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An exploration into the language around design processes and value.

An exploration into the language around design processes and value.

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SDL 04 Language SDL 04 Language Presentation Transcript

  • SDL – LanguageIndustrial Design 2012, Georgia Institute of Technology www.florianvollmer.com @florianvollmer
  • © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Semantics Sequence Form Experience InteractionStorytelling Multidisciplinary Intradisciplinary User Behavior Designscape Technology Systems Network Florian Vollmer 2012 © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Semantics Sequence Form Experience InteractionStorytelling Multidisciplinary Intradisciplinary User Behavior Designscape Technology Systems Network Florian Vollmer 2012 © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinaryVisual User Experience ManagementVerbal Service Design CorporateCreativity Co-Creation Innovation © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinary Quantifiable Impact Process-IntegratedMethods & Best Practices © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinaryVisual User Experience ManagementVerbal Service Design CorporateCreativity Co-Creation Innovation © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Visual VerbalCreativity © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Info Retail Design Tools 2 Info Retail Design Tools 3Methods WHAT DOES IT MEAN? TOOLBOX CONTENT Number of Players CLIENT FACING TOOLS ANALYSIS TOOLS H Pain-Gain Map 6 Mood Boards 46 H Empathy Map 7 Storyboards 48 H Business Model Canvas 10 Personas 50 One person Small group Large group Compare Brand Value 12 TA(A)O 52 FACING Compare Innovations 14 Service Blueprint 46 Body Mind Soul 20 The 5 Whys 26 TOOLS Business Context Map 29 Materials CONCEPT OPENING TOOLS Forces Field Analysis 32 Mind Mapping 48 Customer Journey Map 36 Word Association 50 “Th Body-Storming 42 Context Profiles 52 is Facilitator Co-facilitators Markers Pens Post-its Paper C.U.B.A. (Customer, User, Buyer, Associate) 43 635 Method 48 NO is a Pre-Mortem 44 Draw the Problem 50 Ta To Ma ol Bo Forced Analogy 52 nua x l!” , Flip chart Smartphone Digital Photographs Illustrations Different RESEARCH TOOLS 2 x 2 Matrix 46 CONCEPT CLOSING TOOLS Six Thinking Hats 48 presentation hats Relationship Mapping 48 20/20 Vision 50 Mystery Shopping 50 NUF Test (New, Useful, & Feasible) 52 What if... 52 Impact & Effect Matrix 52 Template A template can be found for this tool in the IR Tool Library under the tools name. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Info Retail Design Tools 6 Info Retail Design Tools 7 Info Retail Design Tools 8 Info Retail Design Tools 9 Info Retail Design Tools 11 PAIN-GAIN MAP EMPATHY MAP BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS COMPARE BRAND VALUE BODY MIND SOUL Procedure Procedure Procedure Procedure Procedure H This tools can be used as homework for the H This tools can be used as homework for the H This tools can be used as homework for the 1 Introduce the exercise by explaining the value of the 1 It can be a good idea to have one co-facilitator from stakeholders. By having gathering information stakeholders. By having gathering information stakeholders. By having gathering information tool; these images should start the discussion of Info Retail and one stakeholder paired up, so the before a summit, the stakeholders are given more before a summit, the stakeholders are given more before a client interaction, the stakeholders are logos and brands value. It is just based on personal co-facilitator can record on sticky notes what the time to consider the challenges and comment. time to consider the challenges and comment. given more time to consider the challenges and connections and feelings about the brands, so stakeholder says. During the summit the stakeholders can review the During the summit the stakeholders can review the comment. During the summit the stakeholders can please go ahead and say anything that comes to information and add additional notes. information and add additional notes. review the information and add additional notes. mind. 2 The stakeholders are required to consider the words, thoughts, concepts and characteristics that 1 It can be a good idea to have one co-facilitator from 1 Define which actors would be relevant to discuss 1 It can be a good idea to have one co-facilitator from 2 Go through each slide one by one and have the define a brand. Each of these words, thoughts, Info Retail and one stakeholder paired up, so the for the specific client. An example could be the Info Retail and one stakeholder paired up, so the client comment. concepts and characteristics should be written on co-facilitator can record on sticky notes what the manufacturer, the retailer and the end user. co-facilitator can record on sticky notes what the sticky notes by the co-facilitators. stakeholder says. stakeholder says. 2 1 It can be a good idea to have one co-facilitator from 3 Then, each sticky note is placed in one of three The object of this exercise is to have the 2 Ask the client to identify the pains in their company. The object of this game is to quickly Info Retail and one stakeholder paired up, so the The Business Model Canvas is a strategic 2 Introduce the business model canvas to the group. This tool can be used to gain insight NOTE Body Mind Soul is a brainstorming activity concentric circles. The most important content Consider the questions: What are the biggest co-facilitator can record on sticky notes what the Explain that the goal of populating the map is to get would appear in the Soul Circle while the least client develop an understanding of the company barriers? What are they afraid could develop a customer or user profile. stakeholder says. management tool, which allows the a sense of the big picture in which the organization on the client’s taste. By having them Facilitators should identify the following traits: ideal for all clients. Non-creative clients important content would appear in the Body Circle. happen? What obstacles stand in their way? operates. pains and gains in the company. The It can be used to reveal the different 4 If a large group is participating, it can be a good participants to develop and sketch out comment on different images, it becomes are usually more comfortable when given Soul Circle The co-facilitator should record every comment on idea to divide the team into smaller groups of 2-3 3 If a large group is participating, it can be a good If any sticky note from the soul circle were to be pains define the short term and long term a sticky note for later reference. points of view that appropriate actors may people. Organize the groups as to mix conflicting new or existing business models. It is a idea to divide the team into smaller groups of 2-3 easier for the client to formulate their likes structure in the form of rules and goals removed, the entire brand/product/service should voices with each other. people. Organize the groups as to mix conflicting These observations will prepare the facilitator for fall apart. problems faced by the company. And the 3 Ask the client to identify the gains in their company. have. visual template pre-formatted with the nine voices with each other. and dislikes. handling the individuals when they respond. similar to a game. Consider the questions: What does the company Ask the groups to describe the different actor’s Mind Circle gains define the short term and long term want and aspire to? How do they measure For example, the participants of this exercise could create 5 experience, moving through the categories of: blocks of a business mode. Have each group start with a different category. Use it early in the client relationship to help the client prioritize If any sticky note from the mind circle were to be 4 “empathy maps” for the manufacturer, the retailer and the end information that characterizes a brand, a product or a service. goals of the company. success? What could benefit the company the thinking, seeing, hearing, saying, doing, and feeling. Each co-facilitator can open the discussion and ask removed, all of the sticky notes in the body circle most? user. for comments. The co-facilitators should write the It will allow the client to analyze themselves on a deeper level would no longer apply, but all of the sticky notes in By having this information Info Retail is better equipped to 6 The co-facilitator should record every comment on comments from the group in the space created for and see structural elements that are essential. the soul circle would not be changed. The co-facilitator should record every comment on a sticky note for later reference. respond proactively to dynamic of the client’s business model that category. By doing this they will start to discuss the major obstacles and and structure. a sticky note for later reference. Body Circle motivations that will need to be addressed to consider the 7 The goal of the exercise is to create a degree of 5 Have each group populate all the categories. If any sticky in the body circle were to be removed, company’s problems. empathy for the actor. Ask the group to empathize: no changes would occur in the soul and mind What does this person want? What forces are 6 Summarize the overall findings with the whole group circle. motivating this person? What can we do for this and ask for observations, insights, “aha’s,” and Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials person? concerts about the business model canvas. template: Duration Duration Duration Duration Duration A large board with 3 concentric circles. Each circle should be labeled at the top in order from biggest to smallest: H Homework to be completed proir to physical H Homework to be completed proir to physical H Homework to be completed proir to physical Body, Mind, Soul. Reference client interaction. Reference client interaction. Reference client interaction. Reference Reference Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Atvur, A. (2010) Gamestorming, p. 190-191. Gamestorming, p. 65-66 Gamestorming, p. 153-154. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Info Retail Design Tools 12 Info Retail Design Tools 14 Info Retail Design Tools 15 Info Retail Design Tools 16 Info Retail Design Tools 18 THE 5 WHYS FORCES FIELD ANALYSIS CUSTOMER JOURNEY MAP BODY-STORMING PRE-MORTEM Procedure Procedure Procedure Procedure Procedure 1 Identify a problem that the client needs to evaluate. 1 If a large group is participating, it can be a good 1 If a large group is participating, it can be a good 1 The exercise requires setting up an experience - 1 After the goals and plans have been laid out and idea to divide the team into smaller groups of 5-7 idea to divide the team into smaller groups of 5-7 complete with necessary artifacts and people - and understood for the current project, the facilitator 2 The facilitator should introduce the tool and give an people. Organize the groups as to mix conflicting people. Organize the groups as to mix conflicting physically “testing” it. Body-Storming can also should ask the simple question, “What will go example of how the individual should ask the WHY. voices with each other. Each group should have a voices with each other. Each group should have a include physically changing your space during wrong?” though it may be elevated in phrasing to Expample: Imagine explaining something to a child. co-facilitator. co-facilitator. ideation. “How will this end in disaster?” - “You need to eat your vegetables.” The child asks - WHY? You explain - “Because they are healthy for 2 On the top of the page, each co-facilitator writes 2 The co-facilitator should guide the process of 2 Prepare what the scenario should be before starting 2 The stakeholders should reflect on their collective you.” The child asks - WHY? You explain “Because the phrase “Forces FOR Change” and “Forces identifying the touchpoints where users interact the exercise. The scenario often involves the experience and directly name risks or elephants they make your body grow.” The child asks - WHY? AGAINST Change.” with the service. This identification process should activities that the user may execute while interacting lurking in the room. This is their chance to voice You explain.... etc. and this could keep going. be done with user insights from the client. The with the brand/product/service. It could be concerns that might otherwise go unaddressed 3 When the group has gathered, the facilitator goal is to have them identify all the steps and start describing the WORST case scenario that currently until it’t too late. 3 Distribute paper and pens introduces the change topic. The “change” can be to understand all the aspects that need to be occurs when users use the client’s brand/product/ The 5 Whys technique is an easy and The Force Field Analysis exercise is a global (what motivates or prevents major changes A Customer Journey Map provides a vivid considered. Body-Storming is a user-empathy service. And it could be describing the BEST case A Pre-Mortem is a way to open a space 3 The facilitator should write down all the risks and 4 Ask the clients to consider the problem individually at your company?) or specific (what has stood scenario that could occur when will be using the concerns. effective tool for clients quickly to uncover and have them ask themselves WHY is it a problem. way to evaluate the forces that affect in the way of developing a more effective web but structured, high-level overview of a To make the customer journey map more personal, technique utilized to facilitate brainstorms new brand/product/service. in a project at its inception to directly Have them write their first response. presence?) it can be a good idea to base the map around one 4 Have the stakeholders rank order vote on the list the root of a problem. change which can ultimately affect our user’s experience. chosen actor (create a fictional character with the wherein the participant physically pretends 3 If it is a large group it can be a good idea to form address its risks. of concerns and risks to determine priority. The 5 Very often, the answer to the first “why” will prompt 4 Each co-facilitator should write the change topics group). smaller groups. Organize the groups as to mix facilitator takes notes. Because it’s simple, you can adapt it quickly and apply it to another “why” and the answer to the second “why” organizations. on the flip chart / white board. It is also their role The touchpoints where users interact with the service are to be a user/stakeholder that is interacting conflicting voices with each other. Unlike a more formal risk analysis, the pre-mortem asks almost any problem. The tactic behind the tool is to keep will prompt another and so on, hence the name the to keep things moving. Do not use too much often used in order to construct a “journey”—an engaging 3 Consider all touchpoints during the experience. participants (often the client) to directly tap into their 5 Whys strategy. Making a deliberate effort to see the system surrounding discussion time on each topic. with a brand, product, or service. 4 Each group should imagine what it would be like delving deeper into the underlying motives for a specific story based upon their experience. This story details their experience and intuition, at a time when it is needed most, change can help the client be more aware of which factors A touchpoint can define anything from personal, if the brand, product, or service existed. Consider behavior or opinion. Each question is triggered by the answer service interactions and accompanying emotions in a It is simply brainstorming, but done with role play. It may look and is potentially the most useful. 6 When each person has finished, have them need to be addressed to change in the desired direction. 5 After flushing out as many change topics as face to face contact between two people, to virtual how the interactions would be, and which relations to the pervious question. highly accessible manner. The overview map enables the different depending on the preparations and location, but in read their own to everyone. This should lead to possible, have the group evaluate the feasibility of interaction with a website or physical trips to a there would be between different touchpoints, etc. a discussion of different ways of considering that change. Rate them on a range from 1 to 5. A identification of both problem areas and opportunities for location. the end all body-storming is fundamentally about one thing: problems. score of 1 means the force is very weak wherease innovation, while focusing on specific touchpoints allows getting people to figure things out by trying things out. It can 5 Discussion is needed but the co-facilitators should a score of 5 means the force is very strong. Ask the service experience to be broken down into individual 4 Once the touchpoints have been identified with also be used when getting stuck in an ideation phase. New encourage the group to improvise. It is not advised them to review each idea FOR and AGAINST stages for further analysis. The structural visualization makes the client, Info Retail can translate this content to structure or script the interaction, just let it and alternative ideas can be generated when body-storming change and add a number to it, weighting the idea. it possible to compare several experiences in the same visual into a visual representation. This overview should happen. in the context of a half-baked concept. be visually engaging enough to make it easily language. 6 At the end of the exercise, summate the scores accessible to all, but should also incorporate 6 In body-storming, the participants are encouraged to assess which side is stronger. Discuss this enough detail to provide real insight into the to visualize the specific person for whom he/she Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials realization with the group. journeys being displayed. So it can be a good idea has as user of the product/service. to consider adding more details than acquired with the client. 7 After the group has rehearsed, they can present to the other group(s). 5 Another idea is to “personalize” the map by 8 Pay close attention to decision-making directly incorporating photographs along with personal related to the environment and related emotional Duration Duration Duration quotes and commentary. Duration reactions. Dig into the “why.” Duration Reference 9 Discuss trends, anomalies and observations seen Reference Reference Reference Oulasvirta, A., Kurvinen, E., & Kankainen, T. (2003). Understanding contexts by being there: in the scenarios. Reference Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). case studies in bodystorming. Personal Ubiqui- Gray, D., Brown, S., & Macanufo, J. (2010). Gamestorming, p. 141-143 Gamestorming, p. 174-176. Gamestorming, p. 125-134. tous Comput., 7(2), 125-134. Gamestorming, p. 117-118. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Bodystorming Info Retail Design Tools 22 Info Retail Design Tools 23 Info Retail Design Tools 25 2 x 2 MATRIX RELATIONSHIP MAPPING WHAT IF... Procedure Procedure Procedure 1 As preparation, choose which items should be 1 Define which actor should be the center focus (the 1 Prepare a question to ask the team. The question explored and defined. map will be created from their standpoint). This should be challenging and based on how the The items could be products, objects, motivations, would most likely be the client’s company or a service would be affected by changes taking place people, quotes, materials, or any group of things specific actor within the company. at the technological, societal or cultural level. that would be useful to explore. Question example: “What would happen to your 2 If the exercise is done in a group, the facilitator service if the internet went mobile?” 2 Draw a 2 x 2 matrix. should introduce the exercise by also presenting the actor that will have the center focus to the team. 2 State the challenging question to the team. 3 Put opposites on either end of each axis. Example: low-to-high vs. rich-to-poor. 3 If a large group is participating, it can be a good 3 Ask the participants to explore the stated situations, idea to divide the team into smaller groups. Each and imagine the kinds of problems they could lead 4 Place items in the matrix by evaluating them with group should have a co-facilitator. to. A 2 x 2 Matrix can visually communicate the opposites defined in the matrix and comparing Relationship Mapping is an effective “What if...” is a question that designers the items to each other. 4 Each group should define and locate actors that 4 Each participant should take notes so all the a relationship between products, objects, visualization technique to quickly has a connection to the actor in focus. Other actors may pose in order to prompt exploring content can be reviewed. Example: If you want to explore and compare could include someone working with the actor in motivations, people, quotes, materials, or coffee drinks (like caffè latte, macchiato, black understand the providers and focus. future scenarios to get the ideas flowing. 5 Review the research. By looking at how well a coffee, etc.), you can use the 2x2 matrix to define service could adapt to the potential problems of any group of things that would be useful the complexity of the coffee making process infrastructure. Have the group discuss the position of the Considering such situations is often an effective way to isolate the future, you focus attention on what it is currently (easy-to-complex) and the price of the coffee actors. The co-facilitator should place the actors and analyze the key components from which a service is doing right, and what could be done better. to explore. (low-to-high). Services are created and consumed through systems of in concentric circles based on how direct the designed. Present the participants with challenging questions relationships between people, things and processes. It is contact is with the actor in focus (Primary providers, on how the service would be affected by changes taking 5 Look for relationships by seeing where groups start important to understand these relations because they are secondary provider, infrastructure). place at the technological, societal or cultural level. This can to form. often the key to defining whether a service will work or not 5 When all the actors are placed, the actor’s diagram help designers to prepare companies for a wide range of work. The tool can evolve from describing a current situation changes likely to occur over the next few decades. 6 See what quadrants are very full or empty; where can help define the relations between the actors. does the assumed correlation break down? Don’t into specifying people’s roles for a new service. discount empty quadrants. An empty quadrant could indicate a market opportunity or a problem area. The discussion that is spurred by trying to place items on the matrix is often as valuable as producing the map itself. Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Number of Players Materials Duration Duration Duration Reference Reference Reference https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/ Bechmann, S. (2010). Servicedesign, p. 151. Stickdorn, M., Schneider, J. (2010). This is wiki/29e5a/2X2_Matrix.html Service Design Thinking, p. 182-183. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. INTERNAL USE ONLY © Info Retail, Inc. All Rights Reserved. © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinaryVisual User Experience ManagementVerbal Service Design CorporateCreativity Co-Creation Innovation © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation y ilit Via ab bil sir ity De Feasibility From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User Experience IterationsService DesignCo-Creation Stakeholder-Integration Prototyping Ethnography Change Management Actors Evidencing Journeys Empathy and User Insights Service Delivery Blueprints Agile Development Systems-Orientation Scenarios Storytelling From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation Client Designer User Core Process From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation Client Designer User Core Process From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation Designer Client User Core Process From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation Client User Designer Core Process From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • User ExperienceService DesignCo-Creation Focus Insight Trust Surprise Empowerment Wow Inspiration Priorities Equality ... Core Process From Tim Brown, “Change by Design”
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinaryVisual User Experience ManagementVerbal Service Design CorporateCreativity Co-Creation Innovation © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Intangible Tangible Value ValueEnd-user Value 1 2Corporate Value 3 4Inspiration: Robert Bau, Designing for Recovery
  • value Intangible Intangible and tangible and tangible benefits costsInspiration: Robert Bau, Designing for Recovery
  • Design Marketing General Manager Strategy Capital Organization Go-to-market Go-to-market Distribution Distribution Pricing/ Financials Pricing/ FinancialsProduct/ Product/ Product/Service Service ServicePackaging Packaging Packaging Inspiration: Louis Kim, VP Advanced Platform Group, HP
  • User needs - discoverGo-to-market Product/ StrategyDistribution Service CapitalPricing/ Financials Packaging Organization User needs - discern
  • Research and Development IT Finance Marketing Operations HR © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Fuzzy Development SolutionFrontend © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • Problem Fuzzy Development Solution Frontend © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • 1. Project2. Environment3. Practice4. Self
  • D3 Matrix D3 Matrix helps distinguish types of design initiatives Developing New Balanced Build HP IP Build IP Design to Innovate Markets Innovation Proprietary assets create a Cultivating new growth Portfolio sustainable advantage prospects Coordinated roadmaps lead to short and long term success Design to Innovate (D2I) Innovating by creating new markets, portfolios, and IP Design to Differentiate Anticipating A Cohesive The Wow Factor Demand System An emotionalconnection to An emotional connection HP offerings to business offerings Addressing unmet needs Coordinating product with compelling solutions portfolios to work better together Design to Differentiate (D2D) Differentiating through anticipating demand, creating products that link Efficient Design Simplified A User Aware together, and connecting with consumers Design to Simplify Processes Technology Supply Chain Process improvement and Experiences Optimizing the supply the efficient use of assets chain in a way that doesn t Improving user interactions across a range of products sacrifice the customer experience Design to Simplify (D2S) Simplifying design processes, Development Process Portfolio of Products Specific to D2x portfolios, and the supply chain Business Experiences, Capital, Core Processes and Solutions and Technologies Tools Services and AssetsThis work is licensed by Hewlett-Packard under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to © Copyright 2011 Hewlett-Packard Hewlett Packard and Jump Associates
  • Innovating by creating n markets, portfolios, and Design to Differentiate Anticipating A Cohesive The Wow Factor Demand System An emotionalconnection to An emotional connection HP offerings to business offerings Addressing unmet needs Coordinating product with compelling solutions portfolios to work better together Design to Differentia Differentiating through a demand, creating produ Efficient Design Simplified A User Aware together, and connectin Design to Simplify Processes Technology Supply Chain Process improvement and Experiences Optimizing the supply the efficient use of assets chain in a way that doesn t Improving user interactions across a range of products sacrifice the customer experience Design to Simplify (D Simplifying design proc Development Process Portfolio of Products Specific to D2x portfolios, and the supp Business Experiences, Capital, Core Processes and Solutions and Technologies Tools Services and AssetsThis work is licensed by Hewlett-Packard under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to © Copyrigh Hewlett Packard and Jump Associates
  • trixMatrix helps distinguish types of design initiatives Developing New Balanced Build HP IP Build IP Design to Innovate Markets Innovation Proprietary assets create a Cultivating new growth Portfolio sustainable advantage prospects Coordinated roadmaps lead to short and long term success Design to Innovate (D2I) Innovating by creating new markets, portfolios, and IP Design to Differentiate Anticipating A Cohesive The Wow Factor Demand System An emotionalconnection to An emotional connection HP offerings to business offerings Addressing unmet needs Coordinating product with compelling solutions portfolios to work better together Design to Differentiate (D2D) Differentiating through anticipating demand, creating products that link Efficient Design Simplified A User Aware together, and connecting with consumers Design to Simplify Processes Technology Supply Chain Process improvement and Experiences Optimizing the supply the efficient use of assets chain in a way that doesn t Improving user interactions across a range of products sacrifice the customer experience Design to Simplify (D2S) Simplifying design processes, Development Process Portfolio of Products Specific to D2x portfolios, and the supply chain Business Experiences, Capital, Core Processes and Solutions and Technologies Tools Services Packard and Jump Associates Hewlett and Assets
  • D3 Matrix Other companies are examples of D3 Matrix goals Developing New Markets Balanced Innovation Build HPIP Build IP Design to Innovate Portfolio new model for car usage for a portfolio of traditional products labs legendary for producing new group of consumers while exploring more playful innovative IP that underpins its products like the Aibo Robot products Anticipating Demand A Cohesive System The Wow Factor Design to Differentiate anticipates needs for quick and products work seamlessly and revived an icon (VW Beetle), easy alternatives to preexisting speak the same design language and designed every detail of products, like Swiffer the experience Efficient Design Processes Simplified Technology A User Aware Supply Design to Simplify Experiences Chain Using the same foot bed allows redesigns and redefines tech optimized its supply chain and the designers to focus on the top experiences, like airport check-in, production to deliver a consistent part of the shoe for simplicity and ease experience no matter where Business Processes and Tools Experiences , Solutions & Services Capital, Technologies & AssetsThis work is licensed by Hewlett-Packard under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to © Copyright 2011 Hewlett-Packard Hewlett Packard and Jump Associates © Copyright 2011 Hewlett-Packard
  • A system, tools and way of thinking for Design Practice Measure Design Using Design Metrics Developing New Balanced Innovation D2I Build HP IP Markets Portfolio Building a Business Case Anticipating D2D A Cohesive System The Wow Factor Demand Using the D3 Efficient Design Simplified A User Aware D2S Technology Process Supply Chain Experience Development Portfolio of Specific to Process Products D2X Logic Model Practice Design Design Thinking Abstract Design Training Frameworks Principles Analysis Synthesis Discoveries Solutions Best Practices Articles Concrete Manage Design Design Job Architecture Planning 70% 60% 1H07 2H06 50% 41% +2% from 2H06 40% Design Skills Inventory 30% Culture Processes 20% 33% 40% -2% 10% -5% 0% D2 I Design Capability Index D2 D2 D 42% 50% S -4% 0% People Resources Design Recruitment Benchmarking Change Management This work is licensed by Hewlett-Packard under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to© Copyright 2011 Hewlett-Packard Hewlett Packard and Jump Associates
  • Organization Risk ToleranceProcess DefinitionMind Creativity
  • Organization Risk ToleranceProcess DefinitionMind Creativity
  • Organization Risk ToleranceProcess DefinitionMind Creativity
  • Focus on theTriple Bottom Line Economic (Profit) Ecologic (Planet) Social (People)
  • Intra-disciplinary Inter -disciplinary Multi -disciplinaryVisual User Experience ManagementVerbal Service Design CorporateCreativity Co-Creation Innovation © Florian Vollmer, 2012 – www.florianvollmer.com
  • SDL – LanguageIndustrial Design 2012, Georgia Institute of Technology www.florianvollmer.com @florianvollmer