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M-consumers: Ethnographic research with UK mobile consumers
 

M-consumers: Ethnographic research with UK mobile consumers

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  • Our mobile Going Mobile programme was born out of the need for insight.Clients are increasingly asking us ‘what should we do with mobile?’And while there are lots of statistics out there about mobile penetration and take up trends, the stats lack the richness that we all need to inspire innovation and creativity in the design of mobile products and services.To design great experiences for mobile we need to understand what people are trying to do on the move, and we need to understand the factors, like time, place, connectivity and privacy that will influence our designs.It was this level of deep insight that we wanted to gather with the Going Mobile programme.
  • Our mobile Going Mobile programme was born out of the need for insight.Clients are increasingly asking us ‘what should we do with mobile?’And while there are lots of statistics out there about mobile penetration and take up trends, the stats lack the richness that we all need to inspire innovation and creativity in the design of mobile products and services.To design great experiences for mobile we need to understand what people are trying to do on the move, and we need to understand the factors, like time, place, connectivity and privacy that will influence our designs.It was this level of deep insight that we wanted to gather with the Going Mobile programme.
  • I won’t spend a lot of time on this but before we get into the findings, it will be useful to provide an overview of the method behind the programme.We kicked off the study in October 2011 and it took just over 6 months to complete.Through five phases we produced a robust and unique collection of insights. The study combined initial industry research, qualitative insights collected in a detail diary study, and robust quantitative validation of our initial analysis. We used Forrester’s mobile segmentation as the basis for all stages of the consumer research, with respondents from the ‘super connected’ segment recruited to take part.So what came out of the study? Well, rather than producing a large report on what we had found, we concentrated on building a set of practical tools and design artefacts that planners and designers could useThese included: Sector-specific insights: While this was a general study of mobile, we framed the fieldwork to allow us to drill down into a number of specific industry sectors: including financial services; retail; media and gaming.Personas: representing four distinct personality and user types within that super connected segment.A mobile vision and set of design principles that crystalize the Going Mobile insights in a form that we’ve found is very easy to communicate.In today’s session we will focus on the the personas, backed-up by some of the attitudinal and behavioural data that we captured during the survey. But I think it will be useful at this point to briefly recap the mobile vision and design principles.
  • So who are these mobile consumers.....?
  • Well today we are going to answer this question by introducing you to four mobile personas, which will help us to think about the different types of consumers out there, - their attitudes, behaviours and priorities.
  • The rich qualitative feedback collecting during the diaries, which has been validated by the online survey, has shown that a consumer’s experience with mobile and the nature of their relationship drives their attitudes and behaviours. So our personas are based upon four key dimensions:Firstly confidence with mobile – do they feel completely au fait with the technology or are they more fragile? It’s worth reminding ourselves at this point that even the ‘super connected’ consumers included in our study can have moments of uncertainty, particularly at times of perceived risk such as mobile transactions.Next it’s frequently of mobile use – are they the type of character who constantly has their smart phone glued to their hand, or indeed tablet by their side, or do they ration themselves?In the last webinar we talked about the potential strength of the emotional connection with mobile, so our third dimension addresses whether a consumer’s relationship with mobile tends to be more functional or emotional.Finally, what’s their attitude towards mobile and what it could do for them in future? Are they very open minded, are they closed-off to the possibilities or are they unsure?So let me introduce you to these personas....
  • ....starting with Chris the Social Animal.Chris is our youngest persona, he’s still paying off his student loan and finances are quite tight.For Chris mobile represents his connection to his whole world – he is a very social person and likes to be kept in the loop at all times.This means that he is a very confident and frequent user of the technology, it’s like second nature to him.He has a strong emotional attachment to mobile because it is the gateway to his social relationships – he would feel extremely cut off without it.So what do brands need to be aware of with a persona like Chris?His confidence and familiarity with technology means that he’s not easily thrown, but he does have high expectations.Constantly communicating with others, and not just about his social life! He will be a brand’s biggest supporter, but he will also tell his social network about apps or mobile services that underdeliver.He’s always out and about so he is frequently engaging with brands in new places and in new ways: for example placing bets on the football in a social environment with friends.Mobile is crucial in helping him to make decisions – money is tight, so mobile banking helps him to work out if he can afford any impulse purchases, or he will simply search for better deals elsewhere.
  • Next up is Lucy, the escapist.Lucy is a successful professional, but like many of us with hectic lives, she needs to escape now and then - and mobile is that welcome distraction.Like Chris, she also a very frequent and open-minded user of mobile, and although high, her confidence isn’t quite as extreme.She has an emotional attachment to mobile in the sense that it adds colour and brightness to her day.So what are implications for brands dealing with someone like Lucy?She has a short attention span and is easily distracted. She is the type of user who will often flick between multiple apps and sites, so mobile services need to work hard to make a good impression and keep her interest.However there are also opportunities with her. She’s not afraid to act on impulse, making purchases in the heat of the moment. She also uses mobile in a more covert fashion to help her do the things she enjoys in places when it normally wouldn’t be possible. An example I drew on in the last webinar was betting or playing roulette at work. SSo in these ways, she is the type of character who could bring additional revenue to brands.
  • Laura the organiser is an extremely busy working Mum, and mobile is like her personal assistant.She is extremely methodical and uses mobile to help her stay on top of things. She doesn’t use mobile as frequently as Lucy or Chris, and her relationship is more functional, but that’s because she has to be. Her life dictates that there has to be times when she shuts her mobile away to concentrate on other tasks, but when she does use mobile she makes sure she is as productive as possible.Mobile for Laura is all about organisation and planning ahead. Tasks such as paying bills, writing shopping lists or shortlisting new products are done on the go so that she can concentrate on her family when she is at home.However, like many other consumers, she will move to another device if she needs to look at more complex information, such a new financial product, or do something that has a perceived risk attached to it such as making a payment. She also has a tablet, and would use this at home because it’s easier to digest information on a bigger screen or look at it with her husband.So Laura is big supporter of apps or sites that help her with these activities, but she can get frustrated if there is a lack of consistency across platforms.
  • Finally, James the cautious explorer is our most novice mobile persona, but you can’t knock his enthusiasm.He is using his very first smartphone and he is still exploring what it can do for him. His confidence and usage frequency is therefore lower than all of the other personas, and he simply hasn’t had a chance to form an opinion about the role of mobile in his life in in future.James is the type of consumer whose usage is entry level – he is worried about security and making mistakes, particularly given that he’s older and starting to be aware of his eyesight getting worse. His son tells him about good apps to use however he will only continue to use the ones that really intuitive and meet a specific need. But he’s willing to learn, and character that some brands will want to nurture particularly as he is more affluent – particular banks comes to mind here.
  • So who are these mobile consumers.....?
  • Well today we are going to answer this question by introducing you to four mobile personas, which will help us to think about the different types of consumers out there, - their attitudes, behaviours and priorities.
  • Taking the remote control – this is about planning in advance and using mobile to make any quiet moments productive. Researching products and services, or making the most of mobile to complete tasks quickly or on the move, in a way that simply isn’t possible on a PC.This behaviour significant facet of our persona ‘Laura the organiser’ and represents a key theme of ‘Going Mobile’: the creation of new time in consumers lives.
  • Planning on the go has implications that stretch beyond mobile – underlining that brands should also consider their wider strategy.For example, consumers are now able to shop around more frequently and with a greater degree of price sensitivity or deal savviness – at an overall level 6 in 10 have become more likely to compare prices or look for better deals since they got a smart phone or tablet.To repeat the point made earlier, a third now shop around for financial products on a more regular basis. Now this might not immediately translate into product acquisitions or customers switching, but we know from other research that that knowledge of competitive deals elsewhere increases customers’ sensitivity to the overall level of service delivered.Looking at retail, nearly 4 in 10 now do more planning before they hit the high street, which has clear implications for brands whose mobile offering does not let consumers do this – at a basic level they could miss out on a chance to be on a customer’s shortlist.
  • Creating fun-time out of down-time is the opportunity to switch off from one’s obligations, much like Lucy the escapist.Through: playing games consuming media or other forms of entertainment Seeking inspiration and having the freedom to act upon impulse, rather than constantly planning.
  • Part of creating fun time out of down time involves shaking off the shackles of constantly planning and organising, with more freedom to act upon impulse, just as described with Lucy’s persona.The constant presence of mobile facilitates this behaviour and we’ve seen particular sector benefits for gambling and retail.Nearly half of mobile gamblers are now placing more impulse bets and 4 in 10 mobile shopping are also now making more impulse purchases. Mobile as a channel has made it possible for brands to benefit from this additional revenue.There’s a strong link here to the design principle ‘your brand in my pocket’.
  • Mobile is still about staying connected with the world.However, staying connected now involves more than traditional communications.Users are sharing their opinions about service, consuming media and accessing information on the move more than they ever have before – and they’re looking for mobile services that help them do this, hence our design principle ‘always keep me connnected’
  • Greater connection brings greater opportunity for users to share their experiences. We now carry our social networks with us on a daily basis and word of mouth is significant to the discovery of new apps and mobile services.Half find out about new apps this way and three quarters have downloaded an app just because someone recommended it to them.This is good news for the brands that create great mobile services, but what about the negative perceptions that we looked at earlier? Would underperforming brands, with underdeveloped mobile offerings they want their customers sharing these views? Probably not!
  • Digital is no longer confined to a fixed location and consumers are using this to their advantage with opportunities to enhance physical experiences and engage in activities that they couldn’t before.New technology, such as NFC, will only continue this trend.
  • This behaviour is evident across several sectors covered by Going Mobile..... For example....
  • But it’s not just brand perceptions that are likely to be affected. This study demonstrates that the winners in mobile gain additional business and solid relationships as they start to play a more regular and meaningful part in consumer’s lives. And we’ve have seen examples of this across financial services, gambling and retail:Half of mobile gamblers place bets more frequently, 4 in 10 of mobile shoppers tell us they now shop more overall, and a 1/3 of mobile banking users look into financial products more frequently.But of course this is another risk for those brands that don’t facilitate or support these mobile behaviours – particularly if their competitors have a more advanced mobile offering.
  • We have seen throughout Going Mobile that there is a real need for action.Brands risk being displaced by organisations who provide superior mobile experiences, and even some established brands are failing to keep pace with consumer desires for mobile services.So before I move onto the behaviours and characteristics of these consumers, I wanted to throw the net a bit wider and look at the impact of mobile experiences, and this time pull on some of our survey data to illustrate the scale of the risks, challenges and opportunities.
  • Starting first with consumers’ increasingly high expectations. Most are dealing with multiple sectors through mobile, and all of these experiences shape their expectations.Brands should look to learn from organisations beyond their immediate competitor set if they are to succeed, particularly given that three quarters believe an app or mobile service doesn’t deserve their loyalty if it fails to hit the mark.Most importantly however, mobile could make or break an overall brand relationship: nearly half have stopped dealing with a brand altogether because the app / mobile service wasn’t good enough.
  • Bur apps and mobile services aren’t given long to prove themselves and demonstrate that they can meet these expectations. They need to capture attention quickly and there are few second chances, with over 8 in 10 claiming that an app or mobile site needs to make a good first impression if they are to continue using it.The point of entry is particularly critical; on the first occasion and on subsequent visits.56% have not signed-up to an app or mobile service because the registration process was too long or confusing49% have stopped using an app / mobile service because the login process was too time consuming
  • We have seen throughout Going Mobile that there is a real need for action.Brands risk being displaced by organisations who provide superior mobile experiences, and even some established brands are failing to keep pace with consumer desires for mobile services.So before I move onto the behaviours and characteristics of these consumers, I wanted to throw the net a bit wider and look at the impact of mobile experiences, and this time pull on some of our survey data to illustrate the scale of the risks, challenges and opportunities.
  • We have seen throughout Going Mobile that there is a real need for action.Brands risk being displaced by organisations who provide superior mobile experiences, and even some established brands are failing to keep pace with consumer desires for mobile services.So before I move onto the behaviours and characteristics of these consumers, I wanted to throw the net a bit wider and look at the impact of mobile experiences, and this time pull on some of our survey data to illustrate the scale of the risks, challenges and opportunities.
  • We created the vision and design principles to help brands win in the mobile space.
  • For our vision, we see that …Ultimately, the goal is to be the brand that has their icon on the first screen of someone’s device. We know from our study that this is where the people keep their most frequently used apps from their most favoured brands, and we know that customers feel closer to these organisations as a result.
  • Consumers are clearly excited about what mobile could do for them in future, and with new technology approaching the point of becomin mainstream mobile space, frankly we are too. But as we have seen today, there is a need to act now to ensure that your organisation is fully committed to mobile and has clear understanding of what it’s trying to achieve.Is your organisation making an adequate investment in the right time and resources?Has it considered the potential negative impact of poorly conceived or delivered services?And at the same time, don’t restrict yourself to your immediate competitive set to understand where the bar is being set for mobile experiencesUnderstand the space your mobile service is trying to fill - which of the 4 behaviours does it play to best? A well designed and focussed service is likely to be more successful than something too generalist.Implicit in this is a need to understand your target audience, bearing in mind their emotional as well as their functional needs – not forgetting the critical onboarding stage.
  • For our vision, we see that …Ultimately, the goal is to be the brand that has their icon on the first screen of someone’s device. We know from our study that this is where the people keep their most frequently used apps from their most favoured brands, and we know that customers feel closer to these organisations as a result.

M-consumers: Ethnographic research with UK mobile consumers M-consumers: Ethnographic research with UK mobile consumers Presentation Transcript

  • M-Consumers. Ethnographic research with UK mobile consumers Tim Loo, User Experience Strategist, Foolproof© 2012 Foolproof Limited @foolproof_ux
  • Experience Design Group @foolproof_ux
  • Mobile loads of datalimited insights @foolproof_ux
  • insightfuelsdesign @foolproof_ux
  • Getting the right idea Getting the idea right @foolproof_ux
  • GoingMobile 2012 – Methodology Quant Insights Industry Diary study Analysis validation & design research toolsA combination of industry views, • Client & SME Interviewsqualitative insights and • 2 week diary study • 40 participants (‘Super Connected’)quantitative analysis covering a • Rich data collection & analysissix month period from Sept • Quant validation (500 survey)2011 – March 2012 • Vision & design principles • Persona & scenarios @foolproof_ux
  • Introducing theM-Consumer @foolproof_ux
  • Personas help us think about different types ofconsumers and theirattitudes, behaviours and priorities @foolproof_ux
  • Confidence with mobile Low High Frequency of mobile use Low High Experience & relationship withmobile drives attitudes & behaviours Relationship with mobile Functional Emotional Attitude towards mobile Closed Unsure Open @foolproof_ux
  • Chris: the social animal.Marketing Assistant, lives with friends, 26 Confidence with mobile Low High Frequency of mobile use Low High Relationship with mobile Functional Emotional Mobile is: Defining app: Mobilke Attitude towards mobile Closed Unsure Open @foolproof_ux
  • Lucy: the escapist.Accountant, lives with partner, 32 Confidence with mobile Low High Frequency of mobile use Low High Relationship with mobile Functional Emotional Mobile is: Defining app: Attitude towards mobile Closed Unsure Open #mobileinsight
  • Laura: the organiser.Sales Manager, married with kids, 44 Confidence with mobile Low High Frequency of mobile use Low High Relationship with mobile Functional Emotional Mobile is: Defining app: Attitude towards mobile Closed Unsure Open #mobileinsight
  • James: the cautious explorer.Lawyer, empty nester, 55 Confidence with mobile Low High Frequency of mobile use Low High Relationship with mobile Functional Emotional Mobile is: Defining app: Attitude towards mobile Closed Unsure Open @foolproof_ux
  • Do you know who your customers are? @foolproof_ux
  • So what areM-Consumersactually doing? @foolproof_ux
  • Emerging behaviour #1. Planning & researching Taking Getting quick remote things done control Managing on the move @foolproof_ux
  • Planning on the go. 33% Of mobile bankers now look into new financial 58% products more frequently More likely to compare prices and 38% look for deals overall Of mobile shoppers do more planning before they hit the high street @foolproof_ux
  • Emerging behaviour #2. Playing games Creating fun-time Consuming out of media down-time Browsing for inspiration @foolproof_ux
  • Inspiration and impulsion. 48% 38% Of mobile gamblers Of mobile shoppers now place more now make more impulse bets impulse purchases @foolproof_ux
  • Emerging behaviour #3. Instant sharing Keeping Crowdsourcing connected answers Getting real-time information @foolproof_ux
  • Does my bum look big in this?Go Try It On appAllows consumers to take a photo of themselves in an outfit, upload it andthen receive feedback. They can also vote on others outfits as well ascreating a network of expert stylists, friends and family.
  • Spreading the word. 49% Find out about new 76% apps via word of Have downloaded an app just because mouth someone recommended it to them @foolproof_ux
  • Emerging behaviour #4 Enhanced physical spaces Merging the New physical private spaces and digital New tech (NFC, AR) @foolproof_ux
  • Image sources: Apple, Pocket-lint, Foolproof
  • New spaces. 29% 32% 55% Of mobile bankers Of mobile gamblers Have used mobile to have used mobile place bets at work look for a better deal banking to avoid while already out going overdrawn shopping @foolproof_ux
  • New opportunities. 33% 50% 38% Of mobile bankers Of mobile gamblers Of mobile now look into new now place bets more shoppers now financial products frequently shop more more frequently overall @foolproof_ux
  • M-consumers’ expectations are high and rising @foolproof_ux
  • The need for action. 73% Claim an app / site doesn’t deserve their 47% loyalty if fails Have stopped dealing with a brand to meet their altogether because the app / mobile needs service wasn’t good enough @foolproof_ux
  • First impressions count. 81% 56% 49% Claim an app / site Have not signed-up to Have stopped usingneeds to make a good an app or mobile an app / mobilefirst impression if they service because the service because the are to continue using it registration process was login process was too too long or confusing time consuming @foolproof_ux
  • Mobile moments of truth matter @foolproof_ux
  • “So where isyour store and when do you open/close?” @foolproof_ux
  • “Do you havethe product I’mafter in stock?” @foolproof_ux
  • “Can I easilyfind a specificbit of productinformation?” © 2012 Foolproof Limited @foolproof_ux
  • Do you exceedexpectations at yourmoments of truth? @foolproof_ux
  • Winning requires long-term vision & commitment @foolproof_ux
  • Mobile experience vision.Great mobile sites and apps change howconsumers think and behave.They understand that they need to earn theright to become part of a customers deviceand life by making it better, faster and smarter. @foolproof_ux
  • 74% What’s your vision for making your customers Feel excited about what lives better, faster andmobile coulddo for them in smarter and inspiring them future to do things differently? @foolproof_ux
  • Many thanks. Any questions? @foolproof_ux
  • Contact Foolproof. Abby Brook- Tim Loo Carter UX Strategist Head of Client @timothyloo Experience @Abbybc 020 7539 3840 www.foolproof.co.uk @foolproof_ux Visit our insight section for more about Going Mobile