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  • 2010 – 2011 Ithaca High School Program of Studies Updated 12/21/09 JW
  • Vision, Mission, IHS Values and Board Priorities OUR VISION All Students Achieving Their Dreams OUR MISSION Our Mission is to educate every student to become a life- long learner; to foster academic, social, emotional and physical development; to nurture an understanding and respect for all people in a multi- cultural and multi- ethnic world; and to promote responsible citizenship in a democracy. IHS VALUES ACHIEVEMENT BELONGING COLLABORATION EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT RIGOROUS COURSEWORK LIFE SKILLS SAFETY COMMUNICATION CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT COMMUNITY & FAMILY Updated 12/21/09 JW
  • BOARD PRIORITIES Priority #1 Culture: To foster a safe, respectful environment of high expectations where every student and staff member can maximize their potential. Priority #2 Equity: To eliminate race, class, and disability as predictors of student academic and co-curricular performance. Priority #3 Communications: To enhance communication and dialogue within the district and community. Priority #4 Resources: To work efficiently to use district resources (community, time, people, facilities and finances) in fulfilling our mission. Updated 12/21/09 JW
  • BOARD MEMBERS President Robert Ainslie 124 Woolf Lane Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)273-2558 1st Vice President Jay True 4 Alessandro Drive Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-4864 2nd Vice President Carol Warshawsky 104 The Parkway Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-2331 Seth Peacock 416 W Buffalo Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)351-1696 Josh Bornstein 413A e. Lincoln St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 277-1463 Scott Perez 201A Christopher Lane Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-7038 Elizabeth Kunz 501 Warren Place Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)274-2102 Bradley Grainger 421 Highland Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-3268 Deborah O'Connor 9 John St Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)272-4207 Dr. Judith C. Pastel, Superintendent of Schools ACCESS TO COURSES In the Ithaca City School District all education, vocational education, and employment opportunities will be offered without regard to sex, race, color, national origin or handicap. This procedure is in compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 as well as the requirements of Section 504 of the United States Rehabilitation Act of 1973. FEE WAIVERS ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS WHO QUALIFY. STUDENTS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR COUNSELOR FOR DETAILS. Updated 12/21/09 JW
  • District Information ................................................................................................................................. Inside front cover ....... Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................................................. 3 ....... Course Selection Process ............................................................................................................................................. 4 ..... Levels of Instruction ........................................................................................................................................................ 5 ....... Special Programs .............................................................................................................................................................. 7 ....... Student Services .............................................................................................................................................................. 10 ....... Academic Intervention Services (AIS) .......................................................................................................................... 11 ...... Career Education ................................................................................................................................................................ 12 ....... English .................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 ......... English as a Second Language ....................................................................................................................................... 26 ...... Fine Arts: Art, Music, Theater ......................................................................................................................................... 27 ...... Health and Physical Education ....................................................................................................................................... 32 ... Library ............................................................................................................................................................................ 33 ... Mathematic ............................................................................................................................................................................ 34 s ... Science .................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 ..... Social Studies ................................................................................................................................................................... 51 ........ Special Education Services ……...................................................................................................................................... 55 ...... World Languages ............................................................................................................................................................ 57 Ithaca High School 1 Program of Studies
  • ....... TST BOCES Career and Tech Program .................................................................................................................... 63 ....... We reserve the right to modify course offerings based on pending instructional decisions and staffing considerations. 2010 - 2011 PROGRAM OF STUDIES ITHACA HIGH SCHOOL 1401 North Cayuga Street Ithaca, New York 14850 (607) 274-2157 www.icsd.k12.ny.us/highschool/ Dear Students, Parents and Guardians: We hope you will find the information contained in this booklet useful in your academic planning and course selection for the upcoming school year and beyond. Please do not hesitate to contact a counselor or administrator if you have questions or concerns. The staff at Ithaca High School is eager to work with you in developing the best academic program possible. Principal Student Services Team Leader Mr. Donald Mills Ms. Samantha Little 274-2145 274-6844 Associate Principals School Counselors Ms. Colleen Ledley Ms. Kas Bilyk Mr. Scott Miller Ms. Leann Donnelly Mr. Jarrett Powers Ms. Sharon Gublo Mr. Ed Redmond Ms. Danielle Murphy Ithaca High School 2 Program of Studies
  • Ms. Debra Rivera Ms. Michelle Snipes Ms. Maria Torres Ithaca High School 3 Program of Studies
  • GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To earn a diploma at Ithaca High School, a student must satisfy requirements in two areas: the first is Course and Credit Requirements, and the second is Testing and Assessment Requirements. Three diplomas are available depending on testing and courses. Please see the chart at the bottom of this page for specific test and course requirements for each diploma. The specific requirements in each of these areas are stated below. Each student’s path to graduation is different so it is very important to consult with a high school counselor frequently to assure that the courses that are planned will meet requirements for both graduation and future goals. FEDERAL NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND legislation anticipates that each student will graduate within four years after the student first enrolls in 9th grade. Each student will have a plan signed by the parent/guardian that outlines the student’s path to graduation including the number of years to graduation and the number of credits the student anticipates earning each year. PARTICIPATION IN GRADUATION: To participate in the graduation ceremony, students must be enrolled and attending Ithaca High School, have earned 22 credits, and have completed ALL other graduation requirements prior to the date and time of the ceremony. MINIMUM CREDIT LOAD / FULL TIME ENROLLMENT Unless there are extenuating circumstances, each student attending Ithaca High School shall be enrolled in courses that total 5.5 credits. Students can enroll for more credits in a school year. Those who want to enroll for less need the approval of the Principal. CREDIT FOR ACADEMIC INTERVENTION LAB OR RESOURCE SUPPORT SERVICES [Pilot: During 2007-08 and 2008-09, a student can earn credit by regular attendance and satisfactory performance in either Academic Intervention Services laboratory (CAL lab or Math Lab) or in a Resource Support Services class] I. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 22 units of credit are required for graduation. Typically, a course which meets one period a day, five days a week, for a full school year receives one credit. Students accumulate credits toward graduation while fulfilling both core and sequence requirements. Any additional credits needed to complete the 22 credits for graduation may be met with elective courses. REQUIRED CREDITS DISTRIBUTION The following are the courses and credits that are included in the core: ENGLISH...............................................................................................4 credits SOCIAL STUDIES.................................................................................4 credits MATH....................................................................................................3 credits SCIENCE..............................................................................................3 credits LANGUAGES other than English..............................................................1 credit .............................................3 credits (for advanced designation endorsement) Earning a credit in a 5-unit sequence in Career & Technology Education or Fine Arts will exempt from second and/or third unit. FINE ARTS..............................................................................................1 credit HEALTH.................................................................................................½ credit PHYSICAL EDUCATION........................................................................2 credits II. TESTING AND ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS Regents Assessment requirements are intended to assure that high school graduates have met the New York State Learning Standards in English, social studies, math and science. Additional Proficiency Exams may be required in certain courses that are part of sequences in Career and Technical Education, Fine Arts and Languages other than English. To earn a High School Diploma a student must pass Regents assessments (or NYS Ed. Approved Alternative) in the following areas: I.H.S. Diploma Class of 2012 - 65 or better on all tests Regents Diploma with Regents Diploma Class of 2011 - 65 or better on 4 tests & 55 on 1 test Exam scores 65 or above on Regents Exams Advance Designation Class of 2010 - 65 or better on 3 tests & 55 on 2 tests Exam scores 65 or above on Regents Exams Class of 2009 - 65 or better on 2 tests & 55 on 3 tests English Language Arts English Language Arts No additional assessment US History & Government US History & Government No additional assessment Global History Global History No additional assessment Math A Math A Math A & Math B One Science Regents Exam One Science Regents Exam Two Science Regents Exams No additional assessment No additional assessment Foreign Language Assessment SCHOOL POLICIES AND PRACTICES Ithaca High School 4 Program of Studies
  • ALTERNATIVE WAYS TO ACCUMULATE CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATION 1. Credits earned at other accredited public or private high schools (including summer school work) are acceptable to meet graduation requirements. 2. Course Credit by Examination: Students may earn 6 ½ units of credit for Regents or local diploma without completing units of study if: a. Superintendent or designee determines if pupil will benefit academically by exercising this alternative. b. Student achieves a score of at least 85 percent on a State-approved exam and student passes an oral examination or completes a special project. 1 3. *Correspondence Courses ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO EARN A DIPLOMA 1. The High School General Equivalency Diploma (GED) Examination is administered through BOCES. An affidavit from the home school to verify one of the following conditions is required for students to be admitted to the High School Equivalency Exams: a. A candidate must be 19 years of age or over. b. If the candidate is between 17 and 19 years of age, he/she must have been out of school at least one year. c. A candidate must be a member of the class which has graduated 2. The Individual Educational Plan Diploma (IEP) is offered to selected students by the Committee on Special Education (CSE). a. The requirements for IEP diploma candidates are determined by the CSE on an individual basis reflecting the educational needs of each student. To the extent appropriate, candidates continue to take courses required to meet local diploma requirements. b. Candidates for this diploma must be reviewed by the CSE to determine that their IEP goals have been met. c. IEP diploma recipients can continue to work toward successful completion of the IHS diploma until age 21. COURSE SELECTION PROCESS The selection of courses and levels of instruction are among the most important decisions that are made during high school. The decisions made will have an impact on the student's success in high school and beyond. It is therefore very important that these decisions be carefully considered before they are made. The course selection process is a partnership between the student, parents/guardians, school counselors, and teachers. The student and the family have values and goals for the student's education, as well as a sense of the student's ability and motivation. The teachers who have taught the student are able to offer their recommendations, based on the performance of the student in their classes and their own past experiences in their subject areas. The school counselor will discuss these factors with the student and parents/guardians and will also explore the student's long-range goals and post high school plans, which also have an impact on the courses selected. A student’s interests, motivation, work habits and study skills are also crucial factors in this decision. The counselor carefully monitors the student's progress towards meeting graduation requirements and will inform the student of courses that are required to meet the various graduation requirements as presented in the previous section. It is through an open dialogue between the members of this partnership that a student’s likelihood of developing an academic program that is realistic, challenging, and goal oriented is maximized. The counselors, teachers, and administrators of Ithaca High School are eager to be active partners in this process and look forward to working with you to develop your program of study. Sometimes, even in the best of partnerships, there are disagreements. It is important that parents/guardians know that Ithaca is a parental choice district, which means that the final decision and responsibility for course selections rests with the parents or guardians. If a student has the necessary prerequisites, then the parents/guardians have the final word on the courses and levels in which their child will enroll. 1 * Correspondence Courses: Students may apply to earn credits by successfully completing a correspondence or on-line course from an accredited institution. Taking a course by correspondence or on-line that is offered at IHS is not encouraged. Approval is discretionary with the Principal and does not fall under the “parental choice.” Conditions such as a deadline for course completion can be put on approval. Typically a student must have a previous history of academic success and diligence including good attendance and work habits. Positive recommendations must be obtained from the student’s counselor and the Department Head before the Principal or designee will consider the request. Ithaca High School 5 Program of Studies
  • LEVELS OF INSTRUCTION The process of transition from 8th to 9th grade including the course selection process is under review. Changes under consideration include recommending a student’s course selection based on student performance data. At Ithaca High School another component of selecting a student's course of study is choosing the appropriate level of instruction. Many courses are taught at more than one level of instruction to better accommodate varying skills, rates of learning and styles. Levels of instruction are explained in detail below. REGENTS (R) Regent’s courses are college preparatory courses and are based on the state curriculum. These courses have been designed to prepare students for a large variety of colleges and will often require a research project as well as some independent study. HONORS (H) Rapid movement through the subject matter, often characterized by extensive research projects and independent study and substantial homework assignments, characterizes honors courses. Students should possess above grade level reading, writing, and study skills and strong interest and motivation in the subject area. ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) The Advanced Placement program is open to only those students who, upon close examination of their records and teacher recommendations, can meet the stringent requirements of the course. The students will be prepared for and are required to take the AP Examination in the spring, for which there is a fee (fee reductions are available for students from low-income families). The awarding of college credit for an AP course is at the sole discretion of the college at which a student enrolls. An AP course is an introductory college course that is exceptionally challenging and stimulating. Compared to other high school courses, an AP course often takes more time and work, but also explores subjects in greater depth, allowing more opportunity for individual progress and accomplishment. Ithaca High School 6 Program of Studies
  • Cumulative Grade Point Average Ithaca High School calculates two CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES (weighted and un-weighted) at the end of the school year. The Un- weighted Cumulative Grade Point Average is computed as an average of final course grades of all traditionally graded courses from accredited institutions, excluding courses in performing music, physical education, academic assistance labs (i.e. Resource Room) and those taken pass/fail or abroad. In computing the Un-weighted cumulative GPA, the following scale applies: A+ = 4.33 B = 3.00 C- = 1.67 The Weighted Cumulative Grade Point Average is computed using an honor point scale in which courses are assigned honor A = 4.00 points relative to the level of rigor of instruction at which they are offered, as shown in the chart below. All traditionally B- = 2.67 graded courses from accredited institutions are included except courses in performing D+ = 1.33 music, physical education, Weighted Cumulative GPA, the following scale applies: A- = 3.67 C+ = 2.33 AP Honors D = 1.00 Regents Local B+ = 3.33 A+ C = 2.00 14.67 12.67 F = 0.00 10.67 8.67 A 14.00 12.00 10.00 8.00 A- 13.33 11.33 9.33 7.33 B+ 12.67 10.67 8.67 6.67 B 12.00 10.00 8.00 6.00 Ithaca High School 7 B- Program of Studies
  • 9.33 7.33 5.33 C+ 10.67 8.67 6.67 4.67 C 10.00 8.00 6.00 4.00 C- 9.33 7.33 5.33 3.33 D+ 8.67 6.67 5.67 2.67 D 8.00 6.00 4.00 2.00 F 0 0 0 0 Ithaca High School 8 Program of Studies
  • ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADUATION In order to be eligible for an Ithaca High School diploma, students must be registered at Ithaca City School District. In order to participate in graduation ceremonies the student must be scheduled to complete all graduation requirements by graduation day. FINAL GRADES CALCULATION Final grades are determined in the following manner: 1. The final exam is counted as 1/4 of the grade for the course. The average of the report card grades comprises the other three-fourths of the grade. 2. If a student is excused from the final exam, the final grade will be the average of the quarterly grades. 3. If a student is truant from the final exam, the grade for the final exam will be zero (F). Pending: A student who is truant from a final examination will fail the course. 4. International exchange students are not diploma candidates, and therefore, will be graded on an audit basis. If course credit is desired, specific arrangements must be made upon entering Ithaca High School. Pending: In the case of a performance or portfolios in lieu of a final exam, a student who is truant from the performance or fails to turn in a portfolio will fail the course. FAILING LAST MARKING PERIOD AND FINAL EXAM Students enrolled in courses at Ithaca High School are required to pass either the last marking period or the final examination in each of their courses in order to pass a course and receive credit. Students who fail both the last marking period and the final will receive a grade of “F” for the course and no credit awarded. GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND HONOR ROLL Grade Point Average: the GPA is computed as an average, based on a scale of A+ = 4.33 to F = 0.0. The following courses are excluded from GPA computation: performing music, physical education, and courses taken in foreign schools. GRADING SYSTEM Please Note: The ranking system is under review and may be changed for the year 2008-09. A+ 97-100% 4.33 C+ 77-79% 2.33 AUD = Audit A 93-96% 4.00 C 73-76% 2.00 P = Pass A- 90-92% 3.67 C- 70-72% 1.67 F = Fail B+ 87-89% 3.33 D+ 68-69% 1.33 S = Satisfactory B 83-86% 3.00 D 65-67% 1.00 U = Unsatisfactory B- 80-82% 2.67 F Below 65% 0.00 NC = No Credit I = Incomplete W = Withdraw The Ithaca High School transcript is an historical record of all courses taken and their final disposition. No grades are deleted or replaced. HONOR ROLL •The Honor roll is determined at the end of each marking period. All courses are considered. •Grades are not weighted. •Grades of F, D, or incomplete render a student ineligible. •A student must be carrying at least 3.5 credits. •A student must be enrolled in and passing a P.E. class. •Honor List is 3.2. •High Honor List is 3.7. •Principal's List is 4.0. Ithaca High School 9 Program of Studies
  • LINK CREW Link Crew is a well-established and nationally known freshman transition program that was brought to IHS during the 2006-2007 school year. Upperclassmen apply for leadership positions. Those who are selected are trained intensively. They serve as mentors to small groups or "crews" of grade 9 students throughout their first year of high school. Link Leaders go into grade 9 classrooms to teach lessons that are designed to give freshmen strategies to succeed academically and socially. They also plan and implement a series of social events just for freshmen, helping to build connections and a strong sense of community. Link Crew is a program that benefits not only the freshmen, but the leaders and the entire high school community as well, helping to create a culture of kindness and mutual support. 504 Students who have medical conditions that significantly interfere with academic performance may seek support under 504. Section 504 is a Civil Rights Law that protects students from discrimination based on a physical or mental impairment. A parent may request meetings with the Instructional Support Team to determine if the symptoms associated with a medical or psychological diagnosis are significant enough to warrant additional support. The 504 chairperson coordinates the discussion and determines if a student meets the criteria for an Accommodation Plan. SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES Please see the section, Special Education Services, elsewhere in this booklet. APPEAL A student, parent, or guardian who wants to appeal a student’s exclusion from an AP course should do so directly to the Principal. SPECIAL PROGRAMS There are several areas in the curriculum where departments offer special options and alternatives within their subject areas. Descriptions of these courses and programs are presented in each department’s listing of courses. This section outlines these special programs. ALTERNATIVE SCHEDULING Ithaca High School offers several courses on a semester block schedule. In a block scheduling format a full year class is taught for two periods each day for one semester. A double period format allows for more in-class discussion and group work and allows the students to concentrate on fewer classes. It is also possible that some courses will be offered on alternate day block schedules where class would meet every other day throughout the school year. This class would be scheduled opposite another class that was offered in the same format. Check with your counselor for the latest information on these and other block scheduled courses. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM Advanced Placement is a program of college-level courses and exams that follows the curriculum and guidelines established by the College Board AP Program. These are introductory college courses that are exceptionally challenging and stimulating. AP courses often take more time and work, but also explore subjects in greater depth. AP courses culminate in AP exams administered nationally each May. Each exam receives an overall grade on a 5-point scale, 5 being high. Almost all colleges in the US participate in the AP Program to some extent, and some grant as much as a full year's credit to students presenting qualifying grades in AP exams. Since these are college level courses, they are not for all students. There are entry criteria unique to each course, such as teacher recommendation, a qualifying exam, prerequisite courses, previous grades in the subject area, and overall school performance. Once accepted into an AP course, the student is committed to take the AP exam the following May. Students must pay a fee for each exam. More detailed information about the AP program is available from the AP Coordinator, AP teachers, or School Counselors. While a student does not have to take an AP course to take an AP exam, they should be sure that their preparation and study fits the appropriate AP course description. The Advanced Placement (AP) offerings at Ithaca High School are extensive. We offer the following courses dependent on the number of qualified students. Each course and its entry requirements are described in the listings for the appropriate department. AP English Language AP Calculus AB AP English Literature AP Calculus BC AP United States History AP Statistics AP Spanish Language AP Computer Science AP French Language AP Biology AP German Language AP Chemistry AP Latin AP Physics B AP Studio Art AP Environmental Science AP Computer Science AB AP Human Geography AVID: ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION Ithaca High School 10 Program of Studies
  • The goal of the AVID program is to ensure that all students, especially students in the academic middle, will succeed in a rigorous curriculum and increase their enrollment and success in four-year colleges. AVID is designed to provide academic support for students in the middle who are underachieving and are historically under-represented in four-year colleges. Students and families apply for acceptance into the program and commit to three years of enrollment in the AVID elective course. In addition, students must be willing to place themselves in some of the most challenging courses available to them in the core content areas at I.H.S. The AVID elective teacher communicates with School counselors and families to monitor student progress. Active parent participation is critical to the success of individual students and the program in general. Prerequisite: Interview and application Co-requisite: Enrollment in rigorous college preparatory courses Course Description: AVID is an elective course that prepares students for entrance into four-year colleges. There is an emphasis on analytical writing, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, study skills, test taking, note taking, and research. AVID meets every day for the entire year. Each week students receive 2 periods of instruction in college entry skills, 2 periods in tutor-led study groups, and one period in motivational activities and academic survival skills. Students participate in activities that incorporate strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, and reading to support their growth academically. Ithaca High School 11 Program of Studies
  • A Sample Week in the AVID Elective Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday AVID Student AVID Student Binder Curriculum Tutorials Curriculum Tutorials Evaluations Speakers Motivational Activities Course Content: AVID students learn skills such as time management, note taking, textbook reading, library research, and maintaining the AVID binder. Students are expected to keep an organized binder that is graded regularly. AVID stresses the importance of writing as a tool for learning. This strategy forms the basis of all assignments and leads to the improvement in all subject areas. AVID 9: Elective course for incoming 9th grade students who were interviewed and selected in middle school. The 9th grade AVID class provides a college-preparatory curriculum with a focus on reading and writing strategies and developing academic skills related to organization, note taking, time management, inquiry and collaboration. Students also receive academic support through tutorials. Introduction to college research. AVID 10: Continuation of college-preparatory curriculum and academic support for students to take honors and AP courses. Introduction to college essay writing and college entrance exam preparation. AVID 11: More focused approach to college research and essay writing. ACT and PSAT preparation. Continuation of college- preparatory curriculum and academic support for students to take honors and AP courses. AVID 12: Focus on college application and financial aid process. SAT preparation. Continuation of college-preparatory curriculum and support for students to take honors and AP courses. LEADERSHIP 101 Prerequisite: Preference given to elected school leaders Course Description: This course is designed to teach leadership theory and motivational techniques to student leaders. Topics covered include: Defining Leadership; Qualities of Leadership- What Makes a Good Leader; Developing a Vision and Setting Goals; Motivating Others; Communication; Leadership Styles and Leadership vs. Management; Decision Making and Consensus Building; Negotiation and Conflict Management; Leadership in Organizations; Leading Change. Students will discuss democratic schooling, and the role of student leaders in an educational organization. Students will read leadership theory and motivational theory and use current local, national, and international events to evaluate leaders' actions and decisions. Activities will include readings, lectures, case study critiques, simulations, and small-group projects related to school events and initiatives. Meeting Time: The course is offered period 0 and meets twice a week. Credit: Students who pass the course accrue .25 elective credits toward graduation. Grading: The course is offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and is not included in students' GPA, but is listed on a student's transcript. Grading is based predominantly on class participation. PROJECT LEAD THE WAY Project Lead the Way is a pre-collegiate program for students considering engineering as a college major or career. Our goal is to expose students to the world of engineering through a fast-paced, hands-on, technology rich sequence of courses. Students can enter the program in either the 9th or 10th grades. Students who complete courses at the Honors level will earn college credit in addition to credit toward graduation from IHS. Details of the program can be found in the Technology section of this booklet. NEW VISIONS PROGRAMS The BOCES area vocational center offers three exciting and challenging senior year options for college bound students who are looking for a different educational experience for their last year of high school. The New Visions program in Health Career Explorations is offered in cooperation with the Cayuga Medical Center and offers an introduction to various medical specialties and opportunities. The New Visions program in Explorations in the Biological Sciences is based at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and focuses on research and experimentation in biological sciences. The New Visions program in Exploring Careers in the Environment and Agriculture is based at Cornell University and focuses on the many research and career opportunities in these fields. Students in these programs attend the high school for the first two periods and the rest of their day is spent on site. Entry in these programs is very competitive. If you are interested, refer to the more detailed entry in the Vocational Studies sections of this guide and talk with your school counselor. WISE PROGRAM The WISE (Individualized Senior Experience) program is an individualized, independent study project for second-semester seniors. Students will earn 1 credit and will explore an area of academic or career interest, guided by mentors they have chosen from the IHS staff and assisted by people in the greater Ithaca community who have expertise in the students' areas of interest. Students will keep daily journals in which they reflect on their project activities, will meet weekly with their mentors and with their classmates, and will prepare public presentations of their experiences at the end of the semester. Students may earn partial credit for English 12 (see English 12 WISE) or elective credit. Talk to your counselor for more information. Ithaca High School 12 Program of Studies
  • SKILLS FOR SUCCESS Skills for Success is a class designed to help students to give students all of the skills necessary to be successful in high school, and to prepare for college. These include, but are not limited to: - Time management - How to prepare for tests - Note taking strategies - Navigating the system at the high school - How to seek part time employment - How to stay organized in High School - How to approach long term writing assignments - How to seek extra help Skills for Success will be offered by Semester, daily, and students can earn .5 elective credit. Students in grades 9-12 are eligible to take this class. COLLEGE SUCCESS (ACAD) College Success is a dual credit offering with TC3. We are looking for students who will attend TC3. This course is specifically designed to give students the skills necessary to make a successful transition to college. These include, but are not limited to: - The college application process - Accessing College Resources - Time management - Money management - Test Preparation - How to access test modifications - Organization and Study Strategies - How to approach long term assignments - How to seek part time employment - Career Exploration Tools College Success will be offered by Semester, daily, and students can earn .5elective credit and up to 3 credits at TC3. This course is for 11th and 12th graders who may be planning to attend TC3 or another community college. Only students attending TC3 will be eligible for college credit. READ 180 Course Content: Read 180 is an intensive reading course designed to directly address a student’s individual needs through differentiated instruction, adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction of reading, writing and vocabulary skills. The Read 180 course provides support to students whose reading achievement is below the proficiency level. This course is open to all students. Ithaca High School 13 Program of Studies
  • STUDENT SERVICES & EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES PENDING: IHS System of Intervention Services ITHACA HIGH SCHOOL PYRAMID OF INTERVENTIONS SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERRALS TO OUTSIDE AGENCIES DSS, Bridges, CFS SECTION 504 Accommodations for Medical Needs, Test Accommodations, Classroom Accommodations ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES Content Area Support, Study Skills Instruction, Co-Teaching, Academic Monitoring RTI TIER II ACTION PLAN Classroom Observations, Schedule Changes, Analyze Academic History, Academic Testing, Assign Case Manager, Brainstorm Intervention based on Individual Needs, Referrals to various Programs and Services COUNSELING SERVICES (Student Services, Social Worker, School Psychologist) BEHAVIORAL CONSEQUENCES Detention, ISS, OSS, Attendance Contracts, Behavior Contracts, Success Plans MENTORING PROGRAM GUIDANCE REFERRALS Daily Sheets, Weekly Sheets, Student Consultation, Parent/Teacher Conferences, Schedule Changes, Mediation, Counseling, Referrals for various services ACADEMIC MONITORING School Counselor, Support Teacher, AIS Department Chair NINTH GRADE INITIATIVE Professional Collaboration, Share Strategies to improve instruction, Parental Support, HOMEWORK HELP After School, Lunch Time QUALITY ‘FIRST INSTRUCTION’ Seat Changes, Proximity, Student Conference, Parent Contact, Classroom Modifications, Differentiated Instructional Strategies, and Refer for additional support Ithaca High School 14 Program of Studies
  • STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT Department Leader: Samantha Little Phone: 274-2157 Fax: 277-3061 School Counselors ~ Social Workers ~ Family Liaisons ~ School Psychologists The goal of Student Services Department and its programs is to assist each pupil in making sound educational, vocational, and personal decisions. School Counselors at the high school monitor each student's progress towards graduation. The plan that is developed in 8th grade is modified, as necessary throughout high school. Counselors meet with students and make any necessary changes in the student's plan to meet all graduation requirements. As discussed earlier, planning a high school program is a joint effort by the student, parents/guardians, and the counselor. The student is expected to assume the major role in planning his/her school program. The counselor's role is one of assisting and guiding the student to plan a program that meets the student's needs in terms of interests, abilities, and goals. We encourage students to share information about the school program, their interests, abilities and goals with parents. Parents/guardians must be consulted and give approval for all high school plans. By utilizing this "team effort" it is hoped that the student will have a school program that best meets his/her individual needs. The counselors will assist the students in any way they can to provide them with a program to meet their goals. Counselors also offer other advisory and individual or group counseling assistance to enable students to benefit from the curriculum, to help students develop and implement post-secondary education and career plans, to help students who exhibit any attendance, academic, behavioral, or adjustment problems and to encourage family involvement. The school counselors work closely with the school psychologists and social workers and refer students for services when necessary. You may find more detailed information about their services in the Student Handbook that is distributed in September. SUPPORT SERVICES DEPARTMENT & CONTENT AREA LAB Department Chair: Gwen Freeman Secretary: Ann Bangs Phone: 274-2166 The Support Services Department consists of Support Teacher Services and Content Area Lab support. SUCCESS IN ACADEMICS The high school Content Area Lab provides an inviting atmosphere in which students can receive assistance in reading, writing, and math through small group instruction in order to pass state mandated examinations and to be successful in their classes. • Teachers help students improve basic skills and provide support for their academic class work. In addition, the staff prepares students for state and local examinations. • Teachers communicate with content area teachers and receive weekly assignments from all teachers to help students plan, organize and complete assignments and long-term projects. • The first half of the period will be Direct Instruction, dealing with such topics as study skills, writing skills, reading comprehension and fluency, and so on. • Students will receive ¼ credit per semester for alternating days. The Support Services Department also provides these services: • Determining student eligibility for (AIS) Academic Intervention Services and working with identified students through a team- taught class or in the Content Area Lab. • Working with support staff and content area staff to design programs that meet the varied needs of students. • Performing formal academic evaluations for those students who are referred to the Committee on Special Education and the 504 Committee as well as informal evaluations when requested by teachers, counselors or parents. • Convening 504 Committee meetings for eligible students and implementing the 504 plans. • Screening of new entrants to identify students in need of support services. For further information regarding services please call 274-2166. Ithaca High School 15 Program of Studies
  • CAREER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY Department Leader: Scott Breigle Career Education Office: E-26A Phone: 274-2180 BUSINESS The Business Department, through its course offerings, provides students with the skills and knowledge for success in a wide variety of college majors and careers. Through an arrangement with Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3), several of the courses offered by the business department offer students college credit. College credit is granted by TC3 and the credit can be transferred to any SUNY school. Other schools may also accept the TC3 course credit. The courses will result in both high school and college credit. Students earning college credit will receive an official college transcript from TC3. The courses which meet the dual requirements for high school and college credit are: Computer Keyboarding 3 Cr/hrs Computer Applications 4 Cr/hrs College Accounting 4 Cr/hrs HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION SEQUENCE A student may complete a 3-credit or 5-credit sequence using the business education offerings to satisfy a high school graduation requirement. This is for students planning on immediate office employment after graduation, or for students planning to pursue a post secondary education in Business Technology. COLLEGE PREPARATION College Accounting, Business Law, Business Applications, or High School Accounting will provide preview and preparation for students considering college work in accounting, management, finance, or marketing. CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The course is devoted to the study of career awareness and the management of personal resources. The student will be introduced to various career opportunities and made aware of the skills, talents, and training needed. The students evaluate themselves and possible careers in terms of needs, wants, goals, and personal resources. Management of personal resources includes the study of banking services, budgeting, and consumer purchasing, and integrates the application of the decision making process. This is a core course required for an occupational sequence. Students will use computers to research careers and colleges and format their resumes. Students will be graded on written assignments, projects, class participation and tests. COMPUTER KEYBOARDING Regents / Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Virtually all PC's purchased today come preloaded with Windows and, often, with one or more Windows application packages. This course is designed to help students, both novice and those with some word processing familiarity, develop efficient keyboarding skills that help simplify and speed up document preparation. The student will use Microsoft Word. Emphasis is placed on activities that give students a chance to practice writing letters, research reports, tables, and outlines. There is a local final exam at the end of the semester. Students completing this course for 3 cr/hrs from TC3 will receive honors credit. Dependent on a Dual Credit and TC3 COLLEGE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Honors/Regents Full Year 1 Credit BA/BCA - Fulfills computer literacy requirements for many colleges. Prerequisites: Completion of Computer Keyboarding or complete a test with a speed of 25 wpm or better. Course Content: This follows the syllabus of TC3's Computer Applications Courses: Intro to Word-processing; Intro to Databases; Intro to Spreadsheets and Intro to Presentation Software. The concepts studied are applied by means of hands on computer activities using Word, Access, Excel and PowerPoint. Learning computer applications skills is essential to any student entering college or a business career. Students will use practical business computer simulations to reinforce concepts learning. Students do not need prior training with the software. Grading will be based on exercises, projects and assignments completed which will demonstrate proficiency in the above software applications. Students completing this course for 4 cr/hrs from TC3 will earn honors credit Ithaca High School 16 Program of Studies
  • PERSONAL FINANCE Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Personal financial planning is a lifelong task of determining goals and objectives and altering financial decisions to accomplish these goals. This course introduces students to the financial realities of living on their own including banking, investing, and paying taxes. Students will use computer programs to prepare budgets, explore checking and savings accounts, and compute credit costs. Students will learn about work skills, careers, computer skills, interpersonal skills, and both written and oral communication. FINANCIAL INFORMATION PROCESSING Regents 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The objective of this course is to equip students with the basic skills needed to keep financial records in sales or support occupations. Students will be given hands-on computer practice in completing record keeping tasks using specific courseware designed for FIP and practice writing entries in workbook type journals. ACCOUNTING Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Introduces students to principles and concepts that form the basis for bookkeeping/accounting systems used by businesses. The course will include the study of applications to both the service and merchandising businesses. Once students understand the concepts behind accounting systems, computers are used to complete a variety of accounting problems. The course will provide a good preparation for the study of college accounting. This course can be used as a unit in a three-unit local math sequence. Students must complete exercises and problems related to each chapter. This is accomplished with class work and daily homework assignments. Students are tested at the end of each chapter and a local final exam is given upon completion of this full year course. COLLEGE ACCOUNTING Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: High school accounting OR B or better in 10th grade math Recommendation: For 11th and 12th graders. Course Content: Content of this course will parallel the first semester of a college introductory accounting course and involves more analysis than the traditional high school accounting class. The course introduces basic accounting concepts, principles, and practices for a service or merchandising business at an accelerated pace. Students are introduced to accrual based accounting. Emphasis is placed on the use of special journals, subsidiary ledgers, and general accounting practices. Students who complete this course with a B or better and pass the final prepared by TC3 with a 75 or better or better will earn 4 cr/hrs from TC3. As this course is given with college-level expectations, consistent study habits and high motivation are required. Students who are comfortable working independently and who get satisfaction from being accurate can expect to do well in this class. CONSUMER MATHEMATICS Regents 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Work will be included on mathematical applications that are likely to be experienced by the post-high school consumer. Topics may include practical math in a home situation involving area and perimeter, such as concrete and paint; extending to pricing materials; payroll and deductions; banking operations; taxes; insurance; installment buying; home and auto expenses; and budgets. Guest speakers may be invited to discuss post-graduation career possibilities with the class. BUSINESS MATH Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Passed two high school math courses and passed one state assessment. Recommendation: Seniors Content: This course is almost entirely about finances and includes work with budgets, taxes, banking, finance charges, mortgages, insurance, discounts, depreciation and investments . Course information: The teaching method combines individual and group work. Consistent attendance and homework completion are essential for success in this course. The final exam is a department final. Note: Concurrent enrollment with TC3 is a possibility. BUSINESS LAW Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Recommendation: 11th or 12th graders Content: The course emphasis is on the individual as he/she encounters business law in personal, family, and occupational life. The course is introduced with an overview of how law affects society and the citizen. The remainder of the course is a study of the legal rules applicable to business contracts with special emphasis on payments, sales contracts, checks and promissory notes, insurance, renting and owning property, and wills. A mock trial is prepared for and conducted in competition with another school. This is a good preparatory course for a student planning to follow a college business management program. Students will be graded on tests, class participation, debate skills, case studies and projects. The final mock trail will be evaluated as well. This course can be used as the fifth unit in a 5-unit social studies sequence. Ithaca High School 17 Program of Studies
  • TECHNOLOGY (Technology Education courses give a broad base of skills that will prepare you for a variety of careers) With a focused sequence in Technology Education, students have the means to link their years in high school with those in post- secondary educational programs or employment. High paying careers in the fields of communication, construction, electricity/electronics, manufacturing and pre-engineering are all obtainable with the right academic preparation and the hands-on skills offered through a Technology Education sequence. Several courses offered may be used for fulfilling Fine Arts requirements (Tech Drafting, Architectural Drawing, Graphic Technology, Production Printing and Design and Drawing for Production). TECHNOLOGY SEQUENCES The Technology Department offers both the Project Lead the Way sequence and 3 or 5 unit sequences. All Technology sequences contain a common two-unit core requirement. Additional electives are offered from which students can choose to complete the units needed for a 5 unit sequence, only for Foreign Language exemption. TECHNOLOGY CORE Career and Financial Management (for 1/2 unit total) 2 Foundation Courses (for 1 unit total) 1 System Course (for 1/2 unit total) Foundation Courses System Courses Technical Drawing Communication Systems Design and Drawing for Production Construction Systems Digital Electronics Transportation Systems CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The working citizen module will provide students with information and experiences which will help them make future choices concerning work. Topics will focus upon a specific area of information and personal development that will help the individual students determine their roles within the work place and the home. The Personal Resource Management module will teach students decision-making skills that are needed to solve appropriate problems in order to make independent and/or group decisions. This course is required for all students completing an occupational sequence. CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS AND WOODWORKING Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is a project-oriented course designed to provide students knowledge related to modern construction technology and woodworking skills. In this course students have a chance to complete laboratory activities that include areas such as foundation layout, wall framing, plumbing, and electrical. Students will also have the opportunity to build woodworking projects including wall clocks or a project of their choice to take home. Students will build a project using the same woodwork machines used by carpenters and cabinetmakers. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This is a basic course that focuses on the transportation systems in our technical world, i.e. land, sea and air. Various engine and automotive systems will be studied. Students will rebuild small engines, and build projects in both the flight and aerospace prospective of today’s transportation systems. MANUFACTURING Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Each student will be directly involved with the selection, designing and producing of a mass produced project of interest to the group. Typical projects include Adirondack Chair and Problem Solving Puzzles. Students will work in the wood working and metal labs to produce jigs and fixtures to ensure exacting mass produced projects. Students will learn skills which will aid in employment or general life. Ithaca High School 18 Program of Studies
  • TECHNICAL DRAWING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This is the traditional course in technical drawing that teaches visualization skills required in all phases of technical and engineering careers. Students complete a portfolio of work including Orthographic Projection, Isometric section developments and descriptive geometry. Students learn to read and make blueprints. Students also learn how computers are used in the drafting industry and get hands-on experience. This course will be useful as a foundation for continuing courses in computer aided drawings and design. This course may be used for partial fulfillment of the Fine Arts Requirement for graduation. ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Students learn the basics of residential architectural design. The primary emphasis will be to use drafting equipment to develop and read blueprints that are used in construction and architectural industries. During the course, students will design a home and produce a complete set of drawings including floor plans, elevations, kitchen perspectives, and plot plans. Students will have a hands-on experience with the role computer aided drafting plays in this industry. This course may be used for partial fulfillment of the Fine Arts Requirement for graduation. COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Entry level course that allows students the flexibility to learn about graphic and audiovisual systems. Students will use computers to digitize audio and video segments, create movies using video software. Integrate digital movies along with scanned images and text to create powerful computer-assisted PowerPoint presentations. Organize important data into meaningful charts and graphs using computer software. Editing software will turn the computer into a non-linear digital audio workstation where students create audio/video commercials and PSA's with unlimited special effects. Students gain the skills necessary to succeed in today's information society. GRAPHIC TECHNOLOGY Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is designed to teach an entry level student the basics of computer hardware and software. The course is essential to any student. Emphasis is placed on the use of the Macintosh computer and related software. Experiences are provided in basic computer operation, flash, page layout, image creation, scanner operation, and the use of digital cameras, laser printers, and color ink jet printers. Students learn top of the line programs used by colleges and industry. This course would also be of great benefit to any student interested in a career related to the graphic communications industry. Anyone involved with IHS publications such as The Tattler, or the IHS Yearbook should seriously consider this course. This course may be used to fulfill 1/2 credit of the Fine Arts requirement for graduation. PRODUCTION PRINTING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is designed to introduce the student to the materials, equipment, and processes used to produce offset and screen printed images. Students will create basic projects such as memo pads, CD covers, stationary, business cards using clip art, computer generated art and type. Students will learn how to integrate text and illustrations on a computer to produce camera-ready copy. These projects will then be volume printed using conventional offset and screen printing techniques. This course may be used to fulfill 1/2 credit of the fine arts requirement for graduation. PHOTOSHOP Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce the student the basics of Photoshop, a photo retouching, image editing, and color painting program. Students will learn the basic functions, tools and techniques used to create original art as well as retouching techniques and image manipulation of photographs. All students are welcome to sign up for this course. Artist, photographers, graphic artist and printers use this program in a wide variety of ways. Students will create projects using Photoshop, scanners, digital cameras, and original artwork. WEB PAGE DESIGN Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of web page design for the Internet using Dreamweaver. Students will learn how to build and design web pages including links, graphics, backgrounds and colors. Students will learn how to plan and define a site; create, use and edit templates; and use the Reference and Assets panels. Ithaca High School 19 Program of Studies
  • MEDIA PRODUCTION Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This is an entry-level course that allows students to learn how to make videos using digital video camcorders and editing software. Students will learn two popular video editing software programs; QuickTime and iMovie. Students will learn how to correctly operate digital video camcorders, tripods, and microphones. Students will learn camera methods as well as editing techniques. Students will create, write, videotape and edit video to produce news stories, movies, and instructional videos as projects in this class. ENGLISH/MEDIA PRODUCTION Regents Full Year 2 Credits Prerequisites: English 9 & 10 (1 Cr. - English & 1 Cr. – Technology) Course Content: The English/Media Production meets two consecutive periods, five days a week, for the whole year, allowing students to earn their required credit in English 11 or English 12 plus an elective credit in Technology. Students use reading, writing, listening and speaking in both individual and collaborative projects which sometimes involve literature, but which are often journalistic, producing news segments and features for a bi-weekly show called "Lake Street News" which airs on public access TV, channel 16. Students learn to operate a TV camera, character generator, video switcher and editors (both analog and digital). They learn the skills and duties of camera operator, technical director, floor manager, anchor, and producer, rotating through these positions during the year. The course uses alternative assessment in which students demonstrate competence by completing projects, reflecting on their process, evaluating the product, and formulating strategies for improvement. Course is offered Pass/Fail or Regents/Honors for a grade. ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: English/Video Production or permission of the instructor Course Content: This class allows students who have completed one year in the English/Media Production course to continue learning video production skills and contributing to the class's biweekly program "Lake Street News". Students will attend Advanced Video Production one period a day for the year, producing programming, and serving as mentors in small group instruction on the equipment, and modeling performance in the various roles required in TV production. Students will receive advanced training in cameras, switching, audio mixing, dubbing, studio lighting, graphics, and character generation. Advanced students will receive training in computer technologies such as digital video, audio, and animation. The Technology Department Also Offers a Specific Pre-Engineering Sequence Known as: PROJECT LEAD THE WAY Note: You do not have to complete the entire sequence to enroll in DDP Recommended Pre-Engineering Sequence/ Project Lead the Way 9th Design & Drawing for Production DDP (meets Fine Arts Requirement) th 10 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Recommended for 10th 11th Principles of Engineering Recommended for 11th grade 11th Digital Electronics Recommended for 11th grade 12th Engineering Design & Development Must have previous 4 courses DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit PRODUCTION-PLTW (Also known as Introduction to Engineering Design) A Solid Modeling Approach Prerequisite: Open to all students with Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Course Content: DDP is an introductory course, which develops student problem-solving skills, with emphasis placed upon the concept of developing a 3-D model or solid rendering of an object. Students focus on the application of visualization processes and tools provided by modern, state-of-the-art computer hardware and software (Inventor). This modern computer-based process replaces the traditional hand drawing methods. The course will emphasize the design development process of a product and how a model of that product is produced, analyzed and evaluated, using a Computer Aided Design System. Various design applications will be explored with discussion of possible career opportunities. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. Ithaca High School 20 Program of Studies
  • DIGITAL ELECTRONICS-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit TC3 dual-credit is available. Prerequisite: Open to all students with Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Course Content: Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic. The course is patterned after the first semester course in Digital Electronics taught in two and four year colleges. Students will study the application of electronic logic circuits and devices and apply Boolean logic to the solution of problems. Such circuits are found in watches, calculators, video games, computers and thousands of other devices. The use of smart circuits is present in virtually all aspects of our lives and its use is increasing rapidly, making digital electronics an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering/engineering technology. Using Electronics Workbench (EWB) and CircuitMaker, the industry standard, students will test and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry. Students will design circuits, using EWB, export their designs to a printed circuit auto-routing program that generates printed circuit boards and construct the design using chips and other components. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: DDP and Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Recommendation: Students are strongly encouraged to also enroll in Computer Integrated Manufacturing. Course Content: Principles of Engineering is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering problem-solving skills that are involved in post- secondary education programs and engineering careers. They will explore various engineering systems and manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers’ address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. The main purpose of this course is to experience through theory and hands-on problem-solving activities what engineering is all about and to answer the question, “Is a career in engineering or engineering technology for me?” *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. COMPUTER INTEGRATED MFG-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: DDP and Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Recommendation: Students are strongly encouraged to also enroll in Principles of Engineering. Course Content: This course builds upon the computer solid modeling design skills developed in Design and Drawing for Production. Students will be presented with design problems that require the use of Inventor and MasterCam to develop solutions to the problems. They will evaluate the solutions using mass property analysis (study of the relationship among the design, function and materials used), make appropriate modifications and use rapid prototyping equipment to produce three-dimensional models of the solutions. Students will be expected to communicate the process and results of their work through oral and written reports. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVEL-PLTW Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Principals of Engineering, Computer Integrated Manufacturing & Digital Electronics. Dependent on successful completion of year long project B+ or better. Course Content: In this course, students will work in teams of two to four to design and construct the solution to an engineering problem, (original, taken from a database of problems, or a national challenge) applying the principles developed in the four preceding courses. Students will maintain a journal as part of a portfolio of their work. Each team will be responsible for delivering progress reports and making final presentations of their project to an outside review panel. The completed portfolio will be invaluable as students apply to college. Ithaca High School 21 Program of Studies
  • P ROJECT L EAD THE W AY A Partnership for America’s Future A Pre-Engineering Program MISSION It is the mission of Project Lead The Way to create and support a dynamic partnership between colleges and universities, school districts, and industry intended to address the impending shortfall of trained technical workers that threatens our nation’s prosperity. BACKGROUND The key to continued national prosperity is directly linked to the development of an effective, high quality, technology-literate work force. America’s need for skilled technical people is growing. At the same time, two and four year colleges are experiencing a decline in applicants to engineering/engineering technology programs. Further, college attrition rates in these programs are 50%. The critical need is to implement a high quality, pre-engineering program that enables high school students to explore the engineering/engineering technology career cluster as a part of a comprehensive high school college preparatory program. The intent is to increase the quality and number of high school students pursuing two and four year technical degree programs which in turn will address a strategic need of national proportions. GOALS • To expand the general high school college prep curricula to include a comprehensive technology preparation program. • To provide upgraded training for high school teachers in the new technologies. • To involve higher education and industry as advisors, supporters, and mentors in the school program. • To apply the highest level of technology in the application of math and science. • To allow students to explore careers within the broad field of engineering and engineering technology. • To help students prepare for the rigors of college-level engineering programs. • To increase the numbers of young people pursuing technical careers. • To reduce the future attrition rate within college engineering programs. • To develop opportunities and linkages enabling a seamless link between high school and college. PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM Pre-Engineering Education is a five-course technology program designed to help students explore technology related careers and to prepare them for two and four year college technical degree programs. Each class is taught in a laboratory setting using state-of-the-art technology equipment and software. Instruction is generally one-third theory and two-thirds application, sometimes involving mentors from industry and colleges. Class activities focus on problem-solving requiring students to work in teams to generate solutions. Students have the option to earn college credit, when possible, though college articulation agreements, offering a seamless link between high school and college. PRE-ENGINEERING STUDENTS Typically, students who enjoy math and science will benefit from exploring at least part of the program. Students in the program range from the valedictorian to the student who requires four years to complete the New York State integrated math program. Students unable to complete a four-year math sequence are not recommended for this program. A SA MPLE FOUR - YEAR STUDENT SC HED UL E Grade 9 Grade 10 English 9 1 unit English 10 1 unit Social Studies 9 1 unit Social Studies 10 1 unit Math 9 1 unit Math 10 1 unit Science 9 1 unit Science 10 1 unit Foreign Language 1 unit Foreign Language 1 unit Design and Drawing for Production 1 unit Computer Integrated Manufacturing 1 unit Physical Education ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Grade 11 Grade 12 English 11 1 unit English 12 1 unit Social Studies 11 1 unit Social Studies 12 1 unit Math 11 1 unit Math 12 1 unit Science 11 1 unit Science 12 1 unit Principles of Engineering 1 unit Engineering Design and Development 1 unit Digital Electronics 1 unit Health ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Ithaca High School 22 Program of Studies
  • ENGLISH ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Department Chair: Shirley Kennedy English Department Office: G-109 Phone: 274-2265, 274-2187 DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVES The Ithaca High School English program is designed to help students develop skills in using the arts of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in order to confront, assimilate, and communicate experience. To help students use language effectively and fully appreciate the oral and written expression of others, the English language arts program teaches students how to use language to gain information, to discover meaning, to understand logical relationships, and to make judgments through critical listening, reading, and viewing; to speak, write, and solve problems creatively; to communicate emotions, ideas, opinions, values, experiences, and information; to discover both the power and the beauty of literature as a mirror of human experience, reflecting human motives, conflicts, values, and traditions. A fifth year/elective program allows students to pursue individual interests and skills beyond the requirement of the four year state minimum. ENGLISH 9R Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 8 Course Content: English 9 Regents provides instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works with broad universal themes such as Othello, Julius Caesar, The First Part Last, Of Mice and Men, The Joy Luck Club, Brian’s Song, and The Mango Season as well as selected poetry and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 major works or literary units will be studied. Students will complete written projects, including an I-Search paper, and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten-week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Regular homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 9 SEMESTER (will not be offered 2010-11) Regents/Honors* Fall/Spring 1 Credit Prerequisite: English 8 Course Content: English 9 Semester meets two consecutive periods daily, allowing students to achieve English 9 Regents or Honors credit. This course combines multi-cultural readings and a variety of cooperative learning activities in a semester course. Reading includes works such as Toning the Sweep, Othello, Things Fall Apart, The Joy Luck Club, and The Chosen. Teaching Methods: The double period format allows for flexible scheduling of activities such as in-depth discussion, “literature circles,” and word processing. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. *Students choose Regents or Honors credit after the first, five weeks progress report. Honors candidates are required to read additional assigned books and write one additional essay. English 9 Honors Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 8 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 8 Course Content: English 9 Honors provides advanced instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and literary analysis. Students will read works such as The Chosen, Julius Caesar, The Joy Luck Club, and Of Mice and Men. Selected writing assignments, oral presentations, and projects will reinforce skills which are important in both English 9 and Global 1. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects including an I- Search paper, and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignments, projects, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 9 HUMANITIES Honors Full Year 1 Credit (ENGLISH 9/GLOBAL STUDIES I) Prerequisites: English 8 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 8 Course Content: English 9 Humanities provides an interdisciplinary study of literature and history. Students will study the literature of particular world cultures while learning about the same culture’s geography, society, and history in social studies. The course is based on Ithaca High School 23 Program of Studies
  • an understanding of cross-cultural themes such as diversity, personal power, gender roles, human rights, and challenges to traditional values. Students will read works such as The Chosen, I Rigoberta Menchu, Things Fall Apart, Othello, Julius Caesar, The Joy Luck Club, First They Killed my Father, and Bless Me Ultima,. Selected writing assignments, oral presentations, and projects are team taught, reinforcing skills which are important in both disciplines. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects including an I- Search paper, and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 10R Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 9 Course Content: English 10 Regents provides instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works of British and Western literature such as Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales (selections), Macbeth, Night, and The Lord of the Flies as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Regular moderate homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 10 SEMESTER (will not be offered 2010-11) Regents/Honor (Fall & Spring) 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 9 Course Content: English 10 Semester meets two consecutive periods daily, allowing students to achieve English 10 Regents or Honors credit. Students will study works of British and Western literature such as Macbeth, Lord of the Flies and Night as well as selected essays, poetry and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 or 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. *During the first marking period, students select Regents or Honors credit based on course work and assessment expectations. ENGLISH 10H Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 9 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 9 Course Content: English 10 Honors provides advanced instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. English 10H emphasizes the relationships between British and European literature and life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will do in-depth analysis of works such as Antigone, Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, Night, Lord of the Flies, and British poetry from the medieval ballad to Tennyson and Browning. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 10H/GLOBAL STUDIES 2 (COMBINED) Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 9 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 9 and a recommendation from their ninth grade English teacher Course Content: This course emphasizes the relationship between European history and European literature and is open to all students. The goals are a better understanding of political, economic, cultural and intellectual history and an understanding of literature in historical context. The double-period format is utilized in a variety of ways: combined classes for field trips, guest lectures, joint student and/or teacher presentations, and class projects such as traditional Greek Olympic Day and the Victorian Tea. Students will read works of British and Western literature such as Antigone, Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Night as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group and large group activities. Ithaca High School 24 Program of Studies
  • Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily, a major theme paper, and four major group projects. ENGLISH 11R Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 10 Course Content: English 11 Regents provides instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works of American literature such as The Crucible, The Red Badge of Courage, A Raisin in the Sun, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Regular moderate homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 11H Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 10 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 10 Course Content: English 11 Honors provides advanced instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works of American literature such as The Scarlet Letter, Ethan Frome, The Red Badge of Courage, The Catcher in the Rye, The Crucible, A Raisin In the Sun, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 11 SEMESTER (will not be offered 2010-11) Regents/Honors* Fall Semester 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 10 Course Content: English 11 one-semester option meets two consecutive periods daily, allowing students to complete one English 11 Regents or Honors credit. Students will focus on the cultural diversity of the American Experience, studying works such as Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, A Raisin in the Sun, The Scarlet Letter, Ethan Frome, The Catcher in the Rye, and The Crucible as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 5 or 6 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Homework will be assigned almost daily. *During the first marking period, students select Regents or Honors credit based on course work and assessment expectations. ENGLISH/MEDIA 11/12 Regents/Honors* Full Year 2 Credits Prerequisites: English 10 1Cr English (English 11-12 & Technology) 1 C Technology Course Content: English/Media meets two consecutive periods, five days a week for the whole year, allowing students to earn the required credit in English 11 or 12 plus an elective credit in Technology. Students use listening, speaking, reading, and writing in both individual and collaborative projects that sometimes involve literature, but are often journalistic. Media literacy and the effects it has on the individual and society will be a significant element of the class. Teaching Methods: Include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. A high degree of participation is expected. Type of Assignments: Students will learn 21st century technologies on the school’s MacBooks such as Imovie, Garageband, PhotoShop, and VoiceThread. Projects include posters, short documentary films, short narrative films, and music composition. Projects will be both long and short term, done as groups and as individuals. Assessment: The course uses alternate assessments in which students demonstrate competence by completing projects, reflecting on their process, evaluating the product, and formulating strategies for improvement. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. *During the first marking period students select Regents or Honors credit based on course work expectations they agree to fulfill. Ithaca High School 25 Program of Studies
  • ENGLISH 12R Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 Course Content: English 12 Regents provides instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works of world and modern American literature such as Hamlet, The Great Gatsby, The Things They Carried, and This Boy’s Life as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Regular moderate homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 12H Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 11 Course Content: English 12 Honors provides advanced instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works of literature such as Hamlet, The Great Gatsby, In Cold Blood, and Their Eyes Were Watching God as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 12 SEMESTER (will not be offered 2010-11) Regents/Honors* Semester (Spring) 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 Course Content: English 12 Semester meets two consecutive periods daily, allowing students to complete one English 12 Regents or Honors credit. Students will focus on the question of individual identity and responsibility in a complex and uncertain world, studying works of 20th century literature such as Their Eyes Were Watching God, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Brave New World, The Great Gatsby, The Stranger, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest as well as selected essays, poetry, and short stories. Students will participate in a joint study program with students from Cornell University. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 5 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. *During the first marking period, students select Regents or Honors credit based on course work and assessment expectations. ENGLISH 12 - WISE Honors/Regents* Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 Course Content: English 12 WISE meets daily during the first semester, providing instruction in reading, listening, speaking, reading, and writing and will prepare students to design and complete individualized independent projects during the second semester. First semester reading will include novels, such as The Great Gatsby, The Things They Carried, Their Eyes Were Watching God, and a selection of poetry, essays and short stories. In the second semester, students will explore areas of academic or career interest, guided by mentors they have chosen from the IHS staff and/or people in the greater Ithaca community who have expertise in the students’ areas of interest. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. During the second semester students will participate in individual projects and meet weekly as a class to discuss their progress. Type of Assignments: Students will keep daily journals in which they reflect on their project activities, will meet weekly with their mentors and with their classmates, and will prepare public presentations of their experiences at the end of the semester. Assessment: First semester ten-week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignments, projects, test and quiz grades. Final project:: public presentation of their second semester project, narrative essay, and research commentary Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily first semester. Second semester, daily participation and completion of individual project is required. *During the first marking period, students select Regents or Honors credit based on course work and assessment expectations. Ithaca High School 26 Program of Studies
  • ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) The English Department offers two Advanced Placement course, English 12 AP Literature and Composition and English 12 AP Language and Composition. Both courses have entry requirements and provide college credit at participating universities. Both courses require students to write extensively and both provide substantial writing instruction. A difference between the two courses is that English 12 AP Literature and Composition primarily studies texts of fiction (novels, plays, short stories, poetry), while English 12 AP Language and Composition primarily studies non-fiction texts (essays, biographies, historical scientific, philosophical works). Both courses meet the English 12 requirement or may be taken in addition to English 12 for a five-unit sequence. Although students are permitted to take both English 12 AP Literature and Composition and English 12 AP Language and Composition, this is usually not recommended because of the substantial work required for each. Both courses require the completion of summer reading and writing assignments to enter the classes in the fall. ENGLISH 12 AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSTITION AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 and two of the following three qualifying criteria: English grade point average of B or higher, a score of 3 or higher on qualifying exam, and departmental recommendation. Course Content: English 12 AP Language and Composition is primarily a course in effective writing and critical reading. Students will examine the principal modes of discourse: narrative; description; exposition; and persuasion/argument; and how they can be controlled in both spoken and written communication. They will study a variety of non-fiction works, but principally essays by writers such as Samuel Johnson, George Orwell, E.B. White, Jamaica Kincaid and Shelby Steele. A national exam costing approximately $90.00 is required to complete the course. (Fee waivers are available for students who qualify.) Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of lecture, discussion, group work, independent research, and formal debate. Types of Assignments: Students will write weekly formal essays, take part in writing workshops, and discuss readings which focus on social, psychological, scientific, political and ethical issues of the 21 st Century. Some summer assignments of reading and writing are required to enter the course in the fall. Assessment: Ten week assignments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. There will be a midterm exam; the final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Daily substantial homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 12 AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 11 and two of the following three qualifying criteria: English grade point average of B or higher, a score of 3 or higher on qualifying exam, and departmental recommendation. Course Content: English 12 AP: Literature and Composition provides highly advanced instruction in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and literary analysis for students desiring possible college credit for their senior English experience. Students will read works of world and American literature as well as essays, a wide range of poetry, and short stories. A national exam costing approximately $90.00 is required to complete the course. (Fee waivers are available for students who qualify.) Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 8 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Some summer assignments of reading and writing are required to enter the course in the fall. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. There will be a midterm exam; the final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Daily substantial homework will be assigned. ELECTIVES/FIFTH UNIT COURSES These courses are available to any student desiring additional concentration or credit in English. They do not count toward the regular four-year requirement in English. Courses will be offered on the basis of student registration and budget restrictions. OFFERED EACH YEAR Speech and Debate Creative Writing Expository/SAT Writing Film Study Introduction to Philosophy Newspaper Yearbook Great Books OFFERED DEPENDING ON ENROLLMENT AND AVAILABILITY OF STAFF Journalism African-American Literature Literature of the Holocaust Literary Magazine Shakespeare on the Page and Stage Ithaca High School 27 Program of Studies
  • SPEECH AND DEBATE Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those students who wish to develop their poise and persuasive power and who are serious about improving their formal oral communication skills. Course will include experience in story telling, using rhetorical devices, oral interpretation, impromptu speaking and debate, informative and persuasive speech. CREATIVE WRITING is offered every year. When there is sufficient interest to differentiate the genres, the courses below are taught. Otherwise, the course incorporates all three forms of creative writing. CREATIVE WRITING: DRAMA Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course will examine and implement the many aspects of drama, which contribute to the dynamic process of play writing. These include: writing dialogue and stage directions, studying scene and plot, and practicing improvisation and characterization. Playwrights, actors, directors, and designers will participate in the collaborative and active process of writing and creating a play. CREATIVE WRITING-POETRY Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those students interested in learning to write a variety of poetic forms. Students will study and write many types of poetry. Portfolio final project. CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those students interested in telling stories about themselves and others. Students will learn to express themselves through extensive practice in journal, personal narrative, and short story writing. Portfolio final project. EXPOSITORY/SAT WRITING Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those students hoping to improve their performance on PSAT or SAT verbal and writing assessments. Students will review grammar, write essays, and learn test taking strategies. Individual conferences will provide feedback to help each student achieve maximum results. JOURNALISM Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those who wish to develop a background in journalism, write for an audience, edit copy, and publish. Students will learn skills such as interviewing, writing news, reviews, features, and sports stories as well as writing editorials and advertising copy. They will be introduced to local avenues to publish their work and meet local editors and reporters. Their final exam will be a portfolio of their published clips. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Honors Semester ½ Credit “The unexamined life is not worth living” – Socrates Course Content: This course is designed to introduce students to some of the key concepts of Western Philosophy, such as the cave allegory, the Socratic dialogue, empiricism, rationalism, nihilism, and existentialism. Philosophers studied will include Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Berkeley, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus. The text used will be Sophie’s World, which will be augmented by teacher handouts. A research paper on one of the philosophers or philosophies will be required. FILM STUDY Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is designed for students who love film and who wish to know more about how films make meaning. Students will learn about the “grammar” of film through study of montage, cross-cutting, jump-cuts, hand held camera, tracking, panning, fades, and super imposing. Weekly movie reviews and a research paper on a major filmmaker (e.g., Hitchcock, Welles, Ford, Sorcese), will be required. GREAT BOOKS Honors Semester ¼ Credit Course Content: The Great Books program is designed as a small group seminar which meets once a week, giving a maximum of ten students per discussion group the chance to discuss and write about literature as they consider elements of doubt in the assigned text. The pass/fail grade is based upon minimum attendance requirements AND upon submission of a response journal where students question and respond both to the text and to the remarks and questions other students present. NEWSPAPER Honors Full Year ¼ to 1 Credit Course Content: Students may earn credit for soliciting advertising, writing, editing, designing and producing regular editions of the school newspaper. They will meet at times determined by the instructor and students, which may include some evenings and weekends. YEARBOOK Honors Full Year ¼ to 1 Credit Course Content: Students may earn credit for the commitment required designing and producing the IHS Annual. Students who wish to be involved in production of the “10-11" yearbook and earn credit must sign up for the class. Those wishing to earn one full credit must take on an editorial role, which would require 5-10 hours of work per week. A number of activities are available for specialization: copy writing, editing, graphics, design, photography, advertising, computer application, finance, and accounting. The instructor, based on student availability, will determine meeting times. Ithaca High School 28 Program of Studies
  • AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those who wish to explore a variety of literature, both poetry and prose, fiction and non-fiction by modern African-American writers such as Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Nikki Giovanni, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright. In addition to reading, this course will involve journal writing, discussion and film. The students will write a final paper based on their experience in the course. LITERATURE OF THE HOLOCAUST Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: This course is for those who wish to explore a variety of literature about the Holocaust. The texts will be primarily first- hand prose accounts by Holocaust survivors and will include such works as: Elie Wiesel’s Night, Charlotte Delbo’s None of Us Will Return, Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, and The Diary of Anne Frank. In addition to reading, this course will involve journal writing, discussion and film. The students will write a final paper based on their experience in the course. SHAKESPEARE ON THE PAGE AND STAGE Honors Semester ½ Credit Course Content: Students will read and discuss three or four selected plays and, for each, view screen adaptations noting details that influence interpretation. Students will study and view interpretations of works such as King Lear, Henry IV, and Romeo and Juliet. LITERARY MAGAZINE Honors Full Year ¼ to 1 Credit Course Content: Students may earn from 1/4 to 1 credit, depending upon their level of involvement, for working to produce three issues a year of the IHS literary magazine. They will meet/work during free periods, after school, or on weekends to type, proofread, format layout, publish, promote and distribute the magazine. Ithaca High School 29 Program of Studies
  • ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Department Leader: Gwen Freeman Phone: 274-2166 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE The English as a Second Language (ESL) program offers four levels of English language instruction for English Language Learners (ELL) and Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. Content area support for ESOL students scheduled in mainstream classes is also offered. A wide variety of assessment tools is utilized in measuring student achievement and language development, including written and oral exams, portfolios, projects, midterm and final exams. Instruction is student centered, and students are offered a diverse range of homework assignments. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I Regents Full Year 2 Credits Course Content: ESL I is an introductory/beginning course in English for speakers of other languages. Most students will have had some prior exposure to the language, while others will have their first experience learning English. Listening and speaking skills are a major focus, with the goal of developing basic communicative competence. Students also develop skills in reading, writing, and learning strategies to build a strong foundation for learning content area course material. Students read and analyze a variety of reading materials and complete basic writing tasks. They are introduced to technology skills that will help them in all subjects. Learning units are designed to help students develop the language skills they need to become more comfortable in their new cultural environment as well as prepare them to succeed in content area courses. Final exam or Final Course Project. *Students who successfully complete this course will earn one ESL credit and an additional credit in English. This full-year course meets daily for two consecutive periods. *A content Area Support Lab is required for all beginning level ESOL students. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE II Regents Full Year 2 Credits Course Content: ESL II is an intermediate-level course in English for speakers of other languages designed to foster their success in all areas of their high school experience. Listening, speaking, reading, writing and learning strategies are integrated in academic thematic units that approximate or parallel units in mainstream social studies and English classes. In addition, students read and analyze many short stories and full-length novels by famous authors. There is a continued focus on language competency and vocabulary development. Students are also exposed to diverse styles of essay writing and learn effective process writing techniques. A research project, local final exam or final course project are required. Students who successfully complete this course will earn one ESL credit and an additional credit in English. This full-year course meets daily for two consecutive periods. *A Content Area Support Lab is required for all intermediate level ESOL students. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE III Regents Full Year 2 Credits Course Content: ESL III class is an advanced course in English language acquisition complemented by an integrated English/Language Arts component. Students will participate in a variety of whole group, small group, and individual reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. They will read short and full-length fiction and non-fiction as well as selected poetry and drama by a diverse range of authors. The process approach to writing will be utilized. Students will also continue to work on building their knowledge of English vocabulary and its proper usage. Students will complete an independent research project. A local final exam or portfolio project is required. ESOL students in 11th or 12th grade will take the New York State Regents English Language Arts exam. *Students who successfully complete this course will earn one ESL credit and an additional credit in English. This full-year team-taught course meets daily for two consecutive periods. *A Content Area Support Lab is available for all advanced level ESOL students but is not required. ENGLISH FOR SIFE (Students with Interrupted Formal Education) Regents Full Year 2 Credits Course Content: English for SIFE is an ESL level 0-1 course for students beginning English language acquisition who have had an interrupted educational experience in their mother tongue, which they may or may not be able to read and write. SIFE students initially come to class with minimal or no exposure to the English language. Students will participate in a variety of whole group, small group, paired, and individual activities to develop basic English listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will focus on building vocabulary and basic grammatical structures. Students will meet for three consecutive periods each day. Ithaca High School 30 Program of Studies
  • FINE ARTS ART-MUSIC-THEATER Department Leader: Carol Spence Phone: 274-2239 All students must complete one unit of fine arts credit for graduation. The following courses can be used to fulfill this requirement: • Studio in Art • Band, Chorus, Orchestra • Introduction to Theater ART The primary goal of the Art Department is to provide our students with a program of creative instruction, which allows each the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to express ideas through the visual arts. By focusing on the basic fundamentals of each discipline offered, and by supplementing these with advanced courses whenever possible, we hope to assure that our students have every chance to realize their own potential as unique individuals with significant ideas to express. NOTE: Students must take the introductory course before taking an advanced course. RECOMMENDED FLOW CHART FOR ART COURSES STUDIO ART Draw A & Draw B & Photography Ceramics A Ceramics B Sculpture Painting Painting Advanced Adv. Workshop A Adv. Workshop B Photography In Art A In Art B Advanced Advanced Ceramics A Ceramics B Independent Study In Art A or B Advanced Placement AP Art STUDIO ART 1 Regents Semester (F & S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: None Course Content: This course is a foundation course and is one of the courses designed to fulfill the fine arts graduation requirement. It is an intensive class exploring the elements and principles of design through techniques in drawing, painting, design and visual vocabulary. Students will engage with fun and creative assignments that encourage personal expression. Process Book is required. STUDIO ART 2 Regents Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: Studio Art 1 Course Content: This is the second part of a two part course. It provides continued exploration of the elements and principals of design through study in painting, drawing, 3 dimensional projects, and graphics. Completion of Studio I and Studio II allows students to take more advanced courses in the art program. Students will explore the elements through new theme units (Graphic Design, Illustration, graffiti, textile design). Process Book is required. Ithaca High School 31 Program of Studies
  • DRAWING & PAINTING A Honors Semester (F) ½ Credit DRAWING & PAINTING B Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: Studio Art I and II Course Content: This class is an introduction to drawing and painting media and techniques with emphasis on drawing from life and nature forms, combined with creative and imaginative work. The use of form, color, texture, and motion in design will be explored in media including charcoal, ink, pencil, pastels, watercolor and acrylics. Emphasis will be on the relationship between discipline and expression in a variety of two dimensional media. Local artist will visit the classroom to share their drawing & painting process. Process Book is required. ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN ART A Honors Semester (F) ½ Credit ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN ART B Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: Drawing and Painting A and B or by permission of instructor Course Content: An advanced studio course in mixed media, exploring multiple techniques in design, drawing, painting and printmaking. The student will be expected to develop a personal approach to technique, composition, and subject matter, solving creative visual problems in an individualized manner. Process Book is required. CERAMICS A Regents Semester (F) ½ Credit CERAMICS B Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: 1 full credit of Fine Art Course Content: This course is an introduction to basic and traditional hand-building techniques that are necessary to understand the ceramic art making process. Coil-building, slab construction, basic glazing, surface design and texture are investigated through hands on exploration. Students will create functional and sculptural artwork. Ceramics A and B need not be taken in order. The first time students take either Ceramics A or B, they will be hand-building and the second class taken will be learning the basics of wheel-throwing. Students must take a semester of hand-building before they learn wheel-throwing. Process Book is required. ADVANCED CERAMICS A Honors Semester (F) ½ Credit ADVANCED CERAMICS B Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisites: Ceramics A & B Course Content: This is a course designed for those who have taken both Ceramics A and B. This course is an extensive exploration structured to provide students with an in-depth sculptural and vessel making experience. Students will focus on improving their wheel throwing and pottery skills. Students will continue to develop their knowledge, skills, visual communication and problem-solving. Students will continue to utilize their previous ceramic making experience and further their understanding of the inherent working characteristics of the ceramic media. Process Book is required. SCULPTURE A Regents Semester (F) ½ Credit SCULPTURE B Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisite: 1 full credit of Fine Art Course Content: Studies in sculpture focus primarily on clay modeling and a variety of other media. Sculptural ideas range from objects and figurative sculpture to organic and inorganic abstractions and site-specific environments. All students are encouraged to keep a notebook and are expected to develop and refine their ideas, skills, and concepts. Process Book is required. PHOTOGRAPHY 1 Regents Semester (F & S) ½ Credit Prerequisite: 1 full credit of Fine Art Course Content: This course provides students with a foundation in both black and white film and digital photography. Students will learn to use cameras in the manual mode, giving them full control over the camera as a tool for art making. Curriculum includes darkroom techniques, (developing film, printing negatives, using multi-grade filters, dodging and burning, etc…), computer manipulation of digital images, art analysis and critique, presentation of personal work and assignments that focus on relevant and expressive themes. Emphasis will be on encouraging students to find their own creative voices and on building their skills in visual communication. A process book is required. Time outside of class is required for shooting images on a regular basis. NOTE: Students will be allotted the film and photo paper necessary to complete their class work, based on the current district budget. Students may need to supplement theses supplies with their own purchases/contributions. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Honors Semester (S) ½ Credit Prerequisite: 1 full credit in the Fine Arts AND Photography 1 Course Content: After successful completion of Photography 1, students may choose to continue their study of Photography. Assignments will be more challenging as students work to improve their visual communication skills. Alternative darkroom techniques will be taught. More advanced techniques with Adobe Photoshop Elements will be covered. Projects focus on personal investigation, developing an aesthetic, and communication of the individual’s ideas through visual means. Time outside of class is required for shooting images on a regular basis. A process book is also required. NOTE: Students will be allotted the film and photo paper necessary to complete their class work, based on the current district budget. Students may need to supplement these supplies with their own purchases/contributions. Ithaca High School 32 Program of Studies
  • INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART Honors ½ to 1 Credit Prerequisites: Completion of an Advanced Class, permission of instructor in cooperation with the Department Chair. Course Content: A studio class enabling the student to explore in depth one phase of creative expression (drawing, painting, printing, photography, or ceramics). In this type of program the student has to fulfill 3 obligations: 1. Write an expected general outline before starting the course. 2. Complete a required amount of reading and writing on related topics. 3. Have his/her work reviewed by the art faculty before the semester ends, and place on exhibit the main body of artwork accomplished each semester. Plans for work in this area are to be arranged under advisement of the instructor. The student must have exhausted all other art courses in his/her area of study. Students will be scheduled in a specific period with their teacher and are required to attend daily. AP STUDIO ART Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Permission of instructor Course Content: This course is intended for highly motivated students committed to a serious study in studio art. Advanced Placement portfolio is college level studio work with three major concerns: 1. Quality - development of a sense of excellence in art 2. Concentration - a personal commitment to a particular mode of thinking and working 3. Breadth - a variety of experiences in the format, technical and expressive means including drawing, painting, design 2D and 3D, and sculpture. Students can select either the Drawing, Design or 3D Portfolio, in which the breadth area will explore a variety of ways of working in drawing - pencil, graphite, ink, conte, charcoal, pastels, and more. All students will complete an extensive portfolio, and will be well prepared for college studio in art. Process Book is required. Music MUSIC Music at Ithaca High School is a comprehensive program providing experiences in listening, performing, and composing. A variety of courses are offered to develop within each student the ability to appreciate, understand, create, perform, and criticize with discrimination, music of all styles and periods. The program of music instruction is designed to meet the needs of students pursuing a career in music education or performance as well as those wishing to pursue the study of music as a leisure time activity. The courses offered allow students to: 1) satisfy the Regents fine arts requirement; 2) take a 3 unit music sequence; and 3) prepare students who intend to major in music in college. CONCERT BAND Regents Full Year 1 Credit Entrance requirements: Previous experience in a Middle School band program or by audition. Course Content: The Concert Band meets daily all year during a class period. The Band is open to all Woodwind, Brass, and Percussion players. While everyone is accepted into the Band, an audition for seating is required. The Concert Band rehearses and performs a wide variety of band literature. Lessons and sectionals are given on a rotating basis for all students to improve their music ability. Satisfies one unit of fine arts credit required for graduation. Private lessons are strongly encouraged. Students are required to participate in all concerts. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Regents Full Year 1 Credit Entrance requirements: String: Recommendation of Middle School Music Teacher. Winds: Audition. Course Content: The Symphony Orchestra includes Strings, Woodwinds, Brass, and Percussion. A wide variety of styles and periods of music will be studied and performed. All string students must attend one sectional lesson per week in addition to the daily orchestra rehearsals. Private lessons are strongly encouraged. Students are required to participate in all after school rehearsals and concerts. Satisfies one unit of fine arts credit required for graduation. CONCERT CHOIR Regents Full Year 1 Credit Entrance requirements: Some musical experience and note recognition ability is helpful. Course Content: A course devoted to the study of musical composition and structure. The basic elements of music are studied and the students learn how to read and write music successfully. The course begins with the study of Basic Musical Notation and ends in the composition of four part harmonic writing. Careful attention is also given to developing the student's ability to aurally recognize and produce the musical topics studied. This course can fulfill the Fine Arts requirement. Ithaca High School 33 Program of Studies
  • MUSIC THEORY 1 Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisites: Some musical experience and note recognition ability is helpful. Course Content: A course devoted to the study of musical composition and structure. The basic elements of music are studied and the students learn how to read and write music successfully. The course begins with the study of Basic Musical Notation and ends in the composition of four part harmonic writing. Careful attention is also given to developing the student's ability to aurally recognize and produce the musical topics studied. This course can fulfill the Fine Arts requirement. MUSIC THEORY 2 Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisites: Music Theory 1 Course Content: A continuation of Music Theory I, this course is designed to cover more in-depth aspects of musical composition including modern techniques and practices. Attention is given to student composition, as well as transposition and the formal structure of music. Students taking Music Theory 1 and 2 may take the A.P. exam in the spring. This course can fulfill the Fine Arts requirement. EXTRA-CURRICULAR PERFORMING ARTS MUSIC JAZZ BAND Regents 0 Credit The Jazz Band is a select group of 20 musicians chosen by an audition. The group meets one evening per week from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. The Jazz Band rehearses all styles of Big Band and popular music. The Band performs at concerts in school, in the community, and participates in Jazz Festivals throughout the Northeast. VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE Regents 0 Credit A select vocal performance organization consisting of singers taken from the Concert Choir through formal audition. The group performs music in Swing, Latin, Blues, Ballad and Be Bop styles with a full rhythm section in a variety of functions including school and community concerts. Vocal Jazz meets Fridays from 3:50-4:45 pm. MADRIGAL SINGERS Regents 0 Credit A select vocal performance organization consisting of singers taken from the Concert Choir through formal audition. The Madrigal Singers perform early music from the Renaissance era. Most of the music is performed a capella, and performances have included school and community functions. Madrigals meet Wednesdays from 3:50-4:45 pm. AFTER SCHOOL CHOIR Regents 1/2 Credit After School Choir is open to students with a serious interest in singing who were unable to schedule Choir during the day. The group rehearses on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:50 – 4:30. The members rehearse the same literature as the day Choir and perform with them at all concerts. Students receive 1/2 credit for the year and are graded on attendance. After School Choir members also attend rotating sectional rehearsals once a week. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Regents 0 Credit The Chamber Orchestra is an ensemble of 20 string players selected by audition and rehearses weekly after school. A variety of string literature from Baroque to contemporary music is performed in school as well as throughout the Ithaca Community. PEP BAND Regents 0 Credit A Fall activity open to all wind and percussion players. The group performs at pep rallies and all home varsity football games. Ithaca High School 34 Program of Studies
  • Theater INTRODUCTION TO THEATER Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisites: None Course Content: Satisfies ½ unit of fine arts credit required for graduation. This course is designed to provide an understanding, appreciation, and knowledge of technique, and of the creative, personal, and practical aspects of theater production. Lecture, demonstration, and performances by students in a laboratory environment, including acting, play writing, directing, and technical theater, with an emphasis on performance. Video equipment is used to evaluate each student's work. ADVANCED THEATER Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisites: Intro to Theater Course or previous participation in a major production. Course Content: Satisfies ½ unit of fine arts credit required for graduation. This course is designed to provide a laboratory setting for students to investigate the personal, creative, and technical aspects of theater production, with an emphasis on performance. This is an in-depth examination of theater performance. Video equipment is used to evaluate each student's work. THEATER PRODUCTION Regents or Honors Semester (F) ½ Credit Course Description: Students will learn how to successfully execute the tasks related to the production aspects of theater such as publicity, ticket sales, budgets, and pubic relations by working directly with the instructor on the Ithaca High School Drama Productions. Permission of instructor required. EXTRA-CURRICULAR PERFORMING ARTS THEATER LAB Regents Semester (F) 0 Credit A series of one act plays produced, directed, and acted by students. The course has after school rehearsals for 2 weeks, 1 performance on Friday after school. The individual director makes selection through audition. MAJOR PRODUCTION Regents Semester (S) 0 Credit Participate in a major theater production, often a musical. Selection is made by audition. Evening rehearsals January through March, four performances and previews in April. SPRING MUSICAL Regents Semester (S) 0 Credit A Broadway style musical theater production incorporating elements of singing, acting, dancing or movement. There are usually parts for lead characters and support roles (chorus). The production also includes a pit orchestra. Opportunities are available for people interested in costumes, make-up, sound, lighting, props, set building and stage management. Formal audition in December. Rehearsals are Sunday through Thursday evenings 7:00 – 9:30 January through the first week in April with four performances taking place at the end of the time commitment. Ithaca High School 35 Program of Studies
  • HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Department Chair: Mike Karlson Phone: 274-2177 HEALTH Regents Semester ½ Credit Teachers: Mr. Eric Parker and Ms. Marie Sadusky Course Content: This class meets New York State mandates and is an overview of health issues pertinent to high school students. Specifically, students study and discuss topics about wellness, emotional and mental health, depression and suicide, consumer health, fitness and nutrition, legal and illegal drugs, human sexuality, and relationships. Teaching methods include a combination of individual and group activities/projects, class discussions, debates, videos and lecture. Guest speakers are used to provide students with additional information on certain topics. Students are encouraged to be creative and projects are individualized. Some class time is spent in the computer lab to familiarize students with Internet searches, electronic databases, reliable resources, and the ability to research health topics and create PowerPoint presentations. Course Information: Students will complete various projects such as: skits, PowerPoint presentations, pamphlets, research projects, oral presentations, personal health plans, and a parenting project. Opinion papers are written on controversial topics. The research and opinion papers will require work at home. Students are graded on the following: class participation, in-class assignments, activities and projects, occasional homework assignments, and tests. *Students and parents are advised that, if at any time, religious or personal beliefs are compromised, they have the right to petition for alternative units of study to complete those portions of mandated health requirements. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Department Objectives: • To provide the student body with an opportunity to improve their levels of fitness through participation in a variety of physical activities. • To promote wellness and making a lifetime commitment to the value of making proper choices to live a healthier lifestyle. • To provide students with opportunities to develop skill levels and an appreciation of a variety of sports and games. • To promote positive attitudes and a lifetime commitment to the value of maintaining a physically fit body. • To be able to identify a career in the area of sport and fitness and research the job responsibility qualifications and opportunities that exist for professional advancement. • To be able to analyze how the availability of and information about community programs encourages active participation in physical activity. Physical education is required every semester a student is registered at I.H.S. The New York State Education Department requires that all students, regardless of existing conditions, be provided with a program in physical education administered by certified physical education teachers. Physical education is a state mandated requirement for graduation. 9th -10th GRADE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Semester ¼ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th grade Physical Education program Course Content: The content of the 9th grade Physical Education course consists of the physical fitness test, developmental skills of flag football, archery, ultimate Frisbee, project adventure, soccer, basketball, volleyball, team handball, cross country skiing, floor hockey, basic water safety, snorkeling, weight training, self-defense, badminton, tennis, track and field, softball, fitness (cardiovascular), and lacrosse. Students will demonstrate proper sportsmanship while learning strategies about how to play the game/activity, and basic offensive and defensive techniques. Course Information: Cognitive, as well as, practical skills assessment will be administered at the conclusion of each unit. These assessments, which comprise 25% of the student’s overall grade, will be averaged and documented on the report card as the final exam. The students who have medical excuses which preclude their physical participation in class will be required to complete written projects that are based on the unit from which they are medically unable to participate in. A swimming proficiency test will be given at the conclusion of the swimming unit to test the physical and mental retention of the skills taught. Students must pass the swimming proficiency test to advance to the 11th -12th grade physical education program. Ithaca High School 36 Program of Studies
  • 11th –12th GRADE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Semester ¼ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th -10th grade Physical Education program Course Content: The content of the 11th –12th grade program is to concentrate on lifetime activities, which will consist of archery, outdoor recreational games, soccer, flag football, ultimate Frisbee, community water safety, water polo, snorkeling, floor hockey, tennis, volleyball, basketball, team handball, badminton, pickle ball, weight training, fitness (cardiovascular), plyometrics, circuit training, softball, aerobics, self-defense, and golf. Students will learn safety rules, strategies, offensive and defensive techniques, scoring and officiating. Students will also learn leadership, cooperative, and social skills while engaged in physical activity. Course Information: Cognitive, as well as, practical skills assessments will be administered at the conclusion of each unit. These assessments, which comprise 25% of the student’s overall grade, will be averaged and documented on the report card as the final exam. The students who have medical excuses, which preclude their participation in class, will be required to complete written projects that will be based on the activity that they are unable to actively participate in. ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Semester ¼ Credit Prerequisite: CSE or Physical Education approved evaluation Course Content: The content of Adaptive Physical Education will meet the specific needs of the students based on their educational plan. The activities will include floor hockey, basketball, soccer, badminton, softball/baseball, team handball, swimming, weight training, and fitness. The activities will be adapted to allow for maximum proficiency in a safe and positive learning environment. Course Information: This course is designed to focus on improving gross and fine motor competence, balance, coordination, tracking, muscular strength and endurance, agility, body composition, self-confidence, and self-image. The course stresses lifelong involvement in physical activities and continued education about health and fitness. LIBRARY Department Leader: Nan Bell Phone: 274-2186 LIBRARY Library Media Specialists: Nan Bell and Armin Heurich The Ithaca High School library offers students extensive training in using electronic and print resources for class assignments and individual interests. Students receive individualized assistance accessing our collection of over 28,000 books and 100 periodicals. Computerized information resources include electronic encyclopedias and magazine and newspaper databases as well as the library web site, with numerous online resource guides. <http://www.icsd.k12.ny.us/highschool/library>. Our telecommunications program permits us to access the online catalogs at the Tompkins County Public Library, nearby colleges and universities, and numerous databases available on the Internet. Students may use library resources for word processing, PowerPoint, and many other applications. Ithaca High School 37 Program of Studies
  • MATHEMATICS Mathematics Department Office: H-216 Phone: 274-2191 The mathematics course offerings at Ithaca High School are designed to help students develop mathematical competencies and skills, and to encourage them to continue study in mathematics. The five elective courses—Fractals and Chaos, Introduction to Computer Programming 1 and 2, Advanced Placement Computer Science, and Advanced Placement Statistics are designed to be taken in addition to other mathematics courses. A laboratory with 24 computers is available for teaching computer programming, AP Statistics, AP Computer Science and for use in supplementing and reinforcing subject matter in other mathematics courses. IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING NEW STATE REQUIREMENTS All regular education students are now required by New York State to pass one Regents-level mathematics examination as part of their graduation requirements. Students must earn three credits in math. Please note: If the prerequisites or recommendations for a particular course do not fit the unique situation of the student, the Student Services department may make exceptions in consultation with the math department. Ithaca High School 38 Program of Studies
  • Business Math PreCalc BC (H) Ithaca High School 39 Program of Studies
  • INTRODUCTION TO HIGH SCHOOL Regents Transition Full Year 1 Credit MATHEMATICS Recommendation: For students who are below grade level in math and need a stronger background in basic math skills before taking a formal Pre-algebra course. Course Information: Students will work on general mathematics topics using a variety of learning styles and activities. Successful completion of this course will lead to transition to Pre Algebra the following year. PRE ALGEBRA Regents Transition Full Year 1 Credit This course is for students who require an additional year of preparation before taking Algebra 1 Prerequisite: Introduction to High School Math or recommendation of CSE or middle school guidance Recommendation: For classified students or AIS students who would benefit from a two year approach to the topics in the required New York State Algebra 1 assessment. Course Content: The course reviews fundamental math concepts and procedures, and covers several topics in algebra and geometry. Emphasis is placed on developing confidence in doing mathematics and in improving math reasoning and communication skills. Course Information: Most concepts are introduced by a brief teacher-led discussion and then are reinforced, practiced and extended by individual or group work and/or computer or hands-on investigations. Homework is usually assigned four times a week. Calculators are used throughout the year. Marking period grades are based on quiz grades, test grades, class work, homework and occasional projects. The final exam is a department final. ALGEBRA 1 Regents or Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Math 8 or PRE ALGEBRA Course Content: Linear algebra, statistics, coordinate geometry, probability, polynomials, exponential equations and quadratic equations. Course Information: Students engage in investigations to make sense of realistic situations while developing an understanding of broadly useful ideas from algebra, statistics, geometry, and discrete mathematics. Graphing calculators and hands-on explorations are fully integrated into class activities and most assignments. Students are encouraged to purchase their own Texas Instruments TI-83 or TI-83+ graphing calculator to use for their entire high school math career and beyond, or they may sign out a school calculator for the school year for only the cost of batteries. Marking period grades are based on homework, quizzes, and tests. Early in the year, students are given opportunity to take this course for honors credit. Honors candidates cover the regents syllabus plus additional topics, and take more challenging exams. The final exam is the state Algebra 1 exam. Honors students will take this exam plus an additional honors supplement. GEOMETRY Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: ALGEBRA 1 Recommendation: For students with passing grades in Algebra 1 Course Content: Coordinate Geometry, Euclidean Geometry, Trigonometry and Circle Geometry, constructions and dynamic geometry. Course Information: A continuation of the investigative approach started in Algebra 1. Graphing calculators are used extensively. Homework is given every night. Good note taking skills are a must. Emphasis is on logical thinking and writing proofs. Students will prepare for and take the required state Geometry Exam in June HONORS GEOMETRY Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Honors ALGEBRA teacher recommendations AND exceptionally high achievement with Honors Algebra 1 material. Recommendations: Students in this course should have obtained a minimum final average of B+ in Honors Algebra 1. This course is intended for students with strong interest and perseverance in math. Course Content: The course includes all GEOMETRY topics as well as non-Euclidian geometry, Conics and computer modeling. Each unit is taught in a rigorous way, with challenging problems assigned and independent thinking expected. An emphasis is placed on student discovery and development of abstract concepts and principles. Course Information: Students will take the required state Geometry assessment in June plus a supplemental final. APPLIED ALGEBRA Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Geometry Recommendation: For students with passing but low grades in geometry. Students must have already passed the New York State Mathematics A Exam or Integrated Algebra Exam. Course Content: The course will cover traditional Algebra topics such as solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems thereof. Students will also be introduced to new concepts such as matrices, sequences and series, and discrete mathematics. Students will make connections between the mathematics classroom and the real world. Course Information: The teaching method relies heavily on modeling and guided practice but will include some small cooperative group work. Technology will be incorporated with the use of the graphing calculator. While this course builds on Algebra 1 and Geometry, students are not expected to take the New York State Mathematics B exam. Ithaca High School 40 Program of Studies
  • Algebra 2 Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Geometry Recommendation: For students with grades of C or higher in Geometry Course Content: The emphasis in this course is on algebra and trigonometry. Topics include functions, logarithms, trigonometric identities and equations and graphs, imaginary numbers and conic sections. Course Information: This course builds on the mathematical concepts and methods developed in Algebra I and Geometry. Students will take the New York State Algebra 2 assessment in June. Honors Algebra 2 Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Honors Geometry teacher recommendations AND exceptionally high achievement with Honors Geometry material. Recommendations: Students in this course should have obtained a minimum final average of B+ in IHS Honors Geometry. This course is intended for students with strong interest and perseverance in math. Course Content: The course includes all Algebra 2 topics but the presentation and emphasis is more abstract, and more difficult problems are assigned and discussed. Extra enrichment is embedded in the curriculum in units such as those on transformations and probability. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture-style combined with individual and small cooperative group work. Students will often use graphing calculators to explore new concepts. Homework is assigned daily, and its careful completion is an important part of the course. The homework, including reading, is expected to take between 20 and 40 minutes per day. Marking period grades are based on test grades, quiz grades, and homework. The final exam is a department exam. In addition, students will take the New York State Assessment toward a diploma with “Advanced Designation.” PRECALCULUS Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Recommendation: For students who have completed Algebra 2 Course Content: This course is a PreCalculus course and is designed to review and build on the material that was taught in previous math courses. Among the topics which may be included are polar co-ordinates and graphs, functions, transformations, advanced graphing, polynomials, logarithms, limits, derivatives and exponential functions. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture-style combined with individual class work and work in small groups. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year on class work, homework, and quizzes and tests. Some T1-83 calculators are available to be borrowed from the department if a student does not own one. Homework is assigned each day and its careful completion is an important part of the course requirements. Marking period grades are based on a combination of quiz grades, test grades, class work, projects, and homework. The final exam is a department final. *This class has concurrent enrollment with TC3. PRECALCULUS AB Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Regents or Honors Recommendation: Honors Algebra 2 or grade of B or higher in Algebra 2, and a passing grade on either the Math B or the state Algebra 2 exam Course Content: The emphasis in this course is on preparing students to study Calculus. Students should have mastered the concepts and skills presented in the previous three Regents courses. There is a focus on functions and graphing, and all material is covered at a demanding level which will provide the rigorous background needed for a study of Calculus similar to the Advanced Placement Calculus AB course. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture and discussion combined with individual class work and work in small groups. The course is a challenging one with new and advanced topics introduced regularly. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year. Some TI-83 calculators are available to be borrowed from the math department if a student does not own one. Homework is assigned every day, and its careful completion is an important part of the course requirement. Marking period grades are based on a combination of quiz grades and test grades with homework as a contributing factor. The final exam is a department final. *This class has concurrent enrollment with TC3. PRECALCULUS BC Advanced Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2 Recommendation: For students with A's and B's in Honors Algebra 2 Course Content: This course is designed for highly motivated and interested mathematics students who have completed three math courses at the honors level and are preparing to take BC level Advanced Placement Calculus in high school or its equivalent in college. The course includes a rigorous treatment of advanced algebra and introductory calculus topics including series and sequences, limits, two and three-dimensional co-ordinate systems, curve and surface sketching, functions, theory of polynomials, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and derivatives. Course Information: The teaching method is a combination of lecture, discussion and group activities. The course is fast paced and rigorous with new and advanced topics introduced each day. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year on class work, homework, and tests. Some TI-83 calculators are available to be borrowed from the math department if a student does not have one. Homework is assigned daily. Marking period grades are based mainly on test scores and labs. The final exam is a department final. *This class has concurrent enrollment with TC3. Ithaca High School 41 Program of Studies
  • AP CALCULUS AB AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Pre-calculus AB or its equivalent Recommendation: For students with A's or B's in pre-calculus AB and the ability to work hard during their senior year. Course Content: This course follows the syllabus of the national Advanced Placement Calculus program and covers material equivalent to the first semester of calculus at most universities. Topics covered include derivatives and integrals of the elementary functions, with applications. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture-style combined with individual class work, projects and work in small groups. The course is a challenging one with new and advanced topics introduced each day. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year on class work, homework, quizzes and tests. Some TI-83 calculators are available to be borrowed from the math department if a student does not own one. Homework is assigned every day and its careful completion is an important part of the course requirement. Marking period grades are based on a combination of quiz grades, test grades, class work, a project and homework. A midterm exam is given during the school exam period in January. All students in the course are required to take the Advanced Placement test, AB level. The final exam is a department final based on the AP test. Students take the department final before the required AP exam. After the AP exam, students are expected to complete a project. AP CALCULUS BC AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Precalculus BC or its equivalent and the recommendation of the teacher Recommendation: Students need an extensive background in pre-calculus mathematics as well as prior work with limits, continuity, derivatives and other topics in 1st semester calculus. Course Content: This course follows the syllabus of the national Advanced Placement Calculus program and is equivalent to a full-year sequence in Calculus at most universities. Topics in the course include derivatives; curve sketching, maximum/minimum problems, related rates, integrals, exponential and trigonometric functions, infinite series and differential equations. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture and classroom discussion combined with individual class work and work in small groups. The course is very challenging with new, advanced topics introduced each day. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year on class work, homework, quizzes and tests. Some TI-83 graphing calculators are available for students to borrow from the math department, if a student does not own one. Homework is assigned every day and its careful completion is an important part of the course requirement. Marking period grades are based on a combination of quiz grades, test grades and a group project. A midterm exam is given during the school exam period in January. All students in the course are required to take the Advanced Placement test, BC level, in May. The final exam is a department final based on the AP test and given before the required AP exam. Students are expected to complete a project after the AP exam. AP STATISTICS AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Geometry with grades of A or B, or Honors Geometry, AND simultaneous enrollment in Algebra 2 (Knowledge of logarithms helpful.) Recommendation: Although the prerequisite is Geometry, students who have completed Algebra 2 will be better prepared for the demands of AP Statistics. This course is an excellent one for students planning further study in mathematics, the sciences, engineering, psychology, sociology, economics, business, health sciences, law, and numerous other fields. Course Content: AP Statistics is equivalent to a one semester introductory college course in statistics. This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for designing experiments and collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include graphical displays of data, measures of position, central tendency, and dispersion. It also covers correlation, and curve fitting, experimental design, probability, modeling, random variables, the normal, t-and chi-square distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The total workload and level of difficulty reflect the fact that this is a college level course. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture and class discussion combined with student projects and group work. Students will plan and conduct their own surveys and experiments and use computer data analysis software and graphing calculators in analyzing and writing reports on the results. Students are required to have a graphing calculator to use throughout the year on class work, homework, quizzes and tests. Some TI-83 graphing calculators are available for students to borrow from the math department if a student does not own one. Homework is assigned every day, and its careful completion is an important part of the course requirement. Marking period grades are based on quizzes, exams, reports on investigative tasks, and projects. All students in the course are required to take the AP Statistics exam in May. The final exam is a department final based on the AP test and given before the required AP exam. Students are expected to complete a project after the AP exam. FRACTALS AND CHAOS Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: Algebra 2 completed or taken concurrently Recommendation: For students with a strong interest in this topic. Course Content: This is an exploration of an exciting new field of mathematics and includes self-similarity, randomness, attractors, complex numbers, iterated functions, dynamical systems, fractional dimensions, chaos, Julia sets, the Mandelbrot Set, and the real world. Course Information: The teaching method is lecture and discussion combined with group activities and work in the math department computer lab. Emphasis is on exploration, experimentation, and use of the computer as a research tool. There are regular assignments which may involve reading, writing, research, computer explorations, problem-solving or other activities. Students are expected to have a graphing calculator to use for class work and on assignments. (Students may purchase their own calculators or borrow one from the Math Department). The course is offered Pass/ Fail. Marking period grades are based on participation in class work and on assignments. Ithaca High School 42 Program of Studies
  • INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING 1 Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: B or better in ALGEBRA 1 Recommendation: For students with interest in computers, but with little or no formal programming experience. Course Information: This is a hands-on course designed to give students an enjoyable and rewarding entry level experience in computer programming. Students will program in the IHS Math computer lab using BlueJ and ObjectDraw, a simplified graphics environment for programming in Java. Emphasis will be on object-oriented programming. There is no homework in this class, other than working in the lab outside of class to keep up with assigned projects when necessary. Grades are based on project work and unit tests. Course Content: Objects, classes, data fields, primitive data types, user-defined types, methods, control statements, Graphics objects and methods in the ObjectDraw Library, program documentation. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING 2 Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: B or better in Introduction to Programming 1 or permission of instructor Recommendation: For students who have completed at least one mathematics course at the Honors level or B's or higher in ALGEBRA 1, GEOMETRY, Algebra 2, or the consent of the instructor. Course Information: This course is the prerequisite for the Advanced Placement Computer Science course. The language of the course is Java, and the software used in the course, BlueJ, will be made available to students for home use (both Mac and PC users). This is a free download. Topics are presented in lecture/discussion/demo format followed by hands-on programming projects completed in the math department e-Mac computer lab. Grades are based on tests and programming assignments. The final exam may be a department exam and/or or a project. Course Content: Introduction to object-oriented programming--objects, classes, references and methods; Basic language constructs- variables, types, operators, and control structures; Program design, testing, and debugging; Strings; Arrays; Array lists and interators. AP COMPUTER SCIENCE AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Introduction to Programming 2 or permission of instructor Recommendation: For students with strong Honors level mathematics backgrounds Course Content: This course fulfills the requirements of the national Advanced Placement Computer Science program and is equivalent to a full year sequence in computer science at most universities. The approach is object-oriented programming. Topics include objects and classes, inheritance and polymorphism, program design and testing, strings and arrays, recursion and analysis and efficiency of algorithms. The second half of the course is Advanced Data Structures: stacks, queues, linked lists, trees and maps. Course Information: Most of the class time is used for lecture and discussion, with students working at the computers where appropriate. Most computer work will be done at home. Students are expected to spend an average of about five hours of home computer time per week. Grades are based equally on tests and large programming projects. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science test in May. The final exam is a department final based on the AP test and given before the required project after the AP exam. Depending on the test results, level of exam, and particular college, students may receive one or two semesters of college credit. The software used is Eclipse, a free download. BUSINESS MATH Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Passed two high school math courses and passed one state assessment. Recommendations: Seniors Course Content: This course is almost entirely about finances and includes work with budgets, taxes, banking, finance charges, mortgages, insurance, discounts, depreciation and investments . Course Information: The teaching method combines individual and group work. Consistent attendance and homework completion are essential for success in this course. The final exam is a department final. This class has concurrent enrollment with TC3. Ithaca High School 43 Program of Studies
  • SCIENCE Department Leader: Linda Knewstub Science Department Office: H-222 Phone: 274-2190 To gain a better appreciation for and understanding of the world in which they live, students should become involved with the concepts, skills, ideas, and knowledge appropriate to science. They should learn how to think scientifically to critically analyze the world around them. The high school science courses are conceptually oriented with a strong emphasis on the application of scientific skills and reflective thinking for solving problems. THE FOLLOWING SKILLS ARE COMMON TO ALL SCIENCE COURSES ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS: • Complete and turn in homework in a timely manner • Complete and turn in laboratory reports in a timely manner • Keep an organized notebook or binder of all class and laboratory materials • Come to class each day with necessary materials • Be responsible for knowing assignments and making up missed work following an absence LABORATORY AND FIELD WORK • Distinguish between scientific evidence and personal opinion. • Recognize the role of observation and experimentation in the development of scientific theories. • Be familiar enough with laboratory and field work to ask appropriate questions and select correct avenues to obtain solutions to problems. • Develop the skills to perform laboratory and field work. (See specific content areas) • Communicate the results obtained in the field and laboratory. • Utilize technology effectively. • Use appropriate lab safety procedures. MATHEMATICS SKILLS • Create tables and graphs appropriate to the data collected. • Interpret data presented in tabular and graphical forms. • Make mathematical relationships to describe scientific analysis and problem solving. • Perform simple mathematical calculations such as average. • Use computer programs to analyze data, such as averaging, rounding, estimating, and to perform statistical tests such as T-tests or chi square when appropriate. • Estimate reasonable answers. • Use and evaluate mathematical formulas. REASONING • Identify and formulate problems and choose multiple avenues to search for the solutions. • Think critically. • Draw evidence from a variety of resources (written, verbal, graphic) to support one's conclusion. • Distinguish opinion from fact. • Set goals and develop priorities consistent with the course of study. • Be a life-long learner, demonstrate a positive work ethic and accept responsibility for one's own learning. COMMUNICATION • Represent one's knowledge in a variety of forms (concept maps, graphic, verbal, written, and multimedia). • Communicate scientific information in a technical manner. • Listen and understand. • Use computers and appropriate software for: collection and retrieval of information, word processing, modeling, simulations, and networking with other resources of information. • Research and compose a technical paper according to a given format. LEVELS OF RIGOR Ithaca High School 44 Program of Studies
  • Students are not locked into levels, but can move from one to another depending upon skills and performance in science classes. Regents Honors Advanced Placement • reading below grade level (serious • reading at or above grade level These courses are taught at the college level. A deficiencies will require extra • independent acquisition of basic significant portion of course grade is based on support) factual information test grades • classroom instruction on basic • emphasis on abstract and critical It is recommended that students enroll in factual information thinking ONLY ONE AP science courses per year. • classroom instruction for critical • able to organize work independently Students should be able to thinking • both guided and independent • read, comprehend and acquire basic factual • both guided and independent practice of skills and mastery of information independently practice of skills and mastery of content • think critically and conceptually content • homework assigned nightly • organize work independently • homework assigned a few times • course work focuses beyond the • An AP Exam at the end of the year is per week State Core Curriculum mandatory and will determine college credit • focuses on the State Core for the courses according to the criteria set Curriculum by each college and university. RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF STUDY FOR SCIENCE COURSES Regents Diploma, starting with 9th graders, 2000: Must take and pass two science courses that follow the NY State Core Curriculum. One must be a life science and one must be a physical science. Must pass one Regents exam. The third science course that must be passed can be any science course offered at the high school. 8th Grade 8TH GRADE PHYSICAL 8TH GRADE SCIENCE ACCELERATED EARTH SCIENCE* Year 1 Environmenta R/H - Earth * l Science Science Year 2 (R) Living Environment* H- Biology * Year 3 Chemistry Conceptual Physics Chemistry in the Community H – Physics* or AP Physics H – Chemistry* Year 4 Zoology or Botany AP Chemistry (or year 5 if (Can be taken at year 3 or 4 AP Env Sci. upon completion of 2 regents accelerated) curriculum courses) AP Biology AP Physics B or AP Physics C * Course ends in a NYS Regents Exam MINIMUM TO GRADUATE: 3 science classes (1 life science, 1 physical science) 2 which follow state core/regents curriculum 1 passed Regents exam Ithaca High School 45 Program of Studies
  • ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Regents Transition Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: This course is intended to prepare 9th grade students with the reading, writing and, comprehension skills necessary to take the Regents Living Environment course and the Regents Living Environment exam in the following year. This course is recommended to students who: • have completed 8th grade Physical Science with a grade of C or below • have achieved a 1, 2 or 3 on 8th grade State Assessments (ELA, Math & Science) • will be taking Pre-Algebra in 9th grade Following successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take Regents Living Environment Prerequisite: Students should have completed Physical Science in 8th grade with a grade of C or below. Course Content: The course covers three main units: the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. Students will address environmental issues from the perspective of earth science, biology, chemistry and physics. This courses also emphasizes the organizational and classroom skills necessary to be successful in regents level science courses. Course Information: • The curriculum for this course is locally generated but touches on many of the main topics covered in earth science and living environment (biology). Environmental Science is offered to students who wish to study environmental issues while gaining skills in both designing and implementing laboratory investigations. • There will be one double lab period in a six-day cycle to enable more hands-on investigations and to allow students to gain experience with the double lab periods that are required in Regents courses. • Weekly homework will consist of lab reports and reading assignments. There will be three, year-long projects: Fall Creek Study, composting, and an in-class landfill project. • Instructional strategies include lectures and note taking, group research and projects, lab experiences, library projects, cooperative learning activities and demonstrations. Assessment: Students will be assessed on class performance, lab, homework, project, and quiz grades. Behavior and participation are also a vital part of each student’s class grade. (This component of the class grade is based on school-wide goals of presence, preparation, politeness, persistence, and generosity) The final exam for this course will be generated locally and will consist of a portfolio and a written exam given during finals week. To successfully complete the portfolio portion of the final exam, students must utilize materials that they developed during the school year. Some examples of their best work will be included. The written portion of the exam will contain multiple choice (some in the style of the Living Environment Regents exam), reading comprehension, lab techniques, and data analysis R/H EARTH SCIENCE Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: This course is recommended for first year high school students who have: • passed 8th grade Physical Science with a B or better grade • passed 8th grade math with a B or higher grade and are concurrently taking Algebra or higher level math course • Achieved a score of 3 or higher on all 8th grade state assessments (ELA, math, science). Students enrolling who have not met these recommended criteria, should expect to invest extra time and energy outside of class time to be successful in this course. This course may also be taken later as a third science course to fill the science graduation requirement. In this case, students should demonstrate successful completion (B or higher grade) of the Environmental Science and Regents Living Environment courses. Upon successful completion of this course, student will be prepared for Honors Biology or Regents Living Environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 8th grade Physical Science with a B or higher grade Successful completion of 8th grade math; grade C or higher. Enrollment in R/H Algebra or higher level math. Course Content: Students will complete a comprehensive examination of Earth systems, using applications of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to analyze Earth phenomena. Topics will include concepts in map skills, minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, plate tectonics, inferred structure of Earth, volcanoes, seismology, earth history and paleontology, meteorology and climate, Earth in space, astronomy, seasonal changes. Course Information: Ithaca High School 46 Program of Studies
  • • The course covers the NYS Earth Science Regents Core Curriculum. • A double laboratory period will be incorporated twice in a six-day cycle to accommodate the state-required 1200 minute lab requirement. • Emphasis is placed on developing laboratory skills, improving writing and reading in the science content area, and developing study skills such as note-taking and research methods. • Homework expectations average 20 minutes a night for 3 to 4 days / week. • Instructional strategies may include small group instruction, independent lab work, lecture format, library research, cooperative learning activities, and speakers. • In addition to the minimum lab requirement of 1200 minutes, Honors students will need to have successfully completed at least 5 honors-specific labs. Assessment: Students will be assessed during the year on labs, homework and class work, quizzes and tests. This course culminates in a NYS Regents exam, which is also the final. Students need to successfully complete, and have on file at the school, laboratory reports reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the school year, by June 1 of the testing year, in order to qualify to take the Regents Exam. LIVING ENVIRONMENT Regents Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: This course is recommended for students who • have exhibited satisfactory work and a passing grade in Environmental Science or Regents Earth Science • may need extra support with literacy skills, learning science and preparing for the NYS Regents Living Environment Exam. (ELA score of 1, 2, or 3) Students successfully completing Living Environment should also meet with success in other Regents level science classes at I.H.S. such as Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, and Chemistry in the Community. Pre-requisite Students enrolling must have completed and received a passing grade in 9th grade Environmental Science or Regents Earth Science. Course Content: Students will investigate concepts in ecology, bio-chemistry, cell biology, human anatomy and physiology, genetics, DNA, and evolution. The course covers the basic NYS Living Environment Regents Core Curriculum. Students will complete 1200 minutes of laboratory experience to be eligible for the NYS Regents exam. Course Information: • This course is based on the NYS Living Environment core curriculum. It is offered for students who need extra help learning science and preparing for the NYS Regents Living Environment exam. Repetition and practice is provided. • Emphasis is placed on developing laboratory skills, improving writing and reading in the science content area, and developing study skills such as note-taking and research methods. • A double laboratory period will be incorporated twice in a six day cycle to accommodate the state required 1200 minute lab requirement. • Homework expectations average 15-30 minutes a night 2 times per week • Instructional strategies may include lecture, group work, library research papers, cooperative learning activities, speakers, field trips, and laboratory investigations. • The goal of the course is for students to develop respect and responsibility for themselves and others, the diversity of the species, and the fragility of the environment Assessment: Students will be assessed during the year on homework, labs, projects and tests, as well as in-class notes and activities. Behavior and participation are also a vital part of each student’s class grade. (This component of the class grade is based on school-wide goals of presence, preparation, politeness, persistence, and generosity) Students will take the state Regents exam at the end of the course.. Students need to successfully complete and have on file laboratory reports reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify for the Regents Exam. HONORS BIOLOGY Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: This class is recommended for students who have the reading, writing, math, and organizational skills necessary to be successful in a fast paced honors course. The specific criteria below are meant as a guide for selecting this course. Students enrolling who have not met these recommended criteria, should expect to invest extra time and energy outside of class time to be successful in Honors Biology It is recommended that enrolling students have • successfully completed R/H Earth Science and the NYS Earth Science Regents exam with a B or higher. Ithaca High School 47 Program of Studies
  • • achieved a 3 or higher on all 8th grade State Assessments (ELA, Math & Science) • reading and writing skills that are on or above grade level • the ability to acquire basic factual information and organize their work independently • concurrently enrolled in Algebra or Geometry This course is meant to prepare students for the NYS Living Environment Regents exam as well as other Honors and AP level science courses as future options at Ithaca High School. Course Content: Students will study concepts in ecology, biochemistry, cell biology, human anatomy and physiology, genetics, DNA, and evolution. The course exceeds the minimum requirements in the NYS Living Environment Regents Core Curriculum. Students will complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of laboratory experience to be eligible for the NYS Regents exam. Course Information: • This course is a rigorous, rapidly paced, in depth treatment of the NYS Regents core Living Environment curriculum with extended areas of study in ecological sciences and molecular biology. • A double period will be incorporated twice in a six-day cycle to accommodate the state required 1200-minute lab requirement. • An average of 30 minutes per night, 3 to 4 times / week is required to complete homework assignments and lab reports that are to be handed in for a grade. Special projects, activities and lab work may occasionally require more time and energy. • The goals of the course are for the student to understand and use the scientific approach to problem solving, to develop a respect for all life forms, and to be aware of the complexity of life, the diversity of species, and the fragility of the environment. • Instructional strategies can include lectures, laboratory investigations, group work, library research, demonstrations, oral presentations, speakers, field trips, computer projects, and cooperative learning activities. Assessment: Students will be assessed during the year on homework, labs, projects, and tests. Students will take the NY State Regents Living Environment Exam at the end of the course. Students need to successfully complete, and have on file, laboratory reports reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify to take the Regents Exam. CHEMISTRY (Formerly CORE CHEM) *Regents Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: This class is recommended for students who have successfully completed Environmental Science, Living Environment, and two years of high school math with a grade of C or below. * This course (along with Conceptual Physics) will fulfill graduation requirements for a State Core Curriculum, third-year science course. However, this course will not culminate in a Regents exam. Students wishing to take the NYS Chemistry Regents Exam should enroll in Honors Chemistry. Students successfully completing this course are recommended for Conceptual Physics or Zoology as future science options. Prerequisites: A passing grade for Regents Living Environment course and the NYS Living Environment Regents exam. A passing grade for one year of high school math. Course Content: The course covers the concepts of food chemistry, food safety, water, metals, petroleum, gases, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry while touching upon biochemistry and bacteriology. Incorporated into these major topics are the fundamentals of chemistry—atoms, phases of water, chemical formulas and chemical compounds, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction, carbon and hydrocarbons, plastics, gas laws (pressure and volume) and nuclear waste. Course Information: • This course will cover the core concepts in the Chemistry in the Community syllabus, with extended time for each topic. The course will have a slower pace than the Honors Physical Chemistry or the Chemistry in the Community course and will place less importance on the mathematics of chemistry. A portfolio project and final exam are required. This year-long course, places heavy emphasis on critical thinking skills, project work, and laboratory experiments. • Emphasis is placed on developing laboratory skills, improving writing and reading in the science content area, and developing study skills such as note-taking and research methods. • There are two double period labs in a six-day cycle to enable more hands-on investigations and to accommodate the state required 1200 minute lab requirement. • A weekly homework will be assigned. • Instructional strategies include lab experiments, lectures, group work, critical thinking, projects, presentations, discussions, videos, and computer research. • The goal in this class is to educate the student to be a knowledgeable voter with the ability to research a science topic of interest. Assessment: Varied assessments of student understanding are used through out the year such as presentations, library research, tests and group projects. Behavior and participation are also a vital part of each student’s class grade. (This component of the class grade is based on school-wide goals of presence, preparation, politeness, persistence, and generosity) The final evaluation is based on both a portfolio project and teacher-written final exam. Students need to successfully complete laboratory Ithaca High School 48 Program of Studies
  • reports, reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify for NY State Core Curriculum course credit. *This course meets the graduation requirement of a NYS Regents diploma, but it does not culminate in the NYS Regents Exam. CHEMISTRY IN THE COMMUNITY (CHEMCOM) *Regents Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: Chemistry in the Community is for students who desire a college-bound curriculum but prefer a more conceptual approach to environmental chemistry with less emphasis on mathematics. *This course (along with Conceptual Physics) will fulfill graduation requirements for a NY State Core Curriculum, third-year science course. However, this course will not culminate in a Regents exam. Students wishing to take the NYS Chemistry Regents Exam should enroll in Honors Chemistry. This course is recommended for students who • have already successfully completed one other course that follows the NY State Core Curriculum with a C or higher grade. (Living Environment or R/H Earth Science) • have passed at least one NYS Regents Science exam • have passed Algebra or are taking it concurrently • have reading and writing skills that are on or above grade level Students who have not met this recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy to be successful in this course. Students successfully completing this course are recommended for Conceptual or Honors Physics, Zoology, or AP Environmental Science as future science course options. Prerequisites: Successfully passed at least one NYS Regents science Exam. Successfully passed or be concurrently taking Algebra. Course Content: Chem Com emphasizes the impact of chemistry on the local community and society as a whole. The course is designed to lead students to mastery of concepts in chemistry through application. Students are given the opportunity to understand the chemistry behind some important socio-technological issues. Units studied include water, materials, petroleum, and atmosphere and may include nuclear chemistry, industrial chemistry and food science. Course Information: • This course follows the Chemistry in the Community curriculum written by the American Chemical Society. The course can be considered for a Regents level, third-year science course and Regents credit can be awarded to those who successfully complete the course. However, this course does not prepare a student for taking the Chemistry State Regents exam. The final exam for this course is locally generated. • There is a strong laboratory emphasis for this course. There are two double period labs in a six-day cycle to enable more hands-on investigation and to accommodate the state required 1200 minute lab requirement. • Homework should take about 20- 30 minutes per night approximately 4 times per week. Homework may include reading, taking notes from the text, writing detailed lab reports and project work. • This is a broad based approach to chemistry which will involve problem solving , lab experiments, group work and discussion. The goal of this course is to give students an appreciation and understanding of the important role of chemistry in their lives and the world. • Instructional strategies include lectures, lab experiments, group and book work, discussions, video studies, and computer research. Class work includes journal writing, group work, text readings, current event analysis, labs, projects, lecture, homework and note taking and frequent assessments of student understanding. Assessment: Students will be assessed on homework completion, journal and notebook entries, lab reports, quizzes, tests and projects. The final exam will be a locally generated and may include a portfolio. Students need to successfully complete laboratory reports, reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify for State Core Curriculum course credit. *This course meets the graduation requirement of a NYS Regents diploma, but it does not culminate in the NYS Regents Exam. HONORS CHEMISTRY Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: This course is recommended for students • who have successfully completed Honors Earth Science and/or Honors Biology, and Algebra with a “B” or higher grade. • whose reading ,writing and math skills are on or above grade level • who can acquire basic factual information and organize their work independently Students who have not met this recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy to be successful in this class. This course (along with Chemistry in the Community) will fulfill graduation requirements for a NY State Core Curriculum, third-year science course. Students successfully completing this course are recommended for Zoology , Conceptual or Honors Physics, or any AP science class as future Ithaca High School 49 Program of Studies
  • options,. Prerequisites: Pass the NYS Honors Earth Science or Honors Biology Regents exam with a “B” or better grade. Successful completion of Algebra with a “B” or better grade. Course Content: This course involves a study of the principles which govern the structure and properties of matter. Topics include: matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, mathematics of chemistry, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, redox and electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Course Information: • The Regents Chemistry Syllabus is used as a guide with considerable enrichment to the core topics. Students are expected to be able to relate topics and knowledge from previous science and math courses to material being studied in chemistry. The treatment of topics is based on experiments and often involves considerable math. Practical applications of chemical principals are emphasized. • A double period will be incorporated twice in a six-day cycle to accommodate the state required 1200 minute lab requirement. • Homework should take an average of 30-45 minutes per night. Homework includes reading, completing lab reports, problem sets, worksheets, and project work. • Instructional strategies include lab experiments, lectures, group work, discussions, and videos. Assessment: Assessments include lab reports tests, quizzes, projects and the Regents Exam. Written laboratory reports are mandated by the State of New York and must be kept on file for entrance into the Regents Exam, which serves as the final examination. Students will take the State Regents Exam in Chemistry at the end of the course. Students need to successfully complete laboratory reports, reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify to take the Regents Exam. CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS *Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: This class is recommended for students who would enjoy a hands-on, project-based course in physical science with less emphasis on mathematics. *This course (along with Chemistry in the Community) will fulfill graduation requirements for a NY State Core Curriculum, third-year science course. However, this course will not culminate in a Regents exam. Students wishing to take the NYS Regents Exam in Physics should enroll in Honors Physics. Conceptual Physics is recommended for students who • have already successfully completed one other course that follows the NY State Core Curriculum with a C or higher grade. (Living Environment, R/H Earth Science or Chemistry) • have passed at least one NYS Regents Science exam • have passed Algebra or are taking it concurrently • have reading and writing skills that are close to grade level Upon successful completion of this course, students may consider Zoology, Chemistry or Chemistry in the Community,or AP Environmental Science as future options. Prerequisites: Successful completion of R Algebra. Passing grade on one Regents exam and one other Regents Core curriculum course . Course Content: This is a project-based course which employs the study of everyday objects to build an understanding of the rules that govern matter and energy. Topics include, but are not limited to: vectors, motion, projectiles, forces, momentum, energy, electricity and magnetism. Course Information: • Instructional strategies employed in this emphasize problem solving and laboratory skills. This hands-on course uses real life examples to explore physics topics. Students will complete many of the laboratory activities mentioned in the Honors Physics description. In addition, Conceptual Physics will use projects to explore several topics with more depth. For example, students will use motion formulas to attempt to drop an egg at a moving target, use knowledge of forces to create shoes that can walk on eggs without breaking them, explore the energy of roller coasters by building a working model, and learn about electricity by building a working stop light. • This course follows the core curriculum for the NYS Regents course in physics. The course covers fewer topics than the Honors Physics class in greater depth. This course can be considered a NY State Core Curriculum course, but does not culminate in a Regents exam. Students needing to pass the Regents exam should enroll in Honors Physics. • There are two double lab periods in a six-day cycle to enable hands-on investigation and to accommodate the NYS 1200 minute minimum lab requirement. • Homework is required 2 to 3 nights a week. Assessment: Quizzes and projects determine the major part of the grade; with labs, homework and participation counting roughly 45%. A project will serve as the final assessment. Students need to successfully complete laboratory reports, reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify for State Core Curriculum course credit. Ithaca High School 50 Program of Studies
  • *This course meets the graduation requirement of a NYS Regents diploma, but it does not culminate in the NYS Regents Exam. **During the first marking period students will decide whether to take the course for Regents or Honors credit based on course work expectations they agree to fulfill. Students electing to take the course for honors credit will be asked to sign an academic contract that clearly describes these more rigorous work expectations. HONORS PHYSICS Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: This hands-on physical science course is recommended for students • who have successfully completed one other course that follows the NY State Core Curriculum with a B or higher grade. • who are skilled in mathematics and have completed Algebra with a B or better grade • who can acquire basic factual information and organize their work independently Students who have not met this recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy to be successful in this class. Upon successful completion of this course, students may consider Zoology, Honors Chemistry or any AP science course as future options. Prerequisites: Because the course involves a great deal of mathematics, students should be skilled in this area and have completed R/H Algebra with a B or higher grade. Pass the NYS Honors Earth Science and/or Honors Biology Regents exam with a “B” or better grade. Course Content: This hands-on course conforms to the New York State Regents curriculum for Physics. Topics include vectors, motion, projectiles, forces, momentum, energy, waves, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Course Information: • Written laboratory reports are mandated by the State of New York and must be kept on file for entrance into the final examination. There are two double lab periods in a six-day cycle to enable hands-on investigations and to accommodate the state required 1200 minute lab requirement. • Homework requires about 4 hours per week outside of class. Assignments will include readings, written homework and laboratory reports. • Instructional strategies used in this course emphasize the mathematical modeling of real-life problems. Students will build kites to explore vectors, use computer probes to study motion, fire rockets to learn about projectile motion, take elevator rides to investigate forces, design a bungee cord for an egg to learn about energy, analyze the wave motion of Slinkies and build a motor to learn about electricity and magnetism, just to name a few examples. Assessment: Quizzes and tests determine the major part of the grade, with labs and homework assignments counting roughly 35%. Students can expect quizzes every week and one or two unit tests per marking period. Students need to successfully complete laboratory reports, reflecting a minimum of 1200 minutes for the year, by June 1 of the testing year in order to qualify to take the Regents Exam. New York State Regents Physics exam serves as the final exam for the course. BOTANY Regents level** Full Year 1 Credit Pending staff availability Recommendation: This can be considered as a third science for a basic Regents diploma. It is recommended that enrolling students should have successfully completed Living Environment or Honors Biology and has an interest in biology and plants. Botany will be offered this year depending on enrollment and staffing. ** While taught on the regents level, this course counts as an elective science class towards graduation. It does NOT fulfill the graduation requirement for NY State Core curriculum. Prerequisite: Passing grade for Biology and the NYS Living Environment Regents exam. Course Content: Survey of the plant kingdom, anatomy and physiology of flowering plants, ecology and evolution of plants. Course Information: Botany is an elective course for students who wish an in-depth study and survey of the plant kingdom. Class work includes lecture, laboratory, and outdoor fieldwork. Reading and written assignments are given weekly. Teaching methods include lectures, labs, local field trips, and demonstrations. Assessments include written exams, lab exams, and local final exam. ZOOLOGY Regents** Full Year 1 Credit Pending staff availability Recommendation: Zoology is an elective (non-core) course open to all students and is recommended for 11th or 12th grade students who • have a strong interest in animals and biology and committed to completing this third/ fourth year course. Ithaca High School 51 Program of Studies
  • • have successfully completed at least two Regents core science courses (one being a physical science) • Have successfully passed at least one Regents examination • Zoology fulfills the graduation requirement of a third course in the science sequence but does not follow a state core curriculum since it is locally developed. . * *While taught on the regents level, this course counts as an elective science class towards graduation. It does NOT fulfill the graduation requirement for NY State Core curriculum. Prerequisite: A passing grade on one Regents Examination and a passing grade in at least two Regents core science courses: one taught to the Physical Science Core (Earth Science, physics, or Chemistry) and one taught to the Living Environment Core (Honors or Regents Biology). Course Content: Students will study animal populations and population dynamics through a field study of crayfish in Fall Creek. They will also study the ecology and evolution of animals, animal diversity (major types of invertebrate and vertebrate animals), comparative anatomy and physiology of animals, animal behavior, animal use in society and careers that involve working with animals. Course Information: • The curriculum for this course is locally developed. • Zoology meets every day for a single period – there are no double lab periods. Students will be asked to spend additional periods working on field studies and going on field trips on several occasions throughout the school year. • Students should expect to work at least 1-2 hours / week outside of class to complete projects, labs and homework assignments. • Students without a strong background in Biology must be prepared to spend extra time and energy in order to be successful in this course. • Instructional Strategies include inquiry labs and hands-on activities, dissections, field studies, lectures, individual and small group research and project work, student presentations, and field trips to local and regional animal facilities. Assessments: Students will be required to create and maintain a Zoology binder through the entire school year. Other forms of assessment include labs, projects, weekly reading assignments and written exams. There is a written mid-term exam (covering first semester material) and a local final exam that includes both a written exam (covering second semester material) as well as a culminating project. AP PHYSICS B AP Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: Like other AP science courses at Ithaca High, this courses is taught at the college level and is recommended for students who can • read and comprehend college level texts • acquire basic factual information independently • think critically and conceptually • organize work independently AP Physics B is recommended for • self-motivated students with a strong interest in science and excellent grades in science and math. • students who have previously completed two Honors level science courses including Honors Chemistry with a grade of B or higher. • students who are highly skilled in algebra and trigonometry and concurrently taking Pre-calculus or calculus. Students who have not met the above recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy outside of class time to be minimally successful in this course. Pre-requisites: Math 11R or 11H with a grade of A or B preferred. Two Honors level science courses including Honors Chemistry with a grade of B or higher. Course Content: This is an introductory algebra-based college level physics course exploring a broad range of topics including mechanics (motion, work, periodic motion, fluids, energy), thermodynamics, electricity & magnetism, geometric & physical optics, waves, nuclear, atomic & modern physics. Course Information : • This is a fast-paced, college-level introductory physics course that follows the Advanced Placement Physics B curriculum. The class meets every day with 3 double periods in a six-day cycle to accommodate explorations, laboratory activities and more extensive study of the curriculum material. Ithaca High School 52 Program of Studies
  • • Students can expect to spend an average of 6 hours on homework per week. Students are expected to work at a concerted pace throughout the year. • Instructional strategies include lectures, interactive demonstrations, group and individual work, class discussion, labs, and shorter exploratory activities. • An independent three-week project will be completed in the last quarter. • A series of seminars by Cornell researchers and a field trip to research facilities will occur in the last quarter. Assessments: Tests carry the heaviest percentage of the course grade; students are also assessed on homework, group problem- solving, quizzes, participation, and labs. There is a midterm in January and a final exam in early May. The Advanced Placement Physics B test given in mid-May is mandatory for all students. An independent three-week project will be completed in the last quarter. AP PHYSICS C AP Full Year 1 Credit Pending staff availability Recommendation: This course is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in AP Calculus BC. The course is recommended for students with a strong interest in physics, chemistry or engineering and excellent grades in science and math. Prerequisites: Students should be enrolled in AP Calculus BC concurrently and should have had excellent grades in Pre-calculus. Course Content: This is an introductory, calculus-based, college level course, geared toward students with a strong interest in physics, chemistry or engineering. Topics include those covered in the first two semesters in a college physics/engineering program including mechanics (motion, energy, periodic motion, work, rotation) and electricity & magnetism. Course Information: • This is a fast paced, college level course that follows the Advanced Placement Physics C curriculum. Students need to be highly capable of independent work. • This class meets every day with 3 double-periods in a six-day cycle to accommodate explorations, laboratory activities and more extensive study of the curriculum material. • Students can expect to spend 6-8 hours on homework per week. Students are expected to work at a concerted pace throughout the year. • Instructional strategies include lectures, class discussion, labs, group work and shorter exploratory activities. There will be a series of seminars given by researchers at Cornell University late in the school year. We expect to have a field trip to Cornell to visit research facilities. Assessment: While tests carry the heaviest percentage of the course grade, students are also assessed on homework, group problem- solving work, laboratory write-ups, and a final project. There will be a midterm exam. All students will be taking the AP Physics C tests for Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism given by the College Board in early May. An independent three-week project will be completed in the last quarter. AP BIOLOGY AP Full Year 1 Credits Recommendation: Like other AP science courses at Ithaca High, this courses is taught at the college level and is recommended for students who have completed Honors Biology and the NYS Living Environment exam and Honors Chemistry with a B or higher grade. Students enrolling should be able to: • read and comprehend college level texts • acquire basic factual information independently • think critically and conceptually • organize work independently AP Biology is recommended for students who • are self motivated and have a strong interest in the biological sciences and related college majors. • have completed Honors Biology and the NYS Living Environment exam and Honors Chemistry with a B or higher grade. Students who have not met the above-recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy outside of class to be minimally successful in this course. Prerequisites: Must have earned a B or higher in Honors Biology, and Chemistry. Course content: The curriculum is designed to facilitate investigation of the interface between humans and the natural world. It draws from a range of sciences (geology, chemistry, cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, gene regulation, genetic counseling, bioethics, and recombinant DNA, ecology, biotechnology, plant and animal physiology, anatomy, evolution, and human systems). The goal of the course is to provide students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies necessary to understand the interrelationships of natural systems, to identify, analyze and evaluate scientific studies and develop the ability to develop and test hypothesizes and provide a foundation for extended coursework at the college level. Course Information: Ithaca High School 53 Program of Studies
  • • This is a college level, course based on the Advanced Placement Biology curriculum. • Advanced Placement Biology has three double periods in each six-day cycle to accommodate explorations, laboratory activities and more extensive study of the curriculum material. • Students should expect to work at least 5-6 hours / week outside of class to complete projects, labs and homework assignments. • Students will be expected to develop several PowerPoint presentations for the purpose of teaching their peers. • Instructional Strategies include lectures, small group research and project work, lab activities, student presentations, and long-term investigations. • The course is intended to have the students develop an understanding of biology as a dynamic science and to encourage the students to learn how to learn and to develop their own curiosity about and respect for the natural world. Other goals are to have students understand more advanced laboratory techniques, to become comfortable presenting oral reports to their classmates, to learn to think scientifically, and to develop into responsible scientifically literate citizens. Assessment: Tests carry the heaviest percentage of the course grade; students are also assessed on homework/class work, projects, student presentations, lab reports, and quizzes. A mid term examination may be given in January. The Advanced Placement Examination, given in May by the Education Testing Service, is mandatory for the course. An independent three-week project will be completed in the last quarter. AP CHEMISTRY AP Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: Like other AP science courses at Ithaca High, this course is taught at the college level. Students enrolling should be able to: • read and comprehend college level texts • acquire basic factual information independently • think critically and conceptually • organize work independently AP Chemistry is recommended for students who • are self motivated and have a strong interest in the chemical and biological sciences and related college majors. • have completed two years of high school math with a B or higher grade • have completed Honors Chemistry and one other Honors level science course with a B or higher grade Students who have not met the above-recommended criteria should expect to invest extra time and energy outside of class time to be minimally successful in this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry and one other Honors level science course with a B or higher grade. Successful completion of or current enrollment in Math 11 . Course Content: This course follows the Advanced Placement Chemistry program and is the equivalent of a full-year sequence in chemistry at most universities. Topics include stoichiometry, reactions, atomic structure, bonding, thermodynamics, and phases of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry and electrochemistry. Course Information: • This course follows the Advanced Placement Chemistry program. The Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam, administered by Education Testing Service in May, is required as part of the course. • Students are expected to complete a problem set every night and its careful completion is considered essential to mastering the content. Assignments are expected to take up to 1 hour to complete. • There are three double lab periods in a six-day cycle to enable more hands-on investigation. Students complete approximately one lab per week, with many labs extending over several days. • The teaching method is lecture, as well as classroom discussion, small group work, and lab work. The course is very challenging with new topics introduced almost every day. Assessment: Quizzes are given regularly (2-4 per week). Tests are given at the end of each 2-4 week unit. Marking period grades are based on a combination of homework, labs, quizzes and tests. A midterm exam is given in January. All students in the course are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam administered by Education Testing Service in May. In addition, a locally generated final exam (based on the AP exam) is given before the required AP exam. Students are expected to complete a final project after the exam. AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AP Full Year 1 Credit Recommendation: Like other AP science courses at Ithaca High, this course is taught at the college level. Students enrolling should be able to: • read and comprehend college level texts • acquire basic factual information independently • think critically and conceptually • organize work independently Ithaca High School 54 Program of Studies
  • AP Environmental Science is especially recommended for11th or 12th grade students who are self-motivated, highly interested in environmental issues and have a solid background in the sciences. Students enrolling in this course should have completed Earth Science, Biology and Chemistry with a grade of B or better. Students without substantial experience in one of these areas must be prepared to invest extra time and energy outside of class time in order to be minimally successful in this course. Prerequisites: Must have earned at least a B in Earth Science, Biology and Chemistry (and/or excellent teacher recommendations). Course Content: AP Environmental Science investigates the interface between humans and the natural world. It draws from a range of sciences (geology, biology, chemistry, biochemistry, ecology, meteorology, oceanography, climatology, etc.) as well as many of the social sciences (economics, public policy, geography, law, politics, etc.). The goal of the course is to provide students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies necessary to understand the interrelationships of natural systems, to identify, analyze and evaluate the risks of environmental problems, and to examine possible solutions to these problems. Field studies include an in-depth ecological survey of Fall Creek, an investigation of succession in the Stewart Park bird sanctuary, and field trips to public works facilities such as the Trash Incinerator in Syracuse, NY and the City of Ithaca’s Sewage Treatment Plant. Long-term in-class projects include composting in the classroom, in-class landfills and engineering design projects.. Course Information: • This is a college level, course based on the Advanced Placement curriculum for Environmental Science. • Environmental Science has three double periods in each six-day cycle to enable field studies, walking field trips and hands-on investigations. • Students should expect to work at least 5-6 hours / week outside of class to complete projects, labs and homework assignments. Students will be expected to develop several PowerPoint presentations for the purpose of teaching their peers. • Instructional Strategies include lectures, small group research and project work, lab activities, student presentations, and long-term investigations. Assessment: Marking period grades are based on a combination of homework, labs, quizzes and tests. A midterm exam may be given in January. All students in the course are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam administered by Education Testing Service in May. The final exam grade is based on the culmination of several yearlong investigations to be completed after the AP exam. Ithaca High School 55 Program of Studies
  • SOCIAL STUDIES Department Leader: Phil Jordan Social Studies Department Office: G-217 Phone: 274-2188 Four units of Social Studies are required for graduation. Ithaca High School offers the following courses to meet that requirement and prepare students for the two required Regents Examinations: Global History 1, Global History 2, United States History, Economics and Participation in Government. An extended sequence (5 units) in Social Studies is earned by successfully completing the four required units of Social Studies, and completing one additional unit from two of the semester courses described below. These electives can be taken in grades 10, 11, and 12. GLOBAL HISTORY I Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course emphasizes the reading, writing and analytical skills necessary to complete the New York State Global History Regents requirement. The course provides an overview of the geography and history of seven cultural regions of the world: Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Global History One is part one of the required two-year Global History sequence. Teaching Methods and Assessment: A variety of teaching methods are used, including cooperative learning, interactive lectures, audio and visual aids, class discussion, oral presentations and role-plays. Students will be evaluated using a number of methods: essays, unit exams, homework, class participation and a cumulative final exam. Students should expect homework approximately three times a week. GLOBAL HISTORY I Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Recommendations: Students should have an active interest in learning about world cultures, strong reading and writing skills and be willing and able to do extensive independent work. Course Content: Students study seven regions/cultures of the world: Latin America, Africa, Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China, and Japan. Teaching Methods and Assessment: A variety of teaching methods are used during the course of the year, including cooperative learning, interactive lectures, audio / visual aids, debate forums, class discussion, oral presentations and role-plays. Students will be evaluated using a number of assessments: essays and research papers, unit exams, homework, group and individual projects, oral presentations, class participation and a cumulative final exam. The final exam is a school exam. Students should expect homework approximately five times a week. GLOBAL HISTORY 1/ HUMANITIES Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Recommendations: Students should have an active interest in learning about World Cultures. Strong reading and writing skills and be willing and able to do extensive independent work. Course Content: The ninth grade Humanities course emphasizes the interdisciplinary study of history and literature. Students study seven regions/cultures of the world: Latin America, Africa, Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China, and Japan. In the Global History component, teachers focus on geography, economics and history. Students must be enrolled in both the Global History and the English sections of this course. Teaching Methods and Assessment: A variety of teaching methods are used during the course of the year, including cooperative learning, interactive lectures, audio / visual aids, debate forums, class discussion, oral presentations and role-plays. Students will be evaluated using a number of assessments: essays and research papers, unit exams, homework, group and individual projects, oral presentations, class participation and a cumulative final exam. The final exam is a school exam. Students should expect homework approximately five times a week. GLOBAL HISTORY 2 Regents Full Year 1 Credit Ithaca High School 56 Program of Studies
  • Prerequisite: Global Studies 1 Course Content: The course will begin with ancient civilizations that influenced Europe and chronologically survey the development of western civilization to the present. The course is taught at the college-preparatory level. Students will be expected to read, analyze and interpret historical trends, developments and events. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Student work will be assessed through written essay responses, homework, classroom participation, quizzes and tests. The New York State Regents Exam is the final evaluation. This exam covers Global History I and II. All students will be expected to study thirty minutes per night to understand and master the material. GLOBAL HISTORY 2 Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Global History I Recommendations: Students have earned a minimum of a B in Regents level Global Studies I. Students should be reading and writing at a 10th grade level. Course Content: There is an emphasis on Eastern and Western Europe and the former Soviet Union. Comparisons and contrasts to other areas and cultures are made. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Methods include lecture, discussion, audio-visual presentations, role-playing, simulations, debates, etc. The Honors program is for highly motivated students who have excellent reading and writing skills. The course requires substantial amounts of reading in a very challenging text. Students who have chosen to be in the Honors course will be evaluated through the use of tests, quizzes, interpretive essays, oral presentations, group work and other methods. The New York State Regents Examination in Global History will be the final examination in this course. This examination will cover the content of Global History 1 and 2. Students should expect nightly homework, sometimes based on the text and sometimes based upon primary source readings and interpretations. GLOBAL STUDIES 2/ENGLISH 10 (Combined) Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Global History I and English 9 Recommendations: Should be reading & writing at a 10th grade level and earned a minimum of a B in Regents Global Studies I. Course Content: There is an emphasis on Eastern and Western Europe and the former Soviet Union. Comparisons and contrasts to other areas and cultures are made. Teaching Methods and Assessment: The English and Global classes will be combined for special presentations, team teaching, and planning for four special class activities (Greek Olympic Day, the Palio, the Eisteddfod Poetry and Music Festival, the Victorian Tea). Two assignments, a written theme and an oral project, fulfill requirements for both sections of the course. In addition, many short oral presentations and written assignments develop connections between history and literature. Written assignments, tests, quizzes, group presentations, class participation, and projects are used in evaluation. Numerous opportunities for extra credit are provided for the class as a whole. The Regents examination is required and will serve as the final exam for the history portion of the course. Students should expect nightly homework, sometimes based on the text and sometimes based upon primary source readings and interpretations. UNITED STATES HISTORY Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Students should have passed Global History 1 & 2 at the Regents or Honors level. Course Content: This is a survey course in the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present with primary focus on the Constitution and the 19th and 20th centuries. Teaching Methods and Assessment: For students having average reading and writing skills. Taught at the college-preparatory level, students will, take tests, do individual project, group work, research, presentations, and write essays. The June Regents exam in US History and Government is the final exam. The Regents examination counts as 25% of the yearly average. Students should expect homework daily. UNITED STATES HISTORY Honors Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: Students should have earned a C or better in Global History I and 2 at the Honors level or a B or better at the Regents level. Students should also be highly motivated with excellent reading and writing skills. Course Content: A survey course in the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present with primary focus on the Constitution and the 19th and 20th centuries. Teaching Methods and Assessment: A variety of teaching methods are used, including lecture, cooperative learning, class discussion, and student presentations. Students will write interpretative and analytical essays and will prepare a series of reports and oral projects. The June Regents exam in United States History and Government is the final exam. A substantial amount of outside reading is required. Ithaca High School 57 Program of Studies
  • AP UNITED STATES HISTORY AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Completion of Global History 1 & 2. Summer reading and research paper due mid-August. Recommendations: Recommended average in Global History I & 2 Honors of at least a B. Students should also be highly motivated with an ability to work independently as well as the ability to read at a college level. Course Content: This course is a survey of the political, economic, diplomatic, intellectual, and social forces that shaped the United States. Students will analyze primary sources, research and write about historical issues and develop a critical understanding of the historiography of the United States. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Lecture, discussion, simulations, interviews, historiography, substantial research. Many written assignments, tests, quizzes, papers, oral presentations, simulations and a mid-term exam. The New York State Regents Exam is the final exam and counts for 25% of the final grade. AP Exam required in May. Homework assignments require a minimum of five hours per week. AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Global History 1. AP Human Geography provides an introductory college level examination of the impact of human activity on the surface of the Earth. Students are exposed to the patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface within a global context. Students learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science, while examining human social organization and its environmental consequences. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Lectures, mostly discussion, interviews, and substantial research. Many written assignments, some oral presentations, tests, quizzes, papers, GIS computer lab work, and a mid-term. AP Exam required in May. Nightly homework assignments. PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT All levels (Regents Credit) Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: United States History Course Content: The goal of the course is to educate students about the role of citizens in our democratic society and to encourage active participation by students in their communities. Topics include the U. S. Supreme Court, voting, media literacy, juvenile justice, and racism. Teaching Methods and Assessment: The course includes a field trip to a NY State correctional facility and many guest speakers (often including our NY State Assemblyperson, the Mayor of Ithaca, the District Attorney and other community leaders). There are written and oral projects, papers and group projects. There are unit exams with a school final exam at the end of the semester. Participation in community events and meetings is required. ECONOMICS Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: United States History Course Content: This course is an introduction to macroeconomics, microeconomics, and the role of the United States in the world economy. This course is for students who have average reading ability and writing skills. This course is taught at the college-preparatory level. Students will do individual projects and group projects and will write essays explaining the interrelationships of the topics studied in this course. A moderate amount of outside reading is required. Students will participate in the Stock Market Simulation. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Regular homework assignments, oral presentations, quizzes, chapter exams and essays. The final exam counts for 25% of yearly average. ECONOMICS Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: United States History Recommendation: Highly motivated with excellent reading and writing skills. Course Content: An introduction to macroeconomics, microeconomics, and the role of the United States in the world economy, with brief forays into personal finance. The course is taught at the college preparatory level. Students will complete a series of projects requiring real-world research, write interpretative and analytical essays, and compose oral presentations. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Homework nightly: reading, exercise projects. Class includes simulations, lectures, and group exercises. Regular written exams, final exam 25% of final grade. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH FILM Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None (Offered Spring 2011) Course Content: People of African descent have made enormous contributions to the development of our United States. An in-depth and enlightening investigation will take place into a variety of themes relating to the African-American experience using the medium of films and videos. Some of the exciting films to be presented include: "Amistad", "Glory", "Buffalo Soldiers", "Rosewood", "Malcolm X", "Mississippi Burning", "Panther", "Boyz in the Hood", and others. Ithaca High School 58 Program of Studies
  • Teaching Methods and Assessment: Study units and research activities will be developed around each film. The course will use cooperative learning activities, essays, video and feature film reviews, oral presentations and role plays, research projects with the use of library, computers and other references. Students should expect occasional homework assignments. A cumulative final exam will be given. ANCIENT HISTORY Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None (Offered Spring 2012) Recommendation: Interest in history, archaeology, anthropology, architecture and art, classical literature, comparative religion. Course Content: This course examines topics in ancient history. Subjects include the Stone Age, Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Hebrews, Greece, and Rome, but topics are determined in part by class interest and have also included China and the Celts. Emphasis is placed on examining and evaluating recent interpretations. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Lecture, group work, role playing, debates, discussion, and field trips to sites such as the Johnson Museum, the Rare Book Collection at Cornell, or architecturally important buildings. Because this is a mixed elective, independent and group projects constitute an important part of the course. Students must be willing to challenge themselves and must be willing to work with other students of different interests and abilities. A final examination is required. Homework expectations differ with the various projects. MEDIEVAL HISTORY Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None (Offered Spring 2011) Recommendation: Interest in history, archaeology, anthropology, art, architecture, music, literature or religion. Course Content: For the most part, biography is the focus of this course. Various people and buildings are used as examples of a particular theme or period. Biographies have included King Arthur, Bodo the Peasant, Eleanor of Aquitaine, St. Francis of Assisi, Harold Godwinson, Chartres Cathedral, Marco Polo, Vladimir of Kiev. While European medieval history is the primary focus, the course is designed to study international connections with Islamic countries, Africa and China. Teaching Methods and Assessment: Includes lecture, group work, role-playing, debates, and discussion. A field trip to Binghamton to visit eastern European “gold domed” churches has become a tradition. Because this is a mixed elective, independent and group projects constitute an important part of the course. Students must be willing to challenge themselves and must be willing to work with other students of different interests and abilities. A final examination is required. Expectations differ with the various projects. FOODS THAT CHANGED HISTORY Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None. (Offered Every Fall) Course Content: We think of our modern world as globally connected. This is not, however, a recent phenomenon. Our history has always been a world history however much we try to divide our study by discipline, area, or chronology. The study of food and history provides an exciting vehicle for examining the inter-connectedness of our planet. Teaching Methods and Assessment: This interdisciplinary and multi-cultural elective course will use the potato, tea, corn, and cod to study geography, ecology, politics, art, and contemporary issues. Topics will range from examining the relationship between salt cod and the institution of slavery to the pros and cons of genetically engineered corn. The course will also include practical culinary applications and field trips. Ithaca High School 59 Program of Studies
  • SPECIAL EDUCATION Department Chair: SERVICES Kathryn Rourke Special Education Services Office: K-24 Phone: 274-2167 Fax: 274-2297 Ithaca High School offers a variety of programs and services for students identified as having a disability (1 of 13 NYS recognized classifications). Resource Support Services – This service (available at each grade level) meets the needs of the majority of classified students. Resource teachers provide remediation for skill deficits and support for mainstream academics. • Consultant Teacher Direct Service - This is a team taught class. There is a general education teacher and a special education teacher jointly providing instruction to a class that includes both students with and without disabilities to meet the diverse learning needs of all students in a class. All students benefit from the instruction of both the general education teacher and special education teacher. Indirect Services - Consultation by a special education teacher with regular classroom teachers to assist them in modifying instructional methods to meet the needs of classified students taking their course. • Transitional Support Services – Temporary services (maximum of 1 year) provided to a classified student moving toward greater academic independence/declassification. • Declassification Support Services – Services that may be provided (up to 1 year) to students or regular ed teachers after those students have been declassified by the CSE. ADDITIONAL COURSES OFFERED BY THE SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ARE SPECIALLY DESIGNED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS: SEATS (Social / Emotional / Academic Transition Service) SEATS, was developed to assist students with disabilities who are at risk for success at IHS. The program is the most intensive level of Special Education Resource programming currently offered on campus and utilizes a team approach that provides students with the structure and support necessary to deal with emotional, behavioral and educational issues. The team consists of the special education teacher, paraprofessionals, school counselor, social worker and assistant principal, all assigned specifically to the SEATS program. The Committee on Special Education must recommend student placement in this program. Program load is limited to 20 students. OASIS OASIS was developed to assist students within the Autism Spectrum. The program designed as an enhanced Resource Room. It utilizes a team approach that provides students with the structure and support necessary to integrate into Ithaca High School. The team consists of the special education teacher, paraprofessionals, and a school psychologist. LIFE SKILLS PROGRAM An IEP-based program designed for students with developmental disabilities. The focus is on practical living skills, basic academics and the transition into competitive employment after high school. Students participating in the Life Skills Program will earn an IEP diploma. Typically, half the day is spent at IHS and the other half at BOCES in a World of Work Vocational program. SPEECH/LANGUAGE SERVICES Students with an IEP may receive Speech and Language services if they have been identified as needing remediation within the areas of articulation, voice, fluency, understanding language or using oral expression. Services are provided in a variety of ways: • Direct Speech/Language Services: Individual or small group instruction, during an assigned time. • Consultation Indirect Speech/Language Services: A Speech/Language Therapist provides consultation to the student’s Special Ed. and General ED teachers. • Combined Services: Students receive services within the Life Skills Program, during Resource Room, or within mainstream classes. There is an established referral process to the Committee on Special Education for students who are suspected of having a special education need, but who are not yet identified. It is recommended that the person considering such a referral meet initially with the IHS Screening Team made up of a school counselor, support teacher, psychologist, social worker, a Special Education staff member, parents, and other appropriate personnel to discuss the individual student’s case. Screening recommendations are documented, put into place Ithaca High School 60 Program of Studies
  • and evaluated prior to the actual processing of a formal referral to the Committee on Special Education. Special Education students who do not meet the requirements of a Regents or Ithaca High School Diploma can be considered for an Individualized Education Program Diploma. In order to be eligible for this diploma, the student must meet the criteria established by the Committee on Special Education and it must be indicated on the student’s I.E.P. TRANSITION I ( Pilot Course Supported by MTP Grant, tuition free) Six Week Summer Session 1 credit Prerequisites: Students must have a current IEP or 504 Plan Course Content: This course will address three areas that will assist students in planning for life after high school. The first is Job Acquisition Skill Development which includes resume writing, applications interview techniques, job safety, behavior, evaluation, performance and advancement. The second is Independent Living and Personal Economics. This includes budgeting, rent, mortgages, insurance, bank loans, car ownership, college costs, and retirement planning. Third is Career Exploration. Students will be introduced to web based tools to research careers. Students will also participate in job shadowing at area businesses throughout the six weeks. Transportation will be provided by the district. TRANSITION II INTERNSHIP ( Pilot Course Supported by MTP Grant , tuition free) Six Week Summer Session 1 credit Semester I 1 credit Semester II 1 credit Prerequisites: Students must have a current IEP or 504 Plan Course Content: Students will be required to participate in a formal internship with an area business that reflects one of the student’s career interests. The total time in the internship will be approximately 150 hours, and may be paid or unpaid. Transportation may be subsidized by the transition grant. READ 180 Read 180 is comprehensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of our high school students whose reading achievement is below the proficient level. The instructional time encompasses three different rotations beyond whole class instruction. The class directly addresses individual needs through diversified instruction, adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction in reading, writing, and vocabulary skills. Ithaca High School 61 Program of Studies
  • WORLD LANGUAGES Department Leader: Janet Abowd Foreign Language Office: K-21 Phone: 274-2189 DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVES The purpose of foreign language study is to contribute to the general goals of education. In the foreign language department, these goals include: development of a positive attitude toward second language learning; awareness of cultural values other than our own; development of proficiency in communication; development of broader understanding of one's own language and of language in general; reinforcement of other disciplines through the foreign language; and use of the language beyond the school setting. There are two New York State standards for Languages Other Than English (LOTE): 1. Students will be able to use a LOTE for communications. 2. Students will develop cross-cultural skills and understandings. It is the goal of the Ithaca City School District foreign language department to enable all of our students to communicate linguistically and culturally in a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic society here and abroad. The Specific content of our courses may be found in Curriculum: Languages Other Than English (LOTE) approved by the Ithaca Board of Education and supported by benchmark examinations at the end of Grade 7, Language 2, and Language 4. One unit of credit will be awarded for the successful completion of each level of study. Please note: 1) in order to enter a Language II Honors level class, it is our policy that the student must have passed the NYS Level I Proficiency exam administered the preceding June with at least an 85%. 2) Course Preemption: Students who apply in advance and are approved to earn credit by testing must do a project plus a written exam which will include oral testing. 3) Students who have developed skills in a language other than English outside an Englishspeaking environment (i.e. not a bilingual environment, but total immersion with schooling) after the age of 10 may be eligible for foreign language Regents Diploma credit. The department head and counselors can advise students of the requirements in foreign languages for graduating with a Regents diploma or a Regents diploma with advanced designation. The essentials are: 1. An IHS diploma requires 1 credit of foreign language gained either by passing the Proficiency Examination before the end of Grade 8, or by passing a Language 1 course at Ithaca High School. N.B.: Currently Latin 1 and Spanish 1 are the only first-year language courses offered at Ithaca High School. (See graduation requirements) 2. A Regents diploma with advanced designation requires successful completion of a 3year sequence, plus the Regents exam. 3. Credit may be granted for a year or more of immersion language use in another country. For this, see the department chair. It is school and foreign language department policy that if there is a final exam, it will count 25% of the year’s grade; the four marking periods together count the other 75%. The Ithaca City School District offers 5 year language programs in: • French • German • Latin (Latin does not have a guaranteed sequence. Therefore students who wish to enroll in Latin must also be enrolled in or have completed a sequence (through Level 3 and the Regents test) in French, German or Spanish. • Spanish There is a 1-year elective in Chinese (see description below). It is not part of a sequence. Students who wish to enroll in Chinese must also be enrolled in or have completed a sequence in French, German or Spanish. EXPLORATIONS IN CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: This course is an elective. Recommendations: This course is NOT part of a sequence of language classes which culminates in a Proficiency, Regents, or AP test. Course Content: This course will introduce students to the Chinese language and various aspects of the culture. Students will learn how to write and read characters, but more emphasis will be placed on proper pronunciation and basic conversation (materials will be provided for students wishing to learn more characters on their own). A significant part of the course will be devoted to learning about many fascinating aspects of Chinese culture including Chinese painting, calligraphy, food and meal taking, acupuncture and traditional medicine, film, tai-chi and martial arts, historical landmarks ,as well as current events and China's emergence as a global economic and political power. China scholars and local experts from our community will share their knowledge as much as possible in class. Course Information: Assessments will include oral and written exams as well as projects and student presentations. Daily oral participation is an important part of the grade, and tests will include listening, speaking, recognizing and writing characters, and culture. Ithaca High School 62 Program of Studies
  • This student-centered class will have lots of pair work. The language laboratory will be used for listening and speaking practice. The final exam will be cumulative and will test all skill areas. FRENCH 1, GERMAN 1 & SPANISH 1 Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: None Recommendations: Recommendation of counselor. (Note that in recent years the Language 1 class has been a heterogeneous class and that only Spanish and Latin have been offered as Language 1 at Ithaca High School.) Course content: Topics of study include: personal identification, house and home, family life, community/neighborhood, physical environment, meal taking/food/drink, health and welfare, education, earning a living, leisure, public and private services, shopping, travel, current events. We study geographic and cultural features of the areas where the language is spoken. Grammar is taught in context, and includes the present tense of regular verbs and of the most common irregular verbs. Course Information: Students must memorize lists of vocabulary, verb conjugations and dialogs, practice writing and spelling, and exercises to learn sentence structures. There are 20 minutes of homework every day, oral performances, lesson quizzes, unit tests, and projects. The NYS Proficiency Exam (10 points speaking in class, 20 points formal speaking interview, 40 points listening, 20 points reading, 10 points writing) is used as the final exam. The course is teacher directed with use of choral repetition and drill, practice, videos and audio cassettes, listening comprehension exercises, and continual teacher reinforcement of vocabulary and structures. NOTE: We believe that all students can learn a modern language, although the Regents student may take longer to reach the same level as the Honors student, and the Regents student may initiate language less than the Honors student. All students are required to pass the Proficiency Exam before the end of Grade 8, or instead, to pass one year of foreign language in a high school foreign language course. FRENCH 2, GERMAN 2 & SPANISH 2 Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Successful completion of Language I Recommendations: For honors: 85 or better on the New York State Language Proficiency and at least a B average in Language 1. Course Content: Education, food, health, occupations, travel, clothing, shopping, daily routine, house/home, personal identification, earning a living, leisure time. We practice common, present, past and future tenses and explicitly study several cultural features or events. Course Information: Written assignments, interviews, surveys, partner work, information gaps, translations, oral presentations and short skits, projects with major topics of study. One project may be assigned per marking period, and may include making books, collages, time lines, posters, mobiles, video tapes, brochures, short poems, fashion show, etc. Homework will be assigned 45 times a week, 2030 minutes a night for Regents students, 30 minutes per night for Honors students. There are both written and oral assessments (notes, letters, descriptions, dialogs, directed compositions). We give tests at least every other week on listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture. Major projects count as tests. The final examination is the ICSD Language 2 Benchmark Exam which is given in June and covers all four language skills and culture. The class, conducted as much as possible in the target language, is teacherdirected, but with continuous student participation, including music, games, and pair work. Where possible, we use an inductive approach to grammar. We encourage selfexpression and creativity by asking students to generate their own videos, dialogs, questionnaires, posters, commercials, etc. We use the language laboratory to practice, reinforce, and test oral material. NOTE: When possible, there are separate Language 2 Regents and Honors sections. The same basic topics of study are covered in Language 2H as in Language 2R. The difference is that at the honors level the students are responsible for more detailed vocabulary and more irregular verb forms. In addition, the honors level students must have better-developed listening comprehension skills, and must be able to use the vocabulary more actively as in spontaneous conversations, translations and composition. FRENCH 3, GERMAN 3 & SPANISH 3 Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Successful completion of Language 2R or 2H. Recommendations: For Honors: a B average or better in Language 2H, or an A average or better in Language 2R. Students taking the honors course should be highly motivated and responsible. Course content: The course content is designed to lead to the Checkpoint B outcomes. Honors will also study grammar, which includes formal and familiar commands, the indicative tenses, the present subjunctive, and grammatical points which pose special difficulties for speakers of English. The course includes: compositions on selected topics, stories based on sketches, lab work involving listening and responding to taped items read by native speakers, work with partners on given tasks for more spontaneous speaking, prepared situations using selected topical vocabulary, reading passages from various sources, short stories, listening comprehension passages from past Regents exams, short recorded passages of various levels of difficulty. Speaking: Students will be able to initiate and develop the topics presented for checkpoint B (personal identification, house and home, family life, community/neighborhood, physical environment, meal-taking/food/drink, health and welfare, education, earning a living, leisure, public and private services, shopping, travel, current events). Students will develop longer oral presentations when prepared beforehand. Listening: Students will comprehend short paragraphs by native speakers and will follow situations as they unfold on commercially prepared videos and will comprehend commercials after some repetition. Reading: Students will understand short narratives of 150 words and will be able to extract main ideas from longer texts. Writing: On the Regents Exam, students will choose two topics and write a minimum of 100 words about each one. Points will be awarded for content (a large vocabulary and good expression of ideas) and writing style (a good opening, smooth transitions from one paragraph to the next, and a good closing). Writing assignments during the year will provide opportunities to develop and practice these Ithaca High School 63 Program of Studies
  • skills. Culture: Students will use and interpret some gestures, understand cultural traits and patterns, draw comparisons between cultures, including among groups that speak the same target language. They will understand how culture influences communication. Homework is to be done 45 times a week, and may include weekends and vacations. The Regents exam (speaking 24%, listening 30%, writing 16%) is used in calculating the final exam grade. Weekly or monthly exams will cover cumulative material in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. There may be compositions every two weeks like those required on the Regents exam. Methods include lecture, partner/group assignments, and lab work. Materials and activities may include textbooks, conversations, skits, videos, museum visits, commercials, music, written exercises, and projects for creativity and selfexpression. LANGUAGE BEYOND THE THIRD YEAR LanguageCom1 (FrenchCom1, GermanCom1, and SpanCom1) and LanguageLang (FrenchLang, GermanLang, and SpanLang) courses both follow Language 3. Students who have taken Language 3 at either a Regents or an Honors level will therefore choose either Regents or Honors credit also at the 4th level. In their fifth year of language students from both courses may take either the course above not yet taken (LanguageCom1 or LanguageLang), the Language Advanced Placement course or, if enrollment allows, a fifth-year non-AP course, LanguageCom 2. FRENCHCOM 1 (French for Communication) Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: French 3 Recommendations:. Students who have taken French 3 at a Regents or an Honors level are encouraged to continue in French and will receive Regents credit. The course is designed for students who wish to improve all aspects of their French and/or prepare for FrenchCom 2 in the fifth year, if enrollment allows. The classroom language is French, although grammar is taught in English. Course Content: FrenchCom 1 places less emphasis on structural details than FrenchLang. The textbook: Bravo! reviews structures while introducing a rich vocabulary, designed around interesting themes based on cultural issues. All four language skills are cycled through each day in class: speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Students will work with video and audio material, native speakers, and a rich reading and film selection including Joachim a des Ennuis, Quebec Raconte, and La Rue Cases-Nègres in addition to newspapers, magazine articles, and timely video clips from TV5. Students will work in groups and pairs as they converse, and regularly express their ideas orally and in short essays. Homework: Thirty minutes of homework is given five nights a week and on weekends. Course Information: Assessments will include oral and written exams as well as projects and student presentations. Daily oral participation is an important part of the grade, and all tests include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture. This student- centered class will have lots of pair work. The language laboratory is used for listening and speaking practice. The final exam is the ICSD French 4 Benchmark Exam, which tests all five language areas. Students will also receive concurrent course credit from TC3 for French 201 (3 college credits) at no additional cost. Tuition is waived. FRENCH LANGUAGE Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: French 3 or FrenchCom 1 Recommendations: Students who have taken French 3 at the Honors level are encouraged to continue in FrenchLang and will receive honors credit for it. The course is designed for students who wish to improve all aspects of their French and prepare for the French Language Advanced Placement Exam in the fifth year. The classroom language NORMALLY is French. Course Content: FrenchLang places more emphasis on structural detail than FrenchCom. The course uses preparation for the French Advanced Placement Examination as the organizing principle for the five language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, culture). Students will use a variety of media and native speakers to study authentic materials for information and pleasure. Homework: Thirty minutes of homework is given five nights a week and on weekends. Course Information: Written and oral assessments are structured like the AP exam. Daily oral participation is important, and tests include listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This class will prepare students to understand complex spoken and written material, and to speak and write fluently and with grammatical accuracy. Students must have an up-to-date dictionary. The language laboratory is used for listening and speaking practice. The final exam is the ICSD French 4 Benchmark Exam, which tests all five language skills. FRENCH COM II Prerequisite: French Com I or French Lang, including passing the ICSD French 4 Benchmark exam Recommendations: Average of B or better in French Com or French Lang Course Content: In French Com II students will continue to work on improving their competence in all four skills, although the speaking and listening skills will take precedence. Students will be introduced to new literary works or articles and increase their vocabulary as we discuss themes not already covered in French 4 Com or Lang. Students will use various Internet sites to increase listening capabilities and to help students keep up with current issues relating to francophone countries. We will cover various grammatical topics so that students have a solid foundation for writing essays deemed appropriate at the 200 level at colleges. Students will be required to speak only French in class so that they will be able to improve their command of the language and oral participation will be extremely important. Homework: 20-30 minutes of homework is given five nights a week and on weekends. Course Information: Written or oral assessments are given each week. Daily oral participation will be assessed and written tests will Ithaca High School 64 Program of Studies
  • include grammar or vocabulary, past material and a reading. Students will receive concurrent course credit from TC3 for French 202 (3 college credits) at no cost. Tuition fees are waived. French Com II will be offered with sufficient enrollment. AP FRENCH AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: FrenchCom I or FrenchLang, including passing the ICSD French 4 Benchmark Exam. Recommendations: Average of B or better in FrenchCom or FrenchLang. This course is for students who want to take the AP Language examination. Course Content: The AP French Language course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced French. College texts are used; assignments can be long and motivation and responsibility are essential. There is an extensive range of material covered from vocabulary to advanced grammar. Certain literary texts will be covered not only for story line but also for character analysis, point of view and theme. Students enrolled in this class will receive concurrent course credit from TC3 for French 202 (3 college credits) at no cost. Tuition will be waived. Course Information: Writing: compositions every other week on topics from past AP exams (graded according to the AP rubric) Speaking: individual oral exams every other week to practice photo sequences from AP exams and prepare other open-ended questions related to the topic. Reading: short stories from college texts, short/long passages from past AP exams. Listening: tapes of various lengths covering a wide range of topics. GERMAN COM 1 (German for Communication) Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: German 3 and/or German Language Recommendations: This is a heterogeneous class. Course Content: This class places less emphasis on structural details than German 4H.The course uses the cultures of the German- speaking world as the organizing principal for the other four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) Students will use movies, video and audio material, native speakers and community experts, working in pairs and groups as they converse, read authentic materials for pleasure (literature) and information (newspapers and magazines), express their ideas and opinions orally and in critical and analytical essays of 250 words, and use the Internet to access and communicate with the German-speaking world. The students will also use the Internet as a resource for verb conjugations, idiomatic expressions, online dictionaries, grammar exercises, etc. Course Information: Thirty minutes of homework is given five nights a week and on weekends. Assessments, in addition to written and oral exams, include projects and student presentations: cooking, student produced videos, music, dance, puppetry, debates, guest speakers, teaching in the elementary schools, student-generated newspapers, magazines, and websites. The language lab is used extensively for listening and speaking practice. The final exam is the ICSD German 4 Benchmark Exam. GERMAN LANGUAGE Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: German 3 and/or GermanCom 1 Recommendations: The classroom language is German. Students should be prepared to progress at a rapid pace and should be ready to conference with the teacher on a regular basis. Course Content: Review and detailed continuation of speaking, writing, grammar study, and vocabulary as we read serious literature, including a variety of short stories and grammar exercises from the text Die Welle, and reading the novel Damals War es Friedrich. Course Information: Students will learn to pace themselves as they work nightly on long-term assignments, which are checked and graded. The final exam is the ICSD German 4 Benchmark Exam, and counts 25% of the year’s grade. The class is teacher-directed, with ample pair and group work, and student presentations. GERMAN 5 Honors/AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: German 4 Recommendations: For AP: B or better in German 4H, an A in German 4R, or preemption of German 4. For Honors: a B in German 4R. Course Content: In-depth focus on advanced grammar, continuation of interpretation of German literature and culture, vocabulary Program emphasis on idiomatic expressions Course Information: There will be class discussions, whole-class and small group work, language lab work, student presentations and productions. There will be individual and group assignments and portfolio assignments. Homework may be given every night or assigned at a specific date to be completed by a specific date. Assessments will include oral and written tests, quizzes, compositions, and projects. The practice AP is the final exam. Note: 5H content is the same as AP except for 5H students the AP Exam is optional. A practice AP will count as the final exam for both. LATIN I Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: Conscientious study habits and success in other foreign languages will help a student succeed in Latin 1. Course Content: Latin 1 students will study classical Latin, learning fundamental reading, writing, and listening skills; acquire new English vocabulary as they learn Latin root words and a deeper understanding of English grammar through a comparison with Latin Ithaca High School 65 Program of Studies
  • grammar as they translate Latin readings on a daily basis. The readings will increase in complexity throughout the course of the year and will emphasize aspects of Roman society, history, and GrecoRoman mythology. Students will be exposed to a range of Roman cultural topics. The teacher will teach some linguistic history, important to Spanish and French as well as to English word derivation from Latin roots. Course Information: Written homework assignments will be checked daily. Assessment is done through weekly quizzes, cumulative unit tests, and homework assignments. The final exam in June is the NYS Language Proficiency Exam. LATIN 2 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Latin 1 (including passing Proficiency Exam) Recommendations: A C or higher in Latin 1 and a score of 75% on the Proficiency Exam will indicate likelihood for success in Latin 2R. A B+ or higher in Latin 1 and a Proficiency Exam score of 85% or higher will indicate a likelihood for success in Latin 2H. Course Content: In the second year, students will complete the study of the basic elements of Latin grammar. Students will continue to acquire new Latin and English vocabulary and employ continuing language skills in translating Latin passages. Culture topics will include mythological heroes, the Trojan War, the Republic and the Civil Wars. Course Information: Written homework assignments will be checked daily. Quizzes will be frequent. Assessment is based on homework assignments, quizzes, and cumulative unit tests. The final exam in June is the IHS Latin II Benchmark Exam. LATIN 3 Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: Completion of Latin 2. Course Content: Students electing this course have completed Latin 2. Students will continue to acquire new Latin and English vocabulary and to translate increasingly spohisticated passages from Latin. Students will master advanced grammatical topics and will thoroughly review all grammar previously studied. Readings in the fall are closely modeled on original Latin (Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles), and in the spring, students read selections from the Roman poet Catullus. Course Information: The final exam in June is the NYS Regents Exam. AP LATIN - Vergil Full Year 1 Credit Recommendations: Completion of Latin 3 Prerequisite: Latin 3 Course Content: With the completion of the study by topic of Latin grammar in the third year, students in AP Latin will study the masterpiece of Roman literature, Virgil’s Aeneid. The entire poem is read in English translation; the extensive Advanced Placement syllabus is read in Latin. Students study scansion, rhetorical figures, and the ancient epic tradition. Course Information: Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in May. The course final in April is a practice AP exam. SPANCOM 1 (Spanish for Communication) Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Spanish 3 and/or SpanLang Recommendations: This is a heterogeneous class. Course Content: SpanCom 1 places less emphasis on structural details than SpanLang. The course uses the cultures of the Spanish- speaking world as the organizing principal for the other four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Students will use movies, video and audio material, and native speakers, working in groups and pairs as they converse, read authentic materials for pleasure (literature) and information (newspapers and magazines), express their ideas and opinions orally and in critical and analytical essays of 200 words, and use the Internet to access and communicate with the Hispanic world. Topics of study include: Artists of Spain, Mexican-Americans, Cuba, African influences in the Caribbean, Central America and the Maya, South American politics, and current authors in the Spanish-speaking world. Course Information: Thirty minutes of homework is assigned daily. Assessments, in addition to written and oral exams, include projects and student presentations: student-produced videos, music, dance, and guest speakers. The language lab is used extensively for listening and speaking practice. The final exam is the ICSD Spanish 4 Benchmark Exam. SPANLANG Honors (see above) Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Spanish 3 and/or SpanCom (as either Sp 4 or 5) Recommendations: This is a heterogeneous class. Students who have taken SpanCom after their Spanish 3 course may wish to enroll in this course after SpanCom in order to obtain Spanish 5H credit. Course Content: SpanLang places more emphasis on structural details than SpanCom, to give special preparation to students who wish to take the Advanced Placement examination at the end of Spanish 5/AP. Several grammar texts, along with teacher-made materials, including audiotapes for the language lab, are used to perfect students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Because this course is viewed as a transition to a college-level course, it offers a thorough study of grammar and syntax, expanded vocabulary, composition, and conversational skills, with an emphasis on reading, writing, and the accuracy of student output. Culture is studied through South American and Spanish literature and guest speakers. Course Information: Thirty minutes of homework is given five nights a week, on weekends, and may be given over vacations. Students receive the entire quarter’s outline at the beginning of each marking period, with all test dates and assignments indicated. Assessment consists of weekly written exams, compositions every other week, one cultural presentation per semester, and student-made audiotapes to hand in. The final exam for students receiving Spanish 4H credit is the ICSD Spanish 4 Benchmark Exam; for students receiving Spanish 5H credit, the final exam is made by the teacher. Ithaca High School 66 Program of Studies
  • AP SPANISH AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: SpanCom 1 or SpanLang Recommendations: a B or better in SpanLang or SpanCom. This course is for students who want to take the Advanced Placement Language Examination. Course Content: The AP Spanish Language course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. College texts are used, assignments are long and motivation and responsibility are essential. There is an extensive range of material covered from vocabulary to advanced grammar. All topics are covered in depth, especially all irregular forms (verbs) and exceptions to rules (grammar). Short stories are selected from contemporary authors and are analyzed not only for story line but also character analysis, point of view, structure, style, and theme. A research paper (on a short story) is done in May after the AP exam is given. Students will learn to use MLA Bibliographies, write footnote/bibliography entries according to the MLA Style sheet format, gather articles/critiques, select a topic to develop and extract information from articles chosen. Course Information: • Writing: compositions every other week on topics from past AP exams (graded according to the AP rubric and typed according to MLA), a research paper at the end of the course. • Speaking: individual tapes every other week to practice directed response questions and photo sequences from past AP exams, discussion groups for each short story covered, spontaneous taped responses to directed questions. • Reading: short stories from college texts, short/long passages from past AP exams. • Listening: tapes of various lengths on topics ranging from most mundane to cultural/literary topics done every two weeks, practice tapes from past AP exams done in class. Homework given every evening, on weekends and over vacations. Students receive a course outline at the beginning of each quarter outlining all assignments. Students are then able to plan ahead for items requiring more time. Because the exam is given the second week of May there is little time to waste given the amount and depth of material to be covered. Weekly exams (taking up to 2 periods in length) cover not only the newest items but also past topics. Speaking tapes done every other week (graded according to the AP rubrics). Compositions done every other week (graded according to the AP). Tapes assigned for listening practice (done weekly). Research paper completed at the end of the course (this is the entire fourth quarter grade). Lecture, discussion groups, lab work. NOTE: In years in which enrollment is insufficient for separate AP and 5H classes, they are taught together. 5H students will do the same course work as the AP student but with two differences: the grade will be boosted to allow for the degree of difficulty, and the research assignment at the end of the year is different. SPANCOM 2 AP Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: SpanCom 1 or SpanLang Recommendations: This is a heterogeneous class Course Content: Like Spancom 1, Spancom 2 uses the Spanish-speaking countries and their history and culture as the organizing principle for the course. It is a great choice for students who would like to have Spanish on their transcript in their senior year, but do not want to take AP Spanish. the subjunctive, narration in the past, and other advanced grammar are taught in conjunction with topical units. Students will use movies, audio and video clips, native speakers, literature and authentic materials to learn about the Spanish-speaking world. Students research a variety of topics and present their research to the class in Spanish. Another feature of the course has been the opportunity to teach Spanish to pre-k students in the pre-k class located at Ithaca High School. This has been a favorite activity for many students. This is done on a bi-weekly basis and is subject to scheduling constraints. Topics of study include: the Mexican Revolution, migrant workers, Don Quijote, Argentina, Chile, and others. Course Information: Thirty minutes of homework is assigned daily. There are weekly oral and/or written exams and research projects and oral presentations. The language lab is used for listening and speaking practice. Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551 Ithaca High School 67 Program of Studies
  • TST BOCES CAREER AND TECH PROGRAMS Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci TST BOCES Career and Tech Programs instruct students in a variety of technical areas, preparing them for entering the work force with a marketable skill and for continuing on to higher education. Classes are conducted at the TST BOCES Career and Tech Center on Warren Road in Ithaca. These programs are taught for a minimum of 2 hours during the AM or PM session each day, and all courses provide an internship experience over the course of the their completed curriculum. Bus transportation is provided to and from the Career and Tech Center. Students continue their major academic subjects in the remaining three or four periods at the home school district. Courses may yield three or four credits, depending on individual students’ situations. All Career and Tech classes are currently New York State Approved. To be approved, courses must meet rigorous guidelines related to assessment, an academically strong curriculum that is aligned with the New York State Learning Standards and relevance to industry practices. Due to the success of our Career and Tech programs, many students have successfully competed at the regional, state and national levels for scholarships and other prizes. Some courses offer concurrent enrollment opportunities through TC3, and all programs have at least one articulation agreement with colleges that have a related program, which include, but are not limited to: SUNY Delhi, SUNY Cobleskill, SUNY Alfred, TC3, Pennsylvania College of Technology, and the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. For more information on these and other Career and Tech Programs, visit the website at: www.tstboces.org AUTO BODY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: This program focuses on collision repair skills for national certification. Practical experience is acquired by working on customers’ cars. Students learn the used of hand, power and special auto body tools and equipment. Areas include frame and auto body repair, auto refinishing and replacement of parts and sections of panels. Welding skills are also taught. In addition, there are opportunities to do customized paint graphics, airbrushing, and restoration work on high performance and show quality vehicles. Can Lead To: Students may pursue entry level work as a body shop assistant, painter, sander or polisher or self-employment as a shop owner. Two-year college or technical degree in Auto Body Technology can lead to collision service worker, welder, insurance adjuster, parts manager or automobile painter. AUTO TECHNOLOGY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: This is a nationally certified program (NATEF). Students learn to repair foreign and domestic cars and light trucks using the latest techniques and computerized diagnostic equipment. Successful graduates are eligible to take the certification examinations offered by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles Inspector License Examination. Throughout the two-year program, students gain daily practical experience working on vehicles donated by major auto manufacturers and/or customers’ cars. Students who qualify may be eligible for clinical experience at local repair facilities. Can Lead To: Students may be eligible for an entry-level job as a brake mechanic, general mechanics assistant, tune-up specialist or parts salesperson. Post secondary opportunities include an associate degree in Auto Technology or specialized training at technical schools. Advanced students may pursue mechanical engineering. CARPENTRY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: In this course, students learn the basics of residential and commercial construction techniques, including introductions to framing, roofing, new construction, remodeling, interior and exterior finishes, door and window installation, siding and masonry. Students also learn to safely operate hand and power tools. There is some work on plan and blueprint reading as well as learning the meaning of symbols and building specifications. From the ground up, this class will teach students the full scope of the construction industry. Students also build sheds of all shapes and sizes for the public. The skills learned in this class will provide students with the basic skills needed to perform required maintenance in a residential or commercial setting. Can Lead To: Students may enroll in a two-year college in the construction field, or pursue a career as a roofer, contractor, project manager, form builder, lumber yard worker or architectural technician. CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT I / 1st Year – AM and PM Session CERT NURS ASST II / HOME HEALTH AIDE 2 Year – AM Session nd Course Description: For the student interested in the health field as a supportive care giver, these classes give training for patient care in nursing homes, hospitals and private homes. Students will participate in a supervised clinical experience to give textbook learning a practical application. Students perform personal care procedures such as bathing, dressing and feeding patients, and assist them with mobility using crutches, canes, walkers and wheelchairs. In addition, they learn how to take vital signs and perform First Aid and CPR. All students must complete a physical exam and be updated on their immunizations to enroll in this program, and they must purchase a uniform, white shoes and a watch. During the second year of the program, students will further their experience by working towards certification in Home Health Aide/Personal Care Aide in order to work with patients and professionals in a variety of health care settings. Ithaca High School 68 Program of Studies
  • This program will allow students to gain additional clinical hours within a hospital setting and participate in a variety of internships to explore areas of health care in our community. All students are required to purchase a uniform, white shoes, and a stethoscope. Can Lead To: This program prepares students for entry into the workforce. Many students pursue nursing or other health care related majors at the post-secondary level. Eligible students can take the NYS certification exam each May for $115.00 to potentially become a licensed certified nursing assistant. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: During the first year, students will experience an overview of the major components of Computer Technology, which include: Website Design, Computer Programming, Hardware Maintenance and Troubleshooting, Operating System Administration (Windows, Linux and DOS), 3D Animation and Design, Digital Video, and Basic Game Design. There is a strong emphasis on problem- solving skills and working independently. Students do not need any previous computer background for this class. The second year of the program is the internationally recognized CISCO Academy. Students learn both the theory and practice of network administration. The curriculum involves hands-on programming of network devices like routers and switches. In addition to theoretical components, this program provides practical experience with all aspects of network design, including: making cables, server management, security, wireless administration, backup technologies and computer forensics. Can Lead To: This program will prepare students for the CISCO Network Associated INTRO exam and the Comp TIA Network + exam. Students are also likely to pursue post-secondary education at the two year or four year college level in computer technology or computer information systems. COSMETOLOGY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with marketable skills to enter the field of cosmetology. From manicuring to hair coloring, perms to styling, students get the full range of skills and hours to prepare them for the NYS Licensing Exam. The program consists of practical hands-on training and theory work, field trips to beauty and styling shows, and presentations by guest speakers from the cosmetology field. Instruction in shop management and communication skills prepares students to handle the business portion of working in a salon. Note: 1st year students are required to purchase a kit costing $175.00, and students will need additional money for advanced supplies and a nail kit. Students are required to complete 1000 hours of training to qualify for a New York License as a cosmetologist. Can Lead To: 1st Year students may find positions as a receptionist at local salons. Students completing the 2nd year and who have passed the NYS Licensing test may become a hair stylist, color and nail technician, salon owner or manager. CRIMINAL JUSTICE 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: The first year of academic instruction focuses on criminal and civil law, vehicle and traffic law, arrest and court procedures, report writing and communication skills. Additional areas include interviewing skills, patrol techniques, self-defense, security, fingerprinting, civil rights, applied math, and Internet research. Class time is split between lecture, physical activities, field trips, and interaction with special guests. The second year will be more career-centered, with a focus on: patrolling, criminal investigation, and police-community relations. Subjects include: forensics, accident and crime scene illustration, digital photography, life skills, and applied science, professional and career development. Class time includes discussions, team-based lab work, and hands-on field activities. Can Lead To: This program of study is an excellent tool for preparation for college, military service, or direct employment in law enforcement or security fields. CULINARY ARTS 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: In the 1 year, students learn fundamentals of safety and sanitation as well as how to prepare both short order and st quantity cooking. Breads, pastries, entrees, soups, etc. are included in menus selected and prepared by students. Equipment operation and safety are also taught. There is a great deal of emphasis on building social skills, working as team members, following directions and exhibiting positive work attitudes. 2nd Year students are responsible for the complete operation of the Sun Room, the on-campus restaurant. Capable students may also do internships in culinary arts related businesses. There is a $30 fee for a mandatory uniform. Can Lead To: This course prepares students for entry level positions in the local job market or students may choose to attend a two-year or four-year college in this field. DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: Students will experience an overview of commercial design, video game development, and video production. Initially, students will develop web-based and business-oriented media through a general exploration of digital editing tools. Building on this foundation and working with industry standard software and hardware, students will investigate both 2D and 3D animation techniques with a focus on website integration and video game design. Students will create complex animations and working video games using a variety of tools, including Adobe Flash and Autodesk 3ds Max. Finally, moving quickly from simple digital video creation to complex movies, students will explore advanced pre- and post-production methods using Adobe Premiere Pro, Encore and After Effects. Throughout the course, there is a strong emphasis on problem-solving and working independently. Can Lead To: Students are likely to pursue post-secondary education at the two year or four year college level in a variety of disciplines including: video production, advertising design, game design and website development. Potential careers are: software engineer, flash designer, web developer, game developer, graphic designer, digital artist, game art and animation designer, animation system programmer, video editor, video systems technician, video production coordinator, and digital video analyst. Ithaca High School 69 Program of Studies
  • EARLY CHILDHOOD 1st Year – AM or PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: Early Childhood education provides students who want to work with young children an understanding of the physical, emotional and intellectual development of children. Students learn about the characteristics and behavioral needs of three and four-year-olds and learn how to care for them in a nursery school setting by operating a nursery school program three days a week. During the 2nd year, students gain hands-on experience through internships at local nursery schools, childcare settings and elementary schools. Good communication skills, both written and verbal, are critical to success in this program, along with a genuine interest in working with children. Can Lead To: Students may pursue a two or four-year college for Early Childhood and/or Elementary Education. This course also provides entry level skills to work as a nanny, preschool teacher aide or a home day care provider. ELECTRICIAN 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: This program is designed to expose and excite students to the world of electricity and how it works. Students learn and apply skills towards electrical construction and electrical maintenance by designing and installing circuit layouts for residential and commercial applications. This is achieved through a mix of classroom instruction, practical applications in the lab, and a “Real Work” project that focuses on the construction of a modular home on campus by the Electrical Construction and Carpentry classes. In addition, students develop and wire industrial electrical control circuits that are then used to energize motors, heaters, and lighting loads. A full set of hand tools is provided, and students are instructed on the various pieces of electrical test equipment as well as many of the primary power tools used in the trade. Other opportunities include field trips and internships with prospective employers. A partnership with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 241 presents various opportunities to students that results in local recognition and prizes for challenge winners. Can Lead To: Entry level Electrician, Electrical Apprenticeship upon completion of the two year program. With further education, a student can use this course as a solid foundation to acquire a two year degree in Electrical Technology, work as a Maintenance Electrician, Machine and Appliance Repair, Utility Worker, Network Technician, Communications Technician, HVAC Technician, Security and Fire Controls Technician, or Elevator Repair Technician. HEAVY EQUIPMENT 1st Year - PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: This program is designed to meet the growing demand for technicians in the transportation, marine, agricultural and construction fields. The course provides training in the diagnosis and repair of heavy equipment, medium and heavy trucks. Students learn the principles of the diesel engine, drive train, brakes, suspension and steering, electrical/electronic systems, hydraulics, welding, and preventive maintenance inspection. Students receive classroom instruction that they will apply to hands-on lab work in the shop or outdoors. Specialty areas include maintenance and heavy equipment operation of tractors and diesel engines. Students who are interested in bio diesel engines, working with alternative fuel sources, landscaping and conservation should join this course. Select students have the opportunity to job-shadow and intern with professionals in the area. Can Lead To: This course prepares students for entry level employment positions, such as: heavy equipment technician, truck marine, agricultural, construction and diesel fields, or to continue into post-secondary education. WELDING 1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session Course Description: Students learn to construct and repair equipment, machinery, parts and piping by fusing metal parts together using oxyacetylene, MIG, TIG or arc welding apparatus and plasma-arc cutters. Instruction is balanced by the opportunity to build practical projects or metal sculpture. Can Lead To: Students may pursue a two or four-year degree in Welding Technology or employment as a production or construction welder. With experience and further training, a student may become a blacksmith, instrument maker or pipe welder. Possible employers are heavy construction contractors, machine tool shops, shipyards, the aerospace industry and fabricating shops. In addition to the Career and Tech Programs, the Center offers classes in Physical Education, Business Math and Science for those students who may need them to meet graduation requirements. A course description is listed below for each of these courses: BUSINESS MATH (BUAD 104) Offered during 1st year or 2nd year of CTE Program Course Description: Designed to develop a thorough understanding and mastery of the arithmetic processes of business, with an emphasis on the application of principles to typical business problems. Topics include: percents, solving for unknowns, discounts, markups and markdowns, payroll, simple and compound interest, credit cards, home ownership, depreciation, inventory, stocks, bonds and mutual funds. Note: Students may be eligible to earn 3 college credits from TC3 by enrolling in this course. College credit for this class can be attained by earning a minimum final average of an 80% and accumulate no more than 8 absences for the year. This course satisfies one (1) credit of Math towards graduation. SCIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY Offered during 1st year or 2nd year of CTE Program Course Description: This course will focus on the following topics: polymers, chemistry of fire, batteries and L.E.D to support sustainability in the environment, forensics, waste disposal, science and our food supply, ecology, and alternative energy sources. The topics taught reflect the science components that are included in each Career and Tech program curriculum offered on the TST BOCES campus. Note: This course satisfies one (1) credit of Science towards graduation. Ithaca High School 70 Program of Studies
  • PHYSICAL EDUCATION Offered during 1st year or 2nd year of CTE Program for participating schools Course Description: This course will focus on team and individual sports, with a focus on life-long fitness. Students are required to wear sneakers for class. Note: This course satisfies one (1/2) credit of Physical Education towards graduation Ithaca High School 71 Program of Studies
  • TST BOCES New Visions Programs Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551 Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci New Visions is a full year program that offers seniors a non-traditional challenging senior year. Accepted students attend this full-day program off-site at Cornell University or Cayuga Medical Center. Students are expected to be professional, courteous and to strictly adhere to the guidelines set by their teachers and mentors. Seniors receive high school credit for English 12 Honors, Government and Economics, as well as two electives, for a total of four credits. Acceptance into a New Visions Program is very competitive. The selection process is based on grades, recommendations, an interview and an essay, among other criteria. These programs are taught at the honors level, provide dual credit through TC3 for the core academic program, and are personally and academically challenging. For more information on the New Visions Programs, visit the website at: www.tstboces.org NEW VISIONS: HEALTH SCIENCES Course Description: This program allows students to explore a variety of health career professions that meets daily at the Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca. Medical terminology along with anatomy and physiology are key health science modules integrated throughout the New Visions curriculum. Students learn the relevance of government, economics and English to this profession and return to class with real-life questions, dilemmas and a greater understanding of the role each student wants to fulfill as a profession in this field. The class work is demanding, but extremely rewarding. The New Visions Health Careers exploration program is for the highly motivated, academically capable student. NEW VISIONS: LIFE SCIENCES Course Description: This program is located at the Guterman Lab at Cornell University. Students will be able to explore and experience first hand some of the many career opportunities in the agriculture and environmental science field, which include: horticulture, veterinary medicine, forestry, land and water conservation, agricultural and environmental education, food science, agricultural business and fishery-wildlife management. The course is designed to attract students who are interested in environmental and agricultural issues, animals, plants, greenhouses, lakes, rivers and streams, who like to work with technical equipment, and who are not afraid of working hard, both independently and with others. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of experiences varying from field trips to local businesses, guest speakers employed in these fields, to job shadowing and career internships. Ithaca High School 72 Program of Studies
  • TST BOCES World of Work Programs Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551 Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci The World of Work classes serve high school students with a variety of instructional needs. Classes promote positive self-esteem and socialization as well as cognitive and motor skills development through a progressive curriculum. The classes integrate students into the most appropriate and least restrictive Career and Tech setting, offering instruction in both generic and job-specific skills important for competitive employment and independent living. Please refer to the World of Work Program: Learning for Life brochure for descriptions of these courses. Listed below are the WOW courses and the times that the courses will be offered next fall: AUTO SERVICES AM or PM Session CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM AM Session CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY AM or PM Session FOOD SERVICE PM Session HUMAN and HOSPITALITY SERVICES AM Session PERSONAL SERVICE AM Session Ithaca High School 73 Program of Studies