR 10
  • 11. Sample Hurdle Rate Allocation • Net profits will be allocated: – First, to all the Partners until each Partner has been allocated net profits sufficient to represent an 8% cumulative IRR on such Partner’s contributed (and unreturned) capital; – Next, 100% to the General Partner until total allocations have been made: 80% to all the Partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments; and 20% to the General Partner; and 11
  • 12. Sample Hurdle Rate Allocation, cont’d. – Next, 80% to all the Partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments; and 20% to the General Partner. 12
  • 13. Observation About Hurdle Rates Because of the 100% “catch-up” allocation to the General Partner, the hurdle will have no ultimate effect on the carried interest if the fund achieves its target IRR 13
  • 14. Alternative to the Hurdle: The “Floor” • Under this approach, the carried interest applies only to those net profits that exceed the hurdle rate • There is no General Partner “catch-up” • More frequently used in “Hedge Funds” than in Venture Capital Funds; strongly resisted by General Partners 14
  • 15. Sample Floor Allocation • Net profits will be allocated: – First, to all the Partners until each Partner has been allocated net profits sufficient to represent an 8% cumulative IRR on such Partner’s contributed (and unreturned) capital; and – Next, 80% to all the Partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments; and 20% to the General Partner. 15
  • 16. Calculation of “Net Profits” • Majority Rule – Net profits are calculated by taking into account all items of fund income, gain, loss and expense (including management fees paid to the General Partner) • Pro-General Partner Rule – Net profits are calculated by taking into account only gains and losses on portfolio company investments (excluding items of fund expense such as management fees) 16
  • 17. Sample Allocation Provision Using Pro-General Partner Rule • Items of gain and loss realized upon the sale of portfolio securities shall be allocated: – 80% to all the Partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments; and – 20% to the General Partner. • All other items of income, gain, loss and expense shall be allocated: – 100% to all the Partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments. 17
  • 18. Example of Economic Impact • Assume: – Limited Partner capital commitments: $99 million – General Partner capital commitment: $1 million – Annual management fee rate: 2.5% of committed capital – Fund term: 10 years – Total management fees: $25 million – Net investment gains: $25 million 18
  • 19. Example of Economic Impact • Allocations to the General Partner: – Under Majority Rule: Investment gains: $ 250,000 Management fee expense: $ 250,000 – Under Pro-General Partner Rule: Investment gains: $5,200,000 Management fee expense: $ 250,000 19
  • 20. Allocations vs. Distributions • Carried interest allocations govern the underlying economic deal among the partners • Distribution provisions govern the timing and content of payments in respect of the carried interest 20
  • 21. Sample Distribution Approaches • Pro-Limited Partner: – Distributions shall be made: First, 100% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments until the Limited Partners have received a complete return of contributed capital; and Thereafter, 80% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments and 20% to the General Partner. 21
  • 22. Sample Distribution Approaches • Pro-General Partner: – Distributions shall be made: First, 80% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments and 20% to the General Partner until all net profits have been distributed; and Thereafter, 100% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments. 22
  • 23. Sample Distribution Approaches • Middle of the road: – First, the cost basis of each portfolio security giving rise to a distribution shall be distributed 100% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments; and – Next, the gain component of each portfolio security giving rise to a distribution shall be distributed 80% to all partners in proportion to their respective capital commitments and 20% to the General Partner. 23
  • 24. Observation About Distribution Approaches Any distribution approach other than the Pro-Limited Partner Approach may result in overdistributions to the General Partner if investment losses follow investment gains 24
  • 25. Example of Overdistribution Under Pro-General Partner Approach 1. Fund purchases Security A for $10 million 2. Fund purchases Security B for $10 million 3. Fund sells Security A for $20 million 4. Fund distributes proceeds $2 million to General Partner and $18 million to all Partners 5. Security B declines in value to $0 6. Fund dissolves 7. Net result: General Partner has received $2 million carried interest distribution even though net profits were $0 8. Clawback? 25
  • 26. Observation About Distribution Approaches Any distribution approach other than the Pro-General Partner Approach may create perverse incentives for the General Partner to manipulate distributions 26
  • 27. Example of Perverse Incentive Under Pro-Limited Partner Approach • Assume: – Unreturned contributions: $10 million – Value of “Dog” Security A: $10 million – Value of “Superstar” Security B: $10 million • Assume: – Due to thin trading market, the value of Security A would decline to $5 million if there were uncoordinated sales by Partners following a distribution – Robust trading market for Security B 27
  • 28. Example of Perverse Incentive Under Pro-Limited Partner Approach ❐Question: Which Security does the General Partner distribute first? ❐Answer: Security A, because the Limited Partner will suffer 99% of the decline in value, leaving the General Partner to receive a full 20% carried interest distribution of Security B 28
  • 29. Additional Information Additional Information For a more detailed discussion of distribution approaches, For a more detailed discussion of distribution approaches, see article by Axelrad and Wright see article by Axelrad and Wright Distribution Provisions in Distribution Provisions in Venture Capital Fund Agreements Venture Capital Fund Agreements

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