Making Sense of Sugars: Fruit in All Forms

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Eating fruit is an important part of a healthy eating style. Whether it's canned, dried, fresh or frozen, eating fruit in all forms contributes to good health.

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Making Sense of Sugars: Fruit in All Forms

  1. 1. Eating fruit is an important part of a healthy eating style. Whether it’s canned, dried, fresh or frozen, eating fruit in all forms contributes to good health. Whole fruit and 100% juice contain naturally-occurring sugars. Fruits in all forms deliver important “nutrients,” “antioxidants,” and other “bioactives,” which can promote overall health and protect against chronic disease. Whether natural or added, all sugars provide the same number of calories per gram and are used by the body in the same way. Foods and beverages with added sugars can be part of a healthy eating pattern. How much fruit is recommended? It’s recommended that adults eat at least 1.5-2 cups of fruit each day. At least half of fruit intake should be as whole fruits. Whole fruits include fresh, canned, frozen, and dried options. All of them can help you reach your daily fruit goal. Fruit juice can also count as fruit and should make up less than half of the fruit you eat every day. 1 CUP towards your daily fruit recommendation 8 OZ of 100% JUICE = 8 OZ of 50% JUICE = 1/2 CUP towards your daily fruit recommendation 1/4 cup dried = 1/2 cup towards your daily fruit recommendation Some foods and beverages have sugars added to them. One of the most common reasons is for flavor. There are other reasons, however. Slow spoilage by binding water Serve as fuel for yeast in breads Extend shelf life Did you know? Sugars ... References: Choosemyplate.gov Schorin M, Sollid K, Smith Edge M, Bouchoux A. The Science of Sugars, Part 1. Nutr Today. 2012; 47(3):96-101. Goldfein K.R., Slavin J.L. Why sugar is added to food: food science 101. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety. 2015 Sep; 14(5):644-656. foodinsight.org 1 CUP 1 CUP A new Nutrition Facts label is on its way! Read labels to consider how the amount of calories, sugars, and added sugars fit into your daily recommendations. Dietary Guidelines recommend that <10% of daily calories come from added sugars. Contribute aroma, color, flavor, and volume Improve palatability of tart foods that are naturally low in sugar Enhance flavor and balances acidity in non-sweet foods.

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