TATI - A Logo-like
interface forinterface for
microworlds and
simulations for Physics
teaching in Second Life
Objective
To present TATI – The Amiable
Textual Interface for Second Life
TATI which allows easy creation ofTATI which all...
Physics learning
Student difficulties in learning
Physics are well known.
In ‘real life’, if you stop pushing it,
Papert (...
Piagetian learning sequence
Papert (1980): microworlds where
learners could progress from Aristotle’s
ideas to Newton’s La...
Virtual worlds
WALK
FLY
PLAY
TALK
SIMULATOR
FLY
DRIVE
TALK
BUILD
HAVE
FUN
Simulations in SL
‘me’
Brownian
motion
Simulator
Immersion: “students
can be part of the
system that is being ‘me’
First-p...
LSL (Linden Scripting Language)
default {
state_entry() {
llSay(0, "Ready!");
}
touch_start(integer total_number) {
intege...
Obstacles
It takes a long time to learn to
move the avatar, go through
doors, manipulate objects,
etc..
Huge learning curv...
Development
1. Objects definition:
a. 4 ‘turtles’ (PAPERT, 1980, pp. 127) +
b. 2 ‘standard’ SL objects: physical & non-
ph...
Object types
NOROBJECT non-physical
SL object
immune to gravity; kinematic
function (llSetPos, llSetRot,
etc.)
GEOOBJECT g...
Object compatibility
NOROBJECT
GEOOBJEC
T
VELOBJECT ACCOBJECT NEWOBJECT
PHYOBJEC
T
GETPOS,
GETROT
FORWARD,
BACKWARD,
RIGHT...
TATILogo
CREATE object_id object_type?
object_shape? colour?
DELETE object_id
SETCOL object_id colour
SETPOS object_id pos...
Example 1 - NOROBJECT
/33 create b1
/33 setcol b1 blue
/33 forward b1 3
/33 backward b1 6
Example 2 - VELOBJECT
/33 create b2 velobject
plane
/33 forward b2 3
/33 speedup b2 0.5
/33 speedup b2 -0.5/33 speedup b2 ...
Exemple 3 - PHYOBJECT
/33 create b3 phyobject
cylinder
/33 setcol b3 red
/33 forward b3 3
/33 speedup b3 0.5/33 speedup b3...
Example 4 – 3D Rotations
/33 create b1 geoobject
plane orange
/33 forward b1 2
/33 right b1 90
/33 left b1 180
/33 right b...
Example 5 - Circumference
/33 create b4 geoobject
plane
/33 repeat 36 ( forward
b4 0.5 ; left b4 10 )
Example 6 - VELOBJECT
/33 create b5 velobject
plane green
/33 repeat 4 (speedup
b5 10 ; slowdown b5 10
; spinup b5 162 ;; ...
Example 7 - NEWOBJECT
/33 create b7 newobject
plane red
/33 repeat 4 (
appimpulse b7 ( 12.0 0
0) ; appimpulse b7 ( -0) ; a...
Example 8 - Collisions
/33 create c1 phyobject
sphere blue
/33 setpos c1 (214.7874
208.3379 38.48)
/33 create c2 phyobject...
Conclusion
We believe that the above sequence of
object types realizes Papert's proposed
Piagetian learning sequence to
Ne...
Conclusion
TATI allows you to “relate what is new
and to be learned to something you
already know […] make it your own:
Ma...
Future
1. To implement the remaining
commands (CONNECT, etc.) despite
the 64kB limitation!
2. Revise all the implementatio...
Proof of concept?
Physics teachers willing to do an usability
test are most welcome.
Which means: HELP, PLEASE!
Links
@SLPhysicsLab
www.tatilogo.com
@SLPhysicsLab
http://www.secondlifephysics.com/
http://slurl.com/secondlife/Castelo/2...
References
• Aelson, H.; diSessa, A. A. (1981) Turtle
Geometry: Computations as a Medium for
Exploring Mathematics. Cambri...
References
• Harvey, B. (1993) Berkeley Logo User
Manual. Berkeley, CA: University of
California.
• Papert, S. A. (1980) M...
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TATI - A Logo-like interface for microworlds and simulations for physics teaching in Second Life

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Student difficulties in learning Physics have been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature. Already in 1980, Papert complained that schools teach Newtonian motion by manipulating equations rather than by manipulating the Newtonian objects themselves, what would be possible in a ‘physics microworld’. On the other hand, Second Life and its scripting language have a remarkable learning curve that discourages most teachers at using it as an environment for educational computer simulations and microworlds. The objective of this work is to describe TATI, a textual interface which, through TATILogo, an accessible Logo language extension, allows the generation of various physics microworlds in Second Life, containing different types of objects that follow different physical laws, providing a learning path into Newtonian Physics.

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TATI - A Logo-like interface for microworlds and simulations for physics teaching in Second Life

  1. 1. TATI - A Logo-like interface forinterface for microworlds and simulations for Physics teaching in Second Life
  2. 2. Objective To present TATI – The Amiable Textual Interface for Second Life TATI which allows easy creation ofTATI which allows easy creation of physical microworlds as proposed by Papert (1980).
  3. 3. Physics learning Student difficulties in learning Physics are well known. In ‘real life’, if you stop pushing it, Papert (1980): instead of teaching Physics by manipulating actual Newtonian objects schools do it by manipulating equations. In ‘real life’, if you stop pushing it, it will stop moving!
  4. 4. Piagetian learning sequence Papert (1980): microworlds where learners could progress from Aristotle’s ideas to Newton’s Laws through as many intermediary [micro]worlds asmany intermediary [micro]worlds as needed. Piaget & Garcia (1989): The genesis of knowledge in the subject is isomorphic to the evolution of Science!
  5. 5. Virtual worlds WALK FLY PLAY TALK SIMULATOR FLY DRIVE TALK BUILD HAVE FUN
  6. 6. Simulations in SL ‘me’ Brownian motion Simulator Immersion: “students can be part of the system that is being ‘me’ First-person learning (Bricken, 1992): •Experiential, •Interactive, •Multisensory •[Kinesthetic] system that is being studied” (dos Santos, 2009)
  7. 7. LSL (Linden Scripting Language) default { state_entry() { llSay(0, "Ready!"); } touch_start(integer total_number) { integer touched_button = llDetectedLinkNumber(0);llDetectedLinkNumber(0); if(touched_button == GetPrimLinkNumber("Buridanian_button")) llSay(-142679, "Aristotelian Cannonball"); else if(touched_button == GetPrimLinkNumber("Newtonian_button")) llSay(-142679, "Cannonball"); } }
  8. 8. Obstacles It takes a long time to learn to move the avatar, go through doors, manipulate objects, etc.. Huge learning curve that discourages teachers to invest in SL (Sanchez, 2009). etc..
  9. 9. Development 1. Objects definition: a. 4 ‘turtles’ (PAPERT, 1980, pp. 127) + b. 2 ‘standard’ SL objects: physical & non- physicalphysical 2. TATILogo language: a. EBNF b. Validation w/ RPA Toolkit 3. Parser (in LSL) a. Predictive (top-down) (Aho et al., 1986 “Red Dragon Book”) 4. TATILogo to LSL translator (in LSL)
  10. 10. Object types NOROBJECT non-physical SL object immune to gravity; kinematic function (llSetPos, llSetRot, etc.) GEOOBJECT geometric turtle geometrical components : position & orientation VELOBJECT velocity turtle commands to define velocity;VELOBJECT velocity turtle commands to define velocity; position changes as a consequence ACCOBJECT acceleration turtle commands to change velocity NEWOBJECT Newtonian turtle commands that apply forces & torques PHYOBJECT physical SL object subject to gravity; dynamical function (llSetForce, etc.)
  11. 11. Object compatibility NOROBJECT GEOOBJEC T VELOBJECT ACCOBJECT NEWOBJECT PHYOBJEC T GETPOS, GETROT FORWARD, BACKWARD, RIGHT, LEFT, UP, DOWN, CLOCK, ACLOCK, SPEEDUP, SPEEDDOWNSPEEDDOWN SPINUP, SPINDOWN GETVEL, GETANGVEL GETACCEL GETFORCE, GETTORQUE, APPFORCE, APPIMPULSE, APPTORQUE, APPROTIMPULSE
  12. 12. TATILogo CREATE object_id object_type? object_shape? colour? DELETE object_id SETCOL object_id colour SETPOS object_id position FORWARD object_id distance ONGO? RIGHT object_id angle ONGO? APPFORCE object_id force ONGO? APPTORQUE object_id torque ONGO? APPROTIMPULSE object_id rotational_impulse ONGO? GETCOL object_id GETTYPE object_idRIGHT object_id angle ONGO? UP object_id angle ONGO? CLOCK object_id angle ONGO? SETVEL object_id velocity ONGO? SPEEDUP object_id speed ONGO? SPINUP object_id angular_velocity ONGO? SETANGACCEL object_id angular_aceleration ONGO? GETTYPE object_id GETPOS object_id GETVEL object_id GETANGVEL object_id GETTORQUE object_id GO CONNECT object_id1 object_id2 REPEAT integer ( list_of_statements ) HELP
  13. 13. Example 1 - NOROBJECT /33 create b1 /33 setcol b1 blue /33 forward b1 3 /33 backward b1 6
  14. 14. Example 2 - VELOBJECT /33 create b2 velobject plane /33 forward b2 3 /33 speedup b2 0.5 /33 speedup b2 -0.5/33 speedup b2 -0.5 /33 setvel b2 (-0.5 0 0) /33 setvel b2 (0 0 0) /33 setvel b2 (0 0 0.5) /33 setvel b2 (0 0 0)
  15. 15. Exemple 3 - PHYOBJECT /33 create b3 phyobject cylinder /33 setcol b3 red /33 forward b3 3 /33 speedup b3 0.5/33 speedup b3 0.5 /33 approtimpulse b3 (0 0 -0.38) /33 appforce b3 (0.5 0 0) /33 appforce b3 (0 0 0)
  16. 16. Example 4 – 3D Rotations /33 create b1 geoobject plane orange /33 forward b1 2 /33 right b1 90 /33 left b1 180 /33 right b1 90 /33 up b1 45/33 up b1 45 /33 down b1 90 /33 up b1 45 /33 clock b1 45 /33 aclock b1 90 /33 clock b1 45 /33 repeat 12 ( forward b1 1 ; up b1 5 ; forward b1 1 ; clock b1 5 ; right b1 5 ; forward b1 2 )
  17. 17. Example 5 - Circumference /33 create b4 geoobject plane /33 repeat 36 ( forward b4 0.5 ; left b4 10 )
  18. 18. Example 6 - VELOBJECT /33 create b5 velobject plane green /33 repeat 4 (speedup b5 10 ; slowdown b5 10 ; spinup b5 162 ;; spinup b5 162 ; setangvel b5 (0 0 0) )
  19. 19. Example 7 - NEWOBJECT /33 create b7 newobject plane red /33 repeat 4 ( appimpulse b7 ( 12.0 0 0) ; appimpulse b7 ( -0) ; appimpulse b7 ( - 12.0 0 0) ; approtimpulse b7 ( 0 0 1.0) ; approtimpulse b7 ( 0 0 -0.98) )
  20. 20. Example 8 - Collisions /33 create c1 phyobject sphere blue /33 setpos c1 (214.7874 208.3379 38.48) /33 create c2 phyobject sphere red /33 setpos c2 (207.5374/33 setpos c2 (207.5374 216.3379 38.48) /33 appimpulse c1 (-4 0 0) ongo /33 appimpulse c2 (0 -4 0) ongo /33 go
  21. 21. Conclusion We believe that the above sequence of object types realizes Papert's proposed Piagetian learning sequence to Newtonian physics (1980) from theNewtonian physics (1980) from the geometric object to the Newtonian one providing the exploratory and syntonic construction of position, velocity, acceleration, force, etc. concepts
  22. 22. Conclusion TATI allows you to “relate what is new and to be learned to something you already know […] make it your own: Make something new with it, play with it, build with it (Papert, 1980, p. 120).” Hopefully TATI and TATILogo represent a significant contribution to Physics learning and reduce SL learning curve. build with it (Papert, 1980, p. 120).”
  23. 23. Future 1. To implement the remaining commands (CONNECT, etc.) despite the 64kB limitation! 2. Revise all the implementation:2. Revise all the implementation: design, usability, rigor, etc. 3. Alpha test w/ specialists 4. Beta test w/ voluntary users 5. Distribution 6. Registration as a Logo variant
  24. 24. Proof of concept? Physics teachers willing to do an usability test are most welcome. Which means: HELP, PLEASE!
  25. 25. Links @SLPhysicsLab www.tatilogo.com @SLPhysicsLab http://www.secondlifephysics.com/ http://slurl.com/secondlife/Castelo/213/211/39/
  26. 26. References • Aelson, H.; diSessa, A. A. (1981) Turtle Geometry: Computations as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. • Bricken, W. (1991). Extended abstract: A formal• Bricken, W. (1991). Extended abstract: A formal foundation for cyberspace. In S.K. Helsel (Ed.), Beyond the vision: The technology, research, and business of virtual reality. Westport: Meckler. • dos Santos, R. P. (2009) Journal of Virtual Worlds Research, 2(1).
  27. 27. References • Harvey, B. (1993) Berkeley Logo User Manual. Berkeley, CA: University of California. • Papert, S. A. (1980) Mindstorms -• Papert, S. A. (1980) Mindstorms - Children, Computers and Powerful Ideas. New York: Basic Books. • Piaget, J. & Garcia, R. (1989) Psychogenesis and the History of Science. New York : CUP.
  28. 28. Σας ευχαριστούμε!

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