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Robert Teclaw Fsis

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Presentation regarding Produce Traceability as presented to FDA & FSIS on December 9 & 10, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

Presentation regarding Produce Traceability as presented to FDA & FSIS on December 9 & 10, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

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  • 1. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Stage 1: Epidemiology and Identify the Food
  • 2. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service FSIS Applied Epidemiology Division
  • 3. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service How does FSIS become aware of clusters (potential outbreaks)? • Reports from local, state, territorial p p public health partners • CDC and PulseNet • Consumer Complaint Monitoring System • Oth f d l agencies ( Other federal i (e.g. FDA military, FDA, ilit National Park Service) • News reports, listservs, etc.
  • 4. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service How is product tracing used by FSIS when investigating outbreaks? • Determine the source of product causing p g illness (as far back as records allow) • Identify distribution of potentially adulterated product (trace forward) • During hypothesis generation help rule in generation, or out certain vehicles based on distribution patterns supplier commonality patterns,
  • 5. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service “As far back as records allow” • If records do not exist or are of very p y poor quality, determining which product to recall p is often impossible • Poor quality records often slow traceback and, therefore, delay regulatory action
  • 6. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service FSIS Investigations and Watches Fiscal Years 2007-2009
  • 7. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Epidemiology & Traceback • 2008 Salmonella Typhimurium – FSIS carried out traceback when poultry initially suspected, results assisted hypothesis- generation – Outbreak ultimately linked to contaminated peanut butter
  • 8. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Epidemiology & Traceback • 2009 E. coli O157:H7 – Two outbreaks linked to ground beef in the Northeast –TTraceback carried out i t d b k i d t in tandem with ith epidemiologic investigation led to more timely in-plant in plant action by FSIS
  • 9. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Some real traceback scenarios • Trace to retail level: no grinding logs • Trace to retail level: multiple suppliers • Trace to processor: multiple suppliers or can’t determine specific dates of production • Trace to slaughter plant, can’t determine specific dates of production • Trace to farm?
  • 10. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Reasons for unsuccessful investigations investigations* • 4 - Insufficient Product Information Provided by Public Health Partner P id d b P bli H lth P t • 12 - Insufficient Product Information Provided by Retail or Distributor • 4 - Lack of Epidemiologic Information • 2 - Unable to Locate Product for Testing *Not included: investigations hampered by p g p y poor information, , but not completely unsuccessful. Most investigations suffer at least partially from poor product information.
  • 11. United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Additional Information Robert Teclaw, DVM, PhD Director, Applied Epidemiology Division Robert.Teclaw@fsis.usda.gov / (202) 690-6045 http://www.fsis.usda.gov p g

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