MISD Supplemental Education Program In Language Arts

                                 Grade 4 Lesson Plans

             ...
from the articles toward a deeper understanding of the issues and content of the
articles and of expository text and autho...
Day 1

  Reading        Introduce this unit by telling students that together you will be talking,
(25 minutes)     readin...
Proofreading and Editing
                      Proofreading is making sure that the audience can read and
                ...
Use the paper provided for notes, freewriting, outlining, clustering, or writing
                 your rough draft. If you...
(25 minutes)   creative ways” papers.

Word Study     Once you have used the spelling inventory in Words Their Way to asse...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                              Day 3

  Reading      Give students the opportunity to...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                              Day 4

  Reading      Introduce the rest of the unit b...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 5

  Reading      Read aloud to students only the...
Day 6

  Reading      Share the reading of the first section of “Henry Ford: Innovator, “ “What Is An
(25 minutes)   Assem...
Writing     Possible Answer
(Continued)   1. Henry Ford made it possible for more people to buy cars cheaper.
            ...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 7

  Reading      Tell students that the next two...
1. Write a sentence that restates the question and gives the most important
                 information to answer the que...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 8

  Reading      Tell students that in this next...
Focus Question #4 (Appendix H)

              If you were Bill Ford, what decision would you make about the 80 year old
  ...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 9

  Reading      Have students read as partners ...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                              Day 10

  Reading      Have students as partners or in...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                            Day 11

   Reading        Have students finish reading t...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 12

  Reading      Direct students attention back...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                              Day 13

  Reading      Provide time for students to fi...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                              Day 14

  Reading      Remind students of the theme, “...
Grade 4 Lesson Plans

                                               Day 15

  Reading      Refer back to the information ...
Day 16

  Reading      Tell students that they will be reading another newspaper article (feature story) on
(25 minutes)  ...
Day 17

 Reading       Spend most of this time reviewing how each of the people in articles, Henry Ford,
               Bi...
Reading      Review with students how each person featured in the four selections, Henry Ford,
(25 minutes)   Bill Ford, R...
Reading      Have students choose 2 people from the articles (chart) to compare in writing.
(25 minutes)   Point out to st...
(25 minutes)   answers highlighting the theme.

Word Study     Administer the same Spelling Inventory from Words Their Way...
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  1. 1. MISD Supplemental Education Program In Language Arts Grade 4 Lesson Plans Introduction The lesson plans that follow for articles about Henry Ford, Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith are designed to be a framework for discussing the articles and will help teachers model for students how to think about, discuss, and write effective answers to constructed response or open-ended literature questions. Students will also be taught strategies that will improve their word study abilities, reading comprehension, and writing skills. By using these comprehension strategies, models, and discussion questions, teachers will be teaching to the Michigan English Language Arts Standards, the new Grade Level Expectations (March, 2004) and helping students prepare for success on Parts 1 and 2 of the ELA MEAP. The best reason to use these methods, models, and materials is that doing so will facilitate students’ delving more deeply into text. It will make text more interesting and challenging to students, as well as, improve their skills and strategies. Many beginning (and experienced) teachers do a great deal of assigning and not enough teaching. They assume that if students have read or listened carefully to a story or book they would be able to write effective and complete answers to questions. This is simply not the case. Students need to be explicitly taught to answer response to literature (open-ended, constructed response) questions. Nancy C. Boyles in her book, Teaching Written Response to Text (Maupin, 2001) points out that students need explicit teaching. Her framework goes like this: “Explicit instruction:  begins with setting the stage for learning,  followed by a clear explanation of what to do (telling),  followed by modeling of the process (To: showing),  followed by multiple opportunities for practice (With: guiding)  until independence is attained.” (By: independence) The answer format in her book has been adapted to provide the model in this unit of Focus Question, Answer Plan, and Possible Answer for teachers and students to use. So what does this mean for discussing, teaching and assessing of these nonfiction articles about Henry and Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith who solve problems and achieve goals through creativity? The questions, modeled answers, and formats (not worksheets) can be used to set up discussion about and learning MISD Supplemental Service Program 1 Grade 4 2004
  2. 2. from the articles toward a deeper understanding of the issues and content of the articles and of expository text and author’s craft. If students are guided through these articles, they will be more ready to have the discussions and write answers to similar questions on other articles. Students also need to be explicitly taught comprehension strategies. Therefore, these lessons for articles on Henry and Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith also make use of Strategies That Work from the book of the same name by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis (2000). These strategies were compiled in a ground-breaking article in 1992 by David Pearson, Laura Roehler, Jan Dole, and Gerry Duffy – “Developing Expertise in Reading Comprehension: What Should Be Taught and How It Should Be Taught.” This article points out that teachers should show and model what proficient readers do and teach students how to use these strategies explicitly in literature-rich learning communities where peers and teachers discuss and collaborate. The list of strategies include: making connections asking questions determining importance inferring synthesizing visualizing. Grade 4 Lesson Plans MISD Supplemental Service Program 2 Grade 4 2004
  3. 3. Day 1 Reading Introduce this unit by telling students that together you will be talking, (25 minutes) reading and writing about real people who “used their heads” or thought creatively to solve problems or get what they wanted (achieve goals). Tell them that they will start out by thinking, talking and writing about how they or someone they know has solved a problem or achieved a goal by thinking and doing things in new, different and/or creative ways. Spend some time discussing the meanings of “creative” and “innovative”. (For “creative”, the dictionary includes “…showing imagination and artistic or intellectual inventiveness.” “Innovation” as it will be used later in the unit, means taking someone else’s idea and making it much better – not the same as inventing.) Brainstorm with students how they or someone they know used creativity to solve a problem. Remind students that when we write we go through steps known as the writing process: Brainstorming Brainstorming is thinking and talking about the topic or theme of the writing and relating it to your own personal life. Brainstorming is asking questions like: “How have I or someone I know achieved goals or solved problems by using my head or thinking creatively?” Which one could I write about? What interesting details can I choose to tell about solving problems creatively? How should I organize my writing (outline, list, graphic organizer, etc)? Drafting Drafting is getting ideas down on paper, trying to organize as the writer is drafting. Drafting is asking questions like: “How will I start my writing to get my reader to want to read it? What details, examples, anecdotes, and/or explanations should I write to show my reader about the big change I have experienced? How shall I end my writing?” Revising Revising is the real work of writing when the writer makes sure that the writing has everything it should have, that it will appeal to the reader (audience) and tell or prove what it is supposed to do (accomplish the purpose). Revising is asking questions like: “Will my reader (audience) know what my point (purpose) is? Is my point or central idea clear and connected to the theme or topic? Have I given important and relevant details, examples, and/or anecdotes to support my point? Is my writing well organized with a beginning that makes my audience want to read on, a middle that makes and supports my point, and an end that satisfies my audience? Have I used interesting words and a variety of sentence lengths and types to engage my reader?” MISD Supplemental Service Program 3 Grade 4 2004
  4. 4. Proofreading and Editing Proofreading is making sure that the audience can read and understand the words and the point. Proofreading and editing involves asking questions like: “ Have I checked and corrected my spelling, punctuation, and capitalization to help my audience understand what I have written? Have I read my work to a friend or myself to make sure it sounds good? Have I looked my writing over to make sure that it’s neat and it invites my audience to read it?” Publishing Publishing is putting writing in its final form for an audience. Publishing involves asking: “Is my final copy just the way I want my audience to see it?” As you guide students through each step of the writing process, remind them of the steps and the questions to ask. (Appendix A). If time permits in this session and students have had enough brainstorming time, have students begin their drafts. Go over the writing prompt (Appendix B) with the students. Emphasize the introduction. students should choose one part of the prompt to write to. Encourage students to make notes on the prompt page and circle or underline the part of the prompt they have chosen. Students will continue drafting during writing time. Grade 4 Writing Prompt (Appendix B) Directions: To be successful in life, we have to use what we know and what we’ve experienced to reach our goals and solve problems. In other words, we have to figure things out creatively. Examples of problems you might have to solve are making up after an argument with a friend or family member, proving to parents you are responsible enough to have a pet or to have certain privileges and finding creative ways to get something you really want. Write about the theme: Solving problems in creative ways. Do one of the following:  Write about a time when you solved a problem or achieved a goal in a different or creative way.  Describe how someone you admire has solved a problem or achieved a goal in a creative way.  Tell what a person can learn from solving a problem in a creative way.  Write about the theme in your own way. You may use examples from real life, from what you read or watch, or from your imagination. Interested adults will read your writing. MISD Supplemental Service Program 4 Grade 4 2004
  5. 5. Use the paper provided for notes, freewriting, outlining, clustering, or writing your rough draft. If you need to make a correction, cross out the error and write the correction above or next to it. You should give careful thought to revision (rethinking ideas) and proofreading (correcting spelling, capitalization and punctuation). You may use a dictionary, thesaurus, spelling book and/or grammar book. Word Study Administer the appropriate spelling inventory from Words Their Way. (15 minutes) Writing Have students continue drafting their “solving problems in creative ways.” (20 minutes) You might consider doing a mini-lesson on how to use a variety of drafting techniques such as: crossing out, cutting and pasting, and using carrots or arrows to show insertions. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 2 Reading Give students this period of time to finish drafting their “solving problems in MISD Supplemental Service Program 5 Grade 4 2004
  6. 6. (25 minutes) creative ways” papers. Word Study Once you have used the spelling inventory in Words Their Way to assess your (15 minutes) students, create activities for students to do during this 15-minute period each day. It is important that games & activities are designed to match the instructional level of your students. Use Words Their Way as a resource. Writing Give students the opportunity to peer-edit their “solving problems creatively” (20 minutes) papers with a partner. Set this activity up by briefly modeling with a student a procedure for peer editing (Appendix C). Each partner will read aloud his/her draft to the other who will listen carefully thinking of the following questions: • Is the central idea point of the writing clear? • Do important and relevant details, examples, and/or anecdotes support the central idea or point? • Does the writing begin with an interesting and engaging lead, continue with a middle that supports and develops the point, and an end that summarizes the point? • Is the writing interesting with engaging words and different sentence lengths and types? • What do I as the listener, think is good about the writing? • Do I have questions and/or suggestions for the writer? Have the student read aloud his/her draft, then model posing the above questions and answering them with the student. Then tell students that the other student will read his/her writing aloud and the process will repeat. Give students the opportunity to peer-edit in partners for the remainder of the time. Tell them they will have more time in the next session. MISD Supplemental Service Program 6 Grade 4 2004
  7. 7. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 3 Reading Give students the opportunity to finish their peer editing. Circulate to monitor (25 minutes) and encourage. Students who have successfully finished peer editing, should begin making revision changes to drafts and beginning editing and proofreading. Have students use the "Review of Writing: Publishing Final Copy" checklist (Appendix D). Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing During this session students should make a final copy and proofread again using (20 minutes) the "Review of Writing: Publishing Final Copy" checklist (Appendix D). MISD Supplemental Service Program 7 Grade 4 2004
  8. 8. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 4 Reading Introduce the rest of the unit by saying something like, “You have just written (25 minutes) about how you or someone you know solved a problem or achieved a goal in a creative way. Now you will be reading four nonfiction selections about real people who “used their heads” or thought creatively to solve problems or get what they wanted (achieve goals). It will be important to think about how these real people thought creatively to solve problems and achieve goals. Two of the selections are biographies, which means they tell about the lives of real people. Webster’s dictionary defines “biography” as (an account of a person’s life, described by another.” Another definition from A Handbook to Literature says that a biography is an accurate telling of the life of a person in which the author tries to interpret the facts to portray the personality, mind and character of the person. Two of the selections are feature stories from newspapers. Feature stories put the emphasis on people rather than facts or news. Feature stories provide information of “human interest” and often evoke an emotional response. The title or lead are designed to catch the readers attention and the conclusion usually ties the piece together in an interesting way without giving a summary. One of the main reasons for reading nonfiction is to get information. Because we read nonfiction for information, we often take more time than we do with stories. We use the same strategies as we do with stories, but maybe a little differently – we: ask questions, make connections between what we already know and what is in the text, determines what is the most important information, summarize and synthesize, visualize, infer, and use fix-up strategies when the text is not making sense. Review briefly or, as necessary, teach students about the above strategies using ideas from Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis and/or from information learned in Comprehension Strategy workshops. Extend instruction/review “writing time” for Day 4. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Continue and complete strategy instruction began in the Day 4 reading segment. (20 minutes) MISD Supplemental Service Program 8 Grade 4 2004
  9. 9. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 5 Reading Read aloud to students only the introductory paragraph (in italics) from “Henry (25 minutes) Ford: Innovator.” Point out to students that good readers ask questions and visualize or make pictures in their heads to better understand what they read. One good question to ask might be, “What might it have been like before there were cars?” Discuss this question with students recording their ideas on the board, overhead, or chart. Encourage students to make pictures in their heads (visualize) what it might have been like without cars. Then tell them that you will show them how to write an answer to this question using some of their ideas. Tell students that you will be using this kind of a format to help them learn how to better answer questions. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Use the following Focus Question, Answer Plan and Possible Answer, as well as (20 minutes) your own ideas, to model answering the question for the students: Focus Question #1 (Appendix E) What might life have been like before there were cars? Answer Plan-What to do: 1. Write a sentence that restates and begins to answer the question. 2. Write a number of detailed sentences showing how life would have been different. 3. Write a concluding sentence about how you feel about having or not having cars in our lives. Possible Answer 1. It must have been very different before there were cars or Can you imagine a world without cars? 2. Write sentences using details that the students brainstormed, like, “It would take forever to get anywhere on horseback or in a buggy.” or “There probably wouldn’t be any fast food restaurants because few people could get there.” 3. I’m glad that people like Henry Ford made it possible for us to have cars today. As you go through the Answer Plan and Possible Answer, point out to students that writing the answer to a question is often easier when you are organized and you: • Restate the question, • Give details or evidence to support your point, and • Tie things together with a conclusion. Grade 4 Lesson Plans MISD Supplemental Service Program 9 Grade 4 2004
  10. 10. Day 6 Reading Share the reading of the first section of “Henry Ford: Innovator, “ “What Is An (25 minutes) Assembly Line?” First, point out that titles, headings, and subheadings help readers know what the selection will be about and what information will be included in each section. Talk about the title, locate the word “innovator” in bold italic in the first line of point. Point out that the words that follow “innovator” define it (a definition in context). Point out “Assembly Line” in the heading and talk about what the section will be about. Find “assembly line” in the second paragraph and show students the definition. Have students skim for “assembly line” in the third paragraph and discuss how the information there adds to the reader’s understanding. Read aloud the three paragraphs reminding students that they should be asking questions as they read such as, “Why did Henry Ford want to use an assembly line?” (He wanted to reduce time and therefore lower cost.) and “Did his plan work?” (Yes, the cost went from $850 in 1908 to $360 in 1916 because the time to build a car went from 14 hours to 93 minutes. Then more people could afford them.) Stress again that reading nonfiction takes more time because we are reading to get and understand information. Give students the assembly line diagram (graphic) and the two paragraphs. Discuss how to read the key (or legend) and the caption. Then ask them to read the paragraphs and study the diagram to see if it helps them understand what an assembly line is and what it does. Pose questions like, “Is there new information here? What is it?” or “Is there different information here from the other article? Does this change how I understand “assembly line”? Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Share the answer to Focus Question #2 with students using the “Answer Plan” and (20 minutes) “Possible Answer” as necessary. Have students work with partners to find the answers. Then construct an answer as a group. Focus Question #2 (Appendix F) How did Henry Ford make it possible for more people to by cars in the early 1900’s? Answer Plan-What to do: 1. Write a sentence that restates and begins to answer the question. 2. Write a sentence or two explaining what an assembly line is and how Henry Ford used it. 3. Write 2 or 3 detail sentences telling how Henry Ford reached his goal. 4. Write a concluding sentence with a quote from the selection, if possible. MISD Supplemental Service Program 10 Grade 4 2004
  11. 11. Writing Possible Answer (Continued) 1. Henry Ford made it possible for more people to buy cars cheaper. 2. To make cars cheaper, he used an assembly line where workers stand along a moving belt and each did a different job in putting a car together. Other people used assembly lines but not with as many people for such a big job. 3. Because of the assembly line, cars took a shorter time to build – from 14 hours to 93 minutes. This made cars cost less, and more people could buy them. 4. Henry Ford reached his goal of making a car that “the average working person could afford” by innovating with the assembly line. MISD Supplemental Service Program 11 Grade 4 2004
  12. 12. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 7 Reading Tell students that the next two sections of the article/biography tell of other ways (25 minutes) Henry Ford saved money so more people could by cars. Tell students that they will be reading the last two sections of the article, “What Is Vertical Integration” and “Waste Not, Want Not” on their own. Remind them to ask questions as they read like, “What else (besides using an assembly line) did Henry Ford do to make cars more affordable for people? You may want to give students post-it notes to record a question that came to mind while they were reading. They can stick the post it near the area of text that triggered the question. Talk to students about another strategy they should be using – determining the most important ideas. Remind students to try as they read to pick out the most important ideas as different from the details. One way of doing this is to tell the students to look for one important point the author is trying to make about Henry Ford (most important idea) and to look for the details that support the point or most important idea. Highlighters or highlighting tape can be quite useful here. Have students read to the end of the article thinking about all you have talked about: • asking questions, and • determining importance Save 5+ minutes at the end of this segment to go over the reading: • define vertical integration and waste not, want not, and • determining most important ideas Be sure to discuss the main point or big idea the author is trying to get across about Henry Ford (“He found very smart and creative ways for doing things and solving problems.”…like making cars more affordable for people.) In order to come to this point, tell students that they have to synthesize new ideas about Henry Ford from the selection with things they already know like if something costs too much, people can’t afford it. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students work as partners to answer Focus Question #3 using the Answer (20 minutes) Plan. Focus Question #3 (Appendix G) Besides using an assembly line, what else did Henry Ford do to reduce the price of cars so more people could buy them? Answer Plan: What to do: MISD Supplemental Service Program 12 Grade 4 2004
  13. 13. 1. Write a sentence that restates the question and gives the most important information to answer the question. 2. Write a sentence defining vertical integration. 3. Write 1 or 2 sentences giving details about how Henry Ford used vertical integration. 4. Write a sentence telling what “waste not, want not” means and giving details on Henry Ford’s recycling. 5. Write a concluding sentence pulling information on Henry Ford together (synthesize). Possible Answer 1. Henry Ford recycled and used vertical integration to save money in making cars so more people could afford to buy cars. 2. Vertical integration is making or having everything at a factory to manufacture something like cars. 3. Henry Ford brought together all he needed to make cars: steel made from iron from Michigan and coal from Kentucky and rubber for tires from Brazil. 4. Henry didn’t like to waste things so he recycled gas into tar, furnace waste into concrete and wood scraps into charcoal briquettes. 5. Henry Ford “…found very smart and creative ways for doing things and solving problems” like making sure many people could afford to buy cars. MISD Supplemental Service Program 13 Grade 4 2004
  14. 14. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 8 Reading Tell students that in this next article they will be reading about Bill Ford, Henry (25 minutes) Ford’s great-grandson. Like Henry Ford, Bill Ford has a goal and has had to be creative to achieve it. Remind students that like the nonfiction selection you just read together, you will be reading this next article slowly. As you read section by section, have students utilize the following strategies: questioning, making connections, inferring, synthesizing, determining importance, visualizing, etc. to make sure they get and understand the information. Compare/contrast what Bill Ford does to achieve his goal creatively with what Henry Ford did. Have students “draw parallels across time.” (Grade level Expectations) Begin by reading the introduction aloud to students asking them to think about Bill Ford’s decision. Then pose the following question: • If you were Bill Ford, what decision would you make about the 80 year old Rouge Plant? Model (or share) how to gather information/evidence to write or talk through the position-(pro or con) that students could take on the issue. Tell students that a good idea would be to contract the two sides. Brainstorm their ideas, use your own and/or refer to the chart: Con: Tear the Rouge Plant down Pro: Renew and improve the old one and build a new one • It’s old and all the technology is • The employees and their families outdated count on their jobs continuing to • The area is polluted. It would be be there better to start over in a new place • The union has been loyal to Ford; • Many of the buildings were built Ford should be loyal to the union to do things that are no longer • The businesses in the community necessary count on business from the plant and its workers. Discuss the brainstormed ideas. Be sure to make a chart as students brainstorm ideas. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Tell students to choose and state a position (pro or con) and to create a list of (20 minutes) brainstormed ideas to support their position. Have them write an answer to Focus Question #4 (in group, in partners, or individually). MISD Supplemental Service Program 14 Grade 4 2004
  15. 15. Focus Question #4 (Appendix H) If you were Bill Ford, what decision would you make about the 80 year old Rouge Plant? Answer Plan: What to do: 1. Write a sentence stating your position. 2. Write a 2 or 3 sentence giving evidence to support your position (use information from chart). 3. Write a concluding sentence giving your strongest argument. Possible Answer 1. If I were Bill Ford, I would have…(pro or con) 2. Sentences with relevant evidence from the chart 3. Strong concluding statement, eg. “The workers, unions and community have been loyal to Ford; Ford should renew the Rouge and save the jobs.” (pro) MISD Supplemental Service Program 15 Grade 4 2004
  16. 16. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 9 Reading Have students read as partners the sections, “Sustainable Design” and Grass on the (25 minutes) Roof?” to get details on what Bill Ford did. Have them discuss what they learned about the advantages of the living roof.” Then have them read “A New Green Way of Doing Things” (Appendix H) to compare and contrast the information about the advantages of a “living roof.” Discuss as a group what they learned. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students answer Focus Question #5 using information they gathered from the (25 minutes) two articles. Focus Question #5 (Appendix I) What are the advantages of the Rouge plant’s “living roof?” Answer Plan: What do: 1. Restate the question in an interesting way. 2. Write 2 or 3 sentences detailing the advantages of the “living roof.” 3. Summarize your points in a concluding sentence. Possible Answer 1. It was a great idea for Bill Ford to plant 8 football fields worth of sedum on the roof of the Dearborn Truck Plant. 2. The layers with the sedum will control and filter the rainwater so it will go back into the Rouge River clean. The “living roof” acts as insulation saving money on heat in the winter and air conditioning in the summer. It will improve air quality (stop pollution) by absorbing carbon dioxide and making oxygen. 3. All in all, everybody wins – Ford saves money; employees have cleaned air; and the environment is protected (Rouge River). Use the Answer Plan and Possible Answer in the discussion as students share their answers. MISD Supplemental Service Program 16 Grade 4 2004
  17. 17. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 10 Reading Have students as partners or individually read the section, “A Parking Lot With (25 minutes) Holes In It?” and “Swales Are Really Swell” to read. They should be asking themselves, “Why would a parking lot have holes in it?” and “What are swales and how are they used?” After reading, have students individually or as partners jot down the advantages to the environment of porous pavement and swales. Share with the group if time permits. It would be a good idea to ask students to visualize what the system of porous pavements and swales might look like. Discuss their answers. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students answer Focus Question #6 using information they gathered during (25 minutes) reading time. Focus Question #6 (Appendix J) What are the advantages to the environment of having porous pavement and swales? Possible Answer Parking lots with holes in them or porous pavement and swales help the environment. First, rainwater doesn’t just run off the parking lots taking pollutants directly into the Rouge River. Instead, the water goes into the holes in the pavement is filtered through sand and gravel. Then rainwater goes into the swales where it is further filtered. The wetlands created by the planting of swales and the cleaner Rouge River also attract plants and animals. This system helps the environment to stay clean and unpolluted. Use the Possible Answer as students share their answers. Have students compare and contrast their answers to the Possible Answer. MISD Supplemental Service Program 17 Grade 4 2004
  18. 18. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 11 Reading Have students finish reading the Bill Ford article and reread the paragraph on (25 minutes) phytoremediation from “A New Green Way of Doing Things.” Ask students to figure out what phytoremediation is and what it has to do with the environment. After students have had 10 minutes to do their reading and thinking, discuss the information they have gathered about phytoremediation. Spend the remaining time discussing the last section/paragraph of the Bill Ford article, especially the meaning of the last phrase, “…using smart and creative ideas to do things in new and better ways.” Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students individually write answers to Focus Question #7. (20 minutes) Focus Question #7 (Appendix K) How does phytoremediation help clean up polluted soil? Possible Answer One of the problems of the old Rouge Plant is that the soil all around it was polluted by years of manufacturing. Usually the polluted soil has to be dug up and taken to a landfill, but a process called phytoremediation helps clean up the soil. The roots of plants like New England aster, prairie dock and Joe Pye weed clean the soil. These plants also make the area around the Rouge prettier and attract birds and animals. Use the Possible Answer to discuss students’ answers. Point out the specific use of the plant names taken from the article. Also point out that the Possible Answer is a good example of synthesis as it uses information even from the beginning of the article – “brownfield” to mean polluted along with other information from both articles along with prior knowledge about factories polluting the area they are in. MISD Supplemental Service Program 18 Grade 4 2004
  19. 19. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 12 Reading Direct students attention back to the theme they wrote about at the beginning and (25 minutes) the theme of both articles: Solving problems (or achieving goals) in creative ways Discuss how both Henry and Bill Ford achieved their goals in creative ways. Build a graphic organizer, Venn diagram, or chart to compare and/or contrast what the two Fords did. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students think about and draft answers to Focus Question # 8 using the (20 minutes) graphic organizer. Focus Question #8 (Appendix L) Some people would say that Henry Ford and Bill Ford achieved their goals by doing things in a creative ways. Do you agree? Yes or No? Explain your answer using specific details and examples from Henry Ford: Innovator/More Ford Innovations: “Revitalizing the Rouge Center.” Be sure to show how the selections are connected or alike. Please review the Checklist For Revision (Appendix M) and the Writing description/rubric on (Appendix N) to see what is needed for full credit before writing your response. MISD Supplemental Service Program 19 Grade 4 2004
  20. 20. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 13 Reading Provide time for students to finish their answers to Focus Question #8. (25 minutes) Then have students share their answers to Focus Question #8. Discuss their answers highlighting the theme of achieving goals in creative ways. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on activities/ (15 minutes) games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Continue to share and discuss student’s answer to Focus Question #8. (20 minutes) MISD Supplemental Service Program 20 Grade 4 2004
  21. 21. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 14 Reading Remind students of the theme, “achieving goals through creativity. Tell them they (25 minutes) will be reading a newspaper article (a feature story, refer to Day 4) about a man who used his head to solve his problem of being poor. Tell them to think about the theme as they read. Have them read the article. Briefly discuss what Roosevelt Ford did to solve his problems and achieve his goals in preparation for their answering Focus Question #9. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students draft answers to Focus Question #9 using the Answer Plan. (20 minutes) Focus Question #9 (Appendix O) How did Roosevelt Ford use his head (creativity) to achieve his goals? Answer Plan: What to do: 1. Write a sentence or two telling about Roosevelt Ford’s goals. 2. Write a sentence telling how he achieved one of his goals. 3. Write another sentence or two telling how he wanted to achieve his other goal. 4. End with a quote summarizing how Roosevelt Ford felt about Ford Motor Company. Possible Answer 1. Roosevelt Ford wanted to be more than a poor field worker. Later he wanted success for his children and grandchildren. 2. He left the south and came to Detroit to get a good paying job at Ford Motor Company. 3. Because Roosevelt Ford was successful at Ford, he wanted his children to be successful by working at Ford. His children and grandchildren (four sons, seven grandchildren, and two great grandchildren) are working or have worked at Ford. 4. Carl Ford said of his father, Roosevelt, “He was so proud of the fact that he worked at Ford. He wanted all of us to be at Ford.” Use the Possible Answer and Answer Plan to go over student answers. MISD Supplemental Service Program 21 Grade 4 2004
  22. 22. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 15 Reading Refer back to the information in Day 4 Reading on feature stories and remind (25 minutes) students of the purpose (to provide “human interest”) and characteristics of feature stories: • the title is designed to catch the readers attention • the content often works emotion(in this case a good feeling about a special family). • the conclusion usually ties the piece together in an interesting way without giving a summary. With students, reread and discuss parts of the article that fit with the above purpose and characteristics of a feature story: • The title, “My Name Is Ford, I worked at Ford and I drive a Ford” catches the readers attention and want to read on. • The content makes the reader like the Ford family and all they have accomplished. • The conclusion about Carl Ford driving the first piling at the new Rouge Center’s Dearborn Truck Plant and Carol’s quote at the end tie the whole piece together in an interesting way. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Tell students that a good piece of writing often explores more than one theme. (20 minutes) This article is also about loyalty. You could have students write about how Ford has been loyal to the Roosevelt Ford family and how the Roosevelt Ford Family has been loyal to Ford Motor Company. Or you could just do the following brainstorming activity in group: • Have students discuss loyalty in the selection and find and record details as evidence of loyalty. The best way might be to construct a chart. Use the following as an example, model, or starter: Ford loyalty to the family The family’s loyalty to Ford Ford Motor Company hired Roosevelt Roosevelt Ford’s family went to Ford to Ford when most companies were not hiring work. nor paying well African Americans. They bought Ford cars and trucks. Ford Gave Roosevelt a very good hourly pay-$5.00 per hour. They spoke loyally about Ford products eg. Kevin Ford’s quote under the “Family Ford hired and promoted Roosevelt Ford’s Loyalty” heading. children and grandchildren as they deserved it. They were proud to work for Ford d buy Ford products. Ford honored the Roosevelt Ford family by asking Carl Ford to drive the piling at the new Ford Truck plant. Grade 4 Lesson Plans MISD Supplemental Service Program 22 Grade 4 2004
  23. 23. Day 16 Reading Tell students that they will be reading another newspaper article (feature story) on (25 minutes) the same theme, “achieving goals creatively.” Tell students to read the feature story thinking about how Sally Smith changed her life and achieved her goal of making more money so that she and her children can live a better life. After students have finished reading, have a brief discussion of how Sally Smith achieved her goal in an unusual way in preparation for answering Focus Question #10. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students write answers to Focus Question #10 individually. (20 minutes) Focus Question #10 (Appendix P) How did Sally Smith creatively achieve her goal of living a better life? Possible Answer Sally Smith was bored with her job of polishing women’s nails and she wanted to provide a better life for her two children. She tried a few jobs she didn’t like, then finally decided to take a chance and try to get a job at Ford Motor Company building trucks. It was hard to get used to the job at first, but she has grown to really like it. She and her children are proud she builds Ford trucks. She even told a man who offered to help her lift something heavy that she didn’t need help; she said, “…I build trucks for a living.” Use the Possible Answer as you discuss student answer. Grade 4 Lesson Plans MISD Supplemental Service Program 23 Grade 4 2004
  24. 24. Day 17 Reading Spend most of this time reviewing how each of the people in articles, Henry Ford, Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith achieved goals or solved problems through creativity. Refer back to previous plans as necessary. This discussion is to prepare for writing a comparative essay during Days 18, 19, and 20. More warm-up ideas will be provided in Day 18 plans for brainstorming. Remind students of the purpose and characteristics of feature stories in preparation for answering Focus Question #11. Using ideas from Days 4 and 15 make a visual on the purpose and characteristics of feature stories for students to use in answering the question. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students answer Focus Question #11 individually using information from (20 minutes) the visual you created together during Day 17 reading time. Focus Question #11 (Appendix Q) Is “From Doing Nails to Building Ford Trucks” a good example of a feature story? Yes or no? Give evidence from the article to support your answer. Possible Answer “From Doing Nails to Building Ford Trucks” is a good example of a feature story because it does interest the reader. The title and lead make the reader want to read on. Using the nail colors like “I’m-Not-A-Waitress-Red” was a good ideas; it makes you want to read to find out how a woman who painted people’s nails changed to building trucks. The whole article makes the reader proud of Sally as Sally is proud of herself. The ending in which she tells a guy who offers help she doesn’t need it because she builds trucks, really puts punch into the conclusion. It also ties back to the title. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 18 MISD Supplemental Service Program 24 Grade 4 2004
  25. 25. Reading Review with students how each person featured in the four selections, Henry Ford, (25 minutes) Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith achieved goals or solved problems creatively. Using information from the selections and previous days plans (especially Days 13, 14, and 16), build a chart comparing how each of the four achieved goals creatively. Let students know that they will be asked to compare how two of the people featured in the articles used creativity to accomplish goals and that they will be able to use information they are gathering in the chart (graphic organizer). Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Have students complete the chart (graphic organizer) with you. (20 minutes) Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 19 MISD Supplemental Service Program 25 Grade 4 2004
  26. 26. Reading Have students choose 2 people from the articles (chart) to compare in writing. (25 minutes) Point out to students that they have already compared Henry and Bill Ford; so, they cannot use that combination. They could use Henry or Bill Ford with Roosevelt Ford or Sally Smith. Have students think about and draft answers to Focus Question #12 remembering what was discussed and included in the chart on Day 18. Focus Question #12 (Appendix R) Some people would say that Henry Ford, Bill Ford, Roosevelt Ford, and Sally Smith achieved their goals in creative ways. Choose two of the above people to compare. Do you agree? Yes or No? Explain your answer using specific details and examples from the appropriate articles. Be sure to show how the selections (people) are connected or alike. Please review the Checklist For Revision (Appendix M) and the Writing description/rubric on (Appendix N) to see what is needed for full credit before writing your response. Word Study Have students work in small groups, with a partner or independently on (15 minutes) activities/games geared to their specific stage of learning. Writing Give students the opportunity to finish writing their answers to Focus Question (20 minutes) #12. Grade 4 Lesson Plans Day 20 Reading Have students share their answers to Focus Question #12. Discuss together their MISD Supplemental Service Program 26 Grade 4 2004
  27. 27. (25 minutes) answers highlighting the theme. Word Study Administer the same Spelling Inventory from Words Their Way that you chose at (15 minutes) the beginning of the program. Analyze the assessment for student improvement. Writing Have students reflect upon themselves as readers and writers. Ask them to write (20 minutes) about what strategies they know good readers use and what strategies they know they can use as a writer. MISD Supplemental Service Program 27 Grade 4 2004

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