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Doc 9375 dangerous goods trainning programme book 3 Doc 9375 dangerous goods trainning programme book 3 Document Transcript

  • =l375-AN/=iIL3 BOOK 3--ENGL 2773 484L4Lh UU903LL &TV R#i --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- STD.TCAO Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 2993 lW .- 484l,L(l,b flO=llJ3l,7 730 Published in separate English, French, Russian and Spanish editions by the International Civil Aviation Organization. All correspondence, except orders and subscriptions, should be addressed to the Secretary General. Orders for this publication should be sent to one of the following addresses,together with the appropriate remittance (by bank draft, chcque or money order) in U.S. dollars or the currency of the country in which the order is placed. Document Sales Unit International Civil Aviation Organization 1000 Sherbrooke Street West, Suite 400 Montreal, Quebec Canada H3A 2R2 Tel.: (514) 28.58219 Telex: 05-245 I3 Fax: (5 14) 288-4772 Sitatex: YULCAYA Credit card orders (Visa or American Expressonly) are acccptcd at the above address. Egypr. ICAO Representative,Middle East Ofticc, 9 Shagarct El Dorr Street, Zamalck I I21 I, Cairo. Frrmce. Representantde I’ OACI, Bureau Europe et Atlantique Nord, 3 his, villa Emile-Bergerat, 92522 Neuilly-sur-Seine (Cedex). Indira. Oxford Book and Stationery Co., Scindia House, New Delhi or I7 Park Street, Calcutta. Jcipun.Japan Civil Aviation Promotion Foundation, 15-l 2, I -chomc. Toranomon, Minato-Ku, Tokyo. Kenyu. ICAO Representative,Eastern and Southcm African Office, United Nations Accommodation, P.O. Box 46294, Nairobi. Mexkw. Reprcscntantede la OACI, Olicina Norteamerica, Centroamerica y Caribe, Apartado postal 5-377, C.P. 06500, Mexico, D.F. Peru. Reprcsentantedc la OACI, Oficina Sudamerica, Apartado 4127, Lima IO. Sene,&. Rcprescntantde I’ OACI, Bureau Afrique occidcntalc et ccntmle, Boite postalc 2356, Dakar. Spkn. Pilot’ Suministros Aeronauticos, S.A., CIUliscs, 5-Oticina Ntim. 2, 28043 Madrid. s, Thuiltnd. ICAO Representative,Asia and Pacific Office, P.O. Box I I, Samyaek Ladprao, Bangkok I090 I. United Kingdwz. Civil Aviation Authority, Printing and Publications Services, Greville House, 37 Gntton Road, Chcltcnham, Glos., CL50 2BN. The Catalogue of ICAO Publications and Audio Visual Training Aids Issued annually, the Catalogue lists all publications training aids currently available. and audio visual Monthly supplements announce new publications and audio visual training aids, amendments, supplements, reprints, etc. Available free from the Document Sales Unit, ICAO --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale E
  • STDJCAO 9375-AN/713 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 R w?MUb 0090318 b77 gp DANGEROUS GOODS TRAINING PROGRAMME (Dot 9375-AN/913) BOOK 3 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- PASSENGER HANDLING STAFF AND FLIGHT ATTENDANTS THIRD Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS EDITION - JANUARY Not for Resale 1993
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/9L3 BOOK 3-ENGL I~993 m 48'4LYLb ClO=lO31=l 503 iM FOREWORD Annex 18 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, entitled “The Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air”, requires in Chapter 10 that dangerous goods training programmes be established and updated as provided for in the ICAO document Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods.by Air (Dot 9284). The Technical Instructions (Part 6) require that initial and recurrent dangerous goods training programmes be established and maintained for or on behalf of the following: --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- - regular shippers of dangerous goods and shippers’ agents; - operators; - agencies located at an aerodrome which perform, on behalf of the operator, the act of receiving, loading, unloading, transferring or other processing of passengers or cargo; - agencies other than operators involved in processing or transporting either passengers or cargo; and - agencies engaged in the security screening of passengers and their baggage. It also recommends that these training programmes be subjected to review and approval as determined by the appropriate national authority, with the exception of the operators’ training programmes which must be subject to review and approval by the appropriate authority of the State of the operator. A series of four books, of which this is Book 3, has been produced for the training of particular categories of personnel involved in the transport of dangerous goods by air. The four books are: Book 1: Shippers, cargo agents and operators’ cargo acceptance staff Book 2: Load planners and flight crew Book 3: Passenger handling staff and flight attendants Book 4: Loading and warehouse personnel This programme of books has been developed to help achieve a uniform world-wide level of training in all aspects of handling and transporting dangerous goods by air and particularly to assist those who are responsible for the establishment of training programmes. The material contained in these books was developed jointly by ICAO and IATA in support of the provision contained in Annex I8 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation. It is believed that the use of an internationally developed training programme will facilitate approval by national authorities. It is intended that revised editions of these books will be published from time to time to maintain alignment with changes to the provisions on which they are based. This third edition of the training programme series is based on the 1993-1994 Edition of the Technical Instructions. (iii) Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 (iv) BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 W ‘ iBqL41b OO=l~320 1225 - Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling Staff and Flight Attenabnts ICAO publish& a document entitled Emergency Response Guidance for Aircrafi Incidents involving Dangerous Goods (Dot 9481). This is only intended for incidents which take place in the air. Part of the document is addressed to flight attendants who may have to deal with dangerous goqds incidents in the passenger cabin. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.lCAO q375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 - '4B'4/4Lb ClO=t[132l, lb1 m TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction ...................................................................................... Dangerous Goods.. I ............................................................................... General ....................................................................................... Dangerous goods acceptable ...................................................................... Dangerous goods forbidden for transport ............................................................ ............................................................... Dangerousgoodsexceptedorlimited Passengers who wish to carry dangerous goods. ...................................................... Classesand Divisions .............................................................................. Description of classes and divisions ................................................................ 6 7 Precautionary Measures ............................................................................ 13 Marking and Labelling ............................................................................. 17 InformationtoPassengers ........................................................................... I8 Review Questions ................................................................................. I9 Answers to Review Questions ....................................................................... 20 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Illustration of Hazard and Handling Labels Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 D 48Y/lllb 0090322 OTB U INTRODUCTION This is a self-study training book intended to familiarize passenger handling personnel, including flight attendants, with the provisions of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Technical Instructiotzs for the Safe Tramport of Dangerous Goods b.y Air. The ICAO Technical Instructions contain the internationally agreed rules which will ensure dangerous goods are carried safely. You need to be aware of the content of these provisions so that you may monitor the system where possible and properly carry out your own responsibilities. Do not attempt to memorize any part of this book or the Technical Instructions. Dangerous goods are commodities with u potential.for by air is not dungemus. dunger hut, if the regulutions ure fMowed, trunsporting such goods Within the definition of dangerous goods are not only obvious substances such as acids, radioactive material, poisons and explosives but also some unlikely items such as magnets, wheelchairs with wet-cell batteries, breathing apparatus with compressed gas cylinders, perishables packed in dry ice, pesticides, etc. The Technical Instructions cover the procedures to be followed dangerous goods and transporting it on an aircraft. by everyone involved in preparing a consignment of The pages that follow will help you to understand the relevant parts of the Technical Instructions more fully. Throughout this book, cross-references to the relevant parts of the Technical Instructions are given. Extracts from some parts are also shown as examples. The cross-references (which appear in parentheses) always begin with a figure indicating the Part of the Technical Instructions, followed by a semicolon and then followed by a group of figures representing the paragraph. For example: 4;2.3 refers to Part 4, paragraph 2.3. A single figure following the semicolon refers to a whole chapter. For example: 2;9 refers to Part 2, Chapter 9. It is worth noting that a detailed Index appears at the back of the Technical Instructions (Attachment 4) and this will help you find any other references you may need. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- It is intended that you read the relevant paragraphs of the Instructions in conjunction with the notes contained in to obtain a fuller understanding of the procedures involved in the transport of dangerous goods by air. To understanding, it is suggested that you attempt to answer the review questions given at the end of the book, Instructions for reference as necessary. The answers to the review questions are also given to enable you to check responses and to indicate areas where further study might be required. The Technical Instructions are updated and reissued every two years. Only the current edition should be used Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS I Not for Resale this book test your using the your own
  • 9375-AN/913 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- STD.ICAO BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 W 'Wlilb OO=lll323 T34 I DANGEROUS GOODS General Dangerous goods may be divided into three categories: a) those which are acceptable for transport by air provided all the provisions of the Instructions are complied with; b) those which are forbidden for transport by air; and c) those which are excepted from the provisions of the Instructions. Provided that the requirements of the Technical Instructions are followed, the desired level of safetv will be maintained. Dangerous goods acceptable - 1;1.2 A great many dangerous goods may be carried safely on aircraft as cargo provided they are properly prepared for transport in accordance with the Instructions. Generally, however, they are not permitted in passengers’ or crews’ checked baggage or as carry-on articles (but see “Dangerous goods excepted or limited” below). A major aspect of the requirements is the use of secure packaging when transporting limited quantities of dangerous goods. The Instructions, in general, restrict the quantity per package rather than the number of packages. Dangerous goods forbidden for transport - 1;2.1 Certain dangerous goods are considered to be too dangerous for transport by air under any circumstances. Special care is taken to ensure that such goods are not accepted for transport. Dangerous goods excepted or limited The provisions contained in the Instructions do not apply to the following: A. Exceptions for dangerous goods of the operator (1;2.3) a) articles and substances which would otherwise be classed as dangerous goods but which are required to be aboard the aircraft in accordance with the pertinent airworthiness requirements and operating regulations or that are authorized by the State of the operator to meet special requirements; b) ‘ 3 aerosols, alcoholic beverages, perfumes, colognes, safety matches and liquefied gas lighters carried aboarh a passenger aircraft by the operator for use or sale on the aircraft during the flight or series of flights, but excluding disposable gas lighters and those lighters liable to leak when exposed to reduced pressure; dry ice intended for use in food and beverage service aboard the aircraft. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 2 Not for Resale
  • Replacement parts and spares must meet the normal requirements of these Instructions except that, when consigned by operators, they can be carried in specially designed containers. B. Dangerous goods in excepted quantities (1;2.5) Certain types of dangerous goods may be carried in small quantities without complying with all the requirements of the Instructions. Special provisions have been made which exempt them from the usual provisions for dangerous goods including documentation, hazard labels and segregation loading. However, such packages must be marked “Dangerous goods in excepted quantities” ( I ;2.5.6.1). Packages containing excepted quantities of dangerous goods do not require any special handling or loading except that they must not be carried in a passenger cabin or on the flight deck. An incident involving leakage or spillage of a package containing excepted quantities of dangerous goods or any other occurrences must be reported in accordance with Part 5;4.4 and 4.5 of the Instructions. C. Dangerous goods in limited quantities (1;2.6) The Instructions contain provisions for limited quantities of dangerous goods. These recognize that many dangerous goods when in reasonably limited quantities present a reduced hazard during transport and can safely be carried in good quality packagings of the types specified in the Instructions but which have not been tested and marked accordingly. The provisions applicable for dangerous goods in limited quantities appear in Part 1;2.6 of the Instructions. The p&king instructions are indicated in Column 9 of Table 2-14 where they are prefixed by the letter “Y”; the associated quantity limitation is shown in Column IO. These packages must be marked, labelled and stowed in the same way as other dangerous goods. D. Dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew (9;1.2) --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Dangerous goods must not be carried by passengers or crew members as or in carry-on baggage, or as checked baggage, or on their person, except for the following: a) b) c) d) alcoholic beverages not exceeding 70 per cent alcohol by volume when packed in receptacles of less than 5 L; non-radioactive medicinal or toilet articles (including aerosols). Also aerosols in Division 2.2, with no subsidiary risk, for sporting or home use in checked baggage only. The total net quantity of all such.articles carried by each person must not exceed 2 kg or 2 L and the net quantity of each single article must not exceed 0.5 kg or 0.5 L. The term ‘ medicinal or toilet articles (including aerosols)’ is intended to include such items as hair sprays, perfumes, colognes and medicines containing alcohols; with the approval of the operator(s), small gaseous oxygen or air cylinders required for medical use; small carbon dioxide gas cylinders worn for the operation of mechanical limbs, also spare cylinders of a similar size if required to ensure an adequate supply for the duration of the journey; with the approval of the operator(s), as checked baggage only, securely boxed cartridges for sporting purposes, in Division 1.4S, in quantities not exceeding 5 kg gross mass per person for that person’ own use, excluding ammunition with s explosive or incendiary projectiles. Allowances for more than one person must not be combined into one or more packages; fl dry ice in quantities not exceeding 2 kg per person, when used to pack non-dangerous perishables, provided the package permits the release of carbon dioxide gas: - in carry-on baggage; or - with the approval of the operator(s), in checked baggage: g) safety matches or a lighter intended for use by an individual when carried on the person. However, lighters containing unabsorbed liquid fuel (other than liquefied gas), lighter fuel and lighter refills are not permitted on one’ person or in s checked or carry-on baggage; h) radioisotopic cardiac pacemakers or other devices, including those powered by lithium batteries, implanted into a person, or radio-pharmaceuticals contained within the body of a person as the result of medical treatment; Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 m ‘ -l84LLlLb 0090325 807 m Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling Staff and Flight Attendants 4 9 with the approval of the operator(s), wheelchairs or other battery-powered mobility aids with non-spillable batteries (see Packing Instruction 806 and Special Provision A67), as checked baggage provided that the battery is disconnected, the battery terminals are insulated to prevent accidental short circuits and the battery is securely attached to the wheelchair or mobility aid; 9 with the approval of the operator(s), wheelchairs or other battery-powered mobility aids with spillable batteries as checked baggage, provided that the wheelchair or mobility aid can be loaded, stowed, secured and unloaded always in an upright position and that the battery is disconnected, the battery terminals are insulated to prevent accidental short circuits and the battery is securely attached to the wheelchair or mobility aid. If the wheelchair or mobility aid cannot be loaded, stowed, secured and unloaded always in an upright position, the battery must be removed and the wheelchair or mobility aid may then be carried as checked baggage without restriction. The removed battery must be carried in strong, rigid packagings as follows: 1) these packagings must be leaktight, impervious to battery fluid and be protected against upset by securing to pallets or by securing them in cargo compartments using appropriate means of securement (other than by bracing with freight or baggage) such as by use of restraining straps, brackets or holders; 2) batteries must be protected against short circuits, secured upright in these packagings and surrounded by compatible absorbent material sufficient to absorb their total liquid contents; and 3) these packagings must be marked ‘ Battery, wet, with wheelchair’ or ‘ Battery, wet, with mobility aid’ and be labelled with a ‘ Corrosive’ label (Figure 4-19) and with a package orientation label (Figure 4-23). The pilot-in-command must be informed of the location of a wheelchair or mobility aid with an installed battery or the location of a packed battery. It is recommended that passengersmake advance arrangements with each operator; also unless batteries are non-ipillable they should be fitted, where feasible, with spill-resistant vent caps; k) hair curlers containing hydrocarbon gas, no more than one per person, provided that the safety cover is securely fitted over the heating element. Gas refills for such curlers must not be carried; 1) with the approval of the operator(s), as carry-on baggage only, a mercurial barometer carried by a representative of a government weather bureau or similar official agency. The barometer must be packed in a strong outer packaging, having a sealed inner liner or a bag of strong leak-proof and puncture-resistant material impervious to mercury, which will prevent the escape of mercury from the package irrespective of its position. The pilot-in-command must be informed of any such barometer; m) with the approval of the operator(s), one small carbon dioxide cylinder per person fitted into a self-inflating life-jacket, plus one spare cartridge; n) with the approval of the operator(s), heat producing articles (i.e. battery-operated equipment such as underwater torches and soldering equipment which, if accidentally activated, will generate extreme heat and can cause fire) may be carried in carryon baggage only. The heat producing component, or the energy source, must be removed so as to prevent unintentional functioning during transport; 0) with the approval of the operator(s) and as checked baggage only, a small oxygen generator for personal use, one per person, that meets the following requirements: 2) the generator must be equipped with an actuating device with at least two positive means of preventing unintentional actuation; 3) when actuated at a temperature of 20°C with the generator well insulated, the temperature of any external surface of the generator must not exceed 1OO’ C; 4) the generator must be in the manufacturer’ original packaging and this must include a sealed outer wrapping or other means s which can be taken as clear evidence that the generator has not been tampered with; and 5) p) the generator, without its packaging, must be capable of withstanding a 1.g m drop test onto a rigid, non-resilient, flat and horizontal surface, in the position most likely to cause damage, without loss of its contents and without actuation; the generator packaging must be marked to indicate that it meets the above requirements. one small medical or clinical thermometer which contains mercury, for personal use, when in its protective case. In the case of electric wheelchairs, if the passenger is unable to confirm that the battery is of the non-spillable type, it must be treated as a spillable battery. Security attache cases (which may contain lithium batteries and/or pyrotechnic material) are totally forbidden. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 1)
  • STD.ICAO 937!i-AN/7L3 BOOK 3-ENGL Ii993 m '484L4Lb Dangerous Goods 007032b 743 m ---__ 5 Passengers who wish to carry dangerous goods It is dangerous, and unlawful, for passengers or crew members to have dangerous goods on their person, in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage apart from the excepted items mentioned above (9; 1.2). Passengers should have been warned of this by means of notices displayed at the check-in counter and printed on their tickets (9;2. I ). --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Passengers who wish to transport dangerous goods can only do so by submitting them, well in advance, to the airline’ cargo s department. There a fully trained acceptance clerk will check the goods to ensure that they are safely packaged and properly documented. This can never be done at the passenger check-in counter. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 7375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL Jqq3 m 48tlj,tjlb flnqo327 bfl-f m CLASSES AND DIVISIONS Dangerous goods are divided into nine classes reflecting the type of risk involved, but the order in which they are listed does not imply a relative degree of danger (2;l to 2;9). It is the responsibility of the shipper to classify the dangerous goods into one of these classes. The nine classes of dangerous goods are: Class I Explosives Class 2 Gases Class 3 Flammable liquids Class 4 Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases Class 5 Oxidizing substances; organic peroxides Class 6 Poisonous (toxic) and infectious substances Class 7 Radioactive material Class 8 Corrosives Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous goods In some classes, dangerous goods are further divided into divisions. The division is expressed by placing a decimal point after the class number and reflecting the number of the division, e.g. Division 6.1. In these cases, reference is made only to the division and not to the class, e.g. Division 5.2, not Class 5, Division 2. Dangerous goods are identified by proper shipping names and UN numbers. These names and numbers are assigned under the United Nations classification system to specific articles and substances. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO =i375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 - '4B9L41b 0070328 5Lb m 7 Classes and Divisions ~__Description of classes and divisions Clus.s/division CLASS 1 - EXPLOSIVES Division I. I Substances and articles which have a mass explosion hazard. Division I .2 Substances and articles which have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard. THESE EXPLOSIVES Division Substances and articles which have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard or both, but not a mass explosion hazard. I .3 ARE NOT NORMALLY PERMITTED FOR Division Substances and articles which present no significant hazard. I .4 TRANSPORT BY AIR Division I .5 Very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard. Division 1.6 Extremely insensitive articles which do not have a mass explosion hazard. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO q375-AN/q13 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 m q84Lqlb ClllqO32q q5~ m Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Pqssenger Handling Staff and Flight Attendants 8 Class/division Lube1 Remarks and examples Description Compatibility group assignment according to the Instructions, see --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Tab’ 2- e I- Substances and articles which present no significant hazard. Effect from accidental functioning is confined within the package. e.g. cartridges for weapons with inert projectiles, cartridges for signalling and safety fuses. Division 2. I Flammable gas Any gas which, when mixed with air in certain proportions, forms a flammable mixture, e.g. butane, hydrogen. Division 2.2 Non-flammable, CLASS 2 - GASES j , ,‘ /’ i #’ .*. ‘ , / Q Division 2.3 non-toxic gas Most toxic gases are forbidden for carriage by air, although a few are permitted, e.g. ammonia, anhydrous. Toxic gas ,: Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Any non-flammable, nontoxic compressed gas, e.g. carbon dioxide or refrigerated liquefied gas, e.g. liquid nitrogen. Z/f’ Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 93?5-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 m 48tili41b OCl=llJ330 l,7V m 9 Classes and Divisions Class/division CLASS 3 - FLAMMABLE Description Remarks and examples Flammable liquid Lube1 Any liquid having a closed-cup flash point of 6OS”C or below, e.g. paint, alcohols. LlQUlDS Class 3 SOLIDS; SUBSTANCES LIABLE TO SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION; CLASS 4 - FLAMMABLE SUBSTANCES WHICH, IN CONTACT WITH WATER, EMIT FLAMMABLE GASES Division 4. I Flammable solid Any solid material, which is readily combustible, e.g. celluloid, or may cause or contribute to fire through friction, e.g. matches, nitronaphtalene and self-reactive substances. Division 4.2 Spontaneously combustible Any substance which is liable to spontaneous heating or to heating up in contact with air and then liable to catch fire, e.g. white or yellow phosphorus, unstabilized fish meal. Division 4.3 Dangerous when wet Substances which, by interaction with water, are liable to become spontaneously flammable or to give off flammable gases, e.g. calcium carbide, sodium. (These substances are often described as “water-reactive”.) CLASS 5 - OXIDIZING SUBSTANCES: ORGANIC PEROXIDES Oxidizing substance Division 5. I --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale A substance that yields oxygen readily to stimulate the combustion of other material, e.g. ammonium nitrate fertilizer, calcium chlorate.
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 48414Lb 009033l, oflo m Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling Staffand Flight Attendants IO Label Description Division 5.2 POISONOUS (TOXIC) Remarks and examples Organic peroxide Class/division CLASS 6 - D An unstable organic material (liquid or solid) that ignites readily or reacts dangerously with other substances. See the Table at the end of Part 2, Chapter 5. AND INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES Poisonous (toxic) substance Liquids or solids which are dangerous if inhaled, swallowed or absorbed through the skin, e.g. arsenic, some disinfectants and most pesticides. Division 6. I Packing Group III Harmful. Keep away from foodstuffs Less dangerous poisonous substances, e.g. potassium fluoride. Division 6.2 Infectious substance Substances containing viable micro-organisms, which are known or reasonably believed to cause disease in animals and humans. Radioactive material Category I - White Slightly radioactive material with radiation level not more than 0.005 mSv/h on the package surface. No transport index indicated. CLASS 7 - RADIOACTIVE Class 7 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS :a MATERIAL Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Division 6. I Packing Group I or I1
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 m '4flqj,qj,b ooqn332 Tq7 m Classes and Divisions Class/division II Label Description Remarks and examples Class 7 Radioactive material Category II - Yellow Radiation level not more than 0.5 mSv/h and a transport index not exceeding I. Class 7 Radioactive material Category III - Yellow Radiation level not more than 2 mSv/h and a transport index not exceeding IO. CLASS 8 - CORROSIVES Class 8 A substance which can cause visible damage to the skin or any living tissue, or which can damage other freight or the aircraft structure, e.g. battery acids, mercury. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- CLASS 9 - - MISCELLANEOUS Class 9 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS DANGEROUS GOODS Miscellaneous dangerous goods Not for Resale Any article or substance which presents a danger during air transportation that is not covered by the other classes. These include magnetized material and other regulated substances which have anaesthetic, noxious or other similar properties which could cause extreme annoyance or discomfort to a flight crew member so as to prevent the correct performance of assigned duties.
  • STD.ICAO 7375-AN/713 BOOK 3-ENGL la993 D 48'il,'4Lb llOqO333 983 m Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling StafSand Flight Attendants 12 Label Class 9 Description Remarks and examples Magnetized material (handling label) Class/division These materials have relatively high magnetic field strength, e.g. some large loudspeakers and non-shielded permanent magnets without keeDer bars --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO =l375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL L=l=l3 PRECAUTIONARY - 484L4Lb 0090334 BLT m MEASURES When examining, accepting or, in the case of flight attendants, assisting in the stowage of carry-on baggage, great care must be taken to ensure that no dangerous goods, other than those specifically listed in Part 9 of the Technical Instructions as described earlier, are carried on the aircraft as either checked or carry-on baggage. Aerosol cans In aircraft, decreased cabin pressure at altitude may result either in leaks, if the can is not properly sealed, or in the contents being expelled at a much greater rate than normal when used. They are also very susceptible to heat, and there have been incidents where cans have exploded as a result of becoming overheated in an aircraft cabin. The aerosol spray is very often flammable. See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 b). Aqualung gas cylinders These cylinders used for water (scuba) diving usually contain a compressed gas and as such cannot be accepted as baggage. Empty cylinders (pressure gauge reads zero) are acceptable. Bull semen Is kept cool either with cryogenic (very cold) liquefied gas, which continuously vaporizes (see cryogenic liquid below), or with dry ice. Camping equipment Beware of cooking equipment especially Butane (LPG) metal bottles which contain a flammable compressed gas. Camping equipment can also contain flammable liquid, for example, kerosene. Chemicals Many chemicals are dangerous and only qualified cargo staff can advise if they are acceptable as cargo. Dangerous chemicals must never be accepted as baggage. Cryogenic liquid Indicates liquefied gases at very low temperature such as nitrogen, helium, argon, etc. Cryogenic liquids are dangerous if spilled because they can cause suffocation and may damage electrical circuits. Dental apparatus May contain dangerous chemicals such as resins or solvents. Diagnostic specimens May contain infectious substances. Diving equipment May contain high intensity diving lamps which can generate extremely high heat when operated in air. In order to be carried safely, the bulb or battery must be disconnected. Drilling or mining equipment May contain explosive(s) and/or other dangerous goods. Electrical equipment May contain magnetized material, mercury in switch gear, electron tubes or wet batteries. I3 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Typical examples of items which may contain or indicate the presence of dangerous goods are listed below. If such items, or similar ones, are noticed or declared, the passenger should be questioned about the exact nature of the contents.
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/913 14 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 D q84L'4Zb OO=llJ335 75b W Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling StafSand Flight Attendants Electrically powered apparatus (wheelchairs, lawn mowers, golf carts, etc.) May contain wet batteries. Expeditionary equipment May contain explosives (flares), flammable (camping gas) or other dangerous goods. Fireworks Usually either highly flammable or explosive. Frozen embryos May involve use of liquid nitrogen. Frozen food, fish, meat, vegetables, etc. Normally packed with dry ice (solid carbon dioxide). See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 f). Gas cigarette lighters The decreased pressure in the cabin and in the hold while flying at high altitudes can cause cigarette lighters with unabsorbed liquid fuel to leak and lighters with liquefied gas under pressure to provide a larger flame than usual. Some low-cost plastic disposable lighters are not fitted with a guard to prevent the release valve from being accidentally operated. Thus all these types of lighters may be hazardous whether in checked baggage or brought into the cabin. See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 g). Gas cylinders If filled, contain gas under pressure and can only be accepted as cargo. Household cleaners Cleaners such as detergents, stain removers, bleaches, etc., can contain either chlorides or ammonias. Many bleaching powders contain strong oxidizers, which react with other materials producing fumes, smoke and fire. Some detergents and stain removers contain ammonia, which is very corrosive and reacts with oxidizing materials. Ammonia also produces toxic fumes. There has been more than one instance where an aircraft has had to return to the airport because of ammonia fumes affecting the crew and passengers. Household goods May contain dangerous goods such as paints, aerosols, bleaching powder, flammable liquids, household cleaners, etc. Instruments May contain mercury in instruments such as barometers, manometers, industrial thermometers, rectifier tubes, etc. Laboratory/testing equipment May contain various dangerous chemicals. Lighter fluid Is a highly volatile and flammable liquid which can produce an explosive concentration of vapour in an enclosed space. See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 g). Machinery parts A very general term which might include several classes of dangerous goods (adhesives, paints, sealants, solvents, etc.). Matches (book matches and boxed matches) Must not be accepted in checked or carry-on baggage but only on the passenger’ s person. Book matches can easily have the protective flap dislodged when moved about in luggage. There have been numerous incidents where the flap has been dislodged and a fire started when match heads rubbed against the striking surface of another book of matches. See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 g). Medical supplies Be certain that they do not contain dangerous chemicals before accepting as baggage. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale (gasoline), flammable mercury gas switches, --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- liquid
  • Precautionary Measures 15 Is a metal which remains in liquid form at temperatures as low as -38°C. It gives off toxic fumes at high temperatures and low pressures. Liquid mercury will very quickly penetrate aluminium and cause it to become brittle and weak. As most aircraft parts are produced from aluminium, it can cause severe structural damage if spilt in an aircraft, especially as it is difficult to trace and remove. Paint Most paints are considered as flammable liquids and can be accepted only as cargo. Classified as paints are enamels, lacquers, stains, shellac, varnish, polish, fillers and thinners. These all contain solvents which are highly flammable. Unless the container is tightly and effectively sealed and packed, the reduced air pressure in an aircraft hold could cause the tin to pop open and the contents to spill. There have been numerous incidents where cans of paint have opened and spilt, not only damaging other goods and the aircraft but also producing explosive vapour in the aircraft hold. Parts of automobile (car, motor, motorcycle) May contain wet batteries, etc. Pharmaceuticals May contain dangerous chemicals either listed individually by name or covered by n.0.s. entries. Photographic equipment Beware of hazardous chemicals which are often found in such equipment. Acids present a number of hazards depending on the particular type. In general they are corrosive and will attack many of the materials used in aircraft construction. They can also cause very severe burns when in contact with the skin. Some acids such as nitric and perchloric are strong oxidizers and, if spilt, they could combine with other substances to create a fire or an explosion. Racing cars or motorcycle team equipment May contain flammable aerosols, nitromethane or other gasoline additives, or wet batteries. Refrigerators May contain gases or dangerous liquids. Repair kits May contain dangerous substances such as adhesives, cellulose, paint, organic peroxides, solvent, etc. Samples If samples contain any dangerous goods, they can only be accepted as cargo. Self-propelled vehicles (motorcycles, motorized bicycles, children’ s automobiles, etc.) May contain gasoline and/or battery. Solvents and adhesives Adhesives (MEK) or spillage or depending Swimming pool chemicals Swimming pool chemicals often contain dangerous goods, such as oxidizers and corrosives. Switches in electrical equipment or instruments May contain mercury. Tool boxes May contain explosives (power rivets), compressed gases or aerosols, flammable gases (butane cylinders), flammable adhesives or paints, corrosive liquids, etc. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Mercury Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS often contain solvents such as acetone, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone acrylonitrile which are very flammable and, in some cases, toxic. If a a leakage of adhesive or solvents occurs, there will be a fire hazard and, on the type of solvent or adhesive, possibly a toxicity hazard. Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO =l375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 - 484LqLb 0090337 529 m Dangerous Goods Training Programme Book 3 - Passenger Handling Stafand Flight Attendants 16 Vaccines May be packed in dry ice (solid carbon dioxide). See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 f). Wet-cell batteries These consist of metal plates immersed in a liquid electrolyte, either a dilute sulphuric acid or potassium hydroxide. Both of these electrolytes are corrosive liquids. These batteries could cause damage either through spillage or accidental short-circuiting of the terminals resulting in a fire. There have been many occurrences where battery acid has leaked, causing damage to both the aircraft structure and adjacent baggage. See “Provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew”, 9; I .2 j). Articles and substances which do not fall within the definitions of dangerous goods but which, in the event of leakage, may cause a serious clean-up problem or corrosion to aluminium on a long-term basis, should be checked to ensure at least that the packaging is adequate to prevent leakage during transport. These may include brine, powdered or liquid dyes, pickled foodstuffs, etc. Passenger handling staff, when accepting live animals as baggage, should ensure that the animal container is leak-proof. In case of doubt as to the acceptability of an item or substance the question must be referred to an appropriate authority. (It is preferable to leave doubtful articles behind rather than risk endangering the aircraft and possibly breaking the law.) If a flight attendant finds, or suspects, that a passenger has carried onto the aircraft the ground supervisor or the pilot-in-command must be informed at once. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale an item of dangerous goods, either
  • sTD.ICAO 93754NFu3 BOOK 3-ENGL MARKING - 1993 m 484~~~~ 4;2 AND LABELLING 0070338 - 4b5 m 4;3 A passenger may attempt to carry, either as checked or carry-on baggage, a package bearing dangerous goods markings or labels. For example: “Mercury, UN 2809”, with a Class 8, Corrosive label. This would indicate that the package contains, or might possibly contain, dangerous goods and the passenger must be challenged to determine the exact nature of the contents. Should the marking or label indicate the correct nature of the goods, the package must be refused as baggage and the owner referred to the cargo department. Should the contents be other than dangerous goods, the passenger must remove or obliterate the marking and/or label prior to acceptance. The full range of hazard and handling labels is shown, in colour, on the last page of this book. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 17 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • sTD.ICAO 7375-AN/713 BOOK 3-ENGL INFORMATION 1973 m ‘ lJ,Yl,b l&‘ TO PASSENGERS - ooqo339 3Tl, m 9;2.1 Each operator must ensure that information is promulgated in such a manner that passengers are warned as to the type of goods that they are prohibited from transporting aboard an aircraft. As a minimum, this must consist of: a) notices sufficient in number and prominently displayed at any location where tickets are issued and baggage checked and in aircraft boarding areas and baggage claim areas; and b) information with the passenger ticket. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- States must ensure that operators, or any other person, organization, or enterprise involved, provide the above information to passengers. 18 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO 9375-AN/=ll,3 BOOK 3-ENGL I,993 m 484343b OO=lO340 013 m REVIEW QUESTIONS (Answers are provided on page 20) On which document is this training programme based? Where would you find details of the dangerous goods that may be carried by passengers? Givethe hazard class number which is assigned to each of the following dangerous goods: a) radioactive material: b) flammable liquids; c) magnetized material. 4. May a passenger take, in carry-on baggage, 5 kg of frozen fish packed in 3 kg of dry ice? 5. Does the pilot-in-command have to be informed if a wheelchair, with battery installed, is loaded on the aircraft: a) b) 6. with a non-spillable battery? with any other battery? May a passenger or crew member take book-matches on an aircraft in: a) b) 7. carry-on baggage? checked baggage? A passenger attempts to board an aircraft with a carton displaying a Class 3 label. a) b) 8. What would you suspect could be in the carton? Upon examination the carton proves to contain clothing. What action must be taken? What dangerous goods may be carried on the flight deck of an aircraft? I9 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Not for Resale
  • STD.ICAO =l375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL L=i=l3 m ‘ 411ILb 48’ 00703~l, T5T m --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- ANSWERS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS (The relevant paragraph of the Technical Instructions is shown in brackets.) 1. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Technical lnstructionsfor by Air. 2. In Part 9, Chapter I of the Technical Instructions. 3. a) Radioactive material, Class 7 (2;7) b) Flammable liquids, Class 3 (2;3) c) the Safe Transport ofDangerous Goods Magnetized material, Class 9 (2;9). 4. No - 2 kg of dry ice is the maximum permitted per passenger when used to pack perishables in carry-on baggage [9; I .2 f)]. 5. a) No [9;1.2 i)] b) Yes [9;1.2 j)]. 6. No - A passenger may carry book-matches on his person as part of personal smoking materials but not in either carry-on or checked baggage [9; I .2 g)]. 7. a) Flammable liquid (4;3.4) b) The label must be removed or obliterated. 8. Only dangerous goods permitted by Part I ;2.3. I and Part 9; I (5;2. I). 20 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • Subsidiary Risk Labels CargoAircraftonly J Dangerous Goods are arranged into classes by type of risk involved. Class and/or Division numbers must appear in the bottom corner of the Primary Hazard labels as indicated on the samples shown. J The numerical order of classes does not imply a relative degree of risk. Substances exist in most Check classes which are forbidden for transport by air or are limited to cargo aircraft only. Table 2-14 in ICAO’ Technical lnsfrucfions for the Safe Transportof Dangerous Goods by Air for s further information. J Text indicating the nature of the risk on the lower half of any Hazard label is optional except the text shown for Class 7 and the Handling labels which is mandatory. J Minimum size for Hazard labels is 100 x 100 m m (except Division 6.2, Infectious Substance labels - for packages too small, this size may be reduced to 50 x 50 mm). --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- For Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization full information on Hazard and Handling Provided by IHS under license with ICAO ICAO Instructions for fhe Safe No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Technical labels for dangerous goods, see the current edition of the Jransporfof Dangerous Goods by Air (Part 4, Chapter 3). Not for Resale Dangerous Goodswhichpossess subsidiary dangemusproperiiesmust also bear Subsidiary labels Risk denoting hazards. those SubsidiaryRisklabelsarethesameas Primary Hazard butwithoutthe labels Class Division or number. Aids ICAOP675 Montreal,1993 Audio Visual
  • S-fD.ICAQ 7375-AN/913 BOOK 3-ENGL ICAO TECHNICAL The following summary gives the status, and also describes in general terms the contents of the various series of technical publications issued by the International Civil Aviation Organization. N does not include specialized publications that do not fall specifically within one of the series, such as the Aeronautical Chart Catalogue or the Meteorological Tables for 1793 - 484L'ilb OOqll3'i~ 822 m PUBLICATIONS regarded as not yet having attained a sufficient degree of maturity for adoption as International Standards and Recommended Practices, as well as material of a more permanent character which is considered too detailed for incorporation in an Annex, or is susceptible to frequent amendment, for which the processes of the Convention would be too cumbersome. International Air Navigation. International Standards and Recommended Practices are adopted by the Council in accordance with Articles 54, 37 and 90 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation and are designated, for convenience, as Annexes to the Convention. The uniform application by Contracting States of the specifications contained in the International Standards is recognized as necessary for the safety or regularity of international air navigation while the uniform applidation of the specifications in the Recommended Practices is regarded as desirable in the interest of safety, regularity or efficiency of international air navigation. Knowledge of any differences between the national regulations or practices of a State and those established by an International Standard is essential to the safety or regularity of international air navigation. In the event of non-compliance with an International Standard, a State has, in fact, an obligation, under Article 38 of the Convention, to notify the Council of any differences. Knowledge of differences from Recommended Practices may also be important for the safety of air navigation and, although the Convention does not impose any obligation with regard thereto, the Council has invited Contracting States to notify such differences in addition to those relating to International Standards. Procedures for Air Navigation Services (PANS) are approved by the Council for world-wide application. They contain, for the most part, operating procedures Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Procedures (SUPPS) have a status similar to that of PANS in that they are approved by the Council, but only for application in the respective regions. They are prepared in consolidated form, since certain of the procedures apply to overlapping regions or are common to two or more regions. The following publications are prepared by authority of the Secretary General in accordance with the principles and policies approved by the Council. Technical Manuals provide guidance and information in amplification of the Lnternational Standards, Recommended Practices and PANS, the implementation of which they are designed to facilitate. Air Navigation Plans detail requirements for facilities and services for international air navigation in the respective ICAO Air Navigation Regions. They are prepared on the authority of the Secretary General on the basis of recommendations of regional air navigation meetings and of the Council action thereon. The plans are amended periodically to reflect changes in requirements and in the status of implementation of the recommended facilities and services. ICAO Circulars make available specialized information of interest to Contracting States. This includes studies on technical subjects. Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Regional Supplementary
  • STD.ICAO =l375-AN/713 BOOK 3-ENGL 1993 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale m ‘ 4lWlUb Oi=lO3’ i4 7b=J D