Erh various applications - SCME 2013

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HMVTRS presents at CSME conference, October 2013 Amsterdam 29 October 2013

HMVTRS was asked to present at the 2013 Contaminated Site Management Europe conference in Amsterdam (CSME). HMVTRS is a Joint Venture between HMVT and TRS. We presented globally the Electrical Resistance Heating Technology (ERH) and the results of two ERH in-situ remediation projects. The first presented project was a chlorinated solvent location on a bedrock location in Clark’s Summit. The second presented project was a mineral spirits and a chlorinated solvent site in Seattle. On this second site various more classical in-situ remediation technologies over the last 20 years failed to solve the problem. TRS was able by using the ERH technology to reduce on both sites the concentration levels over 99%. More information on ERH and the two cases can be found in the presented powerpoint presentation.
HMVTRS was asked to present at the 2013 Contaminated Site Management Europe conference in Amsterdam (CSME). HMVTRS is a Joint Venture between HMVT and TRS. We presented an overview of the Electrical Resistance Heating Technology (ERH) and case studies of two ERH in-situ remediation projects. The first project was a chlorinated solvent (PCE) location on a bedrock site in Pennsylvania. The second presented project was a mineral spirits and a chlorinated solvent site in Seattle. On this second site various more classical in-situ remediation technologies applied over the last 20 years failed to solve the problem. TRS was able to apply the ERH technology to reduce the concentration levels on both sites by over 99%. More information on ERH and the two case studies can be found in the PDF of the presentation.

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Erh various applications - SCME 2013

  1. 1. Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) For Various Applications CSME - Amsterdam October 2013 Jerry Wolf (817) 379-0536 jwolf@thermalrs.com www.thermalrs.com Jerry.wolf@HMVTRS.nl www.hmvtrs.eu
  2. 2. TRS ERH Global Network TRS Group, Inc. TRS International B.V. (‘s Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands) TRSDoxor, Limitada (Sao Paulo, Brazil) HMVTRS B.V. (Ede, The Netherlands)
  3. 3. What is ERH? Electricity is directed into the subsurface area. TRS ERH PROCESS PCU TRS Power Control Unit Site Building Electrode/Vapor Recovery Wells VR Blower Condenser GAC
  4. 4. When Does ERH Apply? • In Situ Soil and Groundwater – simultaneously • VOCs and Semi-VOCs • Heterogeneous Lithology • Under Buildings, Roadways, Railroads • Rapid Remediation – Brownfields/Property Transfer • Mass Removal (Source) – Reduce Downgradient Migration
  5. 5. TCE in Soil and Fractured Bedrock Clark’s Summit, PA • TCE in soil • Treatment Area: 260 m2; 1 to 34 m bgs; 8,487 m3 • Sand and clay between 3.3-6.6 m bgs; bedrock -fractured sandstone with occasional siltstone; coal seams at depths of 23 and 34 m bgs. Groundwater: 5 m bgs • Baseline levels in soil (maximum): 560 mg/kg • Remedial goal(s): • remove estimated mass - 219 kg TCE • Negligible/asymptotic concentrations observed in the vapor stream • total design energy
  6. 6. Project Site Plan
  7. 7. ERH Design • 17 Electrodes (6 intervals each) • VGAC for vapor treatment
  8. 8. Energy (kWh) Vapor Concentrations (ppm) Vapor Concentrations vs. Energy
  9. 9. Results • Asymptotic vapor concentrations in vapor stream reached after 79 days of operations (estimate of 69-90) • 181 kg of CVOC mass recovered
  10. 10. Seattle Site History • Active chemical warehouse and distribution facility • Contaminated soil first found at the site in 1990 • Previously applied technologies • 1995-1997: Soil Vapor Extraction with Pump & Treat • 1998: DVE/Hydrogen peroxide injection Pilot • 2003~2004: Potassium Permanganate and Sodium Permanganate Injection • 2003~2004: SVE • 2005~2007: Expanded SVE and Potassium Permanganate Pilot • 2008~2011: Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination – downgradient • 2010: Expanded ERD and Expanded SVE Pilot Testing
  11. 11. Guaranteed ERH Remediation of PCE and Mineral Spirits - Seattle 2013 • Silt, sand; 7.1 x 10-3 cm/sec • GW at 2 m bgs; flow 0.6 m/day • 2,484 m2; variable depths; 32,188 m3 • 163 electrodes • Elevated TOC from mineral spirits • Active work areas & RR spurs • Beginning maximum TCE+PCE: 4,210 mg/kg • Remedial goal: <10 mg/kg PCE + TCE • Contaminant mass estimate – 10,200 kg
  12. 12. ERH Modeling – 5 Areas The site was divided into 5 Areas for purposes of modeling
  13. 13. Energy & Power Design Targets AREA Design Energy (kWh) Design Energy Density (kWh/m3) 1 804,000 328 2 356,000 358 3 1,064,000 383 4 5,962,000 484 shallow 209 deep 5 1,235,000 209 Total Estimated Energy Required: 9,421,000 kWh
  14. 14. Results • Cumulative Energy – 7,377,000 kWh– 78% of total • Average Power Input Rate – 2,557 kW (max weekly 3,438 kW) • Average subsurface temperature – 95.2⁰C • All treatment areas met clean up goals set by Washington Department of Ecology • Total cumulative mass removed – 9,404 kg • 56% Mineral Spirits, 44% TCE, PCE • Total project cost - €96/m3 “I am impressed to say the least, I expected things to clean up but not be this clean!” - Seattle Client
  15. 15. Results “I have reviewed the compliance soil sample results. I agree that the soil remediation level of 10 ppm specified in the CAP (Corrective Action Plan) has been met, and that the thermal treatment system can be shut down.” – Washington Department of Ecology
  16. 16. Seattle Potassium Permanganate
  17. 17. ERH Summary • GFPR or SFPR – nearly 100 remediation projects • Perfect safety record • In situ remediation of VOCs, semi-VOCs • Unaffected by heterogeneity – easy to control • Does not cause desiccation – Self-regulating • Achieve >99% reduction • Low cost compared to life cycle costs
  18. 18. QUESTIONS? www.thermalrs.com 1-817-379-0536 www.hmvtrs.eu 31.318.624.624

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