2010 –
 2011
Ithaca High
   School
Program of
   Studies

              Updated 12/21/09 JW
Vision, Mission, IHS Values and Board
                           Priorities

                                             ...
BOARD PRIORITIES
Priority #1   Culture:
              To foster a safe, respectful environment of high expectations where ...
BOARD MEMBERS
                        President
                      Robert Ainslie
                     124 Woolf Lane
 ...
District Information                 ........................................................................................
.......

TST BOCES Career and Tech Program                  .................................................................
Ms. Debra Rivera                                  Ms. Michelle Snipes
                                                  Ms...
GRADUATION
                                                           REQUIREMENTS
 To earn a diploma at Ithaca High Schoo...
ALTERNATIVE WAYS TO ACCUMULATE CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATION
1. Credits earned at other accredited public or private high schoo...
LEVELS OF INSTRUCTION
The process of transition from 8th to 9th grade including the course selection process is under revi...
Cumulative Grade Point Average
Ithaca High School calculates two CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES (weighted and un-weighted...
9.33
   7.33
   5.33

   C+
   10.67
   8.67
   6.67
   4.67

   C
   10.00
   8.00
   6.00
   4.00

   C-
   9.33
   7.33...
ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADUATION
In order to be eligible for an Ithaca High School diploma, students must be registered at Ithac...
LINK CREW
Link Crew is a well-established and nationally known freshman transition program that was brought to IHS during ...
The goal of the AVID program is to ensure that all students, especially students in the academic middle, will succeed in a...
A Sample Week in the AVID Elective
        Monday                       Tuesday                    Wednesday              ...
SKILLS FOR SUCCESS
Skills for Success is a class designed to help students to give students all of the skills necessary to...
STUDENT SERVICES &
                         EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT
                               SERVICES

                 ...
STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Department Leader: Samantha Little
Phone: 274-2157
Fax: 277-3061
School Counselors ~ Social Wo...
CAREER EDUCATION
                                        DEPARTMENT
BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY
Department Leader: Scott Breigle...
PERSONAL FINANCE                                   Regents                                    Semester                    ...
TECHNOLOGY (Technology Education courses give a broad base of skills that will prepare you for a variety of careers)
With ...
TECHNICAL DRAWING                                Regents                                 Semester                        ½...
MEDIA PRODUCTION                                  Regents                                Semester                        ½...
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS-PLTW                         Honors / Regents                          Full Year                      ...
P ROJECT L EAD                      THE       W AY
                                                A Partnership for Ameri...
ENGLISH
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Department Chair: Shirley Kennedy
English Department Office: G-109
Phone: 274-2265, 274-2187

D...
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  1. 1. 2010 – 2011 Ithaca High School Program of Studies Updated 12/21/09 JW
  2. 2. Vision, Mission, IHS Values and Board Priorities OUR VISION All Students Achieving Their Dreams OUR MISSION Our Mission is to educate every student to become a life- long learner; to foster academic, social, emotional and physical development; to nurture an understanding and respect for all people in a multi- cultural and multi- ethnic world; and to promote responsible citizenship in a democracy. IHS VALUES ACHIEVEMENT BELONGING COLLABORATION EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT RIGOROUS COURSEWORK LIFE SKILLS SAFETY COMMUNICATION CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT COMMUNITY & FAMILY Updated 12/21/09 JW
  3. 3. BOARD PRIORITIES Priority #1 Culture: To foster a safe, respectful environment of high expectations where every student and staff member can maximize their potential. Priority #2 Equity: To eliminate race, class, and disability as predictors of student academic and co-curricular performance. Priority #3 Communications: To enhance communication and dialogue within the district and community. Priority #4 Resources: To work efficiently to use district resources (community, time, people, facilities and finances) in fulfilling our mission. Updated 12/21/09 JW
  4. 4. BOARD MEMBERS President Robert Ainslie 124 Woolf Lane Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)273-2558 1st Vice President Jay True 4 Alessandro Drive Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-4864 2nd Vice President Carol Warshawsky 104 The Parkway Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-2331 Seth Peacock 416 W Buffalo Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)351-1696 Josh Bornstein 413A e. Lincoln St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 277-1463 Scott Perez 201A Christopher Lane Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-7038 Elizabeth Kunz 501 Warren Place Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)274-2102 Bradley Grainger 421 Highland Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-3268 Deborah O'Connor 9 John St Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)272-4207 Dr. Judith C. Pastel, Superintendent of Schools ACCESS TO COURSES In the Ithaca City School District all education, vocational education, and employment opportunities will be offered without regard to sex, race, color, national origin or handicap. This procedure is in compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 as well as the requirements of Section 504 of the United States Rehabilitation Act of 1973. FEE WAIVERS ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS WHO QUALIFY. STUDENTS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR COUNSELOR FOR DETAILS. Updated 12/21/09 JW
  5. 5. District Information ................................................................................................................................. Inside front cover ....... Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................................................. 3 ....... Course Selection Process ............................................................................................................................................. 4 ..... Levels of Instruction ........................................................................................................................................................ 5 ....... Special Programs .............................................................................................................................................................. 7 ....... Student Services .............................................................................................................................................................. 10 ....... Academic Intervention Services (AIS) .......................................................................................................................... 11 ...... Career Education ................................................................................................................................................................ 12 ....... English .................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 ......... English as a Second Language ....................................................................................................................................... 26 ...... Fine Arts: Art, Music, Theater ......................................................................................................................................... 27 ...... Health and Physical Education ....................................................................................................................................... 32 ... Library ............................................................................................................................................................................ 33 ... Mathematic ............................................................................................................................................................................ 34 s ... Science .................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 ..... Social Studies ................................................................................................................................................................... 51 ........ Special Education Services ……...................................................................................................................................... 55 ...... World Languages ............................................................................................................................................................ 57 Ithaca High School 1 Program of Studies
  6. 6. ....... TST BOCES Career and Tech Program .................................................................................................................... 63 ....... We reserve the right to modify course offerings based on pending instructional decisions and staffing considerations. 2010 - 2011 PROGRAM OF STUDIES ITHACA HIGH SCHOOL 1401 North Cayuga Street Ithaca, New York 14850 (607) 274-2157 www.icsd.k12.ny.us/highschool/ Dear Students, Parents and Guardians: We hope you will find the information contained in this booklet useful in your academic planning and course selection for the upcoming school year and beyond. Please do not hesitate to contact a counselor or administrator if you have questions or concerns. The staff at Ithaca High School is eager to work with you in developing the best academic program possible. Principal Student Services Team Leader Mr. Donald Mills Ms. Samantha Little 274-2145 274-6844 Associate Principals School Counselors Ms. Colleen Ledley Ms. Kas Bilyk Mr. Scott Miller Ms. Leann Donnelly Mr. Jarrett Powers Ms. Sharon Gublo Mr. Ed Redmond Ms. Danielle Murphy Ithaca High School 2 Program of Studies
  7. 7. Ms. Debra Rivera Ms. Michelle Snipes Ms. Maria Torres Ithaca High School 3 Program of Studies
  8. 8. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To earn a diploma at Ithaca High School, a student must satisfy requirements in two areas: the first is Course and Credit Requirements, and the second is Testing and Assessment Requirements. Three diplomas are available depending on testing and courses. Please see the chart at the bottom of this page for specific test and course requirements for each diploma. The specific requirements in each of these areas are stated below. Each student’s path to graduation is different so it is very important to consult with a high school counselor frequently to assure that the courses that are planned will meet requirements for both graduation and future goals. FEDERAL NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND legislation anticipates that each student will graduate within four years after the student first enrolls in 9th grade. Each student will have a plan signed by the parent/guardian that outlines the student’s path to graduation including the number of years to graduation and the number of credits the student anticipates earning each year. PARTICIPATION IN GRADUATION: To participate in the graduation ceremony, students must be enrolled and attending Ithaca High School, have earned 22 credits, and have completed ALL other graduation requirements prior to the date and time of the ceremony. MINIMUM CREDIT LOAD / FULL TIME ENROLLMENT Unless there are extenuating circumstances, each student attending Ithaca High School shall be enrolled in courses that total 5.5 credits. Students can enroll for more credits in a school year. Those who want to enroll for less need the approval of the Principal. CREDIT FOR ACADEMIC INTERVENTION LAB OR RESOURCE SUPPORT SERVICES [Pilot: During 2007-08 and 2008-09, a student can earn credit by regular attendance and satisfactory performance in either Academic Intervention Services laboratory (CAL lab or Math Lab) or in a Resource Support Services class] I. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 22 units of credit are required for graduation. Typically, a course which meets one period a day, five days a week, for a full school year receives one credit. Students accumulate credits toward graduation while fulfilling both core and sequence requirements. Any additional credits needed to complete the 22 credits for graduation may be met with elective courses. REQUIRED CREDITS DISTRIBUTION The following are the courses and credits that are included in the core: ENGLISH...............................................................................................4 credits SOCIAL STUDIES.................................................................................4 credits MATH....................................................................................................3 credits SCIENCE..............................................................................................3 credits LANGUAGES other than English..............................................................1 credit .............................................3 credits (for advanced designation endorsement) Earning a credit in a 5-unit sequence in Career & Technology Education or Fine Arts will exempt from second and/or third unit. FINE ARTS..............................................................................................1 credit HEALTH.................................................................................................½ credit PHYSICAL EDUCATION........................................................................2 credits II. TESTING AND ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS Regents Assessment requirements are intended to assure that high school graduates have met the New York State Learning Standards in English, social studies, math and science. Additional Proficiency Exams may be required in certain courses that are part of sequences in Career and Technical Education, Fine Arts and Languages other than English. To earn a High School Diploma a student must pass Regents assessments (or NYS Ed. Approved Alternative) in the following areas: I.H.S. Diploma Class of 2012 - 65 or better on all tests Regents Diploma with Regents Diploma Class of 2011 - 65 or better on 4 tests & 55 on 1 test Exam scores 65 or above on Regents Exams Advance Designation Class of 2010 - 65 or better on 3 tests & 55 on 2 tests Exam scores 65 or above on Regents Exams Class of 2009 - 65 or better on 2 tests & 55 on 3 tests English Language Arts English Language Arts No additional assessment US History & Government US History & Government No additional assessment Global History Global History No additional assessment Math A Math A Math A & Math B One Science Regents Exam One Science Regents Exam Two Science Regents Exams No additional assessment No additional assessment Foreign Language Assessment SCHOOL POLICIES AND PRACTICES Ithaca High School 4 Program of Studies
  9. 9. ALTERNATIVE WAYS TO ACCUMULATE CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATION 1. Credits earned at other accredited public or private high schools (including summer school work) are acceptable to meet graduation requirements. 2. Course Credit by Examination: Students may earn 6 ½ units of credit for Regents or local diploma without completing units of study if: a. Superintendent or designee determines if pupil will benefit academically by exercising this alternative. b. Student achieves a score of at least 85 percent on a State-approved exam and student passes an oral examination or completes a special project. 1 3. *Correspondence Courses ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO EARN A DIPLOMA 1. The High School General Equivalency Diploma (GED) Examination is administered through BOCES. An affidavit from the home school to verify one of the following conditions is required for students to be admitted to the High School Equivalency Exams: a. A candidate must be 19 years of age or over. b. If the candidate is between 17 and 19 years of age, he/she must have been out of school at least one year. c. A candidate must be a member of the class which has graduated 2. The Individual Educational Plan Diploma (IEP) is offered to selected students by the Committee on Special Education (CSE). a. The requirements for IEP diploma candidates are determined by the CSE on an individual basis reflecting the educational needs of each student. To the extent appropriate, candidates continue to take courses required to meet local diploma requirements. b. Candidates for this diploma must be reviewed by the CSE to determine that their IEP goals have been met. c. IEP diploma recipients can continue to work toward successful completion of the IHS diploma until age 21. COURSE SELECTION PROCESS The selection of courses and levels of instruction are among the most important decisions that are made during high school. The decisions made will have an impact on the student's success in high school and beyond. It is therefore very important that these decisions be carefully considered before they are made. The course selection process is a partnership between the student, parents/guardians, school counselors, and teachers. The student and the family have values and goals for the student's education, as well as a sense of the student's ability and motivation. The teachers who have taught the student are able to offer their recommendations, based on the performance of the student in their classes and their own past experiences in their subject areas. The school counselor will discuss these factors with the student and parents/guardians and will also explore the student's long-range goals and post high school plans, which also have an impact on the courses selected. A student’s interests, motivation, work habits and study skills are also crucial factors in this decision. The counselor carefully monitors the student's progress towards meeting graduation requirements and will inform the student of courses that are required to meet the various graduation requirements as presented in the previous section. It is through an open dialogue between the members of this partnership that a student’s likelihood of developing an academic program that is realistic, challenging, and goal oriented is maximized. The counselors, teachers, and administrators of Ithaca High School are eager to be active partners in this process and look forward to working with you to develop your program of study. Sometimes, even in the best of partnerships, there are disagreements. It is important that parents/guardians know that Ithaca is a parental choice district, which means that the final decision and responsibility for course selections rests with the parents or guardians. If a student has the necessary prerequisites, then the parents/guardians have the final word on the courses and levels in which their child will enroll. 1 * Correspondence Courses: Students may apply to earn credits by successfully completing a correspondence or on-line course from an accredited institution. Taking a course by correspondence or on-line that is offered at IHS is not encouraged. Approval is discretionary with the Principal and does not fall under the “parental choice.” Conditions such as a deadline for course completion can be put on approval. Typically a student must have a previous history of academic success and diligence including good attendance and work habits. Positive recommendations must be obtained from the student’s counselor and the Department Head before the Principal or designee will consider the request. Ithaca High School 5 Program of Studies
  10. 10. LEVELS OF INSTRUCTION The process of transition from 8th to 9th grade including the course selection process is under review. Changes under consideration include recommending a student’s course selection based on student performance data. At Ithaca High School another component of selecting a student's course of study is choosing the appropriate level of instruction. Many courses are taught at more than one level of instruction to better accommodate varying skills, rates of learning and styles. Levels of instruction are explained in detail below. REGENTS (R) Regent’s courses are college preparatory courses and are based on the state curriculum. These courses have been designed to prepare students for a large variety of colleges and will often require a research project as well as some independent study. HONORS (H) Rapid movement through the subject matter, often characterized by extensive research projects and independent study and substantial homework assignments, characterizes honors courses. Students should possess above grade level reading, writing, and study skills and strong interest and motivation in the subject area. ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) The Advanced Placement program is open to only those students who, upon close examination of their records and teacher recommendations, can meet the stringent requirements of the course. The students will be prepared for and are required to take the AP Examination in the spring, for which there is a fee (fee reductions are available for students from low-income families). The awarding of college credit for an AP course is at the sole discretion of the college at which a student enrolls. An AP course is an introductory college course that is exceptionally challenging and stimulating. Compared to other high school courses, an AP course often takes more time and work, but also explores subjects in greater depth, allowing more opportunity for individual progress and accomplishment. Ithaca High School 6 Program of Studies
  11. 11. Cumulative Grade Point Average Ithaca High School calculates two CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES (weighted and un-weighted) at the end of the school year. The Un- weighted Cumulative Grade Point Average is computed as an average of final course grades of all traditionally graded courses from accredited institutions, excluding courses in performing music, physical education, academic assistance labs (i.e. Resource Room) and those taken pass/fail or abroad. In computing the Un-weighted cumulative GPA, the following scale applies: A+ = 4.33 B = 3.00 C- = 1.67 The Weighted Cumulative Grade Point Average is computed using an honor point scale in which courses are assigned honor A = 4.00 points relative to the level of rigor of instruction at which they are offered, as shown in the chart below. All traditionally B- = 2.67 graded courses from accredited institutions are included except courses in performing D+ = 1.33 music, physical education, Weighted Cumulative GPA, the following scale applies: A- = 3.67 C+ = 2.33 AP Honors D = 1.00 Regents Local B+ = 3.33 A+ C = 2.00 14.67 12.67 F = 0.00 10.67 8.67 A 14.00 12.00 10.00 8.00 A- 13.33 11.33 9.33 7.33 B+ 12.67 10.67 8.67 6.67 B 12.00 10.00 8.00 6.00 Ithaca High School 7 B- Program of Studies
  12. 12. 9.33 7.33 5.33 C+ 10.67 8.67 6.67 4.67 C 10.00 8.00 6.00 4.00 C- 9.33 7.33 5.33 3.33 D+ 8.67 6.67 5.67 2.67 D 8.00 6.00 4.00 2.00 F 0 0 0 0 Ithaca High School 8 Program of Studies
  13. 13. ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADUATION In order to be eligible for an Ithaca High School diploma, students must be registered at Ithaca City School District. In order to participate in graduation ceremonies the student must be scheduled to complete all graduation requirements by graduation day. FINAL GRADES CALCULATION Final grades are determined in the following manner: 1. The final exam is counted as 1/4 of the grade for the course. The average of the report card grades comprises the other three-fourths of the grade. 2. If a student is excused from the final exam, the final grade will be the average of the quarterly grades. 3. If a student is truant from the final exam, the grade for the final exam will be zero (F). Pending: A student who is truant from a final examination will fail the course. 4. International exchange students are not diploma candidates, and therefore, will be graded on an audit basis. If course credit is desired, specific arrangements must be made upon entering Ithaca High School. Pending: In the case of a performance or portfolios in lieu of a final exam, a student who is truant from the performance or fails to turn in a portfolio will fail the course. FAILING LAST MARKING PERIOD AND FINAL EXAM Students enrolled in courses at Ithaca High School are required to pass either the last marking period or the final examination in each of their courses in order to pass a course and receive credit. Students who fail both the last marking period and the final will receive a grade of “F” for the course and no credit awarded. GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND HONOR ROLL Grade Point Average: the GPA is computed as an average, based on a scale of A+ = 4.33 to F = 0.0. The following courses are excluded from GPA computation: performing music, physical education, and courses taken in foreign schools. GRADING SYSTEM Please Note: The ranking system is under review and may be changed for the year 2008-09. A+ 97-100% 4.33 C+ 77-79% 2.33 AUD = Audit A 93-96% 4.00 C 73-76% 2.00 P = Pass A- 90-92% 3.67 C- 70-72% 1.67 F = Fail B+ 87-89% 3.33 D+ 68-69% 1.33 S = Satisfactory B 83-86% 3.00 D 65-67% 1.00 U = Unsatisfactory B- 80-82% 2.67 F Below 65% 0.00 NC = No Credit I = Incomplete W = Withdraw The Ithaca High School transcript is an historical record of all courses taken and their final disposition. No grades are deleted or replaced. HONOR ROLL •The Honor roll is determined at the end of each marking period. All courses are considered. •Grades are not weighted. •Grades of F, D, or incomplete render a student ineligible. •A student must be carrying at least 3.5 credits. •A student must be enrolled in and passing a P.E. class. •Honor List is 3.2. •High Honor List is 3.7. •Principal's List is 4.0. Ithaca High School 9 Program of Studies
  14. 14. LINK CREW Link Crew is a well-established and nationally known freshman transition program that was brought to IHS during the 2006-2007 school year. Upperclassmen apply for leadership positions. Those who are selected are trained intensively. They serve as mentors to small groups or "crews" of grade 9 students throughout their first year of high school. Link Leaders go into grade 9 classrooms to teach lessons that are designed to give freshmen strategies to succeed academically and socially. They also plan and implement a series of social events just for freshmen, helping to build connections and a strong sense of community. Link Crew is a program that benefits not only the freshmen, but the leaders and the entire high school community as well, helping to create a culture of kindness and mutual support. 504 Students who have medical conditions that significantly interfere with academic performance may seek support under 504. Section 504 is a Civil Rights Law that protects students from discrimination based on a physical or mental impairment. A parent may request meetings with the Instructional Support Team to determine if the symptoms associated with a medical or psychological diagnosis are significant enough to warrant additional support. The 504 chairperson coordinates the discussion and determines if a student meets the criteria for an Accommodation Plan. SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES Please see the section, Special Education Services, elsewhere in this booklet. APPEAL A student, parent, or guardian who wants to appeal a student’s exclusion from an AP course should do so directly to the Principal. SPECIAL PROGRAMS There are several areas in the curriculum where departments offer special options and alternatives within their subject areas. Descriptions of these courses and programs are presented in each department’s listing of courses. This section outlines these special programs. ALTERNATIVE SCHEDULING Ithaca High School offers several courses on a semester block schedule. In a block scheduling format a full year class is taught for two periods each day for one semester. A double period format allows for more in-class discussion and group work and allows the students to concentrate on fewer classes. It is also possible that some courses will be offered on alternate day block schedules where class would meet every other day throughout the school year. This class would be scheduled opposite another class that was offered in the same format. Check with your counselor for the latest information on these and other block scheduled courses. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM Advanced Placement is a program of college-level courses and exams that follows the curriculum and guidelines established by the College Board AP Program. These are introductory college courses that are exceptionally challenging and stimulating. AP courses often take more time and work, but also explore subjects in greater depth. AP courses culminate in AP exams administered nationally each May. Each exam receives an overall grade on a 5-point scale, 5 being high. Almost all colleges in the US participate in the AP Program to some extent, and some grant as much as a full year's credit to students presenting qualifying grades in AP exams. Since these are college level courses, they are not for all students. There are entry criteria unique to each course, such as teacher recommendation, a qualifying exam, prerequisite courses, previous grades in the subject area, and overall school performance. Once accepted into an AP course, the student is committed to take the AP exam the following May. Students must pay a fee for each exam. More detailed information about the AP program is available from the AP Coordinator, AP teachers, or School Counselors. While a student does not have to take an AP course to take an AP exam, they should be sure that their preparation and study fits the appropriate AP course description. The Advanced Placement (AP) offerings at Ithaca High School are extensive. We offer the following courses dependent on the number of qualified students. Each course and its entry requirements are described in the listings for the appropriate department. AP English Language AP Calculus AB AP English Literature AP Calculus BC AP United States History AP Statistics AP Spanish Language AP Computer Science AP French Language AP Biology AP German Language AP Chemistry AP Latin AP Physics B AP Studio Art AP Environmental Science AP Computer Science AB AP Human Geography AVID: ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION Ithaca High School 10 Program of Studies
  15. 15. The goal of the AVID program is to ensure that all students, especially students in the academic middle, will succeed in a rigorous curriculum and increase their enrollment and success in four-year colleges. AVID is designed to provide academic support for students in the middle who are underachieving and are historically under-represented in four-year colleges. Students and families apply for acceptance into the program and commit to three years of enrollment in the AVID elective course. In addition, students must be willing to place themselves in some of the most challenging courses available to them in the core content areas at I.H.S. The AVID elective teacher communicates with School counselors and families to monitor student progress. Active parent participation is critical to the success of individual students and the program in general. Prerequisite: Interview and application Co-requisite: Enrollment in rigorous college preparatory courses Course Description: AVID is an elective course that prepares students for entrance into four-year colleges. There is an emphasis on analytical writing, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, study skills, test taking, note taking, and research. AVID meets every day for the entire year. Each week students receive 2 periods of instruction in college entry skills, 2 periods in tutor-led study groups, and one period in motivational activities and academic survival skills. Students participate in activities that incorporate strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, and reading to support their growth academically. Ithaca High School 11 Program of Studies
  16. 16. A Sample Week in the AVID Elective Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday AVID Student AVID Student Binder Curriculum Tutorials Curriculum Tutorials Evaluations Speakers Motivational Activities Course Content: AVID students learn skills such as time management, note taking, textbook reading, library research, and maintaining the AVID binder. Students are expected to keep an organized binder that is graded regularly. AVID stresses the importance of writing as a tool for learning. This strategy forms the basis of all assignments and leads to the improvement in all subject areas. AVID 9: Elective course for incoming 9th grade students who were interviewed and selected in middle school. The 9th grade AVID class provides a college-preparatory curriculum with a focus on reading and writing strategies and developing academic skills related to organization, note taking, time management, inquiry and collaboration. Students also receive academic support through tutorials. Introduction to college research. AVID 10: Continuation of college-preparatory curriculum and academic support for students to take honors and AP courses. Introduction to college essay writing and college entrance exam preparation. AVID 11: More focused approach to college research and essay writing. ACT and PSAT preparation. Continuation of college- preparatory curriculum and academic support for students to take honors and AP courses. AVID 12: Focus on college application and financial aid process. SAT preparation. Continuation of college-preparatory curriculum and support for students to take honors and AP courses. LEADERSHIP 101 Prerequisite: Preference given to elected school leaders Course Description: This course is designed to teach leadership theory and motivational techniques to student leaders. Topics covered include: Defining Leadership; Qualities of Leadership- What Makes a Good Leader; Developing a Vision and Setting Goals; Motivating Others; Communication; Leadership Styles and Leadership vs. Management; Decision Making and Consensus Building; Negotiation and Conflict Management; Leadership in Organizations; Leading Change. Students will discuss democratic schooling, and the role of student leaders in an educational organization. Students will read leadership theory and motivational theory and use current local, national, and international events to evaluate leaders' actions and decisions. Activities will include readings, lectures, case study critiques, simulations, and small-group projects related to school events and initiatives. Meeting Time: The course is offered period 0 and meets twice a week. Credit: Students who pass the course accrue .25 elective credits toward graduation. Grading: The course is offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and is not included in students' GPA, but is listed on a student's transcript. Grading is based predominantly on class participation. PROJECT LEAD THE WAY Project Lead the Way is a pre-collegiate program for students considering engineering as a college major or career. Our goal is to expose students to the world of engineering through a fast-paced, hands-on, technology rich sequence of courses. Students can enter the program in either the 9th or 10th grades. Students who complete courses at the Honors level will earn college credit in addition to credit toward graduation from IHS. Details of the program can be found in the Technology section of this booklet. NEW VISIONS PROGRAMS The BOCES area vocational center offers three exciting and challenging senior year options for college bound students who are looking for a different educational experience for their last year of high school. The New Visions program in Health Career Explorations is offered in cooperation with the Cayuga Medical Center and offers an introduction to various medical specialties and opportunities. The New Visions program in Explorations in the Biological Sciences is based at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and focuses on research and experimentation in biological sciences. The New Visions program in Exploring Careers in the Environment and Agriculture is based at Cornell University and focuses on the many research and career opportunities in these fields. Students in these programs attend the high school for the first two periods and the rest of their day is spent on site. Entry in these programs is very competitive. If you are interested, refer to the more detailed entry in the Vocational Studies sections of this guide and talk with your school counselor. WISE PROGRAM The WISE (Individualized Senior Experience) program is an individualized, independent study project for second-semester seniors. Students will earn 1 credit and will explore an area of academic or career interest, guided by mentors they have chosen from the IHS staff and assisted by people in the greater Ithaca community who have expertise in the students' areas of interest. Students will keep daily journals in which they reflect on their project activities, will meet weekly with their mentors and with their classmates, and will prepare public presentations of their experiences at the end of the semester. Students may earn partial credit for English 12 (see English 12 WISE) or elective credit. Talk to your counselor for more information. Ithaca High School 12 Program of Studies
  17. 17. SKILLS FOR SUCCESS Skills for Success is a class designed to help students to give students all of the skills necessary to be successful in high school, and to prepare for college. These include, but are not limited to: - Time management - How to prepare for tests - Note taking strategies - Navigating the system at the high school - How to seek part time employment - How to stay organized in High School - How to approach long term writing assignments - How to seek extra help Skills for Success will be offered by Semester, daily, and students can earn .5 elective credit. Students in grades 9-12 are eligible to take this class. COLLEGE SUCCESS (ACAD) College Success is a dual credit offering with TC3. We are looking for students who will attend TC3. This course is specifically designed to give students the skills necessary to make a successful transition to college. These include, but are not limited to: - The college application process - Accessing College Resources - Time management - Money management - Test Preparation - How to access test modifications - Organization and Study Strategies - How to approach long term assignments - How to seek part time employment - Career Exploration Tools College Success will be offered by Semester, daily, and students can earn .5elective credit and up to 3 credits at TC3. This course is for 11th and 12th graders who may be planning to attend TC3 or another community college. Only students attending TC3 will be eligible for college credit. READ 180 Course Content: Read 180 is an intensive reading course designed to directly address a student’s individual needs through differentiated instruction, adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction of reading, writing and vocabulary skills. The Read 180 course provides support to students whose reading achievement is below the proficiency level. This course is open to all students. Ithaca High School 13 Program of Studies
  18. 18. STUDENT SERVICES & EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES PENDING: IHS System of Intervention Services ITHACA HIGH SCHOOL PYRAMID OF INTERVENTIONS SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERRALS TO OUTSIDE AGENCIES DSS, Bridges, CFS SECTION 504 Accommodations for Medical Needs, Test Accommodations, Classroom Accommodations ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES Content Area Support, Study Skills Instruction, Co-Teaching, Academic Monitoring RTI TIER II ACTION PLAN Classroom Observations, Schedule Changes, Analyze Academic History, Academic Testing, Assign Case Manager, Brainstorm Intervention based on Individual Needs, Referrals to various Programs and Services COUNSELING SERVICES (Student Services, Social Worker, School Psychologist) BEHAVIORAL CONSEQUENCES Detention, ISS, OSS, Attendance Contracts, Behavior Contracts, Success Plans MENTORING PROGRAM GUIDANCE REFERRALS Daily Sheets, Weekly Sheets, Student Consultation, Parent/Teacher Conferences, Schedule Changes, Mediation, Counseling, Referrals for various services ACADEMIC MONITORING School Counselor, Support Teacher, AIS Department Chair NINTH GRADE INITIATIVE Professional Collaboration, Share Strategies to improve instruction, Parental Support, HOMEWORK HELP After School, Lunch Time QUALITY ‘FIRST INSTRUCTION’ Seat Changes, Proximity, Student Conference, Parent Contact, Classroom Modifications, Differentiated Instructional Strategies, and Refer for additional support Ithaca High School 14 Program of Studies
  19. 19. STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT Department Leader: Samantha Little Phone: 274-2157 Fax: 277-3061 School Counselors ~ Social Workers ~ Family Liaisons ~ School Psychologists The goal of Student Services Department and its programs is to assist each pupil in making sound educational, vocational, and personal decisions. School Counselors at the high school monitor each student's progress towards graduation. The plan that is developed in 8th grade is modified, as necessary throughout high school. Counselors meet with students and make any necessary changes in the student's plan to meet all graduation requirements. As discussed earlier, planning a high school program is a joint effort by the student, parents/guardians, and the counselor. The student is expected to assume the major role in planning his/her school program. The counselor's role is one of assisting and guiding the student to plan a program that meets the student's needs in terms of interests, abilities, and goals. We encourage students to share information about the school program, their interests, abilities and goals with parents. Parents/guardians must be consulted and give approval for all high school plans. By utilizing this "team effort" it is hoped that the student will have a school program that best meets his/her individual needs. The counselors will assist the students in any way they can to provide them with a program to meet their goals. Counselors also offer other advisory and individual or group counseling assistance to enable students to benefit from the curriculum, to help students develop and implement post-secondary education and career plans, to help students who exhibit any attendance, academic, behavioral, or adjustment problems and to encourage family involvement. The school counselors work closely with the school psychologists and social workers and refer students for services when necessary. You may find more detailed information about their services in the Student Handbook that is distributed in September. SUPPORT SERVICES DEPARTMENT & CONTENT AREA LAB Department Chair: Gwen Freeman Secretary: Ann Bangs Phone: 274-2166 The Support Services Department consists of Support Teacher Services and Content Area Lab support. SUCCESS IN ACADEMICS The high school Content Area Lab provides an inviting atmosphere in which students can receive assistance in reading, writing, and math through small group instruction in order to pass state mandated examinations and to be successful in their classes. • Teachers help students improve basic skills and provide support for their academic class work. In addition, the staff prepares students for state and local examinations. • Teachers communicate with content area teachers and receive weekly assignments from all teachers to help students plan, organize and complete assignments and long-term projects. • The first half of the period will be Direct Instruction, dealing with such topics as study skills, writing skills, reading comprehension and fluency, and so on. • Students will receive ¼ credit per semester for alternating days. The Support Services Department also provides these services: • Determining student eligibility for (AIS) Academic Intervention Services and working with identified students through a team- taught class or in the Content Area Lab. • Working with support staff and content area staff to design programs that meet the varied needs of students. • Performing formal academic evaluations for those students who are referred to the Committee on Special Education and the 504 Committee as well as informal evaluations when requested by teachers, counselors or parents. • Convening 504 Committee meetings for eligible students and implementing the 504 plans. • Screening of new entrants to identify students in need of support services. For further information regarding services please call 274-2166. Ithaca High School 15 Program of Studies
  20. 20. CAREER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY Department Leader: Scott Breigle Career Education Office: E-26A Phone: 274-2180 BUSINESS The Business Department, through its course offerings, provides students with the skills and knowledge for success in a wide variety of college majors and careers. Through an arrangement with Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3), several of the courses offered by the business department offer students college credit. College credit is granted by TC3 and the credit can be transferred to any SUNY school. Other schools may also accept the TC3 course credit. The courses will result in both high school and college credit. Students earning college credit will receive an official college transcript from TC3. The courses which meet the dual requirements for high school and college credit are: Computer Keyboarding 3 Cr/hrs Computer Applications 4 Cr/hrs College Accounting 4 Cr/hrs HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION SEQUENCE A student may complete a 3-credit or 5-credit sequence using the business education offerings to satisfy a high school graduation requirement. This is for students planning on immediate office employment after graduation, or for students planning to pursue a post secondary education in Business Technology. COLLEGE PREPARATION College Accounting, Business Law, Business Applications, or High School Accounting will provide preview and preparation for students considering college work in accounting, management, finance, or marketing. CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The course is devoted to the study of career awareness and the management of personal resources. The student will be introduced to various career opportunities and made aware of the skills, talents, and training needed. The students evaluate themselves and possible careers in terms of needs, wants, goals, and personal resources. Management of personal resources includes the study of banking services, budgeting, and consumer purchasing, and integrates the application of the decision making process. This is a core course required for an occupational sequence. Students will use computers to research careers and colleges and format their resumes. Students will be graded on written assignments, projects, class participation and tests. COMPUTER KEYBOARDING Regents / Honors Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Virtually all PC's purchased today come preloaded with Windows and, often, with one or more Windows application packages. This course is designed to help students, both novice and those with some word processing familiarity, develop efficient keyboarding skills that help simplify and speed up document preparation. The student will use Microsoft Word. Emphasis is placed on activities that give students a chance to practice writing letters, research reports, tables, and outlines. There is a local final exam at the end of the semester. Students completing this course for 3 cr/hrs from TC3 will receive honors credit. Dependent on a Dual Credit and TC3 COLLEGE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Honors/Regents Full Year 1 Credit BA/BCA - Fulfills computer literacy requirements for many colleges. Prerequisites: Completion of Computer Keyboarding or complete a test with a speed of 25 wpm or better. Course Content: This follows the syllabus of TC3's Computer Applications Courses: Intro to Word-processing; Intro to Databases; Intro to Spreadsheets and Intro to Presentation Software. The concepts studied are applied by means of hands on computer activities using Word, Access, Excel and PowerPoint. Learning computer applications skills is essential to any student entering college or a business career. Students will use practical business computer simulations to reinforce concepts learning. Students do not need prior training with the software. Grading will be based on exercises, projects and assignments completed which will demonstrate proficiency in the above software applications. Students completing this course for 4 cr/hrs from TC3 will earn honors credit Ithaca High School 16 Program of Studies
  21. 21. PERSONAL FINANCE Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Personal financial planning is a lifelong task of determining goals and objectives and altering financial decisions to accomplish these goals. This course introduces students to the financial realities of living on their own including banking, investing, and paying taxes. Students will use computer programs to prepare budgets, explore checking and savings accounts, and compute credit costs. Students will learn about work skills, careers, computer skills, interpersonal skills, and both written and oral communication. FINANCIAL INFORMATION PROCESSING Regents 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The objective of this course is to equip students with the basic skills needed to keep financial records in sales or support occupations. Students will be given hands-on computer practice in completing record keeping tasks using specific courseware designed for FIP and practice writing entries in workbook type journals. ACCOUNTING Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Introduces students to principles and concepts that form the basis for bookkeeping/accounting systems used by businesses. The course will include the study of applications to both the service and merchandising businesses. Once students understand the concepts behind accounting systems, computers are used to complete a variety of accounting problems. The course will provide a good preparation for the study of college accounting. This course can be used as a unit in a three-unit local math sequence. Students must complete exercises and problems related to each chapter. This is accomplished with class work and daily homework assignments. Students are tested at the end of each chapter and a local final exam is given upon completion of this full year course. COLLEGE ACCOUNTING Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: High school accounting OR B or better in 10th grade math Recommendation: For 11th and 12th graders. Course Content: Content of this course will parallel the first semester of a college introductory accounting course and involves more analysis than the traditional high school accounting class. The course introduces basic accounting concepts, principles, and practices for a service or merchandising business at an accelerated pace. Students are introduced to accrual based accounting. Emphasis is placed on the use of special journals, subsidiary ledgers, and general accounting practices. Students who complete this course with a B or better and pass the final prepared by TC3 with a 75 or better or better will earn 4 cr/hrs from TC3. As this course is given with college-level expectations, consistent study habits and high motivation are required. Students who are comfortable working independently and who get satisfaction from being accurate can expect to do well in this class. CONSUMER MATHEMATICS Regents 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Work will be included on mathematical applications that are likely to be experienced by the post-high school consumer. Topics may include practical math in a home situation involving area and perimeter, such as concrete and paint; extending to pricing materials; payroll and deductions; banking operations; taxes; insurance; installment buying; home and auto expenses; and budgets. Guest speakers may be invited to discuss post-graduation career possibilities with the class. BUSINESS MATH Regents/Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Passed two high school math courses and passed one state assessment. Recommendation: Seniors Content: This course is almost entirely about finances and includes work with budgets, taxes, banking, finance charges, mortgages, insurance, discounts, depreciation and investments . Course information: The teaching method combines individual and group work. Consistent attendance and homework completion are essential for success in this course. The final exam is a department final. Note: Concurrent enrollment with TC3 is a possibility. BUSINESS LAW Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: None Recommendation: 11th or 12th graders Content: The course emphasis is on the individual as he/she encounters business law in personal, family, and occupational life. The course is introduced with an overview of how law affects society and the citizen. The remainder of the course is a study of the legal rules applicable to business contracts with special emphasis on payments, sales contracts, checks and promissory notes, insurance, renting and owning property, and wills. A mock trial is prepared for and conducted in competition with another school. This is a good preparatory course for a student planning to follow a college business management program. Students will be graded on tests, class participation, debate skills, case studies and projects. The final mock trail will be evaluated as well. This course can be used as the fifth unit in a 5-unit social studies sequence. Ithaca High School 17 Program of Studies
  22. 22. TECHNOLOGY (Technology Education courses give a broad base of skills that will prepare you for a variety of careers) With a focused sequence in Technology Education, students have the means to link their years in high school with those in post- secondary educational programs or employment. High paying careers in the fields of communication, construction, electricity/electronics, manufacturing and pre-engineering are all obtainable with the right academic preparation and the hands-on skills offered through a Technology Education sequence. Several courses offered may be used for fulfilling Fine Arts requirements (Tech Drafting, Architectural Drawing, Graphic Technology, Production Printing and Design and Drawing for Production). TECHNOLOGY SEQUENCES The Technology Department offers both the Project Lead the Way sequence and 3 or 5 unit sequences. All Technology sequences contain a common two-unit core requirement. Additional electives are offered from which students can choose to complete the units needed for a 5 unit sequence, only for Foreign Language exemption. TECHNOLOGY CORE Career and Financial Management (for 1/2 unit total) 2 Foundation Courses (for 1 unit total) 1 System Course (for 1/2 unit total) Foundation Courses System Courses Technical Drawing Communication Systems Design and Drawing for Production Construction Systems Digital Electronics Transportation Systems CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: The working citizen module will provide students with information and experiences which will help them make future choices concerning work. Topics will focus upon a specific area of information and personal development that will help the individual students determine their roles within the work place and the home. The Personal Resource Management module will teach students decision-making skills that are needed to solve appropriate problems in order to make independent and/or group decisions. This course is required for all students completing an occupational sequence. CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS AND WOODWORKING Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is a project-oriented course designed to provide students knowledge related to modern construction technology and woodworking skills. In this course students have a chance to complete laboratory activities that include areas such as foundation layout, wall framing, plumbing, and electrical. Students will also have the opportunity to build woodworking projects including wall clocks or a project of their choice to take home. Students will build a project using the same woodwork machines used by carpenters and cabinetmakers. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This is a basic course that focuses on the transportation systems in our technical world, i.e. land, sea and air. Various engine and automotive systems will be studied. Students will rebuild small engines, and build projects in both the flight and aerospace prospective of today’s transportation systems. MANUFACTURING Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Each student will be directly involved with the selection, designing and producing of a mass produced project of interest to the group. Typical projects include Adirondack Chair and Problem Solving Puzzles. Students will work in the wood working and metal labs to produce jigs and fixtures to ensure exacting mass produced projects. Students will learn skills which will aid in employment or general life. Ithaca High School 18 Program of Studies
  23. 23. TECHNICAL DRAWING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This is the traditional course in technical drawing that teaches visualization skills required in all phases of technical and engineering careers. Students complete a portfolio of work including Orthographic Projection, Isometric section developments and descriptive geometry. Students learn to read and make blueprints. Students also learn how computers are used in the drafting industry and get hands-on experience. This course will be useful as a foundation for continuing courses in computer aided drawings and design. This course may be used for partial fulfillment of the Fine Arts Requirement for graduation. ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Students learn the basics of residential architectural design. The primary emphasis will be to use drafting equipment to develop and read blueprints that are used in construction and architectural industries. During the course, students will design a home and produce a complete set of drawings including floor plans, elevations, kitchen perspectives, and plot plans. Students will have a hands-on experience with the role computer aided drafting plays in this industry. This course may be used for partial fulfillment of the Fine Arts Requirement for graduation. COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS Regents ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: Entry level course that allows students the flexibility to learn about graphic and audiovisual systems. Students will use computers to digitize audio and video segments, create movies using video software. Integrate digital movies along with scanned images and text to create powerful computer-assisted PowerPoint presentations. Organize important data into meaningful charts and graphs using computer software. Editing software will turn the computer into a non-linear digital audio workstation where students create audio/video commercials and PSA's with unlimited special effects. Students gain the skills necessary to succeed in today's information society. GRAPHIC TECHNOLOGY Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is designed to teach an entry level student the basics of computer hardware and software. The course is essential to any student. Emphasis is placed on the use of the Macintosh computer and related software. Experiences are provided in basic computer operation, flash, page layout, image creation, scanner operation, and the use of digital cameras, laser printers, and color ink jet printers. Students learn top of the line programs used by colleges and industry. This course would also be of great benefit to any student interested in a career related to the graphic communications industry. Anyone involved with IHS publications such as The Tattler, or the IHS Yearbook should seriously consider this course. This course may be used to fulfill 1/2 credit of the Fine Arts requirement for graduation. PRODUCTION PRINTING Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None Course Content: This course is designed to introduce the student to the materials, equipment, and processes used to produce offset and screen printed images. Students will create basic projects such as memo pads, CD covers, stationary, business cards using clip art, computer generated art and type. Students will learn how to integrate text and illustrations on a computer to produce camera-ready copy. These projects will then be volume printed using conventional offset and screen printing techniques. This course may be used to fulfill 1/2 credit of the fine arts requirement for graduation. PHOTOSHOP Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce the student the basics of Photoshop, a photo retouching, image editing, and color painting program. Students will learn the basic functions, tools and techniques used to create original art as well as retouching techniques and image manipulation of photographs. All students are welcome to sign up for this course. Artist, photographers, graphic artist and printers use this program in a wide variety of ways. Students will create projects using Photoshop, scanners, digital cameras, and original artwork. WEB PAGE DESIGN Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of web page design for the Internet using Dreamweaver. Students will learn how to build and design web pages including links, graphics, backgrounds and colors. Students will learn how to plan and define a site; create, use and edit templates; and use the Reference and Assets panels. Ithaca High School 19 Program of Studies
  24. 24. MEDIA PRODUCTION Regents Semester ½ Credit Prerequisite: None This is an entry-level course that allows students to learn how to make videos using digital video camcorders and editing software. Students will learn two popular video editing software programs; QuickTime and iMovie. Students will learn how to correctly operate digital video camcorders, tripods, and microphones. Students will learn camera methods as well as editing techniques. Students will create, write, videotape and edit video to produce news stories, movies, and instructional videos as projects in this class. ENGLISH/MEDIA PRODUCTION Regents Full Year 2 Credits Prerequisites: English 9 & 10 (1 Cr. - English & 1 Cr. – Technology) Course Content: The English/Media Production meets two consecutive periods, five days a week, for the whole year, allowing students to earn their required credit in English 11 or English 12 plus an elective credit in Technology. Students use reading, writing, listening and speaking in both individual and collaborative projects which sometimes involve literature, but which are often journalistic, producing news segments and features for a bi-weekly show called "Lake Street News" which airs on public access TV, channel 16. Students learn to operate a TV camera, character generator, video switcher and editors (both analog and digital). They learn the skills and duties of camera operator, technical director, floor manager, anchor, and producer, rotating through these positions during the year. The course uses alternative assessment in which students demonstrate competence by completing projects, reflecting on their process, evaluating the product, and formulating strategies for improvement. Course is offered Pass/Fail or Regents/Honors for a grade. ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: English/Video Production or permission of the instructor Course Content: This class allows students who have completed one year in the English/Media Production course to continue learning video production skills and contributing to the class's biweekly program "Lake Street News". Students will attend Advanced Video Production one period a day for the year, producing programming, and serving as mentors in small group instruction on the equipment, and modeling performance in the various roles required in TV production. Students will receive advanced training in cameras, switching, audio mixing, dubbing, studio lighting, graphics, and character generation. Advanced students will receive training in computer technologies such as digital video, audio, and animation. The Technology Department Also Offers a Specific Pre-Engineering Sequence Known as: PROJECT LEAD THE WAY Note: You do not have to complete the entire sequence to enroll in DDP Recommended Pre-Engineering Sequence/ Project Lead the Way 9th Design & Drawing for Production DDP (meets Fine Arts Requirement) th 10 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Recommended for 10th 11th Principles of Engineering Recommended for 11th grade 11th Digital Electronics Recommended for 11th grade 12th Engineering Design & Development Must have previous 4 courses DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit PRODUCTION-PLTW (Also known as Introduction to Engineering Design) A Solid Modeling Approach Prerequisite: Open to all students with Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Course Content: DDP is an introductory course, which develops student problem-solving skills, with emphasis placed upon the concept of developing a 3-D model or solid rendering of an object. Students focus on the application of visualization processes and tools provided by modern, state-of-the-art computer hardware and software (Inventor). This modern computer-based process replaces the traditional hand drawing methods. The course will emphasize the design development process of a product and how a model of that product is produced, analyzed and evaluated, using a Computer Aided Design System. Various design applications will be explored with discussion of possible career opportunities. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. Ithaca High School 20 Program of Studies
  25. 25. DIGITAL ELECTRONICS-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit TC3 dual-credit is available. Prerequisite: Open to all students with Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Course Content: Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic. The course is patterned after the first semester course in Digital Electronics taught in two and four year colleges. Students will study the application of electronic logic circuits and devices and apply Boolean logic to the solution of problems. Such circuits are found in watches, calculators, video games, computers and thousands of other devices. The use of smart circuits is present in virtually all aspects of our lives and its use is increasing rapidly, making digital electronics an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering/engineering technology. Using Electronics Workbench (EWB) and CircuitMaker, the industry standard, students will test and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry. Students will design circuits, using EWB, export their designs to a printed circuit auto-routing program that generates printed circuit boards and construct the design using chips and other components. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: DDP and Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Recommendation: Students are strongly encouraged to also enroll in Computer Integrated Manufacturing. Course Content: Principles of Engineering is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering problem-solving skills that are involved in post- secondary education programs and engineering careers. They will explore various engineering systems and manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers’ address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. The main purpose of this course is to experience through theory and hands-on problem-solving activities what engineering is all about and to answer the question, “Is a career in engineering or engineering technology for me?” *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. COMPUTER INTEGRATED MFG-PLTW Honors / Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: DDP and Concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics Recommendation: Students are strongly encouraged to also enroll in Principles of Engineering. Course Content: This course builds upon the computer solid modeling design skills developed in Design and Drawing for Production. Students will be presented with design problems that require the use of Inventor and MasterCam to develop solutions to the problems. They will evaluate the solutions using mass property analysis (study of the relationship among the design, function and materials used), make appropriate modifications and use rapid prototyping equipment to produce three-dimensional models of the solutions. Students will be expected to communicate the process and results of their work through oral and written reports. *Honors Credit dependent on results of the RIT PLTW College Credit Exam. ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVEL-PLTW Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Principals of Engineering, Computer Integrated Manufacturing & Digital Electronics. Dependent on successful completion of year long project B+ or better. Course Content: In this course, students will work in teams of two to four to design and construct the solution to an engineering problem, (original, taken from a database of problems, or a national challenge) applying the principles developed in the four preceding courses. Students will maintain a journal as part of a portfolio of their work. Each team will be responsible for delivering progress reports and making final presentations of their project to an outside review panel. The completed portfolio will be invaluable as students apply to college. Ithaca High School 21 Program of Studies
  26. 26. P ROJECT L EAD THE W AY A Partnership for America’s Future A Pre-Engineering Program MISSION It is the mission of Project Lead The Way to create and support a dynamic partnership between colleges and universities, school districts, and industry intended to address the impending shortfall of trained technical workers that threatens our nation’s prosperity. BACKGROUND The key to continued national prosperity is directly linked to the development of an effective, high quality, technology-literate work force. America’s need for skilled technical people is growing. At the same time, two and four year colleges are experiencing a decline in applicants to engineering/engineering technology programs. Further, college attrition rates in these programs are 50%. The critical need is to implement a high quality, pre-engineering program that enables high school students to explore the engineering/engineering technology career cluster as a part of a comprehensive high school college preparatory program. The intent is to increase the quality and number of high school students pursuing two and four year technical degree programs which in turn will address a strategic need of national proportions. GOALS • To expand the general high school college prep curricula to include a comprehensive technology preparation program. • To provide upgraded training for high school teachers in the new technologies. • To involve higher education and industry as advisors, supporters, and mentors in the school program. • To apply the highest level of technology in the application of math and science. • To allow students to explore careers within the broad field of engineering and engineering technology. • To help students prepare for the rigors of college-level engineering programs. • To increase the numbers of young people pursuing technical careers. • To reduce the future attrition rate within college engineering programs. • To develop opportunities and linkages enabling a seamless link between high school and college. PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM Pre-Engineering Education is a five-course technology program designed to help students explore technology related careers and to prepare them for two and four year college technical degree programs. Each class is taught in a laboratory setting using state-of-the-art technology equipment and software. Instruction is generally one-third theory and two-thirds application, sometimes involving mentors from industry and colleges. Class activities focus on problem-solving requiring students to work in teams to generate solutions. Students have the option to earn college credit, when possible, though college articulation agreements, offering a seamless link between high school and college. PRE-ENGINEERING STUDENTS Typically, students who enjoy math and science will benefit from exploring at least part of the program. Students in the program range from the valedictorian to the student who requires four years to complete the New York State integrated math program. Students unable to complete a four-year math sequence are not recommended for this program. A SA MPLE FOUR - YEAR STUDENT SC HED UL E Grade 9 Grade 10 English 9 1 unit English 10 1 unit Social Studies 9 1 unit Social Studies 10 1 unit Math 9 1 unit Math 10 1 unit Science 9 1 unit Science 10 1 unit Foreign Language 1 unit Foreign Language 1 unit Design and Drawing for Production 1 unit Computer Integrated Manufacturing 1 unit Physical Education ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Grade 11 Grade 12 English 11 1 unit English 12 1 unit Social Studies 11 1 unit Social Studies 12 1 unit Math 11 1 unit Math 12 1 unit Science 11 1 unit Science 12 1 unit Principles of Engineering 1 unit Engineering Design and Development 1 unit Digital Electronics 1 unit Health ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Physical Education ½ unit Ithaca High School 22 Program of Studies
  27. 27. ENGLISH ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Department Chair: Shirley Kennedy English Department Office: G-109 Phone: 274-2265, 274-2187 DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVES The Ithaca High School English program is designed to help students develop skills in using the arts of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in order to confront, assimilate, and communicate experience. To help students use language effectively and fully appreciate the oral and written expression of others, the English language arts program teaches students how to use language to gain information, to discover meaning, to understand logical relationships, and to make judgments through critical listening, reading, and viewing; to speak, write, and solve problems creatively; to communicate emotions, ideas, opinions, values, experiences, and information; to discover both the power and the beauty of literature as a mirror of human experience, reflecting human motives, conflicts, values, and traditions. A fifth year/elective program allows students to pursue individual interests and skills beyond the requirement of the four year state minimum. ENGLISH 9R Regents Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 8 Course Content: English 9 Regents provides instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and literary analysis. Students will read works with broad universal themes such as Othello, Julius Caesar, The First Part Last, Of Mice and Men, The Joy Luck Club, Brian’s Song, and The Mango Season as well as selected poetry and short stories. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 6 major works or literary units will be studied. Students will complete written projects, including an I-Search paper, and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten-week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Regular homework will be assigned. ENGLISH 9 SEMESTER (will not be offered 2010-11) Regents/Honors* Fall/Spring 1 Credit Prerequisite: English 8 Course Content: English 9 Semester meets two consecutive periods daily, allowing students to achieve English 9 Regents or Honors credit. This course combines multi-cultural readings and a variety of cooperative learning activities in a semester course. Reading includes works such as Toning the Sweep, Othello, Things Fall Apart, The Joy Luck Club, and The Chosen. Teaching Methods: The double period format allows for flexible scheduling of activities such as in-depth discussion, “literature circles,” and word processing. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignment, project, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. *Students choose Regents or Honors credit after the first, five weeks progress report. Honors candidates are required to read additional assigned books and write one additional essay. English 9 Honors Honors Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: English 8 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 8 Course Content: English 9 Honors provides advanced instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and literary analysis. Students will read works such as The Chosen, Julius Caesar, The Joy Luck Club, and Of Mice and Men. Selected writing assignments, oral presentations, and projects will reinforce skills which are important in both English 9 and Global 1. Teaching Methods: Methods include a combination of individual, small group, and large group activities. Type of Assignments: A minimum of 7 major works or literary units will be read. Students will complete written projects including an I- Search paper, and participate in oral discussions and presentations. Assessment: Ten week assessments will be determined by a combination of class participation, writing assignments, projects, test and quiz grades. The final exam is a portfolio project. Homework Guidelines: Substantial homework will be assigned almost daily. ENGLISH 9 HUMANITIES Honors Full Year 1 Credit (ENGLISH 9/GLOBAL STUDIES I) Prerequisites: English 8 Recommendation: For students with a B average or higher in English 8 Course Content: English 9 Humanities provides an interdisciplinary study of literature and history. Students will study the literature of particular world cultures while learning about the same culture’s geography, society, and history in social studies. The course is based on Ithaca High School 23 Program of Studies

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