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Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
Lit heritage linked texts question 2012
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Lit heritage linked texts question 2012

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  • 1. THIS IS A NEW SPECIFICATION GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF SECONDARY EDUCATION ENGLISH LITERATURE A661 Literary Heritage Linked Texts CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT RELEASED JUNE 2010 FOR ASSESSMENT SUBMISSION* O C E / 3 0 5 5 5 * JANUARY 2011 AND JUNE 2011 JANUARY 2012 AND JUNE 2012 This assessment may be periodically reviewed. Please check on OCR Interchange that you have the controlled assessment material valid for the appropriate assessment session. * A 6 6 1 * CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT TASKS Controlled Assessment Tasks are subject to differing levels of supervision at the different stages of preparation and during the production of the work. Full details of the procedures for Controlled Assessment Tasks are contained in the JCQ Instructions for conducting controlled assessments. An indication of the level of supervision is given below and this is further clarified in the Notes on Conducting Controlled Assessments on page 2 of this document. There are two areas for study. Shakespeare and Film/Audio/Live performance Candidates choose one of four Shakespeare plays: Julius Caesar or Macbeth or The Merchant of Venice or Romeo and Juliet and one or more performed versions of their chosen play. One task is set on the Shakespeare text studied linked to a film, audio version or live performance. Candidates will need to • study the chosen Shakespeare play (informal supervision – teacher direction, group work) • study one or more performed versions of the play (informal supervision – teacher direction, group work) • carry out relevant research using available resources (limited supervision – support texts, library, internet) • produce an extended piece of work as a response to the set task (formal supervision – direct supervision at all times, can be in the classroom; internet and e-mail are not permitted) Poetry Candidates study one poet from a choice of six: Browning or Chaucer or Hardy or Owen or Rossetti or Shakespeare. One task is set involving comparison linking two of the poems studied. Candidates will need to • study their chosen poet (informal supervision – teacher direction, group work) • carry out relevant research using available resources (limited supervision – support texts, library, internet) • produce an extended piece of work as a response to the set task (formal supervision – direct supervision at all times, can be in the classroom; internet and e-mail are not permitted) • Quality of Written Communication is assessed in this paper. • The total number of marks is 40. • This document consists of 16 pages. Any blank pages are indicated. Teachers are responsible for ensuring that assessment is carried out against the controlled assessment set for the relevant examination series (detailed above). Assessment evidence produced that does not reflect the relevant examination series will not be accepted. © OCR 2011 [T/600/3314] OCR is an exempt Charity DC (SHW 00592 3/10) 30555/4 Turn over
  • 2. 2Notes on Conducting Controlled AssessmentsDefinitions of the level of supervision allowed at each stage are given below.Informal supervisionUnder informal supervision, the use of resources is not tightly prescribed and group work is normallypermitted provided that any assessable outcomes can be attributed to individual candidates. Candidatesdo not need to be under direct supervision at all times. However the Centre must ensure that:• all candidates participate in the assessment• plagiarism does not take place• sources used by the candidates are clearly recorded• each candidate’s preparation for the final production of the work is his/her own.Limited supervisionUnder limited supervision, work may be completed without direct supervision. Research or datacollection may take place outside the classroom.Formal supervisionUnder formal supervision, candidates must be under direct supervision at all times. Candidates shouldhave clean copies of texts during the assessment period. Internet and e-mail access should not bepermitted.It is advisable that the Centre records the date and time of the assessment, the name of the supervisorand keeps a log of any incidents which may occur during the course of the assessment.Candidates are allowed access to dictionaries, thesauri and spellcheckers in completing controlledassessment tasks.ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVESThe relevant Assessment Objectives for these tasks are: AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select and evaluate (Shakespeare) relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations. AO3 Make comparisons and explain links between texts, evaluating writers’ (Poetry) different ways of expressing meaning and achieving effects.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 3. 3 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: Julius CaesarTask 1Remind yourself of Act 1 scene 2 in the text and in one or more performed versions of the play.Explore the ways in which Brutus and Cassius are presented in this scene and elsewhere inShakespeare’s play, and in the performed version(s).You should consider:• the thoughts and feelings Brutus and Cassius express• the way other characters react to them• what makes the relationship between Brutus and Cassius so important.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, as follows:• through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s play for study;• through the choice of performed version(s) for study, e.g. film, animated, audio or live performance(s).In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).Performed versionsSome performed versions are:• film – directed by Stuart Burge (1970) with Charlton Heston/James Mason• film – directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1953) with Marlon Brando• film – directed by Herbert Wise BBC (1979)• audio CD – BBC Audio Books (2004)• audio CD – Arkangel Shakespeare (2005) or any live performance.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12 Turn over
  • 4. 4 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: MacbethTask 2Remind yourself of Act 2 scene 2 in the text and in one or more performed versions of the play.Explore the ways in which Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are presented in this scene and elsewhere inShakespeare’s play, and in the performed version(s).You should consider:• the thoughts and feelings Macbeth and Lady Macbeth express• the way other characters react to them• what makes the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth so important.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, as follows:• through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s play for study;• through the choice of performed version(s) for study, e.g. film, animated, audio or live performance(s).In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).Performed versionsSome performed versions are:• film – directed by Roman Polanski (1971)• film – directed by Philip Casson RSC production starring Judi Dench/Ian McKellan (1976)• film – directed by Orson Welles (1948)• film – ‘Throne of Blood’ directed by Akiro Kurosawa (Samurai version) (1957)• film –CH4 RSC version starring Antony Sher (2003)• film – directed by Jack Gold BBC (1983)• film –‘Macbeth on the Estate/BBC’ directed by Michael Bogdanov (1998).• film – directed by Greg Doran (2001) RSC’s Swan Theatre production• audio CD – BBC Audio Books (2004)• audio CD – Arkangel Shakespeare (2005)• audio CD – New Cambridge Shakespeare Audio (1998) or any live performance.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 5. 5 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: The Merchant of VeniceTask 3Remind yourself of Act 1 scene 3 in the text and in one or more performed versions of the play.Explore the ways in which Shylock and Antonio are presented in this scene and elsewhere inShakespeare’s play, and in the performed version(s).You should consider:• the thoughts and feelings Shylock and Antonio express• the reactions of Bassanio• what makes the relationship between Shylock and Antonio so important.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, as follows:• through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s play for study;• through the choice of performed version(s) for study, e.g. film, animated, audio or live performance(s).In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).Performed versionsSome performed versions are:• film – directed by Michael Radford, starring Al Pacino/Jeremy Irons (2004).• film – directed by Trevor Nunn and Chris Hunt (2001)• film – directed by Jack Gold BBC (1980)• film – directed by John Sichel (1974)• audio CD – BBC Audio Books (2004)• audio CD – Arkangel Shakespeare (2005) or any live performance.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12 Turn over
  • 6. 6 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: Romeo and JulietTask 4Remind yourself of Act 2 scene 4 in the text and in one or more performed versions of the play.Explore the ways in which Romeo and Mercutio are presented in this scene and elsewhere inShakespeare’s play, and in the performed version(s).You should consider:• the thoughts and feelings Romeo and Mercutio express• the way other characters react to them• what makes the relationship between Romeo and Mercutio so important.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, as follows:• through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s play for study;• through the choice of performed version(s) for study, e.g. film, animated, audio or live performance(s).In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).Performed versionsSome performed versions are:• film – directed by Baz Luhrman (1996)• film – directed by Franco Zefferelli (1968)• film – directed by Alvin Rakoff BBC (1978)• film – directed by Trevor Nunn (2006)• film – directed by Renato Castellani (1954)• film – directed by George Cukor (1936)• audio CD – BBC Audio Books (2004)• audio CD – Arkangel Shakespeare (2005)• audio CD – New Cambridge Shakespeare Audio (1997) or any live performance.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 7. 7 ROBERT BROWNING: PoemsEITHERTask 5Poems: Porphyria’s Lover and My Last DuchessCompare how Browning brings vividly to life the men and their relationships with women in these twopoems.You should consider:• the situations Browning describes• the feelings he portrays• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Browning’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 6Poems: James Lee’s Wife III In the Doorway and Home Thoughts from AbroadCompare the ways in which Browning expresses powerful emotions in these two poems.You should consider:• the situations Browning describes• the scenes he portrays• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Browning’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12 Turn over
  • 8. 8 GEOFFREY CHAUCER: The General Prologue to The Canterbury TalesEITHERTask 7Compare how Chaucer brings to life the Friar and the Reeve in The General Prologue.You should consider:• how Chaucer describes the physical appearance and the lifestyle of each man• how Chaucer reveals their personalities• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of The General Prologue for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 8Compare how Chaucer strikingly presents the differences between the Prioress and the Wife of Bath.You should consider:• how Chaucer describes the physical appearance and the lifestyle of each woman• how Chaucer reveals their personalities• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of The General Prologue for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 9. 9 THOMAS HARDY: PoemsEITHERTask 9Poems: The Voice and The GoingCompare the ways in which Hardy movingly portrays the experience of missing a loved one in thesetwo poems.You should consider:• the situations Hardy describes• the feelings he conveys• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Hardy’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 10Poems: Drummer Hodge and TransformationsCompare the ways in which Hardy reflects on life and death in these two poems.You should consider:• the situations Hardy describes• the feelings he conveys• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Hardy’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12 Turn over
  • 10. 10 WILFRED OWEN: PoemsEITHERTask 11Poems: Exposure and Spring OffensiveCompare the ways in which Owen portrays the extreme situations which the soldiers experience inthese two poems.You should consider:• the different circumstances Owen describes• the feelings he conveys• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Owen’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 12Poems: The Dead Beat and The ChancesCompare the ways in which Owen strikingly presents the effects of the war on the soldiers in these twopoems.You should consider:• the situations Owen depicts• the feelings the speakers convey• the language Owen uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Owen’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 11. 11 CHRISTINA ROSSETTI: PoemsEITHERTask 13Poems: ‘No,Thank You, John’ and Promises like Pie-CrustCompare how Rossetti brings vividly to life the relationships between men and women in these twopoems.You should consider:• the situations Rossetti describes• the feelings she portrays• the language she uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Rossetti’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 14Poems: A Dumb Friend and The Key-NoteCompare the ways in which Rossetti portrays the natural world in these two poems.You should consider:• the scenes Rossetti describes• the thoughts and feelings she expresses• the language she uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Rossetti’s poems for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12 Turn over
  • 12. 12 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: SonnetsEITHERTask 15Poems: Sonnet 15 and Sonnet 19Compare how Shakespeare reflects on the passage of time and its effects in these two sonnets.You should consider:• the situations Shakespeare describes• the feelings he portrays• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).ORTask 16Poems: Sonnet 116 and Sonnet 130Compare the ways in which Shakespeare strikingly presents different attitudes to love in these twosonnets.You should consider:• the relationships Shakespeare describes• the thoughts and feelings he expresses• the language he uses and its effects.ContextualisationThis task is set by OCR and may not be changed. A centre may contextualise the task as appropriateto its own resources, through the choice of published edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets for study.In whatever way(s) a centre may choose to contextualise the task, care must be taken to ensure thatcandidates generate evidence against the relevant Assessment Objective(s).© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 13. 13 BLANK PAGE© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 14. 14 BLANK PAGE© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 15. 15 BLANK PAGE© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12
  • 16. 16Copyright InformationOCR is committed to seeking permission to reproduce all third-party content that it uses in its assessment materials. OCR has attempted to identify and contact all copyright holderswhose work is used in this paper. To avoid the issue of disclosure of answer-related information to candidates, all copyright acknowledgements are reproduced in the OCR CopyrightAcknowledgements Booklet. This is produced for each series of examinations and is freely available to download from our public website (www.ocr.org.uk) after the live examination series.If OCR has unwittingly failed to correctly acknowledge or clear any third-party content in this assessment material, OCR will be happy to correct its mistake at the earliest possibleopportunity.For queries or further information please contact the Copyright Team, First Floor, 9 Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 1GE.OCR is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group; Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself adepartment of the University of Cambridge.© OCR 2011 A661 Jan/Jun11 & Jan/Jun12

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