Population Mobility Pwrpt
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  • 1. Population Mobility in the United States Martha B. Sharma APHG Test Development Committee NCGE, Kansas City October 22, 2004
  • 2. II. Population
    • C. Population movement
    • 1. Push and pull factors
    • 2. Major voluntary and involuntary migrations at different scales
    • 3. Migration selectivity
    • 4. Short-term, local movements, and activity space
  • 3. Some Basic Vocabulary*
    • Domestic migration: moves that cross jurisdictional boundaries
    • Residential mobility: moves within the same jurisdiction
    • Moving rate: percentage of people who changed residence in a 1-year period
    *U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, March 2004.
  • 4. U.S. Population Mobility
    • Between 2002 and 2003, 40.1 million U.S. residents moved
    • More than half of all moves were local (i.e., within the same county)
    • Young adults had the highest moving rates (about one-third of 20-29 year olds in 2003)
    • Older adults had the highest interstate moving rates (28% of all 55 and older movers crossed state lines in 2003)
    • Hispanics and African American had the highest overall moving rates (18% in 2003)
    • Factors most influencing moving rates were age and home ownership
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, March 2004.
  • 5. Source: U.S. Census Bureau.
  • 6.  
  • 7. U.S. Change in Residence, 1995-2000 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 8. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 National Mean
  • 9.  
  • 10. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 “Different House, Same City or Town” National Mean
  • 11. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 “Different House, Different City or Town, Same County” National Mean
  • 12. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 “Different House, Different City or Town, Different County, Same State” National Mean
  • 13. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 “Different House, Different City or Town, Different County, Different State” National Mean
  • 14. Region to Region Movement, March 1999 to 2000 Movers to the South Moved from Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 15. Region to Region Movement, March 1999 to 2000 Movers to the Midwest Moved from Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 16. Region to Region Movement, March 1999 to 2000 Movers to the Northeast Moved from Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 17. Region to Region Movement, March 1999 to 2000 Movers to the West Moved from Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 18. Beware the fallacy of absolute truth. What is true at one scale may not be true at a different scale.
  • 19. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 National Mean
  • 20. South Carolina: Changing Residence 1995-2000 National Mean
  • 21. United States: Changing Residence 1995-2000 “Different House, Different City or Town, Different County, Different State” National Mean
  • 22. Movers to South Carolina 1995-2000 Moved from a Different State Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 , Summary File 3 [online]
  • 23. 1. On the Census Bureau Home Page, locate American FactFinder
  • 24. 2. Select Data Sets
  • 25. 3. Select Summary File 3 and Detailed Tables
  • 26. 4. Select the Geographic Scale you want to examine.
  • 27. 5. Then select one or more Geographic Areas for which you want data and click “Add,” then “Next.”
  • 28. 6. Scroll through the list of tables to locate Table PCT 21; click “Add.” Add additional tables if desired, then click “Show Results.”
  • 29. 7. The data is presented as a table that can be printed or downloaded as an Excel file.
  • 30. Questions to Guide Analysis
    • How does your state compare to the rest of the country in term of mobility rates? Is it above or below the national mean?
    • What factors may account for your state’s mobility status?
    • Describe patterns of mobility within your state.
    • Which counties have experienced above average mobility? Which fall below average? How do you account for these patterns?
    • Examine patterns of mobility within your county or city. Visit areas of unusually high or low mobility. Observe characteristics that may influence mobility.
  • 31. Questions (continued)
    • How might patterns of mobility affect political and economic trends in your state, county, or community?
    • Did your parents grow up in your community or are they a part of the mobility pattern?
    • If your parents are “local,” how has your state, county, or community changed since they were in high school? Which changes are a product of mobility trends?
  • 32. Activity Space: Mobility at the Local Scale Population Mobility in the United States, Part 2
  • 33. Movement at the individual scale is affected by three factors:
    • Accessibility, i.e., “where you are”
        • Opportunities
        • Distance
    • Mobility, i.e., “who you are”
        • Age
        • Income
        • Availability of car or public transportation
    • Mental maps, i.e., “what you know”
        • Perception of what is where
        • Perception of danger
  • 34. Evaluating Personal Activity Space
    • Have students keep a diary of their movements for 24 hours on a school day and on a weekend day. [chart provided]
    • Using a piece of quarter-inch graphing paper, have students chart their movements for each day.
        • What factors limit their movement?
        • How is their activity space different on a weekend day compared to a school day?
  • 35.
    • Have students interview people in different age groups (e.g., a 7-year old, a college student, a parent, an elderly relative) concerning their movements over a 24 –hour period.
    • Have them repeat the graphing activity.
        • How does age affect mobility?
        • What factors limit or enable the mobility of persons in different age groups?
    Evaluating Activity Space - Extension
  • 36. Activity Space Resources
    • Fellmann, Getis, and Getis. Human Geography , 8 th edition. McGraw-Hill, 2005. pp. 71-76.
    • Kuby, et al. Human Geography in Action , 1 st edition. John Wiley, 1998. chapter 5.
    • Web resource:
    • http://www.colorado.edu/geography/cartpro/cartography2/spring2001/dettloff/time/prism_map.html