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Karla jackson4 hw499-01-project4

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Unit4 Power Point Presentation

Unit4 Power Point Presentation

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  • Welcome to my presentation on “The Medicinal Properties of Herbs.” Over the next 20 minutes it is my hope to present wholesome and convincing information on these basic and savory foods that we tend to take for granted: herbs! It is an outstanding honor for me to share the following information with you, as I know of the benefits of these “power” and “super” foods, for such symptoms as, inflammation, for example. Inflammation is the underlying cause of such debilitating conditions as allergies, achy and stiff joints, and rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic inflammation, untreated inflammation allowed to remain in the body, “breaks down our body’s defense system” leading to heart diseases, diabetes, and arthritis. (Kurt49, 2011). This presentation, therefore, is designed to provide you with an alternative approach to treating these illnesses with nutrition. The medicinal properties of herbs heal naturally addressing the root symptoms of diseases more comprehensively, and may times with little to no side effects; they are the better solution in comparison to over-the-counter drugs.
  • What is the first thing that enters your mind when you think of herbs? Do you think of cooking? flavoring/seasoning? aroma? healing/first aid? Well, meet herbs: flavorful and therapeutic, because herbs can heal. Herbs, specifically, aloe vera, garlic, ginger, and oregano, have medicinal properties, contributing to your health. This presentation aims to inform and secure herbal knowledge in you, equipping, empowering, a persuasive attempt to assist you to make educated decisions in your new or existing quest toward living healthy lifestyles using herbs for their culinary, as well, as their medicinal properties (nutrition therapy). I have interacted with herbs longs enough to appreciate their value as necessary to a savory pot and necessary to health. Herbs have curative properties; their ability to support and promote healing in our bodies is valued by laymen and research-supported by scientists; herbs heal. When added to the foods we eat or drink, herbs become nutrition therapy, conveyors of healing. “You can regain the health lost to … debilitating disease by taking nutritious supplements, using herbs and eating foods in the most natural state; the answer to debilitating disease is nutrition.” (Kurt49, 2011). I ask that you refrain from asking question during the presentation, waiting until the end. There is also a hard copy with references included, of this presentation available upon request.Thank you very much for attending this presentation.
  • “Herbs, which have been used as standard treatments in many cultures all over the world for thousands of years, are now coming to the forefront as a viable way of assisting the body in healing itself.” (Navarra, 2007, p. xii).
  • Easily grown and maintained for convenience and herbal medicinal purposes, consumers have come to rely on aloe vera’s clear, fleshy leaf extract as a topical antiseptic and skin softener, as well as a systemic cleanser when taken orally. Its extract can be used to produce gel, juice, and other forms.” (Authors of Aloe Vera Gel.org, 2012). In topical treatments, aloe vera is highly effective in providing relief to minor burns and scrapes, insect bites, diaper and heat rashes, poison ivy, oak, and sumac rashes. (Ibid). So effective is aloe vera in treating burns that it is stated that it “heals third degree burns up to six times faster than traditional medical treatments [, as it contains] …active compounds that stop pain and inflammation [, stimulating] skin growth and repair. Its effectiveness lies in its ability to promote the formation of collagen when applied to skin wounds.” (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplement Guide, 2006). Taken orally, aloe vera’s pungent aroma and extremely bitter taste suggests its antiseptic nature, which brings me to my personal experience with aloe vera dating back to my childhood. It would be administered right from the plant: slit down the middle of what seemed the thickest leaf, the thick, gloppy (my childhood scientific reference), clear, flesh spooned off into a cup, then, doled out for ingestion (holding the breath did nil to kill the taste, one needed only to endure). Given for colds, my Crucian elders believed it was good as an expectorant using Simple Wiveyto loosen phlegm from chest colds and for systemic cleansing and purging (the old-fashioned detox). Research has since proven them correct: as a cleanser of the liver, kidney, and spleen, aloe vera is effective when taken orally in crystallized form. (Navarra, 2007).
  • Even good things done in excess can have negative side effects, herbs are no exception. Therefore, caution must be exercised in order to avoid any of the following symptoms.Caution must be exercised, however, taking care to not overdose : improper use of aloe vera can cause a host of symptoms, producing the following side effects, including: “abdominal cramping, blood electrolyte imbalances, colorectal cancer, decreased potassium blood levels, diarrhea (due to laxative effect), lowered absorption of a variety of medications, lowered blood glucose levels (blood sugar), muscle weakness and abnormal heart rhythms (from lowered levels of potassium), rash, such as or similar to hives and eczema, worse constipation or dependency after use for [greater than seven] days as a laxative.” (Authors of Aloe Vera Gel.org, 2012).
  • Pungent in flavor, scent, and impact: garlic! Known scientifically as Alliumsativum, garlic is medicinal power in a perennial multi-cloved bulb. “Eastern and Western medical disciplines recognize the value of garlic as a natural antibiotic for colds, sore throat, phlegm in the respiratory tract, asthma, bronchitis, abscesses and tuberculosis. Garlic is known to reduce high blood pressure and cholesterol.” (Ibid, p. 8). Going back as far as 2600 B.C. in Mediterranean cuisine and Sumerian medicine, garlic continues to be used to flavor pots and treat many ailments including, but not limited to: atherosclerosis, stroke, immune disorders, cerebral aging, arthritis, and cataract formation. (Pratt S. G., 2006, p. 217). The ancient Egyptians used garlic to cure headaches, tumors, heart disorders, and intestinal worms. Garlic continues gaining credibility and popularity by researchers “as an agent that promotes immune-system support and fights viruses.” (Navarra, 2007, p. 8).
  • According to Dr. Brent Agin, author of Superfoods for Dummies, garlic is also credited with reducing the risk of cancer, yes, cancer! (Agin, 2009, p. 30). Further endorsed, world-renowned physician and authority on the role of nutrition’s effects on health and lifestyle, Dr. Steven Pratt lauds the role of garlic as a “health promoter,” adding to Dr. Agin’s claims of its ability to fight cancer, adding cardiovascular diseases, as well as having anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. (Pratt S. G., 2006, p. 217). Some other credits to garlic include it as antibiotic (prevents the growth of and/or destroys microorganisms that can lead to infections (Straub, 2011), antihistamine (allergy treatment) , anticoagulant (blood thinner), expectorant (loosens phlegm), antibacterial (prevents bacterial growth), antiparasitic (prevents the growth of parasites), alterative (behaves as an agent to change bodily functions), diaphoretic (causes perspiration), diuretic (increases output of urine), expectorant (induces cough to produce phlegm), stimulant (immune system activator), antiviral (prevents the growth of viruses), and antispasmodic (in lungs, prevents alveoli quivers, which are contributors to asthmatic symptoms). (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006; Oxford American Dictionary and Thesaurus, 2003). Reasons for garlic effectiveness as medicinal power and “health promoter,” lie in what it contains: organosulfur compounds (75 total, with allicin the most active), saponins (phytonutrients), polyphenols (flavonoids, antioxidants, i.e., rids free-radicals), selenium (an essential mineral), vitamin C (antioxidant), and potassium (cell metabolism). (Pratt S. , 2009, p. 220)
  • The authors at the Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide Web site offers that the daily oral dosage be “4 grams of fresh garlic or 8 milligrams of garlic oil per day. For high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, typical doses range from 600 to 900 milligrams daily.” (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006). As fresh is always best, Dr. Agin, recommends one clove of garlic every day. An added benefit, garlic is low in calories: one clove equals four calories. (Agin, 2009, p. 137). Dr. Pratt offers supportive data: one clove of fresh garlic produces ~18,300 mcg (microgram) of allicin, while a garlic extract of 600 mg produces 3,600 mcg of allicin. “Adverse side effects associated with garlic supplements are rare. However, raw garlic can be very irritating to the digestive system. Consumption of excessive amounts of raw garlic can cause bloating, gas, cramping, diarrhea, flatulence, and changes in the intestinal flora. Fresh garlic applied to the skin could result in blistering, chemical burns, or dermatitis. Large doses of garlic may interact with protease inhibitors. Use of garlic is contraindicated in individuals using the anticoagulant drug Warfarin. (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006). Lastly, as it is extremely pungent, garlic can leave a distasteful odor on the breath and through pores as sweat. Therefore, I recommend eating any green plant/herb after dosing, chewing on parsley, kale, collard, or turnip greens, or taking the suggested dose of liquid chlorophyll, to neutralize the odor.
  • Ginger is an ugly root on the outside, while scented beautifully on the inside (talk about inner beauty, right?). Used in foods, especially of Asian-influence, ginger is ginger ale for that upset stomach or ginger tea for the nausea that can accompany pregnancy. A spice, an “aromatic vegetable substance,” as it is derived from vegetables in the form of tree bark, seed, or fruit, (Pratt S. G., 2006, p. 279), ginger is also herbal medicine, functioning as a detoxifier, “part of your environmental shield, revving up …enzymes that block cancer, [further reducing] cancer risk by stimulating apoptosis, or programmed cell death.” (Pratt S. , 2009, p. 50). “Ginger inhibits inflammation, breaks down protein, stimulates liver function, and is a tonic for the heart. Ginger is anti-microbial and an anti-oxidant, and is helpful for hot flashes, indigestion, bowel problems, morning sickness and wounds. Ginger helps in the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids, and can thin the blood. Ginger is an excellent herb to use for strengthening and healing the respiratory system, and for fighting off colds and flu.” (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006). For these reasons, Dr. Pratt recommends ginger for its antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory properties, as it known to prevent and relieve nausea, indigestion, pain and arthritic symptoms by suppressing cytokines. (Ibid, p. 51, 109). Cytokines are protein cells “involved in almost every disease, and the manipulation of cytokine levels through diet or natural herbal supplements is an exciting field to explore.” (Sahelian, N.D.) “Ginger is used in teas, ginger ale, ginger beer, capsules, broths, and as a spice. The usual daily ginger intake is 2 to 4g per day. For prevention or treatment of motion sickness, take 500 – 1000 mg of dried ginger powder before travel. For the treatment of nausea associated with pregnancy, women can take up to 1 gram daily. To relieve arthritis pain, take fresh ginger juice, extract, or tea, 2 to 4 grams daily. To prevent vomiting, take 0.5 to 2 grams daily.” (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006). 
  • Described as the “bushy perennial herb, Origanumvulgare, of the Labiatae family, oregano is a pungent spice and an herbal stimulant, [having] carminative [relieves flatulence] and diaphoretic [causes perspiration]” (Navarra, 2007, pp. 141-142) properties. In his second book, Super Health, Dr. Steven G. Pratt groups oregano with ginger as “the best spices, a superfood” thus it bears the characteristics of a spice, meaning it detoxifies, working as an antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial, and having “lung protection properties.” (Pratt S. , 2009, pp. 52, 212). In his first book, Super Foods Health Style: Proven Strategies for Lifelong Health, Dr. Pratt describes oregano as having “volatile oils...[with] powerful antioxidant properties,…[demonstrating] 42 times more antioxidant activity than apples and 30 times more than potatoes.” (Pratt S. G., 2006, p. 280).
  • “Since herbal medicines function pharmacologically in the body, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), … recognized the importance of performing careful research studies on…” (Straub, 2011) herbal products people rely on for healing. The medicinal properties of herbs benefit consumers, but should be used responsibly and based on evidence-based research, not excluding time-tested, hand-me-down experience. Please be sure to inform health care providers of all herbal supplements in order to not cause personal injury.
  • Herbs have medicinal properties; herbs heal! Such herbs as aloe vera, garlic, ginger, and oregano, have all been used for centuries, having proven to be powerful, natural medicines, health promoters, super foods, and alteratives. Along with providing outstanding savor to countless pots, the medicinal properties herbs possess have contributed to sustained good health in billions of people through the ages: herbs have been people-tested and scientifically researched, adding to the confidence consumers can rest in when making decisions to incorporate herbs for medicinal purposes. Herbs heal; their uses should be explored and integrated into current diets and lifestyles should be and should be researched and used responsibly. Lastly, herbs are natural products; unlike synthetic products, they require additional time to build in the system and have their effects felt. That being said, give yourself time to take the products you choose. Please inform your physician of all herbal supplements you are using, as they do behave pharmacologically, changing your internal environment and, when applicable, contraindicating pharmaceutical drugs. Know how each herb behaves so as not to cause injury, but facilitate healing.

Transcript

  • 1. The Medicinal Properties of Herbs KARLA JACKSON KAPLAN UNIVERSITYHW499-01- BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS ROBYN HOBAN MARCH 27, 2012
  • 2. Herbs: A Biblical GenesisThen God said, “Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb that yields seed, and the fruit tree that yields fruit according to its kind, whose seed is in itself, on the earth; and it was so.And the earth brought forth grass, the herb that yieldsseed according to its kind, and the tree that yields fruit, whose seed is in itself according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:11, 12, NKJV
  • 3. Introduction Herbs add flavor, aroma, Value to savory pot and to health, This presentation on the medicinal properties of aloe vera, garlic, ginger, and, oregano, To secure herbal knowledge in you, equipping and empowering you to make educated decisions when it comes to incorporating herbs into your current diet and lifestyle, I will answer questions at the end of this presentation, Thank you for attending! Herbs Can Heal!
  • 4. HealingHerbsAloe vera,Garlic,Ginger,Oregano
  • 5. The Healing Properties of Aloe Vera
  • 6. Aloe Vera“Simple Wivey”“Barbados aloe”“Elephant’sGall” “Bitteraloe”“Cape aloe”Aloe africana;“Curacao aloe”“Medicineplant,” “First-aid Plant,”
  • 7. Aloe Vera Facts Member of the Lily family, indigenous to warm regions worldwide, such as East and South Africa, some Mediterranean countries, the tropics, and southern parts of the United States, sturdy, green, thick, leathery, multi- “leafed,” construction, so to speak, protects the clear, thick, bitter, “flesh”
  • 8. Aloe Vera UsesEasily grown and maintained for convenience and herbal medicinal purposes,a topical antiseptic and skin softener,a systemic cleanser when taken orally.
  • 9. Aloe Vera with Caution Orally ingested aloe vera juice, caps, and other forms may have particular side effects, including the following: - Abdominal cramping - Blood electrolyte imbalances - Colorectal cancer - Decreased potassium blood levels - Diarrhea (due to laxative effect) - Lowered absorption of a variety of medications - Lowered blood glucose levels (blood sugar) - Muscle weakness and abnormal heart rhythms (from lowered levels of potassium) - Rash, such as or similar to hives and eczema -Worse constipation or dependency after use for 7+ days as a laxative (Authors of Aloe Vera Gel.org, 2012)
  • 10. The Healing Properties of Garlic
  • 11. Garlic,Allium sativum“Garlic hasgained credibilityand popularity byresearchers “asan agent thatpromotesimmune-systemsupport andfights viruses.”(Navarra, 2007,p. 8)
  • 12. Garlic, Allium sativum, Facts Pungent in flavor and scent, impacting every meal, “a natural antibiotic for colds, sore throat, phlegm in the respiratory tract, asthma, bronchitis, abscesses and tuberculosis. Garlic is known to reduce high blood pressure and cholesterol.” (Navarra, 2007, p. 8) Origins in Europe as far as 2600 B.C. , garlic continues to be used to flavor pots and treat many ailments. Garlic has gained credibility and popularity by researchers “as an agent that promotes immune-system support and fights viruses.” (Ibid, p. 8). .
  • 13. Garlic Strength Reasons for garlic effectiveness as medicinal power and “health promoter,” lie in what it contains: o organosulfur compounds (75 total, with allicin the most active), o saponins (phytonutrients), o polyphenols (flavonoids, antioxidants, i.e., rids free- radicals), o selenium (an essential mineral), o vitamin C (antioxidant), o potassium (cell metabolism). (Pratt S. , 2009, p. 220)
  • 14. Garlic Good as: an antibiotic (prevents the growth of and/or destroys microorganisms that can lead to infections (Straub, 2011) an antihistamine (allergy treatment) an anticoagulant (blood thinner) an expectorant (loosens phlegm) an antibacterial (prevents bacterial growth) an antiparasitic (prevents the growth of parasites) an alterative (behaves as an agent to change bodily functions) a diaphoretic (causes perspiration) a diuretic (increases output of urine) an expectorant (induces cough to produce phlegm) a stimulant (immune system activator) an antiviral (prevents the growth of viruses) an antispasmodic (in lungs, prevents alveoli quivers, which are contributors to asthmatic symptoms). (Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide, 2006; Oxford American Dictionary and Thesaurus, 2003).
  • 15. The Healing Properties of GINGER
  • 16. GingerGinger is an uglyroot, scentedbeautifully on theinside ; derived fromvegetables in theform of tree bark,seed, or fruit, (PrattS. G., 2006, p. 279),ginger is also herbalmedicine,functioning as adetoxifier, known toprevent and relieve .
  • 17. The Healing Properties of OREGANO
  • 18. Oregano Origanum vulgareThe “bushyperennial herb,Origanum vulgare,of the Labiataefamily, oregano is apungent spice and anherbal stimulant,[having] carminative[relieves flatulence]and diaphoretic[causesperspiration]”(Navarra, 2007, pp.141-142) properties
  • 19. A Word on Evidence-Based Research “Since herbal medicines function pharmacologically in the body, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), … recognized the importance of performing careful research studies on…” (Straub, 2011) herbal products people rely on for healing. The medicinal properties of herbs benefit consumers, but should be used responsibly and based on evidence-based research, not excluding time-tested, hand-me-down experience. Be smart: do research, use wisdom
  • 20. Conclusion Herbs have biblical beginnings; herbs heal! Herbs are credited with sustain good health in billions of people through the ages, Herbs have been people-tested and scientifically researched, adding to the confidence consumers Inform your physician of all herbal supplements you are using., Herbs behave pharmacologically, they act like medicines, Herbs heal!
  • 21. ReferencesAgin, B. a. (2009). Superfoods for Dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Publishing, Inc.Authors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide. (2006). Ginger. Retrieved from A Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide Web site: http://www.vitamins-supplements.org/herbal-supplements/ginger.phpAuthors of Aloe Vera Gel.org. (2012). Aloe Vera - Other Names. Retrieved from An aloeveragel.org Web site: http://www.aloeveragel.org/other-names.phpAuthors of Vitamins and Health Supplement Guide. (2006). Aloe Vera. Retrieved from A Vitamins and Health Supplement Guide: http://www.vitamins-supplements.org/herbal-supplements/aloe-vera.phpAuthors of Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide. (2006). Garlic. Retrieved from Vitamins and Health Supplements Guide: http://www.vitamins-supplements.org/herbal-supplements/garlic.phpDavidson, J. R. (2000). Herbs for the Mind. New York, N.Y.: The Guilford Press.Kurt49. (2011, January 8). Inflammation and the Disease It Causes. Retrieved from A Bukisa.com Web site: http://www.bukisa.com/articles/432766_inflammation-and-the-diseases-it-causesNavarra, T. (2007). The A to Z of Vitamins, Minerals, and Supplements. New York, N.Y.: Checkmark Books.Oxford American Dictionary and Thesaurus. (2003). New York: Oxford University Press.Pratt, S. (2009). Super Health. New York, N.Y.: Dutton of Penguin Group.Pratt, S. G. (2006). Super Foods Health Style: Proven Strategies for Lifelong Health. New, York, N.Y.: Harper Collins Publishers.Sahelian, R. (N.D.). Cytokines and inflammation and how they influence depression and various medical diseases . Retrieved from Cytokines and inflammation and how they influence depression and various medical diseases : http://www.raysahelian.com/cytokines.htmlStraub, J. A. (2011). Herbal Alternative Medicine: The Benefits of Being Informed. Retrieved from A Kaplan University Online Web site: http://www.healthandwellness.kaplan.edu/articles/cam/Herbal%20Alternative%20Medicine.htmlThomas Nelson, Inc. (1982). The Open Study Bible: The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, Inc.