Green Roofs for Indoor Climate Control

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Green Roofs for Indoor Climate Control

  1. 1. Green Roofs for Indoor Climate Control Research Team Team Member  Office  Phone  Email Annette
D.
Shine
(PI)
 261
Colburn
Lab
 831‐2010
 shine@udel.edu
Aleksandr
Nagorniy
 359
Colburn
Lab
 (718)
687‐8987
 praanagorniy@aol.com
(REU
researcher)
Jennifer
Dunn
(REU
 359
Colburn
Lab
 (913)
708‐1912
 jldunn@ksu.com
Researcher)
Cathleen
Kappel
(RET
 359
Colburn
Lab
 
 kappelc@mac.com ckappel@nccvt.k12.de.us
Researcher)
Michael
Kittel
(RET
 359
Colburn
Lab
 
 mkittel@nccvt.k12.de.us
Researcher)
Research Topic GREEN ROOFS FOR INDOOR CLIMATE CONTROL For
much
of
the
academic
year,
the
Room
102
classroom
in
Colburn
Laboratory
in
the
College
of
Engineering
at
the
University
of
Delaware
is
an
unpleasant
place
to
learn
and
teach.

Because
the
classroom
is
located
in
a
single‐story
building,
with
a
40
foot
south‐facing
outside
wall,
the
room
is
often
uncomfortably
hot
during
the
period
from
October
to
April,
when
no
air
conditioning
is
available.

One
source
of
heat
input
into
the
room
comes
ultimately
from
solar
radiation
on
the
flat
roof,
which
is
a
gravel‐ballasted
black
membrane.

Its
low
albedo
(about
0.10)
means
that
little
of
the
incoming
radiation
is
reflected,
so
much
of
it
heats
up
the
roof
surface.
We
wish
to
ameliorate
the
indoor
climate
problem
of
Colburn
102
by
installing
a
green
roof
atop
the
classroom,
in
order
to
lower
heat
transmission
from
the
roof.

A
group
of
students
and
faculty
from
the
Colleges
of
Engineering
and
Agriculture
are
designing
the
roof
and
pursuing
funding
for
its
installation.

When
it
is
installed,
the
green
roof
will
be
a
research
tool
for
developing
heat
transfer
models
of
green
roofs
(Engineering)
and
for
assessing
the
impact
on
local
insect
populations
of
native
vs.
non‐native
flora
(Agriculture).

This
summer,
we
plan
to
install
a
web‐based
rooftop
monitoring
station,
which
will
provide
near‐continuous
data
on
air,
roof
and
classroom
temperatures,
rainfall,
humidity
and
wind
speed.

The
data
will
give
us
a
“before”
snapshot
of
the
impact
of
a
green
roof
on
indoor
climate
quality.

We
will
input
this
“before”
data
into
numerical
simulation
of
heat
transfer
in
Colburn
102,
based
on
cooling
models
used
for
green
roofs
(Del
Barrio
1998;
Kumar
and
Kaushik
2005;
Sailor
2008).


For
their
research,
NISE
teachers
will
help
specify,
purchase
and
install
the
monitoring
system
on
the
Colburn
roof.

Examples
of
output
from
such
a
system
can
be
seen
at
the
website
https://www.hobolink.com/p/12b605145efd8ed0b2376bb37ddd0f92?q=livesystem_goldman_green_roof

  2. 2. By
analyzing
the
recorded
data,
we
hope
to
estimate
the
magnitude
of
the
two
blue
arrows
in
Figure
1
below;
the
evaporation
arrow
will
be
determined
from
monitoring
water
pans
and
trial
planting
areas
on
the
roof.

In
particular,
we
will
determine
experimentally
whether
the
Chilton‐Colburn
analogy
correctly
predicts
the
ratio
of
the
size
of
the
two
arrows.


Following
conclusion
of
the
RET
program,
we
hope
to
engage
the
classes
of
the
teachers
in
the
implementation
of,
and
subsequent
research
on,
our
Colburn
Lab
green
roof.
 


Figure 1. Contributions to roof energy balanceTaken from: 
Proceedings
of
the
3rd
Annual
Greening
Rooftops
for
Sustainable
Cities
Conference,
May
4‐6,
2005,
Washington,
DC.
References

  3. 3. Del
Barrio,
E.
P.
(1998).
"Analysis
of
the
green
roofs
cooling
potential
in
buildings."
Energy
and
Buildings
 27(2):
179‐193.
Kumar,
R.
and
S.
C.
Kaushik
(2005).
"Performance
evaluation
of
green
roof
and
shading
for
thermal
 protection
of
buildings."
Building
and
Environment
40(11):
1505‐1511.
Sailor,
D.
J.
(2008).
"A
green
roof
model
for
building
energy
simulation
programs."
Energy
and
Buildings
 40(8):
1466‐1478.

 Importance of Project This
project
will
help
us
develop
engineering
tools
for
evaluating
the
benefits
of
green
roofs.
Background Materials and Related Research See
above
references,
plus
these
websites:
Useful
Green
Roof
Links:

http://www.artic.edu/webspaces/greeninitiatives/greenroofs/main.htm

Best
greenroof
nursery:
http://www.greenroofplants.com/

Research
on
greenroofs
at
Michigan
State:
http://www.hrt.msu.edu/greenroof/

NYT
green
roof
articles:
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/10/realestate/10green.html?_r=1&8hpib&oref=slogin
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/28/nyregion/28roof.html

Greenroof
hardware:

  4. 4. http://www.greenroofproducts.com/
http://www.usconstructionfabrics.com/specs/composite/j‐d‐green.swf

Some
new
Philly
greenroofs:
http://www.kyw1060.com/pages/2898247.php?

A
Philly
company
that
does
intensive
greenroofs:
http://www.roofmeadow.com/#

Modular
greenroof
company:
http://www.greengridroofs.com/

Claymont,
DE
retirement
home
greenroof:
http://www.greengridroofs.com/projects/institutional/projects_bnai.htm

Possible Research Approach and Anticipated Milestone Objectives Researchers
will
purchase
and
install
a
remote
monitoring
station
(temperatures,
humidity)
on
the
Colburn
Lab
rooftop,
in
order
to
determine
baseline
performance
“before”
a
green
installation.
Objectives:
 1) Specification
and
ordering
of
remote
monitoring
equipment
 2) Mastery
of
Dimensional
Analysis
background
 3) Experiment
Design:
determine
how
we
can
best
experimentally
determine
heat
transfer
 from
a
green
roof,
using
only
a
small
area
to
represent
the
entire
area
 4) Experiment
Implementation:
Install
Colburn
Lab
remote
rooftop
monitoring
station
 5) Data
Analysis:
Relate
measured
temperatures
to
evaporation
rate;
predict
green
roof
energy
 savings
 6) Research
Poster
Construction,
Final
Report

  5. 5. Laboratory Organization and Meeting Schedule Meeting
times
will
be
arranged
based
on
mutual
convenience
and
schedules.

I
require
written
project
reports
every
two
weeks,
including
a
final
report.


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