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Articulations

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  • 1. Articulations – Articulations are more commonly called “joints.” By definition, an articulation is the junction between two or more bones, regardless of how much (or how little) actual movement is permitted. The function of joints is exemplified in their capacity to permit movement of the human body.
  • 2. Articulations or joints can be classified in two ways: Structural Classification – three categories based on how the bones involved are connected to each other. Functional Classification – three categories based on the degree of movement permitted by the joint.
  • 3. Structural Classification
    • Based on two criteria:
    • whether or not a space or cavity exists between the bones.
    • b) the type of connective tissue that holds the bones together.
    • Fibrous joints have no space between the articulating bones and the bones are held together by fibrous connective tissue.
    • Cartilaginous joints have no space between the articulating bones and the bones are held together tightly by cartilage.
          • Synovial joints possess a joint cavity and the bones forming the joint are surrounded by a joint capsule.
  • 4. Functional Classification
    • This classification of joints is based solely on the amount of movement permitted at a particular joint.
    • Synarthrosis – “immovable” joints. No movement occurs at the joint. Most synarthrosis joints are fibrous joints.
    • Amphiarthrosis – “slightly moveable” joints. Little movement occurs at the joint. Most amphiarthrosis joints are cartilaginous joints.
    • Diarthrosis – freely moveable joints. a lot of movement occurs at the joint. All diarthrosis joints are synovial joints

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