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Annual Report.doc

  1. 1. DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING College of Engineering & Information Technology University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1, 2001 - JUNE 30, 2002 THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA IS COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, RESEARCH AND SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY AND THE WORLD 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 1
  2. 2. Table of Contents MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN 4 MISSION STATEMENT 5 STRATEGIC PLAN AND GOALS 5 INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM 5 Program Structure for the Future 5 Metrics and Quality Standards 6 GRADUATE AND RESEARCH PROGRAM 6 Research Plan for the Department 6 Metrics and Quality Standards of the Research Program 7 FACULTY PROFILES 8 STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND ACTIVITIES 12 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 13 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 13 UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 14 GRADUATE PROGRAM 16 FACULTY/STUDENT INVOLVEMENT 16 SCHOLARSHIPS 16 STUDENT AWARDS 17 EMPLOYERS PARTICIPATING IN ON-CAMPUS RECRUITING FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 18 DEPARTMENT PROFILE BY FISCAL YEAR 19 DEGREES AWARDED 20 RESEARCH EXPENDITURES/FACULTY 21 FACULTY AWARDS 22 EXTERNAL FUNDING 24 PUBLICATIONS 27 2001 Publications 27 Chapters in Books 27 Journal Articles 27 Conference Proceedings 28 2002 Publications 30 Chapters in Books 30 Journal Articles 30 Conference Proceedings 31 INDUSTRIAL ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS 34 BARD ALLISON, ALUMNI EXECUTIVE 34 ROBERT (BOB) L. BATES, P.E., CEM 34 JEFF GASSER, VICE PRESIDENT 34 WILLIAM BEST, CHAIRMAN AND CEO 34 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 2
  3. 3. CAL DENT, DISTRICT MANAGER 34 KEN FASCHING, VICE PRESIDENT 34 MALCOLM GORDGE, ENGINEERING MANAGER 34 E-MAIL: MGORDGE@SPIRAX.COM 34 ROBERT L. HART, PRESIDENT 34 JOHN P. IRION, PRESIDENT 34 DR. NATRAJ C. IYER, MANAGER 34 MARK JEFFRIES, MANUFACTURING MANAGER 34 Johnny Johnson, Vice President, Sales & Marketing 34 MICHAEL J. MARGOTTA, PRESIDENT 34 MARK FECTEAU, PLANT MANAGER 34 M. WALKER RAST 35 JACK ROACH, DIRECTOR 35 RALPH R. ROE, JR., MANAGER 35 FEROL B. VERNON, PRESIDENT AND CEO 35 E-MAIL: FEROL.VERNON@AT.SIEMENS.COM 36 ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS 37 GEORGE DAVIS, RETIRED V. ADM, CHAIRMAN 37 MELVIN BUCKNER, UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS COORDINATOR 37 MICHAEL TUCKMAN, EXECUTIVE VP, CHIEF NUCLEAR OFFICER 37 STEVE BYRNE, VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF NUCLEAR OFFICER 37 JEFF GASSER, VICE PRESIDENT 37 JAMES S. TULENKO, PROFESSOR 37 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 3
  4. 4. Message from the Chairman I am honored to share this annual report with friends and alumni of the University of South Carolina Department of Mechanical Engineering. This report chronicles the achievements of our faculty and students, outlines our strategic plan and goals for the future, and publishes the quality standards to which we aspire. As our 2001-2002 Annual Report demonstrates, the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering set new departmental records for research during the past year. Their innovative studies and projects generated a substantial increase in overall funding for research and in research expenditures per faculty member. In our department, there are more than 25 professors of national and international stature engaged in research at the leading edge of technology. These faculty members, along with research associates and graduate students, conduct research in traditional research areas and emerging fields of study. Keeping pace with the rapidly expanding scope of mechanical engineering, our department’s research addresses such vital areas as smart materials and structure, mechatronics, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), reverse engineering, advance manufacturing processes, micromechanics, mechanics of materials, image correlation, thermal science, combustion, sustainable systems design, dynamics, machine vision, and manufacturing automation and control. The department’s awards-in-force exceed $3 million and comprise funding primarily from government agencies and industry via grants, contracts, and gifts. Through these research endeavors, our department is playing a major role in the University of South Carolina’s efforts to become one of the nation’s AAU-Research I universities. The department’s faculty contributes to the University’s status as a widely recognized center for international education and research. The large number of articles in major international archival journals and reference books published and edited by the faculty also enhances the reputation of the department and the University. Faculty research enriches our educational programs. Frequently, faculty members include research associates and both graduate and undergraduate students in federally and industrially funded research projects. Students gain first-hand exposure to real-world engineering problems, which, along with their rigorous classroom and laboratory work, makes them attractive candidates to many employers and graduate schools after graduation. Mechanical engineering students have access to state-of-the-art instruction and research laboratories. The department’s facilities in the newly renovated South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) building include an advanced non-traditional manufacturing processes laboratory (Friction Stir Welding, Laser Machining, Waterjet Technology), a high precision metrology lab, a vision systems and image correlation lab, a smart materials and sensing lab, an experimental mechanics lab, an advanced CAD/CAM and computer lab facilities, and lecture rooms. The new $15 million Photonics Materials Research lab adjoins the SCE&G building, and the department has access to several University and governmental laboratories’ facilities. In our department, we emphasize the integration of research and education. We invite alumni, industrial partners, prospective students, and friends to read more about our programs in this report, on our department’s webpage under the College of Engineering (http://www.engr.sc.edu), or to visit our facilities. Abdel E. Bayoumi Professor and Chair 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 4
  5. 5. Mission Statement The mission of the Department of Mechanical Engineering (DME) is to provide students with a sound mechanical engineering education, advance the understanding and application of mechanical engineering principles, enhance the economic development of the State of South Carolina, and improve the quality of life of our citizens through teaching, research, service and outreach programs. Strategic Plan and Goals The underlying principles guiding the department in the implementation of its strategic plan center on establishing a multi-faceted, interconnected system with the following features: • Departmental reward mechanisms will reflect the agreed-upon values of the department: all employees in the department will take ownership of the plan. • The fundamental principles of value-added and quality research and instruction will constantly drive our decision-making process. • Research and instruction can and will co-exist in our activities. • Research, as one of our primary objectives, will be supported by the department to whatever level is financially possible. • Outreach programs and industry interaction will be emphasized in our research, education and extended learning activities. Instructional Program A decade ago, the half-life of the body of knowledge comprising the discipline of mechanical engineering was estimated at 7.5 years. Presently, the half-life is 5 years. Over the next decade, it is expected to decline to less than three years, i.e. less than the time required obtaining a BS degree. At the same time, the knowledge demands in the field are expected to increase. Technological changes are not only influencing the engineer, but they also impact business and society. These changing requirements demand the establishment of a new culture in education, a culture in which both students and educators recognize and emphasize the dynamic nature of their fields. A new educational environment will be created over the next years that will prepare the mechanical engineer for this new culture. The department’s strategic plan is to develop a program to meet these demands with the following educational objectives: • Educate students to apply mathematics, science and engineering principles to solve mechanical engineering problems. • Develop students’ professional skills to enhance their career success. • Provide students with the broad education necessary to practice engineering in a global society. These objectives are met through a curriculum that provides a strong foundation in the basic and applied sciences and in the liberal arts, with increasing emphasis on mechanical engineering topics in the junior and senior years. The curriculum also includes a wide variety of technical electives and a series of engineering laboratory courses to supplement the theory presented in lecture. Liberal arts courses give the mechanical engineering student a well-balanced education. A capstone senior design experience gives the student opportunities to apply and integrate knowledge and skills learned throughout the mechanical engineering curriculum. Program Structure for the Future The mechanical engineering department currently offers an ABET accredited BS degree, an ME degree for practice-oriented engineers, and MS and Ph.D. research degrees. All these programs provide an excellent core in science, engineering, and technology. However, rapid changes in technology are not readily implemented into any of the degree programs. The department plans to maintain the core strength in science, engineering, and technology while expanding emphasis on business and social issues to meet the goals. All structures of the academic and career-long learning program will have the following components: 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 5
  6. 6. • An aggressive and sustainable mechanism for recruiting and retaining high quality students • Flexibility to embrace changes in delivery through telecommunications, multimedia and information technology • Ability to keep pace with changes due to rapid deployment of engineering technology • Curricula that will address societal issues related to technological changes • Incorporation of business practice into the mechanical engineering design sequence • Support for internships programs that incorporate industrial experience into the academic programs • Virtual classrooms for practicing mechanical engineers to advance their education while maintaining their role as technology or management professionals Metrics and Quality Standards Provided that sufficient resources are available, the following goals would be considered: METRIC GOAL Undergraduate enrollment 300 Lifelong Learning enrollment 400 Representative of Student diversity SC demographics 50% of students Number and diversity of scholarships should have one Student involvement in co-op and internships 80% in 5 years Annual BS degrees awarded 75 FE performance for graduates entering engineering profession 100% take & pass Graduate tracking 100% Student/faculty ratio 12:1 External (outside the dept.) faculty teaching awards 3 per year Percentage of classes taught and/or coordinated by full-time faculty 100% Extramural funding for education research $100,000/year Publications from course development and student projects 10/year Graduate and Research Program The mechanical engineering department currently has strong, internationally recognized groups in mechanics and materials characterization, smart structures and active sensors, and manufacturing sciences in both basic and applied research. The best path for improving the research program is to make necessary changes in the current status as outlined in the following list: • Expand faculty size to achieve critical mass in coherent, strategically-chosen areas such as non- traditional manufacturing processes, smart materials, and mechatronics. • Expand infrastructure (e.g. staff, facilities) to enhance research efforts. • Develop a recruitment and retention plan and/or mechanism for high quality MS and Ph.D. students that emphasizes a research culture from BS through Ph.D. • Develop a sound partnership plan with local and national industry for research and economic developments. • Develop a significant endowment for the department specifically directed towards graduate fellowships and faculty support. • Develop successful promotional programs for the department to publicize our graduate education and research. • Develop an aggressive plan to achieve national levels of external funding per faculty member. Research Plan for the Department Over the next five years the department will develop a research program that meets the following goals: 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 6
  7. 7. • Invest substantial resources to develop essential research capabilities in the strategic areas of (a) non-traditional manufacturing processes, (b) environmentally conscious manufacturing and sustainable systems, (c) non-destructive evaluation of materials, (d) mechatronics and control of mechanical and electronic systems, and (e) smart structures and active sensing • Develop a long-term approach to the recruitment of top-quality graduate students. This will require development of a coherent program for advancing the BS to Ph.D. research culture that includes (a) promotion of our research programs to existing undergraduate students, (b) recruitment of top undergraduate students into research internships, and (c) development of a mentoring culture in the department so that senior level students work with and assist junior level graduate students. • Development of a strategy to obtain a continuous stream of investment risk capital to support faculty for new ideas that have the potential for high payoff. • Develop reward criteria in the department that provide incentives to develop the BS to Ph.D. research culture. Metrics and Quality Standards of the Research Program Provided that sufficient resources are available, the following goals will be achieved: METRIC GOAL Extra-mural funding levels per faculty $175k per year Quality and number of MS and Ph.D. applicants annually 65 MS & 40 PhD Number of MS and Ph.D. students graduated per faculty 1 MS & 1/2 PhD Number of refereed peer-reviewed publications per faculty 2 per year Number of faculty members that (a) are fellows of societies, (b) are members 3 of the National Academy of Engineering/National Academy of Science, and (c) receive awards for their research Number of external presentations of technical work per faculty 1 per year Number of grant proposals submitted per faculty member/year 3 per year National ranking of department in the nation Top 50 Number of inventions/patents/disclosures per faculty 1 per year 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 7
  8. 8. Faculty Profiles Dr. Sarah C. Baxter - Assistant Professor Micromechanics of Composites, Probabilistic Micromechanics. Dr. Abdel Bayoumi - Professor and Chair Manufacturing and Design, Mechatronics, Mechanics of Materials. Dr. Yuh J. Chao - John Ducate, Sr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering Theoretical and experimental studies on failure and fracture of materials and structures, welding modeling for residual stress and distortion, impact mechanics for material characterization and failure criterion. Dr. Jeff Darabi - Assistant Professor Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), Microfluidic Systems, Microscale Heat Transfer, Thermal Management of Microelectronics, Nanotechnology. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 8
  9. 9. Dr. Xiaomin Deng - Professor and Graduate Director Nanomechanics/atomistic simulation; fracture mechanics/crack- growth simulation; manufacturing process modeling/simulation (friction stir welding, metal cutting, GMA welding). Dr. Victor Giurgiutiu (jurjutzu) - Associate Professor Adaptive Materials and Smart Structures, Machinery Diagnostics and Prognostics, Structural Health Monitoring, Mechatronics, Laboratory for Adaptive Materials and Smart Structures, Vibration Management Enhancement Program. Mr. Donald Keating - Associate Professor Technology Management. Dr. Jamil Khan - Associate Professor Heat transfer during manufacturing processes, heat transfer and fluid flow with phase change (Solidification/Melting in Casting, Welding), computational and experimental fluid dynamics related to contaminants transport in rooms, heat transfer in porous media, micro-channel heat transfer, environmentally conscious manufacturing/re-manufacturing. Dr. Xiaodong Li - Associate Professor Nanofabrication, nanostructured materials/devices, reliability of nanostructures/devices, nanomechanical characterization. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 9
  10. 10. Dr. Jed Lyons - Associate Professor Engineering education, composites and reinforced plastics, design and manufacturing of renewable materials. Dr. Steve McNeill - Associate Professor Computer Vision, Digital Image Correlation, Microprocessors, Experimental Mechanics, Reverse Engineering. Dr. Jeff Morehouse - Associate Professor Dr. Morehouse and his students have investigated a broad range of thermodynamic heat engine applications, ranging from space- based fuel cell power systems to ground-coupled heat pumps to phase-change storage systems. Dr. Morehouse has long been associated with solar energy system design and analyses and is currently involved in a conventional HVAC control project and with evaporative system applications in humid climates. Dr. Wally Peters - Professor Complex Systems Study and Design. Dr. Bill Ranson - Professor Scale invariant computer vision applications to the measurement of mechanical systems, mathematical modeling of mechanical systems measurements to the system life predictions, application of technology to learning systems. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 10
  11. 11. Dr. Tony Reynolds - Associate Professor Friction Stir Welding, fatigue and fracture, experimental micro- mechanics, quantitative fractographic analysis. Dr. Curtis Rhodes - Professor Computer-aided design, engineering, and manufacturing; computational fluid dynamics. Dr. Elwyn Roberts - Adjunct Professor Materials performance in nuclear reactors, product design, manufacturing and concurrent engineering. Dr. David Rocheleau - Associate Professor Engineering design and product development, applied mechanisms and robotics, mechatronics, Center for Manufacturing and Technology (CMAT), Advanced Actuators Group. Dr. Elmer Schwartz - Professor Emeritus Nuclear engineering. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 11
  12. 12. Dr. Michael Sutton - Carolina Distinguished Professor Coherent and incoherent optics applications, experimental mechanics, digital image processing, Computer Vision, applications of integral methods and experimental mechanics, boundary value problems, plastic fracture mechanics, finite elements modeling of cracked bodies. Dr. Ed Young - Instructor Fluids, heat transfer, thermodynamics. Dr. Wei Zhao - Adjunct Research Professor Structural integrity and reliability, preventive and reliability- centered maintenance, fatigue and fracture mechanics, finite element analysis, wave propagation applied to structural health monitoring, mechanical properties and microstructures of materials, forensic engineering. Student Achievements and Activities Mechanical engineering students at USC receive an excellent general background in the traditional mechanical engineering areas. Through electives the student may specialize in one of several areas. The program is structured so that the students receive extensive experience in both oral and written communications in various engineering courses. In the senior design sequence, DME students are afforded the opportunity to solve real-world design problems. Student learning is further enhanced through small classes and an accessible faculty. The DME has built a strong internship program with South Carolina industries. This program lets the students use what they’ve learned in the classroom and allows them to gain useful work experience. The program focuses on grounding the student in the fundamentals and laying the foundation for life long learning and professional growth. The DME also places a strong emphasis on the undergraduate research experience. Several students have availed themselves of this opportunity and have subsequently won graduate fellowships at prestigious engineering graduate schools. Complementing the academic and work experience is the broad range of student activities available to DME students. These include student chapters of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, the Society of Women Engineers, and the National Society of Black Engineers. The DME and student societies sponsor USC entries in Intercollegiate Automobile Racing (ICAR) and the intercollegiate competitions in solar boats, 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 12
  13. 13. solar cars, Baja race cars and aircraft lifting competitions. USC teams have either won or placed in the top ten in these intercollegiate competitions. The most recent success occurred at Solar Splash 2001 where the DME students were world champions in an intercollegiate solar boat competition. These activities complement course work, foster teamwork and camaraderie, and in many cases, help students get jobs. Through a rich and intensive educational experience, the USC mechanical engineering graduate is well- prepared to become a productive member of the engineering community. Our goal is to ensure that every DME student has a strong background in fundamentals, has on-the-job experience, communicates effectively, and is ready to contribute. Programs of Study Mechanical engineers develop, design, manufacture, and test mechanical systems. These systems range from engines that power rockets, aircraft, and automobiles to robot computers and machine vision used in biomedical and automated manufacturing applications. Mechanical engineering is a broad field. Graduates work in many areas, such as air-conditioning and refrigeration, automotive engineering, manufacturing processes, nuclear engineering, composite materials, robotics, and manufacturing automation. Employment opportunities in mechanical engineering are excellent, especially in South Carolina and the Southeast, areas of rapid technological growth. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that mechanical engineering jobs in South Carolina will increase about 21% a year through the year 2006. The mechanical engineering programs at USC have four principle objectives: 1) to educate students in solving mechanical engineering problems through the application of mathematics, science, and engineering principles; 2) to help students develop the professional skills that enhance career success; 3) to develop students’ communication skills; 4) to provide students the broad education needed for practicing engineering in a global society. . The mechanical engineering curriculum provides a strong foundation in basic and applied sciences and the liberal arts, with increasing emphasis on mechanical engineering topics in the junior and senior years. Laboratory courses and a capstone senior design experience give students opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained in coursework. The DME undergraduate curriculum allows students to concentrate in one of several areas: design/manufacturing, mechatronics, micro machines, mechanics/materials, thermo fluids/energy sciences, and sustainable design development. Opportunities for undergraduate research helps students develop expertise and gain practical experience as they work with professors in a broad spectrum of research activities. All mechanical engineering faculty are accessible to students who have questions about their studies the department’s undergraduate/faculty ratio of 13:1 ensures that students have numerous opportunities to interact with their professors. Undergraduate Program The undergraduate program in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of South Carolina leads to a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET 2000). Students in our program develop a sound understanding of the engineering sciences, chemistry, physics and mathematics and build on these to develop expertise in design, manufacturing, instrumentation, heat transfer, mechanics and materials. In addition, computer modeling has become an integral part of the mechanical engineer’s education, along with courses and materials to help students develop an understanding of the business world. Using the flexibility provided by the technical electives and with career counseling by the faculty, a student can develop an educational program tailored to meet his or her career goals. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 13
  14. 14. The modest size of USC Columbia permits classes that are small by the standards of most universities. Approximately 265 undergraduate students are enrolled in the ME program served by 18 full time faculty. In the fall of 2001 over 50% of the classes consisted of fewer than 25 students, 40% had between 25 and 35 students and no class exceeded 50 students. This situation permits close faculty student interaction and an opportunity for students to ask questions. In classes where we have 25 or 35 students enrolled it is not uncommon to find other universities teaching to 150 or more in one classroom. This is one indication of USC-Columbia’s commitment to undergraduate education. The College of Engineering and Information Technology offers other career enhancement programs for undergraduates including the Co-op and scholarship programs and the College’s Mentoring Program. The Co-ops are managed through the College Career Center and the DME Recruiting office and provide a “real world” engineering experience for students in a wide variety of local and regional companies. The Mentoring Program is a departmental program designed to help students develop the skills needed to enjoy a positive and successful academic experience. Peer-to-peer mentoring, faculty mentoring, learning workshops and supplemental instruction are a few of the opportunities available through the Recruiting Office. The College of Engineering and Information Technology and the Department of Mechanical Engineering strive to provide a first rate educational experience for its undergraduate students. A combination of training in the fundamentals, laboratory experience and reduction to practice prepare students for a competitive and successful professional career as an engineer. At the completion of their undergraduate studies, our graduates find challenging opportunities in numerous industries, ranging from the automotive world of BMW, Siemens, Ford, Michelin, and other automotive firms to such diverse companies as Duke Power, CP&L, Hewlett Packard, Lexmark, and Reliance Electric, to name just a few. Many students also continue their education in graduate school here and elsewhere. Undergraduate Curriculum First Semester Second Semester Third Semester Student in the University - an Introduction to Engineering Introduction to Engineering Statics Composition General Chemistry & Lab Vector Calculus Calculus I Composition & Literature Essential Physics II & Lab Liberal Arts Elective Calculus II Liberal Arts Electives (2) Essentials of Physics I & II Fourth Semester Fifth Semester Sixth Semester Design of Mechanical Dynamics Fluid Mechanics Elements Numerical Methods for Kinematics & Dynamics of Mechanics of Solids Computers Machines Thermodynamics Engineering Materials Heat Transfer Measurement & Measurements & Instrumentation Circuits I Instrumentation Engineering Analysis or Fundamental of Differential Equations Math Microprocessors Liberal Arts/Music Applied Thermodynamics Elective 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 14
  15. 15. Seventh Semester Eighth Semester Introduction to Vibrations Mechanical Design II Mechanical Design I Mechanical Engineering Lab Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Electives (2) Electives (2) Liberal Arts/Music Elective 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 15
  16. 16. Graduate Program The Department of Mechanical Engineering Science offers degree programs leading to a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME), the Master of Engineering (ME) and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). At the master's level, the program is broad based, allowing students to develop expertise in a number of areas including design, manufacturing, thermal and fluid sciences, solid mechanics, biomechanics, materials engineering and science, and mechanical control and instrumentation. The Ph.D. program is more closely focused on smart materials and sensing, failure mechanics, reverse engineering, materials and computer integrated manufacturing (CIM). The graduate program is supported by a world class imaging and nondestructive laboratory, advanced manufacturing processes labs, prognosis and diagnosis of machinery labs, numerous graduate research and computer labs, and a first rate machine shop managed by a group of highly skilled lab and shop personnel. The College of Engineering and Information Technology also supports a network of engineering computer laboratories. There are approximately 52 master’s students, 32 Ph.D. students and 18 full time faculty participating in the graduate program. Graduate students complete a core program that provides a sound foundation in mechanical engineering and select from a wide range of technical electives to develop expertise in their chosen field. Funding for graduate study is provided by a variety of teaching assistantships, research assistantships and fellowships. Our graduates are employed by some of the world’s leading companies, including Siemens Diesel Engine, Michelin, Westinghouse, Lexmark, NIST, Hewlett Packard, Corning, Federal Products and Duke Power. Faculty/Student Involvement Student/Faculty Ratios Fall Semester Fall 97 Fall 98 Fall 99 Fall 00 Fall 01 Graduate Students/Faculty 4.65 4.24 4.08 5.02 5.25 Undergraduate Students/Faculty 15.23 14.23 11.39 14.00 14.50 All Students/Faculty 18.88 17.47 16.22 17.01 17.20 Average Course Load * 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.9 1.8 Scholarships In addition to scholarships offered by the University and the College of Engineering & Information Technology, our alumni and friends in industry have provided a number of scholarships for mechanical engineering students. These scholarships include: • John and Sara Begg (1) • W.O. Blackstone Scholarship (2) • Charles Willis Eaddy Scholarship (9) • Frank B. Herty Scholarship (25) • Irwin Kahn Memorial Fund Scholarship (1) • National Academy for Nuclear Training Scholarship (1) • National Science Foundation Scholarship (2) • Pirelli Cable Scholarship (3) • Jack Price Scholarship (2) • M. Walker & Ruth Rast Endowed Scholarship (1) • Strom Thurmond (1) 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 16
  17. 17. Student Awards • World Championship, ASME “Solar Splash” Solar Boat Competition, New Orleans, June 2001 • Third Place - Endurance, ASME “Solar Splash” Solar Boat Competition, New Orleans, June 2001 • First Place – 300 Meter Spring, ASME “Solar Splash” Solar Boat Competition, New Orleans, June 2001 • Design Achievement Award, ASME “Solar Splash” Solar Boat Competition, New Orleans, June 2001 Industrial Partners Providing Student Co-Ops 1998 - 1999 2000-2001 • Albemarle Corporation, Orangeburg, SC • Albemarle Corporation, Orangeburg, SC • AVM, Inc., Marion, SC • BBA Nonwovens, Bethune, SC • BMW, Munich, Germany • BellSouth, Columbia and Charleston, • BellSouth Telecommunications, SC Columbia, SC • CAPRO, Inc., Swainsboro, GA • Carolina Power & Light, Hartsville, SC • Kaydon Corporation, Sumter, SC • FN Manufacturing, Columbia, SC • Michelin, N. America, Lexington, SC • Georgetown Steel, Georgetown, SC • Kaydon Corporation, Sumter, SC • Milliken & Company, Saluda, SC • Mack Trucks, Inc, Winnsboro, SC • Siemens Diesel Systems Technology, • Milliken & Company, Spartanburg, SC Blythewood, SC • The Ohio Brass Company, Aiken, SC • The Southern Company, Evans and • SMI Steel Company, Columbia, SC Waynesboro, GA • The Southern Company, Waynesboro, • Willamette Industries, Bennettsville, SC GA 2001-2002 • Thermal Ceramics, Augusta, GA • Marathon Ashland Petroleum • Union Switch & Signal, Batesburg, SC • The Southern Company, Waynesboro, • U.S. Department of the Navy, Cherry GA Point, NC • CAPRO, Inc., Swainsboro, GA 1999-2000 • Siemens Diesel Systems Technology, • Albemarle Corporation, Orangeburg, SC Blythewood, SC • Kaydon Corporation, Sumter, SC • AVM, Inc., Marion, SC • Bell South • Carolina Power & Light, Hartsville, SC • Westinghouse SRC • FN Manufacturing, Columbia, SC • Eastman Chemical Company • Kaydon Corporation, Sumter, SC • Mack Trucks, Inc, Winnsboro, SC • Milliken & Company, Spartanburg, SC • The Ohio Brass Company, Aiken, SC • Scroll Technologies, Arkadelphia, AR • SMI Steel Company, Columbia, SC • The Southern Company, Waynesboro, GA 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 17
  18. 18. Employers Participating in On-Campus Recruiting for Mechanical Engineering 2001-2002 Accenture BMW Manufacturing Corp Celanese Acetate Duke Energy Eagan McAllister Eastman Chemical Co. Exxon Mobil Corporation Federal Bureau of Investigation Great Dane Trailers Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. HDR Engineering Inc. of the Carolinas INROADS International Paper J.A. Jones, Inc. Kline Iron and Steel Co, Inc Kraft Foods KryoTech, Inc Lexington Medical Center Marathon Ashland Petroleum Michelin North America Milliken & Co. Nan Ya Plastics Corp NAVSEA Port Hueneme Nissan Technical Center Pontiac Foods, The Kroger Co. RJR Packaging Rodgers Builders Santee Cooper SC Dept of Transportation SCANA Shaw Industries SMI Steel South Carolina Solectron Corp Sonoco Southern Company Spirax Sarco Inc Underwriters Laboratories, Inc US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District Westinghouse Electric Company Westinghouse Savannah River Company 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 18
  19. 19. Department Profile by Fiscal Year 1995-19 1996-19 1997-199 1998-199 1999-200 2000-200 2001-200 96 97 8 9 0 1 2 Faculty Size 15 17 18 18 16 17 16* Research Expenditures $586,689 $911,467 $1,248,444 $1,413,760 $2,718,436 $2,121,590 $2,650,036 Expenditure/Faculty $39,113 $56,158 $83,230 $94,250 $159,908 $124,799 $165,627 Degrees Awarded BS 67 73 64 63 62 67 65 MS/ME 21 9 28 15 15 15 8 PhD 1 2 1 2 2 2 4 Degrees Awarded by Distance Learning/Faculty 13 5 4 Publications and Articles 57 80 118 110 84 143 113 Publications and Articles/Faculty 3.8 4.7 6.5 6 5.25 8.41 7.06 Other DME Members Administrative Staff 4 4 4 4 Facility Engineers 2 2 2 2 Mechanical Engineering Shop Staff 3 3 3 3 Post Doctors Research Associates 8 8 9 9 *Note: The number of faculty used for 2001-2002 does not count Dr. Deng (on sabbatical), Mr. Keating, or Dr. Roberts. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 19
  20. 20. Degrees Awarded Graduate Degrees 30 25 20 Num ber of 15 Degrees 10 5 0 1995- Doctor of Philosophy 1996- 1997- 1996 1998- Master's of Science 1997 1998 1999- 1999 2000- 2000 2001- 2001 Academ ic Year 2002 Undergraduate Degrees 74 72 70 68 Num ber of 66 Degrees 64 62 60 58 56 1995- 1996- 1996 1997- S1 1997 1998- 1998 1999- 1999 2000- 2000 2001- Years 2001 2002 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 20
  21. 21. Research Expenditures/Faculty Research Expenditures/Faculty $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 Am ount $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 1995-1996 Research Per Faculty 1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999 Total Research 1999-2000 Years 2000-2001 2001-2002 DME Research Expenditures $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 Am ount $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999 1999-2000 Years 2000-2001 2001-2002 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 21
  22. 22. Faculty Awards Joseph M. Biedenbach Distinguished Service Award • Elmer Schwartz • Curtis Rhodes • Stephen McNeill Research Achievement Award • William Ranson • Michael Sutton • Yuh Jin Chao Samuel Litman Distinguished Professor Award • William Ranson • Elmer Schwartz • Neuman Connor • Harry McMillian • Stephen McNeill • Walter Peters • Jamil Khan USC Educational Foundation Research Award Recipients • Michael Sutton AMOCO Foundation Teaching Awards Winners • Frank Herty NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award • Michael Sutton • Michael Sutton Mungo Teaching Awards • Jamil Khan • Walter Peters American Society of Engineering Education Excellence Teaching Awards • Abdel E. Bayoumi Carolina Research Professor • Walter Peters R.E. Peterson Award • Yuh Chao Research Fellow – Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation • Yuh Chao Who’s Who in Polymers and Plastics • Jed Lyons John Ducate Sr. Endowed Chair Professorship USC • Yuh Chao 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 22
  23. 23. 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 23
  24. 24. External Funding Principal Agency Dates Amount Title Investigator Sutton NASA/EPSCO 04/01/97-03/31/02 $568,915.00 SC/NASA EPSCOR R Sutton NASA 03/01/97-09/30/01 $31,862.00 NASA Space Grant Consortium Agreement Baxter NSF 09/15/98-08/31/01 $71,379.00 Influence of Random Microstructure on Stress Concentration in Functionally Graded Composites Lyons, Young, NSF 7/15/99-12/31/02 $70,044.00 Educational Materials for Mechanical Morehouse Engineering System Reynolds/Deng NSF 08/15/99-09/30/02 $339,595.00 Development of Coupled Thermal, Mechanical & Material Transport Models of the Friction Stir Welding Process Giurgiutiu NSF 09/15/99-12/31/03 $24,966.00 Smart Composite Materials for Monitoring Reynolds NASA 09/01/99-07/31/01 $50,693.00 Development of a Novel Method for Determination of Residual Stresses in a Friction Stir Weld Deng SC Space 05/01/00-09/30/01 $22,000.00 Three Dimensional Mixed-Mode Grant Fracture Criteria for Aerospace Structures Reynolds 03/01/00-09/30/01 $19,870.00 Use of Fiber-Optical Chemical Sensors McNeill Savannah 09/18/00-09/30/01 $69,661.00 Weld Integrity Inspection System for River HANDSS-55 Technology Ctr McNeill 09/01/00-09/30/01 $25,000.00 Seed Funds to Develop a Research Cluster Reynolds SCRI 06/27/00-05/08/02 $8,460.00 Metals Affordability Initiative Chao 06/01/01-12/31/01 $7,996.00 Determination of Constraint Parameters Khan/Bayoumi/Den 06/01/00-11/30/01 $25,000.00 Novel High Pressure Waterjet g Techniques Khan SCRI SRA 01/15/00-08/15/01 $24,534.00 Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Temperature Effect During Gas-Spring Production Rhodes SCRI 06/01/00-12/31/01 $846.00 Bond Strength Testing of Composite Materials Giurgiutiu 10/01/00-12/31/01 $106,142.00 Mechanical Diagnostics and Prognostics Rhodes SCRI 06/15/01-08/15/01 $1,284.00 Automation Layout for Coastal Technologies Lyons SCRI 5/01/01-05/01/02 $3,384.00 Tensile Impact of Hybrid Composites Peters NSF 09/15/95-08/31/01 $566,600.00 Graduate Research Traineeships Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Giurgiutiu DOD 09/03/98-06/07/02 $76,976.00 Services to Perform Field Portable Non- Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Equipment Concepts for Tagged Smart Composition Applications 2001/2002 Annual Report – DME, USC 24
  25. 25. Principal Agency Dates Amount Title Investigator Ranson SCANG/DOD 02/01/99-01/31/03 $832,766.00 Cost & Effectiveness Analysis of AH-64A/UH 60L Onboard Vibrations Monitoring System Baxter NSF 08/15/99-07/31/03 $232,000.00 CAREER: Effects of Microstructural Randomness in Composite Processing Reynolds/Deng NSF 08/15/99-09/30/02 $339,595.00 Development of Coupled Thermal, Mechanical & Material Transport Models of the Friction Stir Welding Process Giurgiutiu DOE 09/15/99-12/31/03 $34,966.00 Smart Composite Materials for Monitoring Structural Damage Reynolds SCRI 05/17/00-08/30/02 $149,225.00 DUS&T: Friction Stir Welding Technology Commercialization for High Strength Structural Alloys Reynolds SCRI 10/01/00-08/31/02 $1,209,349.00 Friction Stir Welding Sutton DOT 09/21/00-12/31/02 $247,440.00 Development and Application of a Methodology for Reliability Assessment of Tank Car Structures Sutton 12/01/00-08/15/02 $247,038.00 Crack Growth and Stress Intensity Prediction Techniques Giurgiutiu NSF 01/23/01-12/31/02 $14,000.00 Active Sensors for Health Monitoring of Rotating Machinery Sutton NASA 03/01/01-02/28/03 $10,848.00 NASA Space Grant Consortium Grant Chao NASA 03/01/01-02/28/03 $29,179.00 Deformation and Failure Mechanism of Nanostructured Materials Peters SC Forestry 03/01/01-09/30/03 $29,876.00 Assessing the Potential Economic Use Commission/U of Small Diameter Material in the Edisto SDA River Basin Khan SCUREF 07/15/01-08/15/02 $138,820.00 Computational and Experimental Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Argon Reservoir Chao USCRF/NSF 08/01/01-07/31/04 $160,734.00 Weld Mechanics – Residual Stress Material Inhomogeneity and Fracture Lyons NSF 09/15/01-08/31/03 $24,250.00 US-Egypt Cooperative Research: Friction Stir Welding of Super-Plastic Alloys Darabi 11/06/01-12/31/02 $32,303.00 Chip-Integrated EHD Pumped Cyrogenic Cooling Systems Lienert USCRF/OPTO 11/30/01-08/01/02 $16,675.00 Lens Processing of Aluminum Alloys MEC/ NASA and MMCs Chao SCUREF/WRS 01/01/02-06/30/03 $79,125.00 Determination of Constraint Parameters C/DOE In Fracture Testing Chao SCRI 5/14/02-12/31/02 $47,729.00 Spot Weld Testing Giurgiutiu USCRF/NSF 01/15/02-12/31/03 $62,531.00 Microcontroller/Mechatronics Education of Non-Electrical Engineering Students Sutton NASA 11/01/01-10/31/02 $24,056.32 NASA EPSCOR – Year 5 Darabi USCRF/ 02/01/02-03/31/03 $26,096.00 A Source-Integrated Micro Cooling US Army Device Sutton USCRF/NSF 05/12/02-04/30/05 $203,329.00 Development and Application of 3-D Measurement Methodologies at Reduced Length Scales
  26. 26. Principal Agency Dates Amount Title Investigator Deng NASA 03/01/02-02/28/03 $30,000.00 Investigation of Interfacial Fracture by Molecular Dynamics Reynolds USCRF/Howm 04/12/02-04/11/03 $6,427.00 Structural Amorphous Metals et Corporation/ DARPA Peters NSF 05/16/02-05/15/03 $32,000.00 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Award Lyons NSF 03/01/01-02/28/03 $865,109.00 GK-12 Engineering Fellowships to Enhance Science Education in South Carolina Schools Sutton 04/01/01-09/30/02 $425,000.00 Verification & Application of a 3-D Bayoumi STA 06/01/00-09/24/01 $250,000 On the Internal Combustion Engine of the Future: The Camless Engine Sutton SC EPSCOR 07/01/01-09/30/02 $82,213.00 Development of Capacity for Aircraft Structures Lyons SCRI 08/15/97-05/15/03 $162,434.88 Creep and Rupture Behavior of Thermoplastics Rhodes SCRI 02/15/98-05/15/03 $10,123.71 Technical Project Support / SCRI/RECO Industries Rhodes SCRI 09/01/98-08/31/02 $4,218.00 Technical Project Support Rhodes SCRI 10/01/98-09/30/02 $1,688.00 Tensile Testing of 52100 Steel Lyons SCRI 01/29/99-12/31/02 $10,124.00 Composite Component Testing SCRI/Composite Solutions Giurgiutiu CMS 12/01/98-12/31/02 $37,698.90 Review of Existing Work on “Smart” Control Surfaces Analysis & Design Consultants, Ltd. Rhodes SCRI 02/01/00-01/01/02 $3,384.00 Pull Test and Data Reduction for Latch Assemblies Rhodes SCRI 02/01/00-06/30/02 $1,692.00 Experimental Measurement of Material Properties Rhodes SCRI 01/01/01-12/31/02 $4,230.00 Technical Project Support/Coastal Technologies Rhodes SCRI 01/01/01-12/31/02 $3,384.00 Pull Tests and Data Reduction for Latch Assemblies Peters SCRI 03/01/01-08/31/02 $13,855.00 Improving ISO 14001 at Siemens Diesel Systems Technology Sutton USCRF 07/01/01-06/30/03 $81,037.00 Rapid Determination of Strains from 3- D Image Correlation Bayoumi USCRF/BF 10/01/01-09/30/02 $87,683.00 The Goodrich Center of Excellence in Goodrich Mechanical Diagnostics Technology Lab Rhodes USCRF 01/01/02-12/31/02 $846.02 Design and Manufacturing Engineering Assistance for the Development of Custom-designed Glass and Stone Award Plaques Rocheleau 04/01/02-03/31/03 $7,000.00 Acquisition of Brown & Sharpe Coordinat Rocheleau 04/01/02-03/31/03 $5,000.00 Intel Corporation Participation – Acquisition of Brown & Sharpe Peters USCEF/Kann 05/04/01-05/31/02 $3,000.00 Sustainable Universities Initiative Darabi USCRF 11/01/01- 0/31/02 $25,000.00 Acquisition of a Semi-automated Wire Bonder TOTAL $8,460,284.83
  27. 27. PUBLICATIONS 2001 Publications Chapters in Books Giurgiutiu V., Actuators and Smart Structures, Encyclopedia of Vibrations, G. Braun (Ed.), 58-81, Academic Press, 2001, ISBN 0-12-227085-1. Ohadi M.M., J. Darabi and B. Roget, Electrode Design, Fabrication and Materials Science for EHD- Enhanced Heat and Mass Transport, Annual Review of Heat Transfer, XI, C.L. Tien (Ed.), 563-632, Begell House, Inc, New York, 2001. Journal Articles Baxter S.C., M. Imran Hossain and L.L. Graham, “Micromechanics Based Random Material Property Fields for Particulate Reinforced Composites” (2001) International Journal of Solids and Structures, 38: 9209-9220. Cederqvist L. and A.P. Reynolds, Factors Affecting the Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Lap Joints, The Welding Journal Research Supplement, Vol. 80, No. 12, pp. 281-s - 287-s, 2001. Chao Y.J., S. Liu and B. Broviak, Brittle Fracture: Constraint Effect and Crack Curving Under Mode I Conditions, Experimental Mechanics, 41, 3, 232-241, 9/30/2001. Chao Y.J., X.K. Zhu and L. Zhang, Higher-Order Asymptotic Crack-Tip Fields in a Power-Law Creeping Material, International Journal of Solids and Structures, 38, 3853-3875, 2001. Chao Y.J., Y. Wang and K.W. Miller, Friction Stir Welding Effects on Dynamic Properties of AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T7351, Welding Journal, 80, 8, 196s-200s, 2001. Darabi J., M.M. Ohadi and D. DeVoe, An Electrohydrodynamic Polarization Micropump for Electronic Cooling, Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, 10, 1, 98-106, 2001. Deng X. and S. Xu, Solid Mechanics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding Process, Transactions of NAMRI/ SME, SME, Vol. XXIX, 631-638, 9/30/2001. Fleming W.H., J.A. Khan and C.A. Rhodes, Effective Heat Transfer in a Metal-Hydride-Based Hydrogen Separation Process, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol. 26, 711-724, 2001. Giurgiutiu V., F. Jichi, J. Berman, and J. Kamphaus, Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Magnetostrictive Composite Beams, Smart Materials and Structures, IOP Publishers, UK, Vol 10, pp. 934-945, 2001. Giurgiutiu V., J. Lyons, M. Petrou, D. Laub, S. Whitley, Fracture Mechanics Testing of the Bond between Composite Overlays and Concrete Substrate, Journal of Adhesive Science and Technology, VSP International Science Publishing, The Neterlands,, Vol 15, No. 11, pp. 1351-1371, 2001. Graham L.L. and S.C. Baxter, “Simulation of Local Material Properties based on Moving Window GMC” (2001) Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics, 16: 295-305. Helm J.D., M.A. Sutton and M.L. Boone, Characterizing Crack Growth in Thin Aluminum Panels Under Tension-Torsion Loading with Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation, Nontraditional Methods of Sensing Stress, Strain and Damage in Materials and Structures, ASTM STP 1323, 3-14, 2001. Kim Y., X. Zhu and Y.J. Chao, Quantification of Constraint on Elastic-Plastic 3D Crack Front by the J-A2 Three-Term Solution, Engineering Fracture Mechanics, 68, 7, 895-914, 2001. Li N., P. Cheng, M.A. Sutton, S.R. McNeill and Y.J. Chao, Accurate Integration of Surface Profile Data with Quantitative Error Analysis, Experimental Mechanics, 41, 1, 77-83, 2001. Liu S., R.A. Dougal and J.S. Lyons, Heat Treatment of Metal Surfaces by a Conformal Electron Beam, Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology, Vol. 123, 2, 210-215, 2001. Lyons J., E. Young and J. Morehouse, Developing a Systems Approach to Engineering Problem Solving and Design of Experiments in a Racecar-Based Laboratory Course, Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 90, No. 1, 2001. Ma F., M. A. Sutton and X. Deng, Plane Strain Mixed Mode Crack-tip Stress Fields Characterized by a Triaxial Stress Parameter and a Plastic Deformation Extent Based Characteristic Length, Journal of Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 49, 2921-2953, 9/30/2001. Miller K.W., J.A. Khan, M.Z.H. Khandkar and A.C. Smith, Evaluation of Celotex for Shock Protection of Pressure Vessels, Transportation, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive Materials, ASME PVP- Vol. 425, 21-30, 2001.
  28. 28. Morehouse J.H., Educational Aspects of the Solar Splash Regatta, Transactions of the ASME: Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, Vol. 123, February, 53-56, 2001, (invited discussion paper). Peterson P.D., A.P. Reynolds and M.A. Sutton, Measurement of the Effect of Artificial Crack Geometry on the Rate of Bulk H+ Transport Using Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors, Corrosion, Vol. 57, No. 8, 693-701, 9/30/2001, 2001. Ranson W. and D.K. Williams, Pipe Anchor Discontinuity Analysis Utilizing Axisymmetric Power Series Solutions, Bassel’s Functions and Fourier Series, August-September, 2001. Ranson W. and D.K. Williams, Pipe Anchor Discontinuity Analysis Utilizing Axisymmetric Power Series Solutions, Bassel's Functions and Fourier Series, Nuclear Engineering and Design, August- September, 2001. Schreier H., J. Braasch and M.A. Sutton, On systematic Errors in Digital Image Correlation, Optical Engineering, 39, 11, 2915-2921, 2001. Seidel T.U. and A.P. Reynolds, Visualization of Material Flow in AA2195 Friction Stir Welds using a Marker Insert Technique, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions, A, Vol. 32A, pp. 2879-2884, 2001. Smith A.C., P.R. Vormelker, K.W. Miller, J.A. Khan, M.Z.H. Khandkar, G. Chapman and G. Creech, Effect of Orientation and Strain Rate on Crush Strength of Cellulose Fiberboard Assemblies in Transportation, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive Materials, ASME PVP, Vol. 425, 13-19, 2001. Sutton M.A., J.D. Helm and M.L. Boone, Experimental Study of Crack Growth in Thin Sheet Material Under Tension-Torsion Loading, International Journal of Fracture, 109, 285-301, 2001. Wiseman B. and J.A. Khan, Enhancment of Absorption Properties of Building Materials by Adding Scattering Particles, ASME Paper #NHTC2001-20222, 2001. Xu S., X. Deng, A. P. Reynolds and T. U. Seidel, Finite Element Simulation of Material Flow in Friction Stir Welding, Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, vol. 6, 2001, 191-193. Zhang X.D., H. Zhang, R.J. Grylls, T.J. Lienert, C. Brice, H.L. Fraser and D.M. Keicher, Laser-Deposited Advanced Materials, Journal of Advanced Materials, Vol. 33, 1, 2001, 17-23 Zhao W., M.A. Sutton, S.R. McNeill, H. Schreier and Y.J. Chao, Development and Assessment of a Single Image Fringe Projection Method for Dynamic Applications, Experimental Mechanics, 4, 3, 205-217, 2001. Zhu X. and Y.J. Chao, Constraint Effects on Crack Tip Fields in Elastic-Plastic Materials Under Mode-I, II or Mixed Mode I/II Loading, Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 49, 2, 363-399, 2001. Conference Proceedings Baxter S.C., C.T. Herakovich and A.M. Roerden, Influence of Porosity on the Response of Fibrous Composites, IUTAM Symposium on Theoretical and Numerical Methods in Continuum Mechanics of Porous Media, 131-136, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 9/30/2001. Baxter S. and A.P. Reynolds, Characterization of the Reinforcing Particle Size Distribution in a Friction Stir Welded Al-SiC Extrusion, Proceedings of the Symposium on Lightweight Alloys for Aerospace Applications, New Orleans, LA., February 11-15, 2001. Brader J.S and D.N. Rocheleau, Failure Analysis and Redesign of a Pressure Powered Pump Mechanism, 2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, New York, NY, November 11-16, 2001. Deng X. and S. Xu, Finite Element Simulation of the Friction-Stir Welding Process, Proceedings of the 6th U. S. National Congress on Computational Mechanics, Dearborn, Michigan, 9/30/2001. Deng X., M. A. Sutton and F. Ma, Recent Advances in Mixed Mode Fracture Characterization of Airframe Materials, Proceedings of the 2001 Society for Experimental Mechanics Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Portland, Oregon, 9/30/2001. Deng X., M. A. Sutton, L. Wang, and J. Zuo, Mixed-mode Fracture Analysis of Airframe Materials, Proceedings of the 5th Joint NASA/FAA/DoD Conference on Aging Aircraft, Kissimmee, FL, 9/30/2001. Dunlap D.D., M.J. Aherne, D.A. Keating, T.G. Stanford and M.I. Mendelson, Re-Engineering Higher Education for Responsive Engineering and Technology Leadership, Proceedings of the American
  29. 29. Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, American Society for Engineering Education, 2001. Giurgiutiu V. and R. Pomirleanu, Modeling and Characterization of Piezoelectric and Magnetostrictive Induced Strain Actuators, ASME Aerospace and Materials Divisions,IMECE2001/AD-23744, pp. 1-8, New York, NY, November 11-16, 2001. Giurgiutiu V., A. Cuc, P. Goodman, Review of Vibration-Based Helicopters Health and Usage Monitoring Methods, 55th Meeting of the Society for Machinery Failure Prevention Technology, pp. 69-78, Virginia Beach, VA., April 2-5, 2001. Giurgiutiu V., A. Zagrai and J.J. Bao, Embedded Active Sensors for In-Situ Structural Health Monitoring of Aging Aircraft Structures, 7th ASME NDE Topical Conference, NDE-Vol. 20, 107-116, San Antonio, Texas, April 23-25, 2001. Giurgiutiu V. and A. Zagrai, Electro-Mechanical Impedance Method for Crack Detection in Metallic Plates, 6th Annual International Symposium on NDE for Health Monitoring and Diagnostics, pp. 131-142, Newport Beach, CA, March 4-8, 2001. Giurgiutiu V., G. Cracium, A. Rekers, Cost Benefit Analysis Models for Evaluation of VMEP-HUMS Project, 55th Meeting of the Society for Machinery Failure Prevention Technology, pp. 285-294, Virginia Beach, VA., April 2-5, 2001. He R., X. Wang, W. Tang and Y.J. Chao, Stress Mapping Using a Two-Dimensional Diffraction System, SEM Annual Meeting on Experimental Mechanics, 547-550, Portland, Oregon, June 5-8, 2001. Keating D.A, T.G. Stanford, D.D. Dunlap, M.J. Aherne and M.I. Mendelson, Enhancing U.S. Technology Development Through Lifelong Education of Engineers and Technologists as Creative Professionals, Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, American Society for Engineering Education, 2001. Lyons J. and L. Cederqvist, Full-Body Contact Statics and Other Freshman Engineering Experiences, 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, Albuquerque, NM, June 24-27, 2001. Lyons J., E. Young and S. Creighton, Assessing the Effectiveness of a Racecar-Based Laboratory Course, 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, Albuquerque, NM, June 24-27, 2001. Miller K.W. and Y.J. Chao, Effects of Loading Rate on Spot Weld Strength, SEM Annual Meeting on Experimental Mechanics, 62-64, Portland, Oregon, June 5-8, 2001. Posada M., J. DeLoach, A.P. Reynolds, M. Skinner and J. Halpin, eds. K.V. Jata, M.W. Mahoney, R.S. Mishra, S.L. Semiatin and D.P. Field, Friction Stir Weld Evaluation of DH-36 and Stainless Steel Weldments, Proceedings of the Symposium on Friction Stir Welding and Processing, pp. 159-171, Indianapolis, Indiana, November 5-7, 2001. Rada M., J. Darabi, M.M. Ohadi, and J. Lawler, Electrohydrodynamic Pumping of Liquid Nitrogen using a mesoscale ion-drag pump, Proceedings of the 36th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Savannah, GA, July 29-August 2, 2001. Reynolds A.P., M. Posada. J. DeLoach, M.J. Skinner, J. Halpin and T.J. Lienert, FSW of Austenitic Stainless Steels, Proceedings of the Third International Friction Stir Welding Symposium, Session 2, Paper 1, September, 2001, Kobe, Japan Reynolds A.P., X. Deng and J. Khan, Development of Coupled Thermal, Mechanical, and Material Transport Models of the Friction Stir Welding Process, Proceedings of the 2001 NSF Design, Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation Research Conference, January 7-10, 2001, Tampa, FL. Reynolds A. P. and Wei Tang, eds. K.V. Jata, M.W. Mahoney, R.S. Mishra, S.L. Semiatin and D.P. Field, Alloy, Tool Geometry and Process Parameter Effects on Friction Stir Weld Energies and Resultant Joint Properties, Proceedings of the Symposium on Friction Stir Welding and Processing, pp.15-23, Indianapolis, Indiana, November 5-7, 2001. Reynolds A.P., R. Wheeler and K.V. Jata, Deformation, Fracture and Fatigue in a Dispersion Strengthened Aluminum Alloy, Proceedings of the Symposium on Lightweight Alloys for Aerospace Applications, TMS 2001 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, February 11-15, 2001. Salem H., A.P. Reynolds and J. Lyons, Effect of Friction Stir Welding on the Superplastic Behavior of Weldalite Alloys, Proceedings of the Symposium on Lightweight Alloys for Aerospace Applications, TMS 2001 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA., February 11-15, 2001. Sutton M.A., F. Ma, X. Deng, and J. C. Newman, Jr., Mixed Mode I/II Crack-tip Stress Fields Characterized by a Triaxial Stress Parameter and a Plastic Deformation Extent Based
  30. 30. Characteristic Length, Proceedings of the 33rd Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics, Jackson Lake Lodge, June 26-29, 2001, Jackson Hole, WY. Wiseman B., J.A. Khan and C.A. Rhodes, Experimental Determination of Absorption Properties of building Materials, Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, 641-651, Antalya, Turkey, June 17-22, 2001. Zehnder A.T., Y. K. Potdar, X. Deng, and C. Shet, An Experimental and Computational Study of Temperature and Strain Fields in Metal Cutting, Proceedings of the 2001 International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition (IMECE 2001), November 11-16, 2001, New York, NY. 2002 Publications Chapters in Books Chao Y.J., “Failure of Spot Weld: A Competition Between Crack Mechanics and Plastic Collapse,” in "Recent Advances in Experimental Mechanics - In Honor of Isaac M. Daniel," pp.245-256, July 2002. Journal Articles Salem H.G. and J.S. Lyons “Effect of Equal Channel Angular Extrusion on the Microstructure and Superplasticity of an Al-Li Alloy”, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Vol 11, No. 4, pp. 384-391, 2002. Lyons J., D. Laub, V. Giurgiutiu, M. Petrou and H. Salem “Effect of Hygrothermal Aging on the Fracture of Composite Overlays on Concrete”, Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 293-310, 2002. Salem H., A. P. Reynolds, and J. S. Lyons, “Microstructure and Retention of Super-Plasticity of Friction Stir Welded Super-plastic 2095 Sheet”, Scripta Materialia, Vol. 45, No. 5, pp. 337-342, 2002. Khan J. A., H.J. Hinton, and S.C. Baxter, “Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Inclined Baffles and Ribs Combined” Journal of Enhanced Heat Transfer, accepted for publication (2002). Li X. and Bharat Bhushan, “A Review of Nanoindentation Continuous Stiffness Measurement Technique and Its Applications,” Materials Characterization, 48 (2002) 11-36. Li X. and Bharat Bhushan, “Development of a Nanoscale Fatigue Measurement Technique and Its Application to Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Coatings,” Scripta Materialia, 47 (2002) 473-479. Li X. and Bharat Bhushan, “Nanofatigue Studies of Ultra-Thin Hard Carbon Overcoats Used in Magnetic Storage Devices,” Journal of Applied Physics, 91 (2002) 8334-8336. Zhu X. and Chao, Y.J., “Effects of Temperature-Dependent Material Properties on Welding Simulation,” Computers and Structures, 967-976, 80, 2002. Sutton M. A., A. P. Reynolds, B. Yang, and R. Taylor, “Mode I Fracture and Microstructure for 2024-T3 Friction Stir Welds”, Materials Science and Engineering, A, (accepted, available on line). Kroninger H. R. and A. P. Reynolds, “R-Curve Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195”, Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures, Vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 283-290, March 2002. Sutton M. A., A. P. Reynolds, D. Wang, and C. Hubbard, “Residual Stress Analysis in 2024-T351 Aluminum Friction Stir Butt Weld by Neutron Diffraction”, ASME Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology, April 2002, vol. 124, pp. 215-221. Sutton M. A., B. Yang, A. P. Reynolds, and R. Taylor, “Microstructural Studies of Friction Stir Welds in 2024-T3 Aluminum”, Materials Science and Engineering, A, January 2002, vol. 323/1-2, pp 160-166. Pomirleanu R., Giurgiutiu, V. (2002) “Full Stroke Static and Dynamic Analysis of High- Power Piezoelectric Actuators”, Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, (in press) Gelman L., Giurgiutiu, V.; Petrunin, I. (2002) “Advantage of Using the Fourier Components Pair instead of Power Spectral Density for Fatigue Crack Detection”, International Journal of Condition Monitoring and Diagnostics Engineering Management, UK, Vol. 5, No. 4, October 2002 (in press) Giurgiutiu V., Zagrai, A. N.; Bao, J. (2002) “Embedded Active Sensors For In-Situ Structural
  31. 31. Health Monitoring of Thin-Wall Structures”, ASME Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology, Vol. 124, No. 3, August 2002, pp. 293-302 Giurgiutiu V., Zagrai, A. N.; Bao J.; Redmond, J.; Roach, D.; Rackow, K. (2002) “Active Sensors for Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures”, International Journal of the Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management, UK, Vol. 5, No. 3, August 2002 (in press) Giurgiutiu V., Zagrai, A. N.; Bao, J. (2002) “Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring”, Structural Health Monitoring – An International Journal, Sage Pub., Vol. 1, No. 1, July 2002, pp. 41-61 Giurgiutiu V., Bayoumi, A. E.; Nall, G. (2002) “Mechatronics and Smart Structures: Emerging Engineering Disciplines of the New Millennium”, Journal of Mechatronics, Pergamon Press, UK, Vol. 12, No. 2, March 2002, pp. 169-181 Giurgiutiu V., Zagrai, A. N. (2002) “Embedded Self-Sensing Piezoelectric Active Sensors for Online Structural Identification”, ASME Journal of Vibration and Acoustics, Vol. 124, January 2002, pp. 116-125 Schreier H.W., M.A. Sutton, "Effect of Higher Order Displacement Fields on Digital Image Correlation Displacement Component Estimates", International Journal for Experimental Mechanics, 42 (3) 303-310 (2002). Zhao W. and M.A. Sutton, "Microstructure and residual stresses in TC-128B tank car steel butt welds ", ASME Journal for Engineering Materials and Technology, 124 (4) 405-415 (2002) Cheng P., M.A. Sutton, S.R. McNeill and H.W. Schreier, ”Full-field Speckle Pattern Image Correlation with B-Spline Deformation Function", International Journal of Experimental Mechanics, 42 (3) 344-353 (2002) Conference Proceedings Lyons J., M. Banich, J. Brader and C. Ebert, “Formative Assessment of the University of South Carolina’s Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education Program”, Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada, June 16-19, 2002. Brader J. and J. Lyons, “Utilization of the Learning Cycle and Design of Experiments to Enhance Understanding of Mechanical Engineering Concepts,” Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada, June 16-19, 2002. Lyons J., “Partnerships to Enhance Engineering Education in K-16,” Proceedings of the 2002 National Science Foundation Engineering and Computing Education Grantees Conference, Washington DC, September 30-October 1, 2002, http://beaker.andrulis.com/eec/index.cfm. Lam P.S., Y.J. Chao, X. –K. Zhu, Y. Kim, and R.L. Sindelar, “Determination of Constraint-Modified J-R Curves for Carbon Steel Storage Tanks,” PVP-Vol.434, PVP2002-1116, Computational Weld Mechanics, Constraint, and Weld Fracture, Editor: F.W. Brust, pp.133-142, ASME Pressure Vessel and Piping Conference, August 2002, Vancouver, Canada. Chao Y.J., “Failure of Spot Weld –n A Competition Between Crack Mechanics and Plastic Collapse,“ Special Symposium on Recent Advances in Experimental Mechanics : Fracture and Fatigue In Honor of Isaac M. Daniel, Contemporary Research in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Proceedings of the 14th US National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, June 23-28, 2002, Blacksburg, Virginia, p.202. Chao Y.J., “Observation of Failure Mechanisms and Development of Model for Predicting Strength of Resistance Spot Weld,“ Contemporary Research in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Proceedings of the 14th US National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, June 23-28, 2002, Blacksburg, Virginia, p.556. Liu S. and Chao, Y.J., “Mixed Mode I/III Fracture of Solids: Tensile-Shear Transition,“ Contemporary Research in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Proceedings of the 14th US National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, June 23-28, 2002, Blacksburg, Virginia, p.533. Kim Y., Jang, S.K., Liu, S., Chao, Y.J. and Sutton, M.A., “Experimental Study on Ductile Crack Growth of Aluminum 7075 Alloy by Rubber Impression Method,” Contemporary Research in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Proceedings of the 14th US National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, June 23-28, 2002, Blacksburg, Virginia, p.537.
  32. 32. Miller K.W., Chao, Yuh J., Martinez, A., and Zhu, X., “Quasi-static and Impact Strength of Spot Welds in Used Vehicles,” Proceedings of the SEM annual meeting on Experimental Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pp.63-65, June 10-12, 2002. Chao Y.J., “On the Failure of Resistance Spot Welds: Nugget Pullout vs. Interfacial Fracture,” Proceedings of the SEM annual meeting on Experimental Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pp.66-69, June 10-12, 2002. Chao Y.J. “On the Failure of Resistance Spot Weld,” Developments in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Vol. XXI, Editors: A.J. Kassab, D.W. Nicholson,and I. Ionescu, pp.343-350; Proceedings of the Southeastern Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Conference (SECTAM) XXI, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, May 19-21, 2002. Kandahar M.H., J.A. Khan, and A.P. Reynolds, “Input torque Based Thermal Model of Friction Stir Welding of Al 6061-T6”, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research, Callaway Gardens, GA, USA, April 2002. Reynolds A.P., K. Lindner, Wei Tang, and T.U. Seidel, “Weld Efficiency and Defect Formation: Correlation Between Experiment and Simple Models”, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research, Callaway Gardens, GA, USA, April 2002. Posada M., J. DeLoach, A.P. Reynolds, and J.P. Halpin, “Mechanical Property and Microstructural Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded AL-6XN”, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research, Callaway Gardens, GA, USA, April 2002. Sutton M. A., X. Deng, and A. P. Reynolds, “Development of a 3-D stable tearing prediction methodology,” seminar presentation at the Air Force Research Laboratories, Dayton, Ohio, Feb. 25, 2002. Mahgoub E., X. Deng, and M. A. Sutton, “Stress and deformation fields around a slant crack,” 21st Southeastern Conference on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (SECTAM XXI), Orlando, Florida, May 19-21, 2002. Deng X., E. Mahgoub, and M. A. Sutton, “Analysis of slant fracture in specimens under nominal Mode I loading conditions,” 14th U.S. National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, June 23-28, 2002. Zuo J., M. A. Sutton, and X. Deng, “A model for failure initiation in ductile materials,” 14th U.S. National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, June 23-28, 2002. Zuo J., M. A. Sutton, and X. Deng, “A unit-cell based micro-mechanics study of ductile failure by void growth,” Society for Experimental Mechanics Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 10-12, 2002. Deng X., E. Mahgoub, and M. A. Sutton, “A three-dimensional analysis of slant fracture in ductile materials,” Society for Experimental Mechanics Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 10-12, 2002. Sutton M.A., A.P. Reynolds, B-C. Yang and N. Yuan, "Mixed mode I/II fracture studies for 2024-T3 aluminum FSW joints", Presented at 6th International Conference on Welding Trends at AWS Meeting in Calloway Gardens, April 2002. Sutton M.A., A.P. Reynolds, B-C. Yang and N. Yuan, Mixed Mode I/II fracture studies for 2524 Aluminum FSW Butt Welds", presented at FSW Conference in Orlando Florida, June 6-12, 2002. Sutton M.A. and W. Zhao, "Damage tolerance assessment for welded tank car structures", Proc. of Am. Steel Society Conference in Raleigh, NC in April, 2002. Sutton M.A., A.P. Reynolds, B-C. Yang and N. Yuan, "Friction Stir Weld Energy: Effects on Mixed Mode I/ II Stable Tearing of 2524 Plate", Proceedings of AEROMAT Meeting in Orlando, FLA, June 8-13, 2002 Wan B., M.F. Petrou, K.A. Kent, M.A. Sutton, and B. Yang, “Experimental Investigation of Bond between FRP and Concrete”, The Third International Conference on Composites in Infrastructure, San Francisco, California, June 10-12, 2002. Sutton M.A., "Recent Advances in Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Computer Vision: Theory and Applications", British Society for Strain Measurements, Stratford-upon Avon England, August 27-29 2002 (invited talk) Deng X., E. Mahgoub, and M. A. Sutton, “Analysis of slant fracture in specimens under nominal Mode I loading conditions,” 14th U.S. National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, June 23-28, 2002. (invited)
  33. 33. Zuo J., M. A. Sutton, and X. Deng, “A model for failure initiation in ductile materials,” 14th U.S. National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, June 23-28, 2002. (invited) Zuo J., M. A. Sutton, and X. Deng, “A unit-cell based micro-mechanics study of ductile failure by void growth,” Society for Experimental Mechanics Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 10-12, 2002. Deng X., E. Mahgoub, and M. A. Sutton, “A three-dimensional analysis of slant fracture in ductile materials,” Society for Experimental Mechanics Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 10-12, 2002.
  34. 34. Industrial Advisory Board Members Bard Allison, Alumni Executive Malcolm Gordge, Engineering Manager Phone: 770-988-8709/FAX: 770-565-6213 Spirax Sarco, Inc. Email: bard.jean@mindspring.com 1150 Northpoint Boulevard Blythewood, SC 29016 Robert (Bob) L. Bates, P.E., CEM Phone: 803-714-2000 DuPont Engineering Technology E-mail: mgordge@spirax.com Energy Systems/Rotating Machinery Southeast Regional Consulting Operations Robert L. Hart, President Camden, SC PSC Associates, LLC Phone: 803-425-2738 2836 Colonnade Drive Email: Robert.L.Bates@usa.dupont.com Mt. Pleasant, SC 29466 Phone: 843-200-1753/Fax: 843-971-5917 Jeff Gasser, Vice President E-mail: rhart104@comcast.net Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc. 40 Inverness Center Parkway John P. Irion, President Post Office Box 1295 South Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership Birmingham, AL 35201 817 Calhoun Street Phone: 205-992-7110/Fax: 205-992-0403 Columbia, SC 29201 E-mail: jtgasser@southernco.com Phone: 803-252-6976/Fax: 803-254-8512 E-mail: jirion@scmep.org William Best, Chairman and CEO Thermal Engineering Corporation Dr. Natraj C. Iyer, Manager Post Office Box 868 Material Technology Columbia, SC 29202 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Phone: 803-783-0750, ext. 3104 Building 773-A, Room D1123 Fax: 803-783-0756 Aiken, SC 29808 Phone: 803-725-2695/Fax: 803-725-7369 Andrew H. Card, Jr., Chief of Staff to the E-mail: natraj.iyer@srs.gov President of the United States White House Mark Jeffries, Manufacturing Manager 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Next Generation Frigidaire Home Products Washington, DC 20500 101 Masters Boulevard Phone: 202-456-1111 Anderson, SC 29622 Phone: 864-260-0435 Cal Dent, District Manager E-mail: vastinc@aol.com The Trane Company 111 Lott Court Johnny Johnson, Vice President, Sales & West Columbia, SC 29169 Marketing Phone: 803-936-4701/Fax: 803-936-4715 Thermal Engineering Corporation E-mail: fcdent@trane.com 2741 The Boulevard Columbia, SC 29209 Colonel Lester D. Eisner, State Army Aviation Phone: 803-783-0750, x3161/Fax: 803-783-0756 Officer E-mail: johnny.johnson@tecinfrared.com Office of The Adjutant General 1 National Guard Road Michael J. Margotta, President Columbia, SC 29201-4766 Technomic Publishing Co., Inc. Phone: 803-806-4335/4327/Fax: 803-806-1566 851 New Holland Avenue, Box 3535 E-mail: lester.eisner@sc.ngb.army.mil Lancaster, PA 17604 Phone: 717-291-5609/Fax: 717-295-4538 Ken Fasching, Vice President E-mail: president@techpub.com Manufacturing Services Greater Columbia Chamber of Commerce Mark Fecteau, Plant Manager 930 Richland Street Westinghouse Electric Company Post Office Box 1360 Post Office Drawer R Columbia, SC 29202 Columbia, SC 29250 Phone: 803-733-1115/Fax: 803-733-1157 Phone: 803-647-2114/Fax: 803-647-2025 E-mail: kfasching@gcbn.com E-mail: fecteamw@westinghouse.com
  35. 35. M. Walker Rast 27 Knightsbridge Lane Steve W. Trewhella, Sr., Chairman of the Hilton Head, SC 29838 Board Phone: 803-785-8222/Fax: 843-785-9977 Glassmaster Company E-mail: rasthhi@aol.com Post Office Box 788 Lexington, SC 29072 Jack Roach, Director Phone: 803-359-2594/Fax: 803-359-0897 Advanced Product Development ArvinMeritor - Motion Control Systems Ferol B. Vernon, President and CEO Hwy 76, East, Box 729 Siemens Diesel Systems Technology Marion, SC 29571 1410 Northpoint Boulevard Phone: 843-464-5346/Fax: 843-464-0932 Blythewood, SC 29016 E-mail: jack.roach@arvinmeritor.com Phone: 803-788-9901/Fax: 803-788-7069 Ralph R. Roe, Jr., Manager Space Shuttle Vehicle Engineering Office Mail Code MV NASA Johnson Space Center 2101 NASA Road One Houston, TX 77058 Phone: 281-483-3307 E-mail: ralph.r.roe1@jsc.nasa.gov
  36. 36. E-mail: ferol.vernon@at.siemens.com

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