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  • 1. AIR NAVIGATION PLAN - EUROPEAN REGION Volume I, Basic ANP 1. Insert the following replacement pages: Table of Contents Part I 2. O-iii to O-v 1-1 to 1-12 Record the entry of Amendment No. 4 on page ii. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale Doc 7754, Vol. I Amendment No. 4 27/6/05
  • 2. AIR NAVIGATION PLAN - EUROPEAN REGION Volume I, Basic ANP 1. Doc 7754, Vol. I Amendment No. 2 I 20/8/03 Insert the following replacement pages and charts: Introduction Pari III III-A-1 to III-A- 19 Pari V V-A-5 to V-A-144 Charts ATS lA, lB, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 21,2J and 2K Part VII Charts SAR 1A and 1B Appendix 2. 0-7 to 0-1 1 A-1 to A-2 Record the entry of Amendment No. 2 on page ii. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 3. - AIR NAVIGATION PLAN EUROPEAN REGION VOLUME I, BASIC ANP O - PLAN DE NAVIGATION AÉRIENNE REGION EUROPE VOLUME I, ANP DE BASE PLAN DE NAVEGACIÓN AÉREA - REGION EUROPA VOLUMEN I, ANP BÁSICO Doc 7754 Corrigendum Rectificatif Corrigendo McnpaenetiMe 1. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- A3POHABMrAUMOHHbln nJiAH. EBPOnEMCKMM PETMOH TOM I. OCHOBHOM AHn Insert the following replacement chart: Part VI1 Chart SAR 1A 2. Record the entry of this Corrigendum on page (i). 1. Insérer la carte de remplacement suivante: O Partie VI1 Carte SAR 1A 2. Inscrire le présent rectificatif à la page 0-11. 1. Insértese la carta de remplazo siguiente: Parte VI1 2. Carta SAR 1A Anótese este corrigendo en la pagina (i). - 2. 3 a p e r ~ c ~ p ~ p y M ~ e McnpaeneHme H c. (i¡) AaHHoe a Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 4. AIR NAVIGATION PLAN - EUROPEAN REGION Volume I, Basic ANP 1. insert the following replacement pages and charts: Pageii ' . Part nr Part v V-A-5 t0V-A-132 [Remove exìstingpages Y-A-133 to Y-A-1381 Charts ATS 2A,B, C, D,E, F, G, H, I, J and K Part VI1 Chart SAR 1A Appendix 2. III-A- 1O A-l to A-2 [Remove mistingpage A-31 Record the entry of Amendment No. 1 on page ii. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale Doc 7754, Vol. I Amendment No. 1 8 August 2002
  • 5. AIR NAVIGATION PLAN - EUROPEAN REGION VOLUME I, BASIC ANP Doc 7754 Volume I Addendum* 28/3/02 ADDENDUM 1. Insert the following new charts, which were not included in the first edition of Doc 7754, Volume I: a) Chart SAR 1A - Search,and rescue services (West) Part VI1 - SAR b) Chart SAR 1B - Search and rescue services (East) Part VI1 - SAR 2. Replace page 0-v of the Table of Contents with the attached new page dated 28/3/02. 3. Record the entry of this Addendum on page (i). * This addendum is issued separately in English and Russian only. The French and Spanish versions will be incorporated directly into the publication. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 6. Doc 7754 * _ European Region --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Air Navigation Plan Volume I, Basic ANP Not to be used for operational purposes - First edition 2001 International Civil Aviation Organization Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 7. AMENDMENTS :* The issue of amendments is announced regularly in the ICAO Journal and in the monthly Supplement to the Catalogue o ICAO Publications and Audio-visual f Training Aids, which holders of this publication should consult. The space below is provided to keep a record of such amendments. RECORD OF AMENDMENTS AND CORRIGENDA CORRIGENDA AMENDMENTS Entered applicable c of issue I I I I --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- t Entered entered (ii) Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale entered
  • 8. o-iii --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction New concept of air navigation plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction of CNS/ATM elements into the plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Formatandscopeoftheplan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . States’ responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contentsoftheplan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementationdata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Establishment and provision of a multinational ICA0 EUR air navigation facility/service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Procedure for the amendment of regional plans, including FASID material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Procedure for the amendment of approved Basic Air Navigation Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Procedure for the amendment of the Facilities and Services Implementation Document (FASID) . . . . . . . . . . . . Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alphabetical index of States and territories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o-1 o-1 o-1 0-2 0-2 0-3 0-3 0-3 0-4 0-5 0-5 0-7 Part I . operational requirements and planning criteria (BORPC) for regional Basic air navigation planning Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General (applicable to both international commercial air transport and international general aviation) . . . . . . . . Aerodromes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Airtrafficmanagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Searchandrescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Surveillance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meteorology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aeronautical information services and aeronautical charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I- 1 I- 1 1-3 1-4 1-7 1-7 1-8 1-10 1-11 1-12 Part II . General planning aspects (GEN) General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Systemcapacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Economicconsiderations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmentalconsiderations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General operational considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specific operational considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System monitoring and adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National facilities and services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compatibility of systems between States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Securityaspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Airtrafficdemand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II- 1 II- 1 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-3 27/6/05 No 4 . Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 9. Page 11-3 11-3 Part III -Aerodrome operational planning (AOP) General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix -International aerodromes required in the EUR region ................................... 111-1 111-1 111-3 111-6 111-7 111-9 III-A-1 Part IV - Communications,navigation and surveillance (CNS) General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I .... Aeronautical Fixed Service (AFS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aeronautical Mobile Service (AMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aeronautical radio navigation service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frequency assignment planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provision of navigation means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Areanavigation(RNAV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV-1 IV-1 IV-3 IV-3 IV-4 IV-5 IV-7 - Part V Air traffic management (ATM) Part V.1- Airspace management (ASM) CiviYmilitarycoordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :...... . . . . Establishment of ATS routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v-1 v-2 Part V.11- Air traffic services (ATS) Provision of ATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VHF VOLMET broadcasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provision of information on hazardous weather conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ATS procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RadarforATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AutomationinATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provisions regarding VFR operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provisions regarding helicopter operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Incident reporting and investigation .......................................................... EUR RAN Meeting Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v-2 v-3 v-3 v-3 v-3 v-4 v-4 v-5 v-5 v-5 v-5 Part V.111- Air traffic flow management ( A T M ) Airtrafficdemand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ATCcapacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ATFM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-6 v-7 v-7 Appendix -Table ATS 1 - Basic ATS Route Network in the Lower and Upper Airspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale V-A-1 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Carriageanduseofairborneequipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assumednavigationperforrnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • 10. o-v Table of Contents Page Chart ATS 1A . Information Regions . Airpace (West) Flight Lower Chart ATS 1B . Information Regions . Airspace (West) Flight Upper Chart ATS 1C . Information Regions . Flight (East) Charts ATS 2A, €3, C, D. E. F. G . H. I. J. K (ATS Routes and Associated Navigation Means) Part VI1 . Search and rescue services (SAR) ProvisionofSAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooperation between SAR services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Search and rescue facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provisions for specific flight operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chart SAR 1A - Search and rescue services (West) Chart SAR 1B . and rescue services (East) Search Part VI11 . Aeronautical information services (AIS) International NOTAM offices (NOF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ProvisionofAIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coordination between AIS and other services .................................................... AIRACsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pre-flight information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automation in AIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix . Summary of Amendments to the Basic ANP .......................................... VI- 1 VI- 1 VI- 1 v1-2 v1-2 v1-2 v1-3 v1-3 v1-3 v1-4 v1-4 v1-4 v11-1 VII- 1 v11-1 VII- 1 VIII- 1 VIII-1 VIU- 1 v1u-1 VIII- 1 VIIJ-1 VIII-2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Part VI . Meteorology (MET) Areaforecastcentres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meteorological offices and stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Routine observations and reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIGMETandSpecialAirReports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Information for operators and flight crew members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Display of information, consultation and flight documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meteorological information for low-level flights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meteorological information for helicopter operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meteorological information for air traffic services units ............................................ Meteorological information for search and rescue services units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exchange of operational meteorological information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Communications requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-l 27/6/05 . No 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 11. 0-1 INTRODUCTION NEW CONCEPT OF AIR NAVIGATION PLANS INTRODUCTION OF CNS/ATM ELEMENTS INTO THE PLAN 1. Air navigation plans set forth in detail the facilities, services and procedures required for international air navigation within a specified area. Such plans contain recommendations which governments can follow in programming the provision of their air navigation facilities and services, with the assurance that facilities and services furnished in accordancewith the plan will form, with those of other States, an integrated system adequate for the foreseeable future. 4. While the traditional focus of a regional ANP has been to cover the facilities and services required for a period of five years, the introduction of CNSIATM systems with longer planning horizons is recognized and CNSIATM planning and implementation elements are being introduced progressively into regional A N P s . 2. On 26 February 1997, the ICAO Council decided that the regional air navigation plans (ANPs) should be published in two volumes: a Basic ANP and a facilities and services implementation document (FASID). It was agreed that the Basic ANP would contain stable plan material such as: a) the geographical area constituted by the flight information regions (FIRS) covered by the plan; b) the basic operational requirements and planning criteria (BORPC), as approved by the Air Navigation Commission (ANC) for application in all regions except Europe; and 5 . Such introduction of CNS/ATM planning elements is guided by the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan for CNS/ATM systems, which has been developed so that it has a clear and functional relationship with the regional air navigation plans. This has been accomplished by dividingthe Global Plan into two parts. Voiume I guides further development of the operational requirements and planning criteria of the regional air navigation plans. The tables in Volume I1 form the framework to guide the implementation of CNS/ATM systems on a global basis, using the traditional regional planning processes, leading to a global integrated ATM system. The document therefore offers, under one cover, a global snapshot of progress achieved and work remaining toward implementation of CNS/ATM systems, thereby serving as a consolidated planning tool. FORMAT AND SCOPE OF THE PLAN c ) the latest planning and implementation guidance formulated for the region through recommendations by regional air navigation (RAN) meetings. 3. It was agreed that the FASID would set forth the dynamic material from the plan constituted by the facilities and services required for international air navigation within the specified area. The FASID would also include appropriate additional guidance, particularly with regard to implementation, to complement the material contained in the Basic ANP. 6. The first volume of this document is the basic air navigation plan. It contains general planning criteria, implementation guidelines and stable plan elements. The second volume, the facilities and services implementation document (FASID) sets forth in general terms the facilities, services and procedures required for international air navigation within a specified area. This FASID contains specificationswhich governmentscan follow in programming the provision of their air navigation facilities and services, --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 12. EUR BASIC ANP 0-2 with the assurance that facilities and services furnished in accordance with the basic pian will form with those of other States an integrated system adequate for the foreseeable future. Note.- Non-Contracting States in the European region are: Holy See and Liechtenstein. . , . ’ 7 In technical scope the plans comprise statements of . 8. In geographical scope the plan is related to one or more of the nine ICAO air navigation regions. However, the plan may call for the provision of basic facilities and services and for the application of supplementary procedures beyond the boundaries of the region(s) where such facilities, services and procedures are necessary to meet the requirements of international air navigation within that (those) region(s). STATES’ RESPONSIBILITIES 9. Under Article 28 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation, each Contracting State is responsible for the provision, in its territory, of facilities and services and application of appropriate procedures. The Assembly has stipulated that the facilities, services and regional supplementary procedures set forth in regional air navigation plans constitute facilities, services and procedures to be provided or applied pursuant to Article 28. The plan may include services to be provided in portions of airspace over the high seas, and associated facilities and supplementary procedures. The State accepting responsibility for providing such services may apply the provisions of ICAO in a manner consistent with that adopted for airspace under its jurisdiction. 10. Inclusion in &r navigation plan documents of b&ic facilities and services in non-Contracting States and territories is simply a recognition that they are needed by or likely to affect international civil aircraft operations of Contracting States or the facilities and services of these States. CONTENTS OF THE PLAN 1 1. This basic air navigation pian document presents in general terms the ICAO plan for the provision of facilities and services for international air navigation in the ICAO European region. It has incorporated in an evolutionary manner requirements emanating from introduction of the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan for CNS/ATM Systems. The companion document to this plan, the European facilities and services implementation document (FASID) includes detailed information on States’ facilities, services, and plans for implementation. Facilities and services outside of the prescribed regional boundaries may also have been included in order to maintain the integrity of “systems” and to ensure in so far as possible that all the facilities and services provided by any one State appear in one air navigation plan document. 12. For historical reasons, the structure, presentation and contents of the EUR Air Navigation Plan vary considerably from the norm adopted for the other publications in the series of ICAO Air Navigation Plan Publications. r ’ _. 13. In future editions, it is anticipated that the EUR ANP would be aligned with those of other regions. 14. It should also be noted that the plan does not list all facilities and services existing in the region but only those required as approved by ICAO Council for internationalcivil aviation operations. It does not contain information on the implementationand operative status of any facility or service. Accordingly, it shall not be used for operational purposes. Aeronautical Information Publications, NOTAM and other State documents should be consulted for ‘information on additional facilities and services and for operational information in general. 15. Nothing in the manner of presentation of information in this document implies endorsement or acceptance by ICAO in matters affecting the status and boundaries of States and territories. 16. Corrections to this document should be notified to the ICAO Regional Office accredited to the State concerned. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- required facilities and services in the AOP, AIS, ATM, CNS, MET and S A R fields, in sufficient detail to ensure proper functioning of the plan as a whole and its adequacy to meet present and foreseen operational requirements. They also include any special procedures considered necessary to supplement the worldwide procedures contained in Annexes and PANS. As living documents, the format and content of the Basic ANP and FASID should be kept under review by the European Air Navigation Planning Group (EA”G) in order, inter alia, to meet the requirementsof the ICAO Global Air Navigation Pian for Communications, Navigation and Surveillance/AirTraffic Management (CNS/ATM) Systems. ~. . I j .“.J Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 13. Introduction r IMPLEMENTATION DATA --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 17. The Council of ICAO, at the Seventh and Eighth Meetings of its 121stSession, decided that the explanation of “implemented” as agreed at Regional Air Navigation Meetings should be widely publicized and the determination of whether a service or facility is implemented should be examined in that light. The agreed explanation of the term “implemented”, as it applies to facilities and services included in this document, is as follows: “Facilities and services specified in the a r navigation plan provided, i installed, functioning and operated in accordance with appropriate ICAO specifications and procedures”. 18. Additionally, the Council of ICAO at the Eighth Meeting of its 131st Session agreed to discontinue the practice of including implementation data in a r navigation i plan publications. 0-3 *‘. navigation in airspace extendingbeyond the airspace serviced by a single State, the European Air Navigation Planning Group (EANPG) developed “General Guidelines on the Establishment and Provision of a Multinational ICAO EüR Air Navigation Facility/Service”. The guidelines were endorsed at its 27th Meeting on 1 December 1986 and submitted to Council which noted with interest the initiative taken by the EANPG. While not approving these guidelines, the Council requested the EANPG to keep it informed on experience gained with their application in the EUR region and of comments made by States. The Council may take further action on the guidelines in due course as appropriate. 21. The guidelines are contained in the Introduction to the EUR Facilities and Services Implementation Document (FASID) to which States should refer for further information. PROCEDURE FOR THE AMENDMENT OF REGIONAL PLANS, INCLUDING FASID MATERIAL 19. The supplementary procedures for the region are omitted from this document since they are published for all regions in Doc 7030, Regional Supplementary Procedures. I‘ . ESTABLISHMENT AND PROVISION OF A MULTINATIONAL ICAO EUR AIR NAVIGATION FACILITY/SERVICE 20. Upon recognition in the middle 1980s that developments in international civil aviation in the EüR region would require the establishment and provision of facilities/cervices for the purpose of serving international air Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 22. The plan contained in this document is amended as necessary to reflect changes in requirements for basic facilities and services either by a regional air navigation meeting or by following the amendment procedure reproduced below. As a consequence, this document is revised from time to time in order to record amendments to the plan that may have been approved by the Council during the preceding period. Additional guidance and information concerning the management of the EUR A is contained in ” the EUR Facilities and Services Implementation Document (FASID). Not for Resale
  • 14. EUR BASIC ANP 0-4 PROCEDURE FOR THE AMENDMENT OF APPROVED BASIC AIR NAVIGATION PLANS 1. introduction The procedure outlined below has been evolved to provide a means of maintaining basic regional plans in a current condition by correspondence. amendment conflicts with established ICAO policy, or that it raises questions which the Secretary General considers should be brought to the attention of the Air Navigation Commission, the proposal will be first presented, adequately documented, to the Commission. In such cases, the Commission will decide the action to be taken on the proposal. 2. General criteria The Assembly has resolved that regional plans shall be revised when it becomes apparent that they are no longer consistent with current and foreseen requirements of international civil aviation and that, when the nature of a required change permits, the associated amendment of the regional plan shall be undertaken by correspondencebetween the Organization and the ContractingStates and international organizations concerned. 2.1 2.2 When a State cannot immediately implement a particular part or a specific detail of a regional plan, although it intends to do so when practicable, this in itself should not cause the State to propose an amendment to the plan. 3. Procedure 3.1 If, in the light of the above criteria, any Contracting State (or group of States) of a region wishes to effect a change in the approved basic air navigation plan for that region it should propose to the Secretary General, through the regional office accredited to that State, an appropriate amendment to the plan, adequately documented;the proposal should include the facts that lead the State to the conclusion that the amendment is necessary. Such amendments may include additions,modifications or deletions.(This procedure does not preclude a State having previous consultation with other States before submitting an amendment proposal to the regional office.) 3.2 The Secretary General will circulate the proposal, adequately documented, with a request for comments to all provider and user States of the region considered affected as well as to user States outside the region and international organizations which may be invited to attend suitable ICAO meetings and which may be concerned with the proposal. If, however, the Secretary General considers that the proposed Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 3.3 If, in reply to the Secretary General’s inquiry to States and selected international organizations, no objection is raised to the proposal by a date specified, the proposal shall be submitted to the President of the Council, who is authorized to approve the amendment on behalf of the Council. 3.4 If, in reply to the Secretary General’s inquiry to States and selected international organizations any objection is raised, and if objection remains after further consultation, the matter will be documented for formal considerationby the Air Navigation Commission. If the Commission concludes that the amendmentis acceptable in its original or other form, it will present appropriate recommendations to the Council. 3.5 Proposals for the amendment of regional plans submitted by international organizations directly concerned with the operation of aircraft, which may be invited to attend suitable ICAO meetings and which attended the meeting(s) where the relevant plan was prepared, will be dealt with in the same manner as those received from States, except that, before circulating a proposal to States and selected international organizations pursuant to 3.2 above, the Secretary General will ascertain whether it has adequate support from the State or States whose facilities will be affected. If such support is not forthcoming,the proposal will be presented to the Commission, and the Commission will decide on the action to be taken on the proposal. 3.6 Proposals for the amendment of regional plans may also be initiated by the Secretary General provided that the State or States whose facilities will be affected have expressed their concurrence with the proposal. 3.7 Amendment to regional plans which have been approved in accordance with the above procedure will be promulgated at convenient intervals. Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Approved by Council on 25 February 1998
  • 15. Introduction 0-5 PROCEDURE FOR THE AMENDMENT OF THE FACILITIES AND SERVICES IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENT (FASID) Approved by Council on 26 February 1997 1. Amendments to the FASID shall be effected on the basis of an adequately documented proposal submitted by a Contracting State (or a group of States) to the ICAO Regional Office; the proposal should include the facts that lead to the conclusion that the amendment is necessary. Such amendments may include additions, modificationsor deletions to the FASID. (This procedure does not preclude a State having previous consultation with other States before submitting the amendment proposal to the ICAO Regional Office.) 4. If,in reply to the ICAO Regional Office's inquiry, any State objects to the proposal, and if objection remains after further consultation, the matter will be documented for discussion by the respective planning and implementation regional group (PIRG) and, ultimately for formal consideration by the Air Navigation Commission, if necessary. If the Commission concludes that the amendment is acceptable in its original or other form, it will present appropriate recommendations to the Council. 2. The ICAO Regional Office will circulate the proposal, adequately documented, with a request for comments to the provider States in the region and to user States except those which obviously are not affected, and, for information and comments if necessary, to international organizations which may be invited to attend suitable ICAO meetings and which may be concerned with the proposal. If, however, it is considered that the proposed amendment conflicts with established ICAO policy, or that it raises questions which should be brought to the attention of the Air Navigation Commission, the proposal will be adequately documented and presented to the Air Navigation Commission. In such cases, the Commission will decide the action to be taken on the proposal. 5. Proposals for the amendment of the FASID submitted by international organizations directly concerned with the operation of aircraft in the region, which may be invited to attend suitable ICAO meetings where the FASID was prepared, will be dealt with in the same manner as those received from States, except that, before circulating the proposal to all interested States, it will be ascertained whether the proposal has adequate support from the State or States whose facilities or services will be affected. If such support is not forthcoming, the proposal will not be pursued. 3. If, in reply to the ICAO Regional Office's inquiry, no objection is raised to the proposal by a specified date, it will be deemed that a regional agreement on the subject has been reached and the proposal shall be incorporated into the FASID. 6. Proposals for the amendmentof the FASID may also be initiated by the ICAO Regional Office provided that the State or States whose facilities or services will be affected have expressed their concurrence with the proposal. 7. Amendments to the FASID which have been approved in accordance with the above procedure will be promulgated at convenient intervals. All abbreviations used in this document are contained in the ProceduresforAir Navigation Services- ICAOAbbreviationsand (Doc 8400),with the exception of those used in the explanations of the various tables, which also give their Codes (PANS-ABC) meaning. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- ABBREVIATIONS
  • 16. i' 0-7 ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF STATES AND TERRITORIES LISTE ALPHABÉTIQUE DES PAYS ET TERRITOIRES ÍNDICE ALFABÉTICO DE PAÍSES Y TERRITORIOS This index is for the purpose of determining the name under which information appears . ia présente liste permet de déterminer sous quel nom figurent les renseignements Este índice permite determinar bajo qué nombre aparece la información Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre emleado en las tablas State or territory Pays ou territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre emdead0 en las tablas Afganistan Afghanistan Afnque du Sud Albania Albanie Alemania Algeria Algérie Allemagne American Samoa Andorra Andorre Angola Anguila Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Antigua-et-Barbuda Antigua y Barbuda Antillas Francesas Antillas Neerlandesas Antilles françaises Antilles néerlandaises Arabia Saudita Arabie saoudite Argelia Argentina Argentine Armenia Arménie Aruba Australia Australie Austria Autriche Azerbaïdjan Azerbaijan Azerbaiyán Afghanistan Afghanistan South Africa Albania Albania Germany Algeria Algeria Germany American Samoa Andorra Andorra Angola Anguilla (United Kingdom) Anguilla (United Kingdom) Antigua and Barbuda Antigua and Barbuda Antigua and Barbuda French Antilles (France) Netherlands Antilles (Netherlands) French Antilles (France) Netherlands Antilles (Netherlands) Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia Algeria Argentina Argentina Armenia Armenia Aruba (Netherlands) Australia Australia Austria Austria Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Belgium Belice Belize Benin Bénin Bermuda Bermudas Bermudes Bhoutan Bhutan Bhután Bolivia Bolivie Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia y Herzegovina Bosnie-Herzégovine Botswana Brasil Brazil Brésil British Virgin Islands Brunei Darussalam Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Bulgarie Burkina Faso Burundi Belgium Belize Belize Benin Benin Bermuda (United Kingdom) Bermuda (United Kingdom) Bermuda (United Kingdom) Bhutan Bhutan Bhutan Bolivia Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brazil Brazil Virgin is. (United Kingdom) Brunei DarusSalam Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Bahamas Bahrain Bahrein Bahreïn Bangladesh Barbade Barbados Belarus Béiarus Belanis Bélgica Belgique Bahamas Bahrain Bahrain Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Barbados Belarus Belarus Belarus Belgium Belgium Cabo Verde Cambodge Cambodia Camboya Cameroon Cameroun Camenin Canada Canadá Canary Islands Cape Verde Cap-Vert Cayman islands Central Afncan Republic Chad Chile Chili China Chine Chipre Chypre Colombia Cape Verde Cambodia Cambodia Cambodia Cameroon Cameroon Cameroon Canada Canada Canary islands (Spain) Cape Verde Cape Verde Cayman is. (United Kingdom) Central African Republic Chad Chile Chile China China CypNS Cyprus Colombia --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- State or territory Pays ou territoire País o territorio 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 17. * I EUR BASIC ANP 0-8 Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre empleado en las tablas Colombie Comorasla Comores Comoros Congo Cook islands Costa Rica Côte d’Ivoire Croacia Croatia Croatie Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Colombia Comoros Comoros Comoros Congo Cook Is. Costa Rica Côte d’Ivoire Croatia Croatia Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Danemark Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Dinamarca Qibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Dominique Denmark Democratic People’s Rep. of Korea Democratic Rep. of the Congo Denmark Denmark Qibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Dominica Ecuador Egipto Em‘ Egypte EI Salvador Emiratos Árabes Unidos Emirats arabes unis Équateur Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Érythrée Eslovaquia Eslovenia Espagne España Estados Unidos Estonia Estonie États-Unis Ethiopia Éthiopie Etiopía Ecuador Egypt Emt Egypt EI Salvador United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates Ecuador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Eritrea Slovakia Slovenia Spain Spain United States Estonia Estonia United States Ethiopia Ethiopia Ethiopia Federación de Rusia Fédération de Russie Fidji Fiji Filipinas Finland Finlande Finlandia France Francia French Antilles Russian Federation Russian Federation Fiji Fiji Philippines Finland Finland Finland France France French Antilles (France) State or territory Pays ou tenitoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre empleado en las tablas French Guiana French Polynesia French Guiana (France) French Polynesia (France) Gabon Gabón Gambia Gambie Georgia Géorgie Germany Ghana Gibraltar Granada Grèce Grecia Greece Greenland Grenada Grenade Groenland Groenlandia Guatemala Guayana Francesa Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guinea Ecuatorial Guinée Guinée-Bissau Guinée équatoriale Guyana Guyane française Gabon Gabon Gambia Gambia Georgia Georgia Y Ghana Gibraltar (United Kingdom) Grenada Greece Greece Greece Denmark Grenada Gr~ada Denmark Denmark Guatemala French Guiana (France) Guinea Guinea-Bissau Equatorial Guinea Guinea Guinea-Bissau Equatorial Guinea Guyana French Guiana (France) Haiti Haïti Haiti Holy See (the) Honduras Hong Kong Hongrie Hw3ary Hung’a Haiti Haiti Haiti Holy See (the) Honduras Hong Kong, China HwwY Hungary Hungary Iceland iies Caïmanes iies Canaries iles Cook iles Mariannes septentrionales Iles Marshall Iles Salomon iles Turques et Caïques Iceland Cayman Is. (United Kingdom) Canary Islands (Spain) Cook Is. Northern Manana Is. (United States) Marshall Is. Solomon Is. Turks and Caicos Is. (United Kingdom) Virgin is. (United States) Virgin is. (United Kingdom) Wallis and Futuna Is. (France) India india Indonesia Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iran (Islamic Republic of) îies Vierges américaines Iles Vierges britanniques Iles Wallis-et-Futuna Inde India Indonesia Indonésie Iran (Islamic Republic of) irán (República Iclámica del) 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale O --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- State o territory r Pays ou territoire País o territorio
  • 18. 0-9 Introduction/lntroducción State or territory Pays OU territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre emleado en las tablas State or territory Pays ou territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre empleado en las tablas Liban Líbano Liberia Libéria Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Lituania Lituanie Luxembourg Luxemburgo Lebanon Lebanon Liberia Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Lithuania Lithuania Luxembourg Luxembourg Islas Vírgenes Islas Vírgenes Británicas Islas Wallis y Futuna Isla Wake Israel Israël Italia Italie Italy Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Ireland Ireland Iceland Johnston I. (United States) Iceland Cayman Is. (United Kingdom) Canary Islands (Spain) Cook Is. Northern Mariana Is. (United States) Marshall Is. Solomon Is. Turks and Caicos Is. (United Kingdom) Virgin Is. (United States) Virgin Is. (United Kingdom) Wallis and Futuna Is. (France) Wake I. (United States) Israel Israel Italy Italy Italy Jamahiriya h a b e Libia Jamahiriya arabe libyenne Jamaica Jamaïque Japan Japon Japón Johnston Johnston Island Jordan Jordania Jordanie Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Jamaica Jamaica Japan Japan Japan Johnston I. (United States) Johnston I. (United States) Jordan Jordan Jordan Kazajsîán Kazakhstan Kenya Kirghizistan Kirguistán Kiribati Koweït Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Kazakhstan Kazakhstan Kenya Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan Kiribati Kuwait Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Macao Madagascar Malaisie Malasia Malawi Malaysia Maldivas Maldives Mali Mali Malta Malte Maroc Mamecos Marshall Islands Maurice Mauricio Mauritania Mauritanie Mauritius Mexico México Mexique Micronesia (Estados Federados de) Micronesia (Federated States of) Micronésie (États fédérés de) Monaco Mónaco Mongolia Mongolie Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Macao, China Madagascar Malaysia Malaysia Malawi Malaysia Maldives Maldives Mali Mali Malta Malta Morocco Morocco Marshall Is. Mauritius Mauritius Mauritania Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Mexico Mexico Micronesia (Federated States of) Micronesia (Federated States of) Micronesia (Federated States of) Monaco Monaco Mongolia Mongolia Montserrat (United Kingdom) Morocco Mozambique Myanmar La ex República Yugoslava The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Latvia Latvia The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Namibia Namibie Nauru Nepal Népal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niger Nigeria Namibia Namibia Nauru Nepal Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles (Netherlands) New Caledonia (France) New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niger Nigeria Iran (République islamique d’) Iraq Ireland Irlanda Irlande Islande Isla Johnston Islandia Islas Caimanes Islas Canarias Islas Cook Islas Marianas del Norte Islas Marshall Islas Salomón Islas Turcas y Caicos de Macedonia Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Letonia Lettonie rex-République yougoslave de Macédoine 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 19. . 0-1o EUR BASIC ANP ~ ~~ State or tenitory Pays ou territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre empleado en las tablas State or tenitory Pays ou territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre emleado en las tablas Nigeria Nioué Niue Northern Manana Islands Noruega Norvège Norway Nouvelle-Calédonie Nouvelle-Elande Nueva Caledonia Nueva Zelandia Nigeria Niue (New Zealand) Niue (New Zealand) Northern Manana Is. (United States) Norway Norway Norway New Caledonia (France) New Zealand New Caledonia (France) New Zealand Oman Omán Ouganda Ouzbékistan Oman Oman Uganda Uzbekistan Países Bajos Pakistan Pakistán Palaos Palau Panama Panamá Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée Papua New Guinea Papua Nueva Guinea Paraguay Pays-Bas Pérou Peni Peni Philippines Poland Polinesia Francesa Pologne Polonia Polynésie française Porto Rico Portugal Puerto Rico Netherlands Pakistan Pakistan Palau Palau Panama Panama Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea Paraguay Netherlands Pen, Peni Peru Philippines Poland French Polynesia (France) Poland Poland French Polynesia (France) Puerto Rico (United States) Portugal Puerto Rico (United States) République arabe syrienne République centrafricaine République de Corée République démocratique du Congo République démocratique populaire lao République de Moldova République dominicaine République populaire démocratique de Corée République tchèque République-Uniede Tanzanie Réunion Reunión Romania Roumanie Royaume-Uni Rumania Russian Federation Rwanda Syrian Arab Republic Central African Republic Republic of Korea Democratic Rep. of the Congo Lao People’s Democratic Republic Republic of Moldova Dominican Republic Democratic People’s Rep. of Korea Czech Republic United Rep. of Tanzania Réunion (France) Réunion (France) Romania Romania United Kingdom Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Qatar Qatar Reino Unido República Árabe Sina República Centroafncana República Checa República de Corea República Democrática del Congo República Democrática Popular Lao República de Moldova República Dominicana República Popular Democrática de Corea República Unida de Tanzania Republic of Korea Republic of Moldova United Kingdom Syrian Arab Republic Central African Republic Czech Republic Republic of Korea Democratic Rep. of the Congo Lao People’s Democratic Republic Republic of Moldova Dominican Republic Democratic People’s Rep. of Korea United Rep. of Tanzania Republic of Korea Republic of Moldova Sahara occidental Sahara Occidental Sainte-Lucie Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis Saint Kitts y Nevis Saint Lucia Saint-Marin Saint-Siège (le) Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Saint-Vincentet-les Grenadines Samoa Samoa américaines Samoa (estadounidense) San Marino Santa Lucía Santa Sede (la) Santo Tomé y Príncipe San Vicente y las Granadinas Sao Tome and Principe Sao Tomé-et-Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Sénégal Serbia and Montenegro Serbia y Montenegro Serbie-et-Monténégro Seychelles Sierra Leona Sierra Leone Singapore Singapour Singapur Slovakia Slovaquie Slovenia Slovénie Solomon Islands Western Sahara Westem Sahara Saint Lucia Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia San Manno Holy See (the) Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa American Samoa American Samoa San Marino Saint Lucia Holy See (the) Sao Tome and Principe Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Sa0 Tome and Principe Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Serbia and Montenegro Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Sierra Leone Singapore Singapore Singapore Slovakia Slovakia Slovenia Slovenia Solomon Is. 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale ti
  • 20. 0-11 Introductionllntroducción State or territory Pays ou territoire País o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre emleado en las tablas - State or territory Pays ou territoire Pais o territorio Name used in tables Nom employé dans les tableaux Nombre empleado en las tablas Somalia Somalie Soudan South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudáfnca Sudan Sudán Suecia Suède Suisse Suiza Suriname Swaziland Swazilandia Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Somalia Somalia Sudan South Africa Spain Sri Lanka South Afnca Sudan Sudan Sweden Sweden Switzerland Switzerland Suriname Swaziland Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Turkey Turkmenistan Turkménistan Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Turquía Turquie Tuvalu Turkey Turkmenistan Turkmenistan Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Is. (United Kingdom) Turkey Turkey Tuvalu Ucrania Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United Republic of Tanzania United States UWWY Uzbekistan Uzbekistán Ukraine Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United Republic of Tanzania United States UwwY Uzbekistan Uzbekistan Tadjikistan Tailandia Tajikistan Tayikistán Tchad Thailand Thaïlande The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Timor-Leste Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad y Tabago Trinitéd-Tobago TUnez Tunisia Tunisie Tajikistan Thailand Tajikistan Tajikistan Chad Thailand Thailand The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Timor-Leste Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Tunisia Tunisia Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin islands Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Is. (United States) Wake Wake Island Wallis and Futuna lands Western Sahara Wake I. (United States) Wake I. (United States) Wallis and Futuna Is. (France) Westem Sahara Yemen Yémen Yemen Yemen Zambia Zambie Zimbabwe Zambia Zambia Zimbabwe 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 21. Part I BASIC OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND PLANNING CRITERIA (BORPC) FOR REGIONAL AIR NAVIGATION PLANNING INTRODUCTION 1. On 22 February 2005, the Air Navigation Commission approved this Statement of Basic Operational Requirements and Planning Criteria (BORPC) which is applicable to all the ICA0 regions. 2. The Commission has considered that in planning the facilities and services related to communications, navigation and surveillance/airtraffic management (CNSIATM) systems, the Global Air Traffic Management Operational Concept, supplementedby the GlobalAir Navigation Planfor CNS/ATM Systems (Doc 9750),provides the frameworkto be followed.In addition, relevant recommendations, accepted by the Council, contained in the report of the Eleventh Air Navigation Conference (Montreal, 22 September to 3 October 2003) should be taken into account. The importance of planning on the basis of homogeneous areas and major traffic flows, as referred to in the Global Plan, is also stressed. As ATM requirements are developed, the BORPC will be updated to take into account the most up-to-date work on follow-up activities related to the operational concept. 3. The Commission has also considered it unnecessary to repeat in this statement any pertinent requirements already contained in the Convention, Annexes or Procedures for Air Navigation Services. an integrated system designed to meet the requirements of all international civil aircraft operations. The plan should meet the requirementsof all operations planned to take place in the area during the next five years, but not necessarily limited to that period, taking due account of the long-term planning and implementationstrategiesregarding CNS/ATM systems.Due account should be taken of the possible effects that changes could have on adjacent regions. 5 . Traffic forecasts have a special role in planning the implementation .of CNS/ATM systems. The forecasts represent the demand for future ATM. Forecasts of aircraft movements within homogeneousATM areas and along major international air traffic flows form the basis for planning of the infrastructure and arrangements which will supply the required level of air traffic services (ATS). 6. The planning should be based on historical trends or, if otherwise available, traffic forecasts, and should be used taking into account the normal ranges of operating characteristics of the aircraft. The system should be sufficiently flexible to accommodate aircraft operational characteristics outside the normal range. 7. Aircraft engaged or planned to be engaged in internationaloperationshave been grouped into the following categories: a) turbo-jet aeroplanes; GENERAL (APPLICABLE TO BOTH INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORT AND INTERNATIONAL GENERAL AVIATION) b) multi-engine turboprop aeroplanes; c) piston-engine aeroplanes and single-engine turboprop aeroplanes with: 4. Air navigation facilities, services and procedures recommended for the area under consideration should form 1) a normal cruising speed of more than 260 km/h (140 kt) (type A); and 27/6/05 No. 4 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 22. 2) a normal cruising speed up to 260 kmlh (140 kt) (type B); 2) Type B: 110 - 260 km/h (60 - 140 k) t. c) Range of desirable cruising levels: d) helicopters; and 1) 'Type A: up to 6 100 m (FL 200); e) other aircraft (V/STOL, gliders, balloons, etc.). 2) Type B: up to 3 050 m (FL 100). Note.- Aircraft listed in e} are to be included only to the extent that they require consideration in regional planning. 8. The normal operating characteristicslisted below for each group of aircraft should be taken into account in the development of facilities, services and procedures to the extent that relevant categories operate, or will operate, within the system. 8.1 Turbo-jet aeroplanes. d) Descent pe rformance: 1) Type A: 5 - 10 m / s (1 O00 - 2 O00 ft/min); 2) Type B: 2 - 5 m/s (500 - 1 O00 ft/min). 8.4 Helicopters. a) Climb per$ormance: up to 8 m/s (1 500 fVmin). a) Climb performanee: 8 - 25 m/s (1 500 - 5 O00 ft/mh). b) Speed range in cruisingflight: up to 370 k d h (200 kt). b) Speed range in cruisingjlight: 780 - 1 020 kmni (420 550 kt) (Mach 0.71 - 0.92). c) Range o desirable cruising levels: up to 3 050 m f c) Range of desirable cruising levels: 8 250 - 13 700 m (FL270 - 450). d) Descent pe$ormance: up to 8 m / s (1 500 fvmin). d) Descentperformance: 10 - 25 m / s ( 2 O00 - 5 O00 fdmin). 8.2 Multi-engineturboprop aeroplanes. a) Climbper$ormance: 5 - 15 m/s (1 O00 - 3 O00 ft/min). b) Speed range in cruising flight: 460 - 650 km/h (250 350 kt). c) Range of desirable cruising levels: 5 200 - 8 250 m (FL 170 - 270). d) Descent performance: 8 - 15 m/s (1 500 - 3 O00 ftímin). 8.3 Piston-engine aeroplanes and single-engine turboprop aeroplanes. a) Climb per$ormance: (, n loo). . Note 1.- Further to 6 above, it is emphasized that the values given in 8 represent average values covering the majority of aircraft types in each category. Also, depending on circumstances (e.g. load, stage length of a flight), considerable deviations from them may occur for specijìc flights. Note 2.- Per.-,4ormance of military aircraftnot covered by the above values may be considerably in excess of those quoted. It is, however, assumed that in such cases national arrangements will be made to cater for these aircraf. 9. Planning should not include an aerodrome or other facility or service used only by operators of the State in which the aerodrome or other facility or service is located unless such planning is required to protect the integrity of the plan. 10. Planning for facilities and services, in addition to meeting the operational requirements, should take into account the need for: i) Type A: 2 - 10 m/s (500 - 2 O00 ftímin); 2) Type B: 2 - 5 m / s (500 - 1 O00 fdmin). a) efficiency in operation; and b) economy in equipment and personnel, b) Speed range in cruisingflight: 1) Type A: 260 - 460 kmk (141 - 250 kt); with due consideration being given to capability for future expansion without major redesign or replanning. 27/6/05 No. 4 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 23. BORPC 1-3 ensure that operators have access to information necessary to exercise effective operational control; 11. Planning should take into account the need for an adequate number of technically qualified personnel to be employed in the system to supervise, maintain and operate air navigation facilities. and services and should result in recommendations, as necessary, to meet such a need. Human resource development capabilities should be compatible with the plans to implement facilities and services. A systematic and quantitative approach towards analysing human resource needs should be used to ensure that the consequential training capabilities are available and accessible. 12. The facilities, services and procedures recommended for implementation should not result in imposing on flight crew or ground personnel, employed in the system developed in accordance with the plan, a workload level that would impair safety or efficiency. The integration of human factors knowledge into the design and certificatiori of facilities, services and procedures is therefore essential. In order to achieve a workload level that would not impair safety and efficiency, as well as to introduce the capability for future expansion without major redesign or replanning, human factors issues should be considered during the process of design and certification of facilities, services and procedures, before they are operationally deployed. 13. Special operational features of the area under consideration, such as those which may have been associated with causal factors notedin aircraft accident investigation and incident reports, should be taken into account, particularly if there are indications, such as those given in the “recommendations” of aircraft accident investigation and incident reports, that special measures are called for to prevent recurrence of accidents and incidents from the same cause or causes. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 14. Planning for facilities and services should normally provide for their availability on a 24-hour basis. In cases where part-time availability is deemed adequate to meet the operational requirements, a brief description of the circumstances should be given in the plan. Lighting aids should be planned when use of the aerodromes at night or during low visibility conditions is expected. 15. It is essential that the overall plan: a) satisfy the requirements of all aircraft, including domestic and military traffic to the extent that it may affect international traffic; b) ensure compatibility of facilities, services and procedures with those recommended for operations in adjacent areas; provide for speedy exchanges of necessary information between the various units providing air navigation services and between such units and operators; and take account of aircraft performance and navigational capability in specifying requirements for the carriage of airborne equipment, as weil as having due regard for the operational environment. 16. In the development of the plan, full cognizance should be taken of the cost-effectiveness of the recommended facilities, services and procedures. Planning should be directed towards facilitating implementation of essential improvementsrequired for existing and anticipated operations in the region. The objective should be to expedite the eradication of current deficiencies in the air navigation facilities and services.Project management techniques should be employed for the implementation of CNS facilities and services to facilitate the phased introduction of ATM system enhancements. AERODROMES International commercial air transport operations 17. Regular aerodromes and their alternates should be determined based on the needs identified by users. When studying the requirements for alternate aerodromes, the guiding principle should be that, to the greatest practicable extent, the requirements for alternate aerodromes be satisfied by regular aerodromes used for international aircraft operations. Additionally, the requirements of extended-range twin-engine operations for en-route alternate aerodromes should also be considered. 18. Physical characteristics, visual aids and emergency as well as other services should be determined for each regular and alternate aerodrome required for international operations and should include runway length and strength, as well as the aerodrome reference code(s) selected for runway and taxiway planning purposes. 19. Where at an aerodrome, planning for Category II or III operations, as the case may be, is not a requirement during the plan period but such operations are contemplated at a time beyond the plan period, planning should take into 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 24. account the possible requirement .for Category II or III operations so that at least one runway and the related groundair environment may be provided in the future to accommodate such operations. 20. In cases where the extension or development of an aerodrome to meet infrequent critical operations would entail disproportionateexpenditures, alternative solutions should be explored. Note.- If it is found that the full operational requirements cannot be met at an aerodrome, then the maximum practicable development to facilitate operations should be recommended and the relevant reasons for this included in the report. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 21. At alternate aerodromes, the physical characteristics should be determined in accordance with the landing requirements of the diverted critical aircraft and the take-off requirements for the aircraft for a flight to the aerodrome of intended destination. To ensure safe taxiing operations, a specified taxiway route should be determined for the diverted critical aircraft. The adequacy of the emergency response and rescue and firefighting services to meet the requirements of the diverted critical aircraft should be reviewed to plan the necessary augmentation from sources nearby. Note.- Where more than one alternate aerodrome is available, the requirements should be based on the types of aircraft each is intended to serve. International general aviation (IGA) 22. Aerodromes, in addition to those required for international commercial air transport operations, should be determined to meet the needs of the IGA flights as identified by user requirements. 23. Physical characteristics, visual aids and emergency as well as other services should be determined for each aerodrome to meet at least the needs of the most commonly used aircraft operated or intended to be operated at the aerodrome by IGA and should include runway length and strength, as well as the aerodrome reference code(s) selected for runway and taxiway planning purposes. Certification of aerodromes and safety management system 24. Annex 14 -Aerodromes, Volume I -Aerodrome Design and Operations, requires States to certify their aerodromes used for international operations in accordance with the specifications in that Annex, as well as other relevant ICA0 specifications, through an appropriate regulatory framework. Additionally, the Annex recommends that States certify aerodromes open to public use. The regulatory framework should include the establishment of criteria for certification of aerodromes. Furthermore, the certification should be based on the review and approvdacceptance of an aerodrome manual to be submitted by the aerodrome operator which would include ali relevant information such as location, facilities, services, equipment, operating procedures, organization and management structure of the operator. The aerodrome manual should also include details of the aerodrome safety management system as implemented by the aerodrome operator. The intent of a safety management system is to ensure the implementation of aerodrome safety policies by an aerodrome operator, which provide for the control of safety at, and the safe use of, the aerodrome. Therefore, the safety management system of the aerodrome operator should be compatible with those of the ATS provider and other agencies working on the aerodrome to ensure total system safety. 25. The existence of basic aviation law that empowers a suitable aviation civil regulatory agency is a primary requirement. Such an entity may be the civil aviation authority or the directorate-general of civil aviation, adequately staffed to assess an application for granting of the aerodrome certificate, inspecting and evaluating the aerodrome facilities and services and operating procedures, and coordinating with other appropriate agencies such as the aviation security agency, ATS provider, aeronautical information services (AIS) and meteorological (MET) services as detailed in the aerodrome manual submitted with the application. Note.- Further guidance on certification of aerodromes can be found in the Manual on Certification of Aerodromes (Doc 9774). AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT 26. Air traffic management should enable aircraft operators to meet their planned times of departure and arrival and adhere to their preferred flight profiles with minimum constraints without compromising agreed levels of safety. The ATS to be provided, the airspace organization, the associated facilities, and the required navigation performance (RNP) should be determined on the basis of an agreed network of ATS routes or organized track system taking account of the type, density and complexity of traffic. 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 25. BORPC 1-5 Airspace management delineating FIR boundaries, due consideration should be given to: 27. The airspace structure and organization should include a network of ATS routes or organized track system established so as to enable aircraft to operate along, or as near as practicable to, the preferred flight path, in both the horizontal and vertical planes, from the departure aerodrome to the destination aerodrome. ATS routes based on area navigation (RNAV) should be recommended where appropriate and feasible. ATS routes shall be great circles between significant points, wherever possible. Standard instrument arrival routes (STARS) should be established when the density of air traffic justifies their application in a terminal control area (TMA) and to facilitate the description of the route and procedure in air traffic control (ATC) clearances. Standard instrument departure routes (SIDs) should be established for each instrument runway. ' a) the need for adequate air-ground communications coverage from the location of the flight information centrehea control centre (FIUACC); b) the need to minimize frequency and secondary surveillance radar (SSR) code changes, position reporting by aircraft, and coordination between FICs/ACCs; and c) the need to minimize problems relating to climbing and descending traffic at major aerodromes located in the vicinity of FIR boundaries. 32. Area control service should be provided for instrument flight rules (IFR) flights operating in controlled airspace except where the type and density of traffic clearly do not justify the provision of such service. Controlled airspace, in the form of airways, control areas of larger dimensions and TMAs, should be recommended to encompass ali relevant ATS routes. In delineating control area boundaries, due account should be taken of the factors listed in 3 1 above. 28. Whenever the circumstances warrant, the airspace organization should be designed to support the ultimate goal of allowing each aircraft to fly its own optimized flight path. To achieve this, procedures that support collaborative decision-making should be developed. 29. The airspace organization should be indicated in accordance with the ICA0 airspace classification. 33. Approach control service should be provided at all aerodromes used for international aircraft operations and equipped with navigation aids for instrument approach and landing, except where the type and density of traffic clearly do not justify the provision of such service. Controlled airspace, in the form of TMAs and control zones, should be recommended to encompass at least the climb to cruising levei of departing aircraft and the descent from cruising level of arriving aircraft. 30. Airspace restrictions should be subject to a continuing review procedure with the object of eliminating them or reducing their restrictive effects to a minimum, with particular emphasis on the need to achieve effective civiUmilitarycoordination. Permanent segregation of airspace should be avoided. Temporary airspace reservations, where necessary to cater for large formation flights or other military air operations, should be minimized in time and space, closely coordinated, and promulgated in a timely manner. Military operations should not only be promulgated in a timely manner but also through international dissemination (international NOTAM). 34. Aerodrome control service should be provided at all regular and alternate aerodromes to be used for international commercial air transport operations. Aerodrome control service should also be provided at those additional aerodromes used by IGA aircraft where the type and density of traffic warrant it. At aerodromes used by IGA aircraft, where the type and density of traffic clearly do not justify the provision of aerodrome control service, the provision of aerodrome flight information service by a unit located at the aerodrome should be recommended. Air traffic services 31. Flight information service and alerting service should be provided throughout the area under consideration. The plan of flight information regions (FIRs) should provide for the least number of FIRs compatible with efficiency of service and with economy. In this connection, the evolutionary introduction of CNSIATM systems should be taken into account and consideration should be given to cooperative efforts for introducing more efficiency in airspace management by reducing the number of FIRs. In 35. Air traffic advisory service should not be recommended as part of the plan. Where provided (to IFR flights in advisory airspace or on advisory routes), its replacement by ATC service at the earliest possible time should be recommended. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 27/6/05 No. 4
  • 26. The ATS system and procedures should: a) permit the most efficient use to be made of the airspace by all users and provide for the most expeditious handling of the various types of traffic; b) be so designed that the number of air-ground communications contacts, frequency changes and SSR code changes required of aircraft, and the amount of coordination required between ATS units, are kept to a minimum; c) ensure the prompt and timely transmission to all aircraft concerned of information on hazardous meteorological conditions, operational flight information and other available information affecting the safety and efficiency of flight; d) require the use of uniform altimeter setting procedures throughout the area under consideration when operating below the established transition level or climbing up to the established transition altitude; and e) establish a common transition altitude on an area basis and, where possible, on a regional basis. 37. Information on destination meteorological conditions, the integrated operational status of facilities associated with the runway in use, and the runway conditions should be provided to aircraft (in voice or data format) by the transmission of operational flight information service (OFIS) messages, including VOLMET, or by the appropriate FICIACC upon request, prior to commencement of descent. Where this information is transmitted in voice format, a discrete frequency should be assigned for this purpose, Airground data links are particularly efficient for this type of service, as well as for clearance delivery, and should be recommended when a sufficient number of aircraft are appropriately equipped. (GPWS) warnings occur. These warnings can occur due to conflict between ATS procedures, or operator procedures, and the characteristics of the terrain andor those of the GPWS equipment in use. Effort should further be made, with cooperation between the ATS authority and the operators, to eliminate the occurrence of unwanted GPWS warnings by appropriate adjustment of ATS andor operator procedures. Note.- Where adjustment of procedures is not possible, or is not eflective, it may be possible to eliminate unwanted warnings, at a specific location, by GPWS envelope modulation. This possibility will be based on technical data of the equipment manufacturer and will be proposed by the operator for acceptance by the operator's authority. Air traffic flow management and capacity management 41. Air traffic flow management and capacity management should be provided to ensure an optimum flow of air traffic to, from, through or within defined areas during times when demand exceeds, or is expected to exceed, the available capacity of the ATS system, including relevant aerodromes. However, this should not preclude the need for planning airspace to adequately meet demand. Safety management 42. The Standards and RecommendedPractices relating to the implementation by States of safety management programmes for ATS are contained in Annex 11 - Air Trafic Services, 2.26. Further provisions relating to the implementation of these safety management programmes are contained in Chapter 2 of the Procedures for Air Navigation Services - Air Trafic Management (PANS-ATM, Doc 4444). 39. To assist in the prevention of controlled flight into terrain (CFIT), efforts should be made to implement a minimum safe altitude warning system or equivalent. 43. Annex 11, 2.26, requires States to implement systematic and appropriate safety management programmes in relation to the provision of ATS. It will therefore be necessary for all States to establish regulatory provisions concerning ATS safety management, together with the necessary supporting infrastructure to enable them to discharge their responsibilities in relation to oversight of these provisions. There are two prerequisites for the introduction of a regulatory system. These are: 40. To assist in the prevention of CFIT, every effort should be made, in cooperation with the operators, to identify locations at which unwanted ground proximity warning system a) the provision, in the basic aviation law of the State, for a code of air navigation regulations and the promulgation thereof; and 38. Contingency plans should be developed to mitigate the effects of volcanic eruptions or tropical cyclones as required. In addition, contingency plans should be developed to mitigate disruptions in ATS due to any other cause. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 36.
  • 27. BORPC 1-7 49. The planning of the aeronautical fixed telecommunication network (AFTN) should be based on the guidance material contained in the Manual on the Planning and Engineering of the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunication Network (Doc 8259) and taking into account the predominating characteristics for conditions in the region or area concerned. b) the establishment of an appropriate State body, hereinafter referred to as the civil aviation authority (CAA), with the necessary powers to ensure compliance with the regulations. SEARCH AND RESCUE 50. The AFS should be designed so as to meet transit time criteria as follows: 44. Planningfor search and rescue (SAR) service should take into account, to the maximum practicable extent, existing facilities, even if they are provided for purposes not connected with SAR. Such planning should take into account the delimitation of maritime search and rescue regions (SRRs). In the peak season of the year, even in the average peak hours, at least 95 per cent of the messages should achieve transit times of less than the following: SIGMET and AIRMET messages, volcanic ash and tropical cyclone advisory information and special air-reports Amended aerodrome forecasts (in meteorological code (TAF)) METAWSPECI, trend forecasts and TAF from 0 to 900 km (500 NM) for distances exceeding 900 km (500 NM) 45. A single SAR point of contact (SPOC) should be designated for each SRR to facilitate cooperation with the associated mission control centre of the COSPAS-SARSAT' system. Note.- A SPOC may be an aeronautical or a maritime rescue coordination centre. 46. Where aircraft of the long-range and longer-range categories are required for the provision of air coverage of large oceanic SRRs, but such aircraft cannot be made available by the State responsible for SAR services, specific cooperative arrangements should be made for the deployment of such aircraft from other locations in an attempt to meet the requirements for sufficient air coverage of the appropriate regions. 5 minutes 5 minutes 5 minutes 10 minutes Transit times for requestkeply for international operational meteorological (OPMET) data banks should be less than 5 minutes. 5 I. TAF bulletins originated by meteorological offices in the region should be available, at all locations in the region to which they are addressed, at least 30 minutes before their period of validity commences. 47. SAR organization, plans, procedures, operations and equipment should be in accordance with the provisions of Volumes I, II and III of the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR)Manual (Doc 973 l), to the extent practicable. 52. The dissemination means for world area forecast system (WAFS) products should be such as to guarantee availability of these products throughout the region at international aerodromes and other locations as appropriate to meet operational needs. COMMUNICATIONS 53. Planning of ATS ground-to-groundcommunication networks comprisingdirect and switched ATS speech circuits should take account of operational voice communication requirements. It should also take into account relevant ICA0 documentation with regard to the application of analogue and digital voice switching and signalling systems. Aeronautical fixed service (AFS) planning and engineering 48. The AFS recommended should be designed to meet the agreed requirements for AIS, ATS, MET, SAR and aircraft operating agencies for voice, message and data communications. * COSPAS , 54. With the introduction of automation in ATM, many coordination functions will be accomplished through data interchange between ATM systems using aeronautical telecommunicationnetwork (ATN) applications such as ATS Space system for search for vessels in distress SARSAT - Search and rescue satellite-aided tracking ~ 27/6/05 No. 4 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 28. Frequency assignment plans 62. Frequency assignment planning should be done in accordance with the method applicable to the region and using the relevant ICA0 Regional Office Frequency Lists. 55. For planning of AFS, attention should be paid to the establishment of institutional arrangements for the implementation by States of coordinated digital networks, using appropriate technology to meet, in an integrated way, current and future communications requirements. Aeronautical mobile service (AMS) and aeronautical mobile satellite service (AMSS) 56. Air-ground data link and voice communications facilities should be recommended to meet effectively and reliably the agreed requirements for ATS as well as, to the extent required, all other classes of traffic acceptable on the AMs. The facilities should employ voice and data communicationslinks based on available transmission media (e.g. HF, VHF, satellite). This decision should be based on system performance and economical criteria to comply with operational needs. 57. Regional planning should take into account AMSS ground earth station (GES) redundancy requirements in coordination with the AMSS service provider(s) with a view to avoiding an unnecessary proliferation of facilities. 58. Automatic terminal information service and VOLMET or OFIS broadcasts should be recommended only if overloading of air-ground channels due to requestheply communicationshas occurred, or is expected to occur. When justified by the number of aircraft suitably equipped, data links should be recommended for these functions, as well as for certain clearance deliveries. 59. Aerodromes having a significant volume of IGA traffic should be served by stations of the AMs, and such stations should operate on frequencies within the bands normally used by aircraft constituting this traffic. NAVIGATION General 63. The planning of navigation aids should be on a systembasis, recognizing that the requirementsfor both longrange and short-range navigation may be met by different navigation systems having RNAV capability, including the global navigation satellite system (GNSS). It may be practicable to establish ATS routes not provided with ground station-referenced aids for suitably equipped aircraft. For routes or areas which require that aircraft achieve an acceptable level of navigation accuracy, the requirement should be specified, e.g. in the form of a required navigation performance (RNP) type to support a selected horizontal separation minimum, or a minimum aircraft system performance specification to support a selected vertical separationminimum. The navigation systems should meet the needs of all aircraft using it and form an adequate basis for the provision of ATS. 64. Where aircraft are using different systems for navigation and position determination within the same controlled airspace, the facilities involved should, in so far as practicable, be located and oriented to enable a fully integrated ATC structure to be established. 65. Planning should take into account the need of civil aircraft for sufficiently accurate navigation guidance to remain clear of restricted, prohibited and danger areas as required. 60. Selective calling (SELCAL) devices should be employed, wherever possible and necessary, at aeronautical stations. 61. An air-to-air VHF communication channel (INTERPILOT) on the frequency 123.450 MHz should be used over remote and oceanic areas, provided users are out of range of VHF ground stations, to enable pilots to exchange the necessary operational information. International commercial air transport operations En-route aids 66. The en-route aids to be recommended should provide navigation assistance to permit en-route navigation on the agreed ATS route network with the accuracy required. 27/6/05 No.4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- interfacility data communication (AIDC) or ATS message handling services (ATSMHS). As such, the planning for ATN should include the provision of suitable gateways to facilitate the exchange of information between existing and newly established networks.
  • 29. BORPC 1-9 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 67. It is expected that GNSS wiil ultimately meet all requirements for en-route navigation. Planning for other en-route aids should take due account of the need for a gradual transition towards the use of GNSS in lieu of en-route groundbased navigation aids. Pendingimplementationof GNSS, VHF omnidirectionalradio range (VOR) supplementedas necessary by distance measuring equipment(DME) shouldbe installed as the primary aid for this purpose. VORAIME and when improved accuracy in navigation is a prerequisite to such flexibility. 74. Consideration should also be given to the provision of suitably located DMEs in support of RNAV procedures based on DMEíDME. Non-visual aids to final approach and landing 68. Where VOR is used, supplemented as necessary by DME, a total navigation error value for VOR of +5 (95 per cent probability) should be assumed for planning purposes. However, the specific value of VOR radial signal error for individual facilitieshadials should be obtained by flight checking, and if these values are worse than 53 appropriate precautions should be taken in respect of the routes concerned. O O , 69. Long-distance radio navigation aids should continue to be provided where required. Terminal area aids 70. The terminal area aids should permit navigation for arrival and approach, holding and departure to be carried out with the accuracy required. 71. It is expected that GNSS will ultimately meet all requirements for terminal navigation. Planning for other terminal aids should take due account of the need for a gradual transition towards the use of GNSS in lieu of terminal area ground-based navigation aids. Introduction of GNSS-based navigation services, such as Basic GNSS and satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), should be considered as initial transition steps. 72. Where VOR is used as the primary aid, it should be so located as to permit the most efficient approach and ATC procedures, and to give the pilot maximum assistance in adhering to requisite patterns. Whenever possible, VORs should be located and operated so that they can serve both the requirements for en-route and terminal navigation guidance, including holding. Where the provision of VORs for holding is not practicable, non-directional beacons (NDBs) can be used for this purpose. 73. Consideration should be given to the provision of DME to be collocated with VORs whenever this is required to ensure necessary ATC flexibility in the routing of air traffic in a given TMA using RNAV procedures based on 75. The standard non-visual aids to final approach and landing (ILS, MLS aid augmented GNSS), supporting precision approach and landing operations, shall comply with general provisions in Annex 10 - Aeronautical Telecommunications, Volume I - Radio Navigation Aids, 2.1, and technical specifications in Chapter 3, and their introduction and application are expected to be in line with the strategy contained in Attachment B to Volume I. 76. In planning the requirements for aids to final approach and landing, each aerodrome should be considered in relation to its traffic, its meteorological conditions and other aspects of its physical environment. In addition, the following two aspects should be taken into consideration in the determination of specific requirements: a) The aerodynamic and handling characteristics of the aircraf. Turbo-jet aeroplanesneed precise approach path guidance during approach and landing, irrespective of weather conditions. Such guidance should be provided to runways intended to serve these aeroplanes as follows: On a runway having significant traffic, the facilities to be provided should be an ICAO standard non-visual aid to final approach and landing, complemented by a visual approach slope indicator system. When a standard non-visual aid cannot be implemented in the first instance, this should not delay the installation lof a visual approach slope indicator system. On a runway not having significant traffic, the facilities to be provided should at least include a visual approach slope indicator system. b) Routine auto-coupled approaches. Where auto-coupled approaches are to be made on a routine basis, an ICAO standard non-visual aid to final approach and landing, i.e. ILS, MLS or GNSS (GBAS), should be provided as appropriate to the type of operation planned at the aerodrome. In the case of an ILS of facility performance 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 30. 1-1o EUR BASIC ANP Category I, the ILS should be of Category II signai quality, without necessarily meeting the associated reliability and availability criteria for back-up equipment and automatic changeover of facility performance Category II. It should be adjusted and maintained to the greatest possible extent and accuracy, and its performance characteristics should be published in Aeronautical Information Publications or other suitable documents. Precision approach and landing procedures 77. Precision approach and landing operations are to be based on standard non-visuai aids indicated in 75 above. aerodromes referred to in 22 where the density of traffic and the meteorological conditions so warrant, with due account being taken of the airborne equipment carried by aircraft. These aids should, as appropriate, be located so as to permit instrument approaches. Flight testing of visual and non-visual navigation aids 83. Cooperative arrangements for the flight testing of visual and non-visual navigation aids (Annex 10, Volume I, 2.7) should be recommended where flight testing on a national basis would be impracticable or uneconomical. Approach with vertical guidance SURVEILLANCE 78. Consideration should be given to approach with vertical guidance. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Non-precision instrument approach procedures 79. Non-precision instrument approach procedures are to be based on terminal area aids (see 70 to 74 above) which should also support SIDs and STARs. These approach procedures should be constructed whenever possible in accordance with the concept of the stabilized approach; to provide an equivalent three degree final approach glide path; to eliminate stepped approaches; and to provide a final approach fix. 80. Particular account should be taken of 79 in the design of non-precision instrument approach procedures for use with GNSS which should also support SIDs and STARs. RNA V procedures 84. Surveillance systems should provide adequate support to all phases of flight and meet ATM requirements. A table of surveillance facilitieslservices (including radars, automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) and automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B)), together with an associated chart, is considered to be a useful tool in the planning and implementation of surveillance systems. 85. Surveillance should be provided as an integral part of ATC where practicable and desirable or necessary in the interest of safety, efficiency and economy of operations, in particular for those areas where traffic density andlor the multiplicity or complexity of ATS routes create constraints. Primary andlor secondary surveillance radar systems may be used to fulfil this requirement. Subject to availability and cost-effectiveness, and provided that the required level of safety is maintained, ADS and ADS-B may be used in airspace where surveillance by radar is impracticable or cannot be justified. 81. RNAV procedures can be based on terminal area aids (e.g. VOIUDME, DMEIDME) or GNSS (e.g. Basic GNSS, SBAS or GBAS positioning services). 86. Provision should also be made for the use of surveillance systems for the purpose of monitoring a r traffic i and identifying civil aircraft in areas where they might otherwise be intercepted. International general aviation Note.This requirement does not constitute a justification or operational requirement for installation of new radars. Since interceptions would normally only take place under existing military radar control, this should be interpreted as a requirement for a State to make better use of existing measures and to improve civil/military coordination. Short-distance a d s ? 82. Appropriate aids such as GNSS for short-distance navigation should be provided to serve the additional 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 31. 1-11 BORPC ___I METEOROLOGY World area forecast system (WAFS) regional aspects 87. Planning for regional aspects of the WAFS should be undertaken, with particular reference to user States’ requirements for WAFS products, service areas and areas of coverage of charts to be included in flight documentation. Areas of coverage of charts to be provided under the WAFS should be selected so as to ensure the required coverage for flights departing aerodromes. 88. Requirements for the issuance of medium-level significantweather (SIGWX) forecasts (FL 100- 250) under the WAFS should only be specified for limited geographical areas having a large number of international flight operations using those flight levels and for extended-range operations. Meteorological services at aerodromes 89. The meteorological service to be provided for operators and flight crews should be specified for each international aerodrome. Aerodrome forecasts --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 90. TAF and amendments thereto should be exchanged to meet the needs of current flight operations, including IGA. TAF for the aerodromes of departure and destination and their respective alternates, and en-route alternates, should be disseminated so as to be available at departure aerodromes and at ATS units designated to provide data link-VOLMET or VOLMETbroadcasts for aircraft in flight. In addition, they should be disseminated to be available at ATS units for transmission to aircraft in flight up to a distance from the aircraft corresponding to two hours’ flying time. half-hourly at aerodromes where the volume of traffic and the variability of meteorological conditions so justify, and/or reports are required for data link-VOLMET or VOLMET broadcasts, and relevant OPMET bulletin exchange schemes. 93. METAR and SPECI should be exchanged to meet the needs of current flight operations. METAR and SPECI for the aerodromes of departure and destination and their respective alternates, and en-route alternates, should be disseminated so as to be available at departure aerodromes and at ATS units designated to provide data Link-VOLMET or VOLMET broadcasts for aircraft in flight. In addition, they should be disseminated to be available at ATS units for transmission to aircraft in flight up to a distance from the aircraft corresponding to two hours’ flying time. Aircraft reports and SIGMET and AIRMET information 94. For international air routes having a high density of air traffic, air-reportingexemption or designationprocedures should be developed to reduce the frequency of routine airreports commensurate with the minimum requirements of meteorological offices. The procedures should be included in the Regional Supplementary Procedures (Doc 7030). 95. SIGMET and AIRMET messages, as well as special air-reports which have not been used for the preparation of a SIGMET, should be disseminated to meteorological offices so as to be available at departure aerodromes for the whole route and at ATS units designated to provide data link-VOLMET or VOLMET broadcasts for aircraft in flight. In addition, they should be disseminated to be available at ATS units for transmission to aircraft in flight for the route ahead up to a distance corresponding to two hours’ flying time. International airways volcano watch (IAVW) regional aspects - 91. The determination of the aerodromes at which landing forecasts are required should take into consideration relevant operationaland climatologicalfactors, including the weekly number of flights requiring those forecasts and the incidence of adverse meteorological conditions. 96. Planning for regional aspects of the IAVW should be undertaken, including the designation of volcanic ash advisory centres (VAACs) and selected State volcano observatories. Meteorological observations and reports Tropical cyclone watch - regional aspects 92. Meteorological observations and reports should be made at hourly intervals. However, the intervals should be 97. Planning for regional aspects of the tropical cyclone watch should be undertaken for regions affected by tropical 27/6/05 No. 4 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 32. cyclones, including the designation of tropical cyclone advisory centres (TCACs) among the centres of the WMO Tropical Cyclone Programme. functional stages of the aeronautical data -process, from origination until the next intended user. 105. Aeronautical geographical coordinates should be stated in terms of the World Geodetic System - 1984 (WGS-84). AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION SERVICES AND AERONAUTICAL CHARTS 98. The designation of intemational NOTAM offices and their areas of responsibility should be based on maximum efficiency in the dissemination and exchange of aeronautical informatioddata by telecommunicationsand on optimum use of the AFS. 99. Arrangements for the international exchange of elements of the Integrated Aeronautical Information Package and aeronautical charts should be established to meet the needs of all forms of international civil aviation. 100. Arrangements for the transmission and exchange of NOTAM should be planned with a view to recommending measures to ensure that adequate information is available to users in a timely manner, and that their presentation is efficient as to format and selective as to contents. 106. Arrangements should be made for those States that have not yet done so, to make available, as applicable, at least the following types of charts: Aerodrome Obstacle Chart -ICAO Type A; Aerodrome Obstacle Chart -ICAO Type C; Precision Approach Terrain Chart -ICAO; Enroute Chart -ICAO ; Area Chart - ICAO; Standard Departure Chart -Instrument (SID) -ICAO; Standard Arrival Chart -Instrument (STAR) -ICAO; Aerodrome/Heliport Chart -ICAO; 101. The advantages of using integrated automated AIS systems should be considered when planning the exchange of aeronautical informatioddata. Instrument Approach Chart - ICAO; 102. Priority for the planning and implementation of aerodrome AIS units should be based on aerodrome designation (RS, RNS, RG, AS and EAS) as set out in the Appendix to Part III - AOP. World Aeronautical Chart - ICAO 1:l O00 000. Visual Approach Chart; and 103. Pre-flight information bulletins (PIBs) should be made availableat designated intemational aerodromesat least one hour before each flight in order to meet the operational requirements of users. 107. States which have not yet produced the World Aeronautical Chart - ICAO 1:l O00 O00 should in accordance with established sheet distribution and regional arrangements,take measures to ensure the preparation of the sheets for which they are responsible, either through individual effort or with the collaboration of other States or specialized cartographic agencies. 104. Planning and arrangements should be made for the introduction by States of a quality management system for aeronauticalinformation and chart services. The systemmust include procedures, processes and resources necessary to ensure that the procedures are put in place for all the Note.- When operational or chart production considerations indicate that operational requirements can efectively be satisfied by Aeronautical Chart - ICAO 1:500 000, the chart may be made available instead of World Aeronautical Chart - ICAO I : I O00 000. 1____1 27/6/05 No. 4 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .
  • 33. Part I1 GENERAL PLANNING ASPECTS (GEN) GENERAL 1. Air navigation facilities, services and procedures recommended for the EUR region should form an integrated system, designated to meet the requirements of international civil aviation operationsand should meet the requirements of all planned operationsduring the seven years following a full review. 2 . Planning should not necessarily be limited to this period, especiallywith regard to facilities and services which require large investments for which cost effectiveness considerations are particularly important. . . .. . 3. To ensure that the plan is kept current, each of the major sub-systems composing the total air navigation system should be reviewed at specified intervals so that a whole review of the entire system will be completed within a period of seven years. Note.- A description of this concept is contained in the Introduction to the EUR FASID. and its ability to satis@ this demand, the capacity of each-of its components should be assessed at appropriate intervals. Note.- Paragraphs 3 to 11 and Attachment B to Part Y.111 -ATFM of the EUR FASID refer. 7. Whenever necessary, the capacity of the system should be adjusted, unless it is found that such adjustments would result in costs which would be unacceptable when compared with the overall benefits to be derived. 8. The airport capacity is one essential link in the combined overall air navigation system. The overall system is shown diagrammatically below: Arrival I H H H H I -, - En-route sector!c) capacity 4. To achieve the objective in 1, it is essential that all planned operations be taken into account. These should include domestic civil and military operations to the extent that they influence international civil aviation. 5 . Services to civil and military users should, whenever possible, be provided by jointly operated facilities in order to ensure not only an equitable sharing of the available resources but also to keep down the cost of operation of air navigation services for both parties. SYSTEM CAPACITY 6 . In order to maintain a reasonable balance between the air traffic demand imposed onthe air navigation system TMA capacity Airport capacity TMA capacity ~~~[~~~ capacity Definitions 9. Airport capacity is the combined result of the performance of one or more components of the three main subsystems at an airport, which are: - terminal capacity: the number of passengers per hour which depends upon the movement rate through various functions in the terminal, e.g. security, immigration, customs, etc. - apron capacity: the number of aircraft handled per hour which depends upon the number of parking stands and the capability of the ground handling agencies to service the associated aircraft, etc. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Departure Not for Resale
  • 34. 11-2 EUR BASIC ANP SPECIFIC OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS - aircrafr operations capacity: the number of movements per hour that the combined air traffic services, runways and taxiways, etc., can support. 16. The operation of the air navigation system should be planned in such a way that it takes optimum account of i seasonal and other variations in a r traffic demand. SYSTEM MONITORING AND ADJUSTMENT --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- . ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS The air navigation system as a whole should be planned so as to achieve optimum cost effectiveness. 10. 17. The operation of the air navigation system should be continuously monitored in order to adjust its components in the light of shortcomings, including those revealed in the course of investigations of incidents and accidents. 18. Any restrictive elements in the air navigation system should be reviewed at frequent intervals and should be removed as soon as no longer justified. 1 1 . Due account should be taken of the need for economy in the operation of aircraft, especially as regards fuel consumption, aircraft performance and airborne equipment. Note.- See also Part K I l - ATS and Part KiIi ATFM on airspace restrictions. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS NATIONAL FACILITIES AND SERVICES 12. Account should be taken of the environment and possible constraints imposed by it, in particular safety, national security, pollution and noise. 19. Relevant planning criteria used for international planning should, to the extent possible, also be used by States for the planning of the national parts of their air navigation system so as to provide a common planning basis. This applies particularly to those parts of the system where international and national requirements must share the same technical resources (radio frequencies, use of SSR modes and codes, methods of navigation, etc.). GENERAL OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 13. Operation of facilities and services and the use of associated procedures should not result in a workload for flight crews and ground personnel that could impair safety or efficiency of operations. 14. In planning the air navigation system, due account should be taken of the possibilities for future expansion of the system without the need for major revision or redesign. Planning should also take into account the need for timely availability of adequately trained and competent personnel capable of supervising, maintaining and operating available air navigation facilities and services. 15. In imposing on operators the mandatory carriage of specific airborne equipment, adequate lead times should be provided. Such lead times should be determined in cooperation with the operators concerned, taking into account equipment delivery times, retrofit programmes and all other relevant factors. - COMPATIBILITY OF SYSTEMS BETWEEN STATES 20. Planning should ensure compatibility of facilities, services and procedures with those used in adjacent States, unless this would adversely affect the efficiency of the planned system. SECURITY ASPECTS 21. Planning of the air navigation system should take into account the essential needs for the security of operation against possible interference or threat. [Annex 171 . 'r. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale . l i
  • 35. GEN r 113 AIR TRAFFIC DEMAND 22. A detailed traffic forecast regarding major traffic flows in the EUR region should be prepared on which to determinethe developmentof airspace and flow management for a period of five (5) years ahead and in such a form that it can be used by ail concerned with the planning of the air navigation system. 23. In order to achieve a continuous assessment of available capacity and demand on the air traffic control system,an Integrated Database (IDB) should provide data for strategic,pre-tactical and tactical air traffic flow management (ATFM) purposes. Note.- Complete informationon the provision o an air f traficjlow management (ATFM) service in the EUR region f andon the maintenance o an integrated database (IDB) may befound in Part V.III -A TFM of the EUR FASID. 24. The air traffic demand to be accommodated by the air navigation system or parts thereof should be described in such terms that it can be directly compared with the capacity of that system or its affected components. Note.- Paragraphs I and 2, Part i! III -ATFM refers. CARRIAGE AND USE OF AIRBORNE EQUIPMENT [Annex 6, P r s I and 11, Chapter 71 at 25. Carriage of airborne equipment used for navigation, communication or other purposes related directly to the conduct of a flight, its operating status and use by flight crews should be based on the following minimum requirements: ! a) for controlled IFRjlights: 1) navigation equipment: b) for controlled VFRflights where prescribed 1) navigation equipment: specific minimum SSR capability, as prescribed; and 2) communication equipment: VHF communication capability to contact prescribed ATS units. 26. States of Registry should, in cooperation with operators, promulgate provisions based on those contained in Annex 6 regarding the carriage and operating status of airborne equipment, including provisions regarding the conduct of operationswith reduced equipment capability. in addition,respectivenational provisions should be coordinated amongst States to avoid difficulties to operators. [Annex 6, Part I, 6.1 and 7.3, and Part II,6. 1 and 7.21 27. States of Registry should ensure that the relevant provisions in Annex 6 are met regarding the qualificationsof flight crews to operate the equipment required to be used in the course of a planned flight. at [Annex 6, Part I, 9.3 and 9.4, Annex 6, P r II,9.1] 28. Provider States should, in cooperation with each other, develop exemption procedures for those cases when a specific equipment covered by 25 fails while the aircraft concerned is either away from the aerodrome at which it is normally stationed or away from where the equipment in question can be repaired. 29. No specific provisions over and above those contained in the relevant Parts of Annex 6 should be required for: n a) IFR flights i controlled airspace; b) VFR flights in uncontrolled airspace. [Annex 6, Parts I and 11, Chapter 71 - dual VOR with 50 kHz channel spacing, single DME and ADF; - SSR with 4 096 Code capability and Mode C (for specified portions of the airspace, as prescribed); - for operations on RNAV routes: serviceable navigation equipment capable of meeting the navigation performance standard prescribed for that particular route (32 below refers); and L’ 2) communication equipment: dual VHF communication equipment with 25 kHz channel spacing; and ASSUMED NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE [Annex 6, Parts I and 11, Chapter 71 30. Aircraft using ATS routes will, to the extent possible, be operated along the centre lines of the routes and will, in any case, remain within the specified lateral limits of such routes. [Annex 6, Parts I and 11, Chapter 7; Annex 2,3.6.2.1.1] --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 36. EUR BASIC ANP 11-4 3 1. Aircraft are capable of navigating satisfactorily under the following conditions: a) that normal navigational guidance along a given ATS route is considered to exist if the designated operational . ..coverage of a navigation aid is specified up to at least the halfway point between it and the next aid on the route in question, plus a specified overlap (see also criterion No. 6 in Attachment J to Part IV - CNS of the EUR FASID); b) that'significant points, either en route or within TMAs, . are established with reference to: 1) the radial of a VOR used for track guidance and its intersection with a radial of another VOR, provided the angle of intersection of the two radials is not less than 45" and not more than 135"; 2) a radial of a VOR, combined with a specified DME indication from its co-located DME or from the colocated DME of the next VOR intendedto be used for track guidance, provided the point is located within the designated operational range of that DME. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Note.- Other arrangements may be made subject to agreement between States and operators concerned. 32. For operation on RNAV routes where specified values of navigation accuracy are prescribed by regional air Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS navigation agreement, aircraft will be capable of meeting these values. In the EUR region, two levels of navigational accuracy have been established. For en-route purposes the values are as follows: 0 a) basic RNAV, having a navigation performance equal to or better than a track-keeping accuracy of f 9.3 km ( 5 NM) for 95 per cent of the flight time of all aircraft f using basic RNAV equipment. This level is similar to that currently achieved by aircraft without RNAV capability operating on existing routes defined by VOR or VOR/DME, where VORSare less than 185 km (100NM) apart; b) precision RNAV, having a navigation performance equal to or better than a track-keeping accuracy of 0.93 km (0.5 NM) standard deviation. This level of accuracy is currently achieved by aircraft with a capability similar or superior to continuous automatic dual DME position fixing and updating. Note.- While this accuracy level is still under evaluation, it is expectedto be compatible with total route widths of less than 1I km (6 NM). Trials are planned to validate the basic criteria and to develop the precision criteria into a recommended route width. These criteria will then be expressed i terms similar to those usedfor n basic RNA V. Not for Resale -- .. :. . . . .- * I
  • 37. 1 11 1- Part IlI AERODROME OPERATIONAL PLANNING (AOP) Aerodrome services GENERAL AIRPORTS Physical characteristics . . 2. The specificphysical characteristics for each regular use international aerodrome should meet the requirements of the critical aircraft. [Annex 14, Volume I, Chapter 31 3. The specific physical characteristics for each alternate use international aerodrome should be based on the requirements of the diverted critical aircraft. [Annex 14, Volume I, Chapter 31 4. In those cases where the extension or development of an aerodrome in accordance with the provisions contained in 2 and 3 above would only be required to meet infrequent operations of the critical aircraft but would entail disproportionate expenditures,specific arrangements should be made between operators and the State concerned regarding the reasonable practical development of the aerodrome in question. The results of such arrangements, together with relevant reasons, should be reflected in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. _.. 5. The specific physical requirements for each aerodrome used by international general aviation (IGA) only should be based on the requirements of those IGA aircraft likely to use the aerodrome in question most frequently. [Annex 14, Volume I, Chapter 31 Rescue and fire fighting services 6. Rescue and fire fighting services at international aerodromes should be provided at the required level of protection, as expressed by means of required aerodrome category for rescue and fire fighting in accordance with Annex 14, Volume I and reflected in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. [Annex 14, Volume I, 9.21 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 1. For regular and alternate aerodromes used for international operations, the general physical characteristics, marking, visual aids and services should be in accordance with the relevant ICAO provisions. 7. Rescue and fire fighting services at international aerodromes should be capable of meeting the specified response time and be kept in a state of readiness throughout those times when the aerodrome is available for use. [Annex 14, Volume I, 9.21 Runway surfaces 8. In amplification of relevant provisions in Annex 14, Volume I, runway surfaces should be constructed andor treated so as to ensure continuous good friction characteristics when wet. Runway markings should consist of non-slip materials. [Annex 14, Volume I, 3.1.22 and 5.21 Runway visual range 9. In order to facilitate aircraft operations in low visibility, runway visual range (RVR) information should be available for runways intended for use when either the horizontal visibility or the RVR is less than 1 500 m. The provision of such information is essential for CAT I1 and I CAT Ii operations. 10. A secondary power supply should be provided for RVR observing systems which use instrumental means. Local ' C Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 38. EUR BASIC ANP 1 12 1- ATS units shall be kept informed of changes in the operational status of RVR observing systems. Aids for aerodrome operations 11. The provision of non-visual and visual aids for aerodrome operations should take into account: a) aircraftperformance characteristicsof those aircraft likely to use the aerodrome in question; c: approach purposes. Specific aids should only be provided if this is warranted from a cost effectiveness point of view. 16. When it has been determined that navigation guidance to an aerodrome without precision approach is required and this requirement cannot be met by use of a suitable aid already provided for en-route or TMA purposes, (see also Part IV - CNS) it should be covered by the provision of a VOR on or in the vicinity of that aerodrome and located so that it permits the establishmentof a straight-in non-precision approach procedure for the aerodrome, based on that VOR. b) prevailing meteorological conditions; c) use of the aerodrome at night or during low visibility conditions; d) aerodrome layout; e) expected traffic density; and f) other relevant local conditions. 12. The provision of approach, runway lighting and taxiway lighting should be in accordance with the Standards and Recommended Practices detailed in Annex 14, Volume I, for the appropriate runway type of approach or takeoff operations as required in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. 17. At aerodromes required for use by international commercial air transport operationsand having a high density of traffic, or being planned with a single runway only, and where, at times, the main landing direction when provided with precision approach procedure may not be suitable for use due to meteorological conditions or other causes, the alternativelanding direction to be used should be planned and provided with aids permitting the conduct of a non-precision approach procedure which will avoid an unacceptable decrease in the aerodrome capacity or make the aerodrome inaccessible during such periods. Such procedures are of particular value when prevailing terrain or obstacles render visual circling difficult. Precision approach a d is 13. The sensitive areaaround radio navigation aids and the immediate vicinity of visual aids required for the conduct of instrument approaches should be made accessible so that these areas can be kept clear of snow, ice and/or obstacles likely to interfere with their correct functioning and use. Non-precision approach aids 14. Where required by the topographic andor environmental situation of an aerodrome, improved track guidance during departure and/or approach by specific nonvisual andor visual aids should be provided even if such aids would not normally be required in accordance with the above provisions. 15. At aerodromes used by international general aviation only, non-visual and visual aids for approach and landing should be provided on the basis of the expected type of traffic, its density and the utilization of the aerodrome in question. Consideration should then be taken of the location of navigation aids provided for other purposes in relation to the aerodrome in question and their potential use for 18. Regardless of prevailing weather conditions, turbine-engine transport aircraft have a need for precise approach path guidance during approach and landing. For all runways to be used by turbine-engine transport aircraft, visual approach slope indicator systems should be provided. The main landing runway of aerodromes, catering for asignificant number of operations by such aircraft should be provided with an ILSMLS and associated appropriate visual aids. 19. At aerodromes where frequent poor weather conditions require the provision of precise approach path guidance during approach and landing, the main landing runway should be provided with an E S and associated appropriate visual aids regardless of the operating characteristics of the aircraft using the aerodrome concerned. The category for precision approach should be I, I1 or III depending on the weather records of the aerodrome,the type of traffic expected, and the period of day when arrivals normally take place. Note.- Pending the development of corresponding worldwide provisions, the additional procedures described . . . .. : ; . 4 : --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 39. 1 13 1- .AOP r in Attachment E to Part III-AOP of the EUR FASID should be usedfor the calibrationof CategoryI ILS installationsand the promulgation of the results of such calibration. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 20. At aerodromes where auto-coupled approaches are made on a routine basis, the ILS signal quality should be suitable for auto-coupled approaches even though a facility performance Category I would otherwise be sufficient. a) For economic and operational reasons, where: ILS and associated DME are implemented; or b) ILS is implemented and associated DME is planned; or c) both ILS and associated DME are planned; triple frequency pairing with MLS should be implemented. ILSMLS 21. 26. As a consequence of 24 and 25 above, the implementation of DME should: ILS services implemented in accordance with the ANP,and as outlined in Table AOP 2 of the FASID, should be retained, at least, until 1 July 1996. 22. The MLS implementation programme at major international airports in the EUR region should be substantially completed by 1 July 1996. The category of service of facilities implemented should be that indicated in Table AOP 1 of the FASID for the runway concerned. Note.- The approved EUR IU/MLS transition plan is contained in Table AOP 2 of the FASID. ~ 25. 23. Although it is permissible to withdraw ILS facilities after 1 July 1996 when the specified category of service, based on MLS, has been provided, a number of ILS facilities will have to be maintainedin service in the 1996-1998 period. In some cases the level of operation of the remaining ILS services can be downgraded. in the first phase of the transition, follow as far as possible the current ILS practice for siting and zero range reading at threshold or touchdown zone; and in the second phase of the transition, follow the practice recommended for M U ,i.e. site the DME at the azimuth site and avoid reply delay adjustment of the DME. The ILSMLS approach procedures should be promulgated with DME plate values. Note.- In the transition from the first to the second phase, a DME located with an ILS must be relocated to the MLS Azimuth Station. OPERATIONS Note.- This operationalrequirementis intended to cover the possible needs arising from the progress in ILSMU transition in regions other than EUR. Implementation strategy of ianding DMEs during the ILS/MLS transition Note.- Within the European region, two phases in the transition areforeseen. In thefirst phase of the transition the majoriiy of aircrafi will be equipped with ILS only. In the second phase the majority of aircraft will be equipped with ILS and MLS or MLS only. 24. To avoid operational confusion during the transition, when a DME is associated with an MLS and a separate DME is associated with an ILS, both DMEs should provide the same distance indication along the ILS approach. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS General 27. Measures should be taken to reduce, to the extent possible, the risk of collision between aircraft and birds during all flight phases conducted on or in the vicinity of aerodromes. Such measures should include: the reduction of bird concentrations at and near aerodromes both by appropriate planning and practical measures; the collection and dissemination, in appropriate form, of information on bird movements; and the development of procedures permitting ATS to alert pilots of potential bird collision hazards. [Annex 14, Volume I, 2.9 and 9.51 Not for Resale
  • 40. EUR BASIC ANP 111-4 Runway visual range Reduced runway declared distancesfor take-off 28. In order to meet the requirements for ail-weather operations, RVR information should normally be provided from the following observation sites: Note.- In the following operational requirements the term “intersection” is used to cover both intersection and junction concepts. Non-precisionapproachand Category loperations: One site providing informationrepresentative of the touchdown zone. the following full runway declared distances be calculated Category I1 operations: As for Category I, plus a second site representative of the mid-point of the runway. - ( i and promulgated for each runway intended to be used by aircraft operators engaged in international commercial air transport: Category I l l operations: As for Category II, but normally with a third position representative of the stop-end of the runway, unless observations at two sites are adequate for the operations planned. Note 1.- Where RVR information is required for operations in both directions of the runway, the same sites would normally be used for both directions, e.g. RVR information representative of the stop-end of the runway would normally be provided from the site serving the touchdown zone of the opposite direction. Note 2.- RVR requirementsfor take-ofin low visibility are usually met by facilities provided to support landings under such conditions. [Annex 3,4.7.5] 3 1. Paragraph 2.8 of Annex 14, Volume I, requires that Take-off run available (TORA); Take-off distance available (TODA); Accelerate stop distance available (ASDA); and Landing distance available (LDA). 32. The reduced runway declared distances for take-off should consist, as for full runway declared distances, of TORA, TODA and ASDA. 33. The datum-line from which the reduced runway declared distances for take-off should be determined is defined by the intersection of the downwind edge of the specific taxiway with the runway edge. The loss, if any, of runway length due to alignmentof the aeroplaneprior to takeoff should be taken into account by the operators for the calciflation of the aeroplane’s take-off weight. [Annex 6, Part I, 5.2.81 -.. Take-off runway 29. As the take-off minima are normally less than landing minima, sufficient visual and non-visual guidance should be available to control the aircraft in the event of both a discontinued take-off in adverse circumstances and a continued take-off after failure of the critical engine. 30. Take-off operations under low visibility should also require the existenceof suitable runway protection measures, surface movement guidance, emergency procedures and apron management. The implementation of these requirements is the responsibility of the appropriate State and aerodrome authorities. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS .... ~~ ..... 34. Intersections used as intermediatetake-off positions should be identified by the “taxiway designator” to which the datum-line of the associated reduced runway declared distance for take-off refers. 35. At each international aerodrome,specific minimum visibility for take-off should be established,regulatingthe use of intersection take-off positions. These minima should permit the appropriate ATC unit to maintain a permanent surveillance of the ground movement operations, and the pilots-in-command to constantly secure their position on the manoeuvring area, so as to exclude any potential risk of confusion as to the identification of the aircraft and intersections used for take-off. The minima should be Not for Resale . --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Low visibiiiiy operations Note.- Diagrams depicting the datum-linefor declared distances are contained in the Introduction to Part I l l AOP o the EUR FASID. f
  • 41. AOP consistent with the surface movement guidance and control system (SMGCS) provided at the aerodrome concerned. 36. The provision of marking and lightingaids together with signs should ensure the safe control and guidance of aircraft towards and at take-off intersections appropriate to the minimum visibility criteria retained. At the taxi holding position of the associated intersection take-off position, such signs should indicate the runway heading and the remaining take-off run available (TORA) in metres (paragraph 15 of Part IU -AOP of the EUR FASID also refers). Air traffic services Note.- Thefollowing operational requirement relates to the provisions of Air Trafic Services for all trafic on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome and all aircraff flying in the vicini9 of an aerodrome. 37. Aerodrome control service should be provided at all regular and aiternate aerodromes.Aerodrome control service should also be provided at those aerodromes used by international general aviation aircraft, but only when the type and density of traffic warrant it. Surface movement guidance and control systems (SMGCS) 38. Surface movement radar (SMR) should not be used for other than monitoring tasks unless identification procedures are implemented. Note.-Material on the application of advanced SMGCS is presented in Attachment G to Part I l l -AOP of the EUR FASID. New larger aeroplanes (NLA) operations B747-400Operations - General distances do not adversely affect the safety or significantly affect the regularity of operations of aeroplanes. Experience in some States with operation of B747-400 has shown that it may be permissible, if specific measures have been implemented to reduce separation distances on taxiways, apron taxiways and aircraft stand taxilanes to the dimensions specified in Attachment H to Part 1 1- AOP of the EüR 1 FASID. (Cf. Aerodrome Design Manual (DOC 9157), Part 2, Table 1-4.) 40. The provision of unambiguous and conspicuous taxi guidance to pilots under all operational conditions prevailing at the aerodrome by appropriatemeans (e.g. visual aids, marshaller, etc.) is an essential prerequisite for operations conducted with lower separation distances. Equally important is the provision of good taxiway surface friction conditions at all times to ensure proper braking and nosewheel steering capability of aeroplanes. 4 1 . Regarding turns, reduced separationsklearance distances are based on the assumption that the cockpit should remain above the taxiway centre line markinflighting as accurately as possible and at taxi speeds commensurate with actual operating conditions prevailing, except that for aircraft stand taxilanes a different technique, as specified in the AIP, may apply. Reduced separation distances on taxiwayslapion taxiways 42. Whenever minimum separation distances between the centre lines of parallel taxiways or between taxiway/apron taxiway centre line and object, as specified in Annex 14, are reduced in accordance with Attachment H to Part III -AOP of the EUR FASID, taxiway centre line lighting should be provided for night, winter or low visibility operations. 43. On parallel taxiways the separation distances between the centre lines should be not less than 76 m (Attachment H to Part III -AOP of the EUR FASID refers). 44. In straight portions of a taxiway or apron taxiway Note.- Material on the impact of operations of NLA on aerodromes is presented in Attachment F to Part I l l -AOP of the EUR FASID. 39. Where the minimum separatiodclearance distances as specified in Annex 14, Volume I, Table 3-1 cannot be provided by the existing layout of an aerodrome, States may introduce lower separation standards provided that an aeronautical study indicates that such lower separation the separation distance between the centre line and an object such as a building or a parked aircraft should be not less than 41.5 m (AttachmentH to Part III -AOP of the EUR FASID refers). 45. In taxiway or apron taxiway curves the separation distances between the centre line and an object should be not less than 45.5 m (Attachment H to Part 1 1 - AOP of the 1 EUR FASID refers). Lt Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- r 1 15 1-
  • 42. EUR BASIC ANP 1 16 1- Reduced separation distances on aircraft stand tarilanes . 46. On aircraft stand taxilanes where reduced separation distances exist proper guidance such as centre line lights or equivalent guidance (e.g. marshaller, etc.) should be provided for night, winter or low visibility operations. r) 53. An aircraft stand equipped with a visual docking guidance system should provide the minimum clearance of 5 m between an aircraft using the stand and any adjacent building, aircraft on another stand and other objects. 47. All objects not providing the minimum separatiodclearance distance as specifiedin Annex 14 should be properly marked or lighted (Annex 14, Chapter 5 refers). Note.- The clearance distance between an aircraft on a stand provided with azimuth guidance by a visual docking guidance system and an object or edge of a service road may further be reduced subject to local circumstances provided that the object (e.g. blastfence) does not exceed a height of 3 m above the surface of the relative aircraft stand. 48. Apron service roads should be properly marked with service road boundary lines and apron safety lines (Annex 14, Chapter 5 refers). CAPACITY 49. Along straight portions of an aircraft stand taxilane the separation distance between the centre line and an object such as a parked aircraft or a building should be not less than 40 m, whereas the wing tip clearance of an aircraft turning from a taxilane into an aircraft stand should not be less than 7.5 m as recommended in Annex 14, Chapter 3, 3.12.6. Note.- The separation distance between the taxilane centre line and an object or edge of a service road may further be reduced to not less than 37.5 m provided that the object (e.g. blastfence) does not exceed a height of 3 m above the relative taxilane centre line. 50. In curves of aircraft stand taxilanes the separation distances should not be less than 42.5 m, as specified in Annex 14, Table 3-1, whereas the wingtip clearance of an aircraft taxiing on a curved taxilane or turning from one taxilane into another taxilane/taxiway should not be less than 7.5 m. Note.- Where vertical clearance criteria are being considered, the separation distance between the taxilane centre line and the edge of the service roads or an object, which may not exceed a height of 3 m above the relative taxilane centre line, shouid be not less than 41.5 m. Reduced clearance distances on aircraft stands Airport capacity 54. States shouldensurethat adequate consultationand, where appropriate, cooperation between airport authorities and userdother involved parties is executed at all international aerodromes to satisfy the provisions of 59 to 69. 55. States should provide and coordinate communication and exchange of information between the States’ internationalairportsand internationalorganizationsinvolved with airport capacity issues. . . . / . I 56. Consultation procedures should be established between airport authorities and users commensurate with local conditions and appropriate to the specific purpose the consultation process is intended to serve (capacity assessmenildemand forecasting, etc.). 57. Regular consultation between airport authority and users should preferably be effected by local working groups composed of all parties involved, including ATS where applicable. Alternatively, a local group may be replaced by a national committee. 58. At airports where environmental concerns prevail with apotential impact on airport capacity adialogue-oriented activity with communities will be required in which users should actively participate. 51. On aircraft stands where reduced clearance distances exist guidance by visual docking guidance system should be provided. 52. All objects for which reduced clearances apply should be properly marked or lighted (Annex 14, Chapter 6). . Airport capacity assessment and requirement 59. The declaredcapacity/demandcondition at airports should be periodically reviewed in terms of a qualitative . . i.’ . ..,; .;.j --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 43. AOP analysis for each systemcomponentand, when applicable,the result of the qualitativeassessmentupon mutual agreementbe used for information in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. 60. The future capacity/demandbased on a forecastfor the next seven years should be agreed upon after close cooperation between airport authorities and affected users and the relevant capacity requirements reflected in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. 61. Operators should consult with aerodrome authoritieswhen future plans indicate a significantincreased requirement for capacity resulting in one of the elements reaching a limiting condition. This forecast should then be shown as an updated requirement in Table AOP 1 of the FASID for the appropriate element. 62. Each airport in the region will have its own requirement in the mix of the above-mentioned elements. However if there is a capacity limitation at an airport this will have an impact on the surrounding links in the overall capacity chain and vice versa. Therefore, it is essential that the specific element that causes the limitation in the traffic flow be identified and adjusted. 63. Airport capacity shouldbe assessed and declaredby airport authorities in consultation with the parties involved for each component(terminaYaprodaircraft operations)using agreed methods and criteria for level of delays. 1 17 166. Major research and development programmes should be undertaken in order to implement new initiatives for increasing airport capacity. .. 67. Due to lack of capacity at many international airports, a better and more efficient utilization of existing runways is required. Runway selection procedures and standardtaxi routes at aerodromes should ensure an optimum flow of air traffic with a minimum of delay and a maximurn use of available capacity. They should also, if possible, take account of the need to keep taxiing times for arriving and departing aircraft to a minimum. 68. Extreme traffic peaking at airports generates congestion and severe economic penalties, such as underutilization of costly airport facilities and services, inefficient facility design criteria and delays to aircraft and passengers. Improvementsshould be obtained fromeffectiveconsultation between the airlines, airport and government authorities to achieve maximum capacity utilization. 69. The possibility of overcoming capacity limitations should also take the use of other airports in the vicinity into consideration. Note.- Guidance material on capaciv and level of service is presented in Attachment C to PartlII AOP of the EUR FASID. - Note I.- The result of the airport capacity assessment, as required by and detailed in paragraphs 59 to 62, must be reflected in Table AOP 1 of the FASID against each airport enrry listed in this table. PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS Note 2.- The figures used to ref2ect this assessment, together with the updating process of these elements, are detailed in the explanation of Table AOP I of the FASID. 70. Requirements for alternate aerodromes should, if at all possible, be satisfied by the appropriate regular aerodromes.However, where in specificcases the designation of an aerodrome in close proximity to a regular aerodrome would result in appreciable fuel conservation or other operationaladvantages,this aerodromemay be designated for use as an alternate aerodrome only. 64. Where restrictionsin airportcapacityare identified, a full range of options for their reduction or removal should be evaluated by the airport authority, in close cooperation with the operators and other involved parties. Such options could include technical/operational/procedural and environmental improvements and facility expansion. 65. At many aerodromes, airspace capacity has influence on the airport capacity. If the declared capacity of a specified airspace has influence on airport operations, this should be indicated and action undertaken to reach a capacity in this airspace corresponding to the airport capacity. Alternate aerodromes 7 1. Planning of alternate aerodromes should be made on the basis of the following objectives: a) to ensure that at least one suitable alternate is available for each internationaloperation; b) to ensure that the facilities at the designated alternate aerodrome(s) are appropriate for the alternate operation: --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 44. EUR BASIC ANP 1 18 1- Physical characteristics 72. Even though at specific aerodromes Category II or 1 1 operations may not be a requirement during the period 1 covered by the plan, account should nevertheless be taken in the planning for such aerodromes of possible future requirements in order to avoid costly and disruptive modifications at a later date. This applies in particular whenever replacement or improvement programmes are undertaken. However, investments needed to prepare for future CAT 1 or 11operations at specific aerodromes should 1 1 always be subject to cost-benefit analysis. ILSMLS transition Note I.- The approved ILS/MLS Transition Plan is contained in Table AOP 2 of the FASID. Note 2.-The general planning strategyf o r the transition from ILS to MLS in the EUR region is contained in Attachment D to Part III -AOP of the EUR FASID. Note 3.- Within the European region, two phases in the transition areforeseen. In thejirstphase of the transition the majority of aircrafr will be equipped with ILS only. In the second phase the majority of aircrafr will be equipped with ILS and MLS or MLS only. 73. Until the introductionof specific MLS procedures, the planning of approach and landing procedures for MLS should be based on ILS procedures. 74. Where required and possible, advantage should be taken of the improved performance and any alleviation of siting constraints and signal protection requirements of the MLS to improve the efficiency of precision approach operations at difficult sites or in low visibility conditions. 75. The introduction of MLS into operational service should be planned on the basis of achieving initially a precision approach performance equivalent to ILS Category I. Note.- It is expected that such use could be approved within a short period following the introduction of M U into service. 76. The implementation of MLS at runways with performance Category I1 or I11 should be made sufficiently ahead of the planned date of withdrawal of the ILS. ILS 77. When the national MLS implementation plan is presented, a plan for withdrawal of ILS should be established by each State and should be made available to ICAO for coordination purposes. The plan of withdrawal of ILS should contain the optimal time for economical balance between airborne and ground equipment replacement (technicaVeconomical lifetime) and should be the subject of prior consultation with aircraft operators. Operational aspects (i.e. no reduction of airspace capacity, ATC means and methods, etc.) and planning consequences (i.e. coordination in the EUR region) should be given adequate consideration. 78. The installation of new ILS, or the replacement of e x i s t i n g u , should take into account the physical location of the future MLS azimuth, MLS back-azimuth, MLS elevation and DME system. 79. New DMWtransponders associated with MLS should be of the DMElP type, initially operating on X or Y channel. This will provide: - a) the opportunity for all aircraft equipped with DMEP to have the full benefit of the higher precision; and b) the opportunity for all aircraft fitted with DMEM to benefit from the use of ground DMEP (IA mode only) service for approach and landing purposes. 80. For those runways where it is intended to install DME associated with ILS and where early MLSRNAV operations are planned, D M W should be installed. 81. In conjunction with the purchase of new aircraft or the replacement of DME interrogators, aircraft operators should consider the provision of DMEP capability in order to have the full benefit of the improved distance accuracy. 82. When considering possible relocation of the localizer, such factors as obstacle clearance, approach and runway lighting, effect of turbojet blast, etc., should be taken into account. 83. The runway approach type requirement will remain as stated in Table AOP 1 of the FASID. However, the performance of MLS will provide advanced application irrespectivelyof the performance category listed in the ANP. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS i. ‘ services should not be withdrawn or downgraded before a similar service by the MLS is available on the ground and a sufficiently high number of aircraft using that facility are certified for M U operations. Not for Resale . . _ .. . _ . .CJ”
  • 45. 1 19 1- AOP 84. It is one of the objectives of EUR ILSMLS transition planning to achieve the transition in the most costeffective manner possible and to harmonize the MLS ground equipment implementation timetable with the needs and numbers of MLS-equipped aircraft. 85. From 1990 onwards, MLS implementation should take place on the preferred landingrunway at all international airports in the region. The M U will be installed in addition to the I S which will remain in service and perform to the L, category required by the EUR A . " Where parallel or multiple runways exist, it may not be necessary to implement MLS on all other runways in the early part of the 1990 to 1998 transition period. Where the preferred landing runway provides a Category 11service, and tests or local knowledge 1 show that MLS cannot be installed without degradation of the ILS service (e.g. reversion to Category I), then a secondary landing runway should be chosen for the first MLS installation. Where a landing direction is served by two runways with Category 111 ILS facilities, and a temporary reversion to a lower category of service of one of them is unavoidable when MLS is introduced, this can be accepted provided that the remaining Category 1 1ILS service can be 1 maintained. 86. The withdrawal of an ILS equipment should be effected with an advance notice of not less than two years from the intended date of the actual time of closing. OPERATIONS General 87. Where noise abatement methods are applied to turbo-jet transport aircraft while on approach to land, the low power approach techniquemay be utilized, provided that the necessary facilities and services are available at the aerodrome concerned. These comprise: a) the availability of positive glide path information on the landing runway; b) the use of ATC "MA procedures compatible with the low power approach technique; Note I.- Such range information could be provided by different means, such as radar, DME or appropriate airborne navigation equipment. Note 2.- Guidance material on low power approach techniques f o r noise abatement purposes is contained in Attachment B to Part III -AOP of the EUR FASID. Air traffic services (AOP) Note.- The following requirements relate to the provision of Air Trafsic Services f o r all traffic on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome and all aircraftflying in the vicini9 o an aerodrome. f Aerodrome flight information service (AFIS) 88. At aerodromes used by international general aviation, where the provision of aerodrome control service is not yet justified, aerodrome flight information service (AFIS) should be provided by a unit located at the aerodrome. Note.- The term AFIS is used to describe a service at IGA aerodromes where an aerodrome control service is not provided (Annex I 1 and guidance material on AFIS contained in ICAO Circular 21 I refer). 89. In determining whether aerodrome control service or AFIS should be provided at a given IGA aerodrome, the appropriate ATS authority is expected to give due considerationto the type(s) of air traffic involved, the density of air traffic, the topographical and meteorological conditions, and such other factors as may be pertinent to safety and efficiency,including the language or languages to be used in air-ground communications. 90. Where an aerodrome control service is not clearly justified by the complexity,density of air traffic, topographic and prevailingmeteorologicalconditions, an aerodrome flight information service (AFIS) should be provided by a unit located at those aerodromes. An A R S should also be provided as an intermediate step between no service at all and an aerodrome control service. [Annex 11,2.5.1 and 2.3.21 c) the provision of significant range information along the approach path (distance from touchdown). Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- r
  • 46. EUR BASIC ANP 111-1 0 Note.- Material on the application of advanced SMGCS i presented in Amchment G to Part I l l -AOP of the EUR s FASID. 91. Where the traffic density is high and the layout of the airfield is complex, the implementation of surface movement radar (SMR) should be considered when the procedural aerodrome control service is a limiting factor for the overall air traffic services and the traffic volume. (Air Traffic Services Planning Manual (Doc 9426), Part 11, Section 5 and Manual of Surface Movement Guidance and Control Systems (SMGCS) (Doc 9476) also refer.) 92. Guidance material has been produced on SMR identification procedures. In order to harmonize the use of SMR in the region, it is recommended that these procedures be implemented to allow more effective use of SMR. Where SMR identification procedures are already in operation it is recommended that they be reviewed taking into account the guidance material now available. Note.- Guidance material on SMR identijkation procedures is contained in ICAO Doc 9426, Air Traffic Services Planning Manual, Part 11, Section 5, Chapter 4. 93. Due to the difficulty in maintaining aircraft and vehicle identification on primary SMR displays only, significant increases in ATS capacity can be achieved when identification labelling is made available. account all the aspects of the changing division in responsibility for collision avoidanceduring low visibility conditions. Note.- Guidance material on responsibiliry aspects CM be found in ICAO Doc 9476, Manual of Surface Movement Guidance and Control Systems (SMGCS), Chapter 3. 96. Where radar service is required for approach control and the traffic mixture is so composed, the possibility to provide aerodrome control service with assistance from radar information, for the final approach segment, based on the same source as the approach control, should be considered.With appropriateregulations the need for coordination and handover could be reduced and the mix of arrivals and departures more efficiently conducted. ILSMLS transition 97. Initially ILS and MLS procedures will be identical, with aircraft being navigated by pilots or radar vectored to intercept the final approach procedure in accordance with current practices. When traffic density is not a constraint (e.g. during night hours) or at certain aerodromes, MLS/RNAV procedures should be introduced during the ILS/MLS transition period. These MLS/RNAV procedures should be identical to.existing approach procedures based on another navigation aid or result from an operational benefit and improvement in airspace management for aircraft equipped with suitable avionics. New larger aeroplanes (NLA) operations Note.- Identification labelling trials and development are taking place in certain States. 94. In order to fully exploit capacity gains, the advanced surface movement guidance and control systems (SMGCS) operate from runway to parking position and must vice versa. The use of advanced SMGCS will require the controllingauthority to acceptan increasingresponsibilityfor aircraft safety in low visibility conditions. The level of service provided must be maintained from the runway to the stand and should be provided by properly trained and/or licensed personnel. 95. Where an advanced SMGCS is used to provide guidance from one area of responsibility to another, coordination procedures should be implemented taking into Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS p: B747-400Operations Note.- Material on the impact of NLA on aerodromes i s presented in Attachment F to Part III - AOP of the EUR FASID. 98. Where the minirnumseparatiodclearancedistances as specified in Annex 14, Volume 1, Table 3-1, do not permit B747-400 operations at existing airports the following options to overcome such problems should be considered by the appropriate authority in consultation with the operators: - apply selective taxi routes where feasible; - remove objects where feasible; - reduce size of aircraft stands where feasible; - implement reduced separation distances. Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Aerodrome control service and surface movement guidance and control systems (SMGCS)
  • 47. 1 111 1- AOP r Note.- Although these options may have a degrading effect on either the provision of suitable stands or on the ground movement capacity/efiiciency of the aerodrome, they should however be given particular attention so as to permit best and early B747-400operations. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 99. In order to achieve an efficient operation of aeroplanes on existinglayouts of major aerodromes with high B747-400 traffic where the separatiodclearance distances as specified in Annex 14, Volume I, 3.8.7 Table 3-1are not and being provided, lower separationklearance distances may be introduced conditional to the prior conduct of an aeronautical study substantiating that there are no consequential adverse effects on the safety or regularity of operations at the aerodrome and by taking specific measures. 100. The safe and efficient operations with B747-400 at existing European aerodromes requires a careful analysis regarding the separationlclearance distances provided on taxiways or apron taxiways, aircraft stand taxilanes and aircraft stands. On taxiways and taxilanes the clearance between the wingtip and an object such as aparked aircraft or a building should be not less than 7.5 m. Therefore, adetailed evaluation will be required in all cases of reduced separationsklearances to determine the path followed by the wingtip on the inside and on the outside of the turn. Smaller or larger turn radii of taxiways, or taxilanes or taxilanehircraft stand centre line intersections may be required to meet the minimum clearance requirements. In the case of taxilanes and stands, the clearance distances provided in the vertical plane between wingtips and objects may additionally be accounted for. 101. Reduced separation distances between parallel taxiway centre lines and between taxiway/apron taxiway centre line and an object may be introduced based on the assumption that the lateral deviation of B747-400will not exceed 2.5 m, if specific measures are introduced (e.g. taxiway centre line lights, etc.). Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 102. Where on aircraft stand taxilanes or stands, objects do not exceed a height of 3 m above the relative apron surface, the clearance distances may be further reduced accounting for the fact that the minimum wingtip height of a B747-400 is more than 5 m above the ground. Reduced runway declared distances for take-ofl 103. At aerodromes regularly used by international commercial air transport, take-Offs from runway/taxiway intersections may be justified for the following reasons: a) runway capacity improvement; b) taxi routes distances reduction; c) noise alleviation; and d) air pollution reduction. 104. To this end, the appropriate authorities should, upon prior consultation with aircraft operators, agree on the selection of suitable intermediate intersection take-off positions along the runway(s). Accordingly, authorities should determine the reduced runway declared distances for take-off associated with each selected intersection take-off position and establish the specific ATC rules and operational procedureshimitations. Such provisions should be published in the State AIP. Note.- Detailed operational requirements governing the implementation of reduced runway declared distances for rake-off are contained in 31 to 36. Additional guidance is contained in Part 111 -AOP of the EUR FASID. Not for Resale
  • 48. Ill-A-I Appendix INTERNATIONAL AERODROMES REQUIRED IN THE EUR REGION EXPLANATION OF THE LIST CITY/AERODROME Name of the city and aerodrome, preceded by the location indicator. DESIGNATION Designation of the aerodrome as: --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- RS RNS RG AS international scheduled air transport, regular use; international non-scheduled air transport, regular use; international general aviation, regular use; and intemational scheduled air transport, alternate use Note.- When an aerodrome is neededfor more than one type of use, normally only the use highest on the above list i shown. s An exception is that AS aerodromes are identified even when they are requiredfor regular use by international non-scheduled air transport or internationalgeneral aviation, as some specifications in Annex 14, VolumeIplace special requirements on these aerodromes. Example 1 -An aerodrome required for both RS and RG use would only be shown as RS in the list. Example 2 -An aerodrome required for both RS and AS use would only be shown as RS in the list. However, this table may still show specific requirements for AS use. 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 49. III-A-3 AOP I 1 l I CiîylAerodromeIDesignation CitylAerodromelDesignation UBBG GYANDZHAIGyandzha RS UBBN ALBANIA LATI NAKHICHEVAN/Nakhichevan RS TIRANAIRinas RS ARMENIA UGEL GUMRIIShirak RS UGES BRESTlBrest RNS, AS STEPANAVANIStepanavan RS UGEE BELARUS UMBB Y EREVANIZvaiinots RS UMGG UMMG UMLI MINSWMachulishchi RNS UMMM MINSWMinsk-1 RS UMMS MINSWMinsk-2 RS KLAGENFURTKIagenfurt RS LOWG GRODNOIGrodno RNS INNSBRUCWlnnsbruck RS AUSTRIA LOIH GOMEUGomel RNS, AS UM00 MOGILEVIMogilev RNS UMII VITEBSWitebsk RNS DORNBIRNRlohenems-Dornbirm RG GRAZIGraz RS LOW1 LOWK LOWL LINZILinz RS ST. JOHANN IN TIROUSt. Johann in Tirol RG LOIJ LOWS SALZBURGISalzburg RS LOAV VOESLAUNoeslau RG LOLW BELGIUM EBAW WELSMlels ANTWERPENDeume RS EBKH BALENKeiheuvel RG EBGB BRUXELLESIGnmbergen RG EBBR BRUXELLESlNational RS EBCI CHARLEROIIGosselies RS EBZW GENWZwartberg RG EBKT KORTRIJWevelgem RS RG LOW WIENISchwechat RS LOWZ ZELL AM SEE/Zell am See RG AZERBAIJAN UBBB BAKUIBina RS 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 50. CityIAerodromeDesignation CitylAerodromelDesignation EBLG SPLITIKastel LDSP LIEGEIBierset RS RS OOSTENDEIOostende RS LDPV VRSARICrijenka RNS EBSH SAINT-HUBERT RG LDZD ZADARiZemunik RS EBSP SPAiLa Sauveniere RG LDZA ZAGREBff leso RS EBTï TOURNAIIMaubray RG CYPRUS LCLK BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BANJA LUWahovIjani LQBK RS LARNACAiLarnaca RS LCNC NICOSIAiNicasia AS PAPHOSIPaphos RNS LQMO MOSTARlOrtijes RS LCPH LQSA SARAJEVOButmir RS LKKV LQTZ TUZWDubrava RNS LKMT OSTRAVAIMosnov RS LKPD PARDUBICEPardubice . RNS LKPR PRAHAmuzyne RS BULGARIA LBBG ' BURGASISarafovo RS LBSF SOFIANrajdebna RS LBWN VARNNAcsakovu RS KARLOW VARYKarlovy Vary RS DENMARK ALBORG/Alborg RS EKAH ARHUSKirstrup RS EKBI BILLUNDlBillund RS EKEB ESBJERGIEsbjerg RS EKCH K0BENHAVNIKastrup RS EKRK CROATIA LDLO EKYT K0BENHAVNlRoskilde RG LOSINJILosinj RNS LDOC OSIJEWCepin RNS LDOS OSIJEWKlisa RNS LDPL PUWPula RS LDRI RIJEWKrk RS 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- EBOS
  • 51. Ill-A-5 AOP CiiyIAerodromelDesignation CitylAerodromeIDesignation EFMA MARIEHAMNIMariehamn RS MARIBOIManbo RG EFOU ouLu/oulu EKOD ODENSEBeldnnge RG EFRO ROVANIEMlRovaniemi RS EKRN R0NNERmne RS EFTP TAMPEREfiamperePirkkala RS EKSN SINDAUSindal EFTU TURKUTTurku EKVD KOLDING RG EKMB RS RS RG EKSV EFVA SKIVOSkive EKSB EKVJ EKTS ESTONIA EEKA VAASANaasa RS RG S0NDERBORG/Sanderbrg RG FRANCE LFKJ STAUNINGlStauning RG LFSB BALE-MULHOUSEIBâle-Mulhouse RS THISTEDTThisted RG LFKB BASTIAIPoretta RS KARDLA LFOB BEAUVAISTTiIIé RNS RG AJACCIOICampodell'0ro RS KURESSAARE RG LFBZ BIARRITZ-BAYONNEIAnglet RS EEPU PARNU LFBD BORDEAUWMéngnac RS LFRB BRESTIGuipavas RS LFRK CAENICarpiquet RG LFAC CALAISIDunkerque RG LFKC CALVIISainte-Catherine RNS LFMD CANNESNandelieu RG RG EETN TALLINN RS EETU FINLAND EFHF TARTUiiJlenurrne RG HELSINKIIHelsinki-Malmi RG EFHK HELSINKIIHelsinki-Vantaa RS EFIV IVALOIlvalo RG --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- EEKE 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 52. City/Aerodrome/Designation City/Aerodrome/Designation LFLB CHAMBERYIAix-Les-Bains RG LFMN NICEICôte d'Azur RS LFRC CHERBOURGIMaupertuc RNS LFTW NTMESIGarons LFLC CLERMONT-FERbNDIAulnat RS LFPG PARiSICharlesde-Gaulle RS LFRG DEAUViLLEISaint-Gatien RNS LFPB PARISRe Bourget RG URD DINARDIPleurtuit-Saint-Malo RS LFPO PARISIORLY D6LEITavaux LFBP PAUIPont-LongUzein RS LFGJ RG RS RG LFLS GRENOBLEISaint-Geois RNS, AS LFMP PERPIGNANIRivesaltes RNS LFRO LANNION LFBi POiTiERSIBiard RS LFRQ QUiMPEWluguffan RS RG LFBH LA ROCHELLERaleu RG LFOH LE HAVRUOcteville RS LFSR REIMSIChampagne RG LFAT LE TOUQUETParis-Plage RG LFRN RENNESISainîJacques RS LFQQ LILLEResquin LFRT SAINT-BRIEUCiArmor RNS LFMH SAINT-ETIENNEIBouthén RG LFRZ SAINT-NAZAIREiMontoir RG RS LFLY LYON/Bron. RG LFLL LYONISatoias RS LFML MARSEILLEProvence RS LFST STRASBOURGEntzheim RS LFMT MONTPELLIERFrejorgues RS LFBT TARBESlOssun-Lourdes RNS LFSN NANCYIEssey LFBO TOULOUSEBiagnac RS LFOT TOURSISaint Symphorien RG RG LFRS NANTESIChâteau-Bougon RS --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale O
  • 53. I I I-A-7 AOP I CiîyIAerodrome/Designation LFPN GEORGIA UGGG I CityIAerodromelDesignation EDTD DONAUESCHINGENNillingen RG EDLW TOUSSUS-LE-NOBLE RG DORTMUND RS TBILISIILochini RS EDDC EDQD EDDB EDDT EDFE EGELSBACHEgelsbach RG EDME EGGENFELDEN AS EDWE EMDENEmden RG BAYREUTHIBayreuth RG EDDE ERFURTIErhirt RS BERLINISchönefeld RS EDLE ESSENIMÜlheim RG EDU FLENSBURGiSchäferhaus RG EDDF FRANKFURT MAINIFrankfurt Main RS RG EDAB DÜSSELDORFDüsseldorf .RS RG EDBH EDDL RG EDMA DRESDENDresden RS RG GERMANY EDAC EDFH FRANWURTMahn RS BONNRlangelar RG EDTF FREIBURGBreisgau RG BRAUNSCHWEIGIBraunschweig RG EDNY FRIEDRICHSHAFENIFriednchshafen-Löwental RG BREMENIBremen RS EDHI HAMBURGIFinkenwerder RNS BREMERHAVEN AS EDDH HAMBURGRlamburg RS COBURG-Brandensteinsebene AS EDDV HANNOVERRlannover RS COTTBUSIDrewiiz AS EDAH HERINGSDORF RG ALTENBURG/Nobih RS AUGSBURG BARTH BAUTZEN BERLINlTegel RS EDDI EDLI EDKB EDVE EDDW EDWB EDQC EDCD BERLINlTempelhof RS BIELEFELD 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 54. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- EDQM CityIAerodromelDesignation CityIAerodromelDesignation EDLV HOFIPlauen NIEDERRHEIN RS RG ETSI INGOLSTADTIManching AS EDDN NÜRNBERGINürnberg RS EDSB KARLSRUHEIBaden-Baden RS EDMO OBERPFAFFENHOFENIOberpfafíenhofen RG EDVK KASSEL-Calden RNS EDTO OFFENBURGIBaden RG EDHK KIEU-Holtenau RG EDLP PADERBORNRippsíadt RG EDDK KÖLN/-Bonn ETNL ROSTOCWLaage AS KONSTANZIKonstanz RG EDDR SAARBRUCKENIEnsheim RS EDML LANDSHUTILandshut RG EDTY SCHWÄBISCH-HallRlessentai AS EDTL LAHR EDOP SCHWERINIParchim AS EDGS SIEGERLAND RS EDTZ AS EDDP LEIPZIGiHalle RS EDWD RG EDLS STADTLOHNNreden RG LUBECWBlankensee RS EDMS STRAUBfNGIStraubing-WallmCihle MAGDEBURG EDDS STUTTGARTIStuttgart RS EDRT TRIERIFöhren LEMWERDER RNS EDHL EDBM RG AS EDFM MANNHEIMICity RS RG , EDLN MÖNCHENGLADBACH RS EDXW WESTERLANDISylt RG EDDM M~NCHENIII EDFV WORMSNVorms RG EDRZ ZWEIBRUCKEN AS RS EDDG MÜNSTERIMünster-Osnabrück RS ETNU NEUBRANDENBURG AS 2018103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale I
  • 55. CitylAerodromeiDesignation 1 GIBRALTAR (United Kingdom) LXGB GIBRALTÄWNO~~~I Front RC CityIAerodromeDesignat¡on LGAD LGRX LGEL LGAV MIKONOSIMikonos RNS LGMT GREECE LGAL LGMK MITILINlIOdysseas Elytis RNS, AS ALEXANDROUPOLISiDimokntos RNS LGBL NEA ANCHIALOSIAlmiros RNS ANDRAVIDAIAndravida RNS, AS LGPZ PREVEWAktio RNS ARAXOSIAraxos RNS LGRP RODOSDiagoras RS ATHINAIIElefsis AS LGSM SAMOSISamos RNS ATHINAIIEleftaeriosVenizelos RS LGSR SANTORINI RNS LGSA CHANIAISouda RNS, AS LGIO LGIR SKIATHOSIAlexandrosPapadiamantis RNS RNS LGHI LGSK LGTS THESSALONIKIIMakedonia RS IOANNINNloannina RNS LGZA Z4KlNTHOSIDionsolomos RNS CHIOSlChios IRAKLIONIN.Kazantzakis RS LGKL KALAMATAIKalamata RNS LGKV HUNGARY LHBP KAVAWM. Alexandros RNS IRELAND EIKN BUDAPESTIFenhegy RS CONNAUGHT RS CORWCork KARPATHOSIKarpathos RS ECK LGKF KEFALLINIAIKefallinia RNS EIDW DUBLINiDublin RS LGKR KERKIRAkKapodistnas RS EINN SHANNONIShannon RS LGKO KOSIIppokratis EIKY KERRY LGKP RS RS RNS, AS LGLM ITALY LIMG LIMNOSRimnos RNS, AS ALBENGAIAlbenga RNS 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 56. CiiyIAerodromelDesignation City/Aerodrome/Designat¡on I LIEA ALGHEROIAlghero RS LIMC MILANOIMalpensa RS LIPY ANCONAIFalconara RNS LIRN NAPOLIICapodichino RS LIMW AOST AIAosta LIE0 OLBIAICocta Smeralda RS RG BARIIPalese Macchie RS LIPU PADOVAIPadova RG LIME BERGAMOIOrio al Seno RNS LICJ PALERMO/Punta Raisi RS LIPE BOLOGNAIBorgo Panigale RS LICG PANTELLERIAPantelleria RNS LIPB BOLZANOIBolzano RG LIMP PARMAParma RNS BRINDISIICasale RS LIRZ PERUGIAIPerugia RG CAGLIARIIElmas RS LIBP PESCARAIPescara RNS LICC CATANIAIFontanarosca RS LIRP PISAISan Giusto RS LILY COMOIldroscalo RG LICR REGGIO CALABRIAIReggioCalabria RNS LIMZ CUNEOILevaldigi RNS LIPR RIMINIIRimini LIRJ ELBAIMarina di Campo RG LIRA ROMAICiarnpino RNS LIRQ FIRENZEIPeretola AS LIRF ROMAIFiumicino RS LIPK FORLIIForli LIRU ROMAIUrbe LIBR LIEE --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- LIBD RNS RG RNS LIMJ GENOVAISestn RS LIMF TORINOICacelle RS LICA LAMEZIPJTerme RNS LICT TRAPANIIBirgi MIlANOllinate LIPH UML RNS RS 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale TREVISOIS. Angelo RNS, AS O
  • 57. u Ill-A-I 1 AOP CiîylAercdromeIDecignation CiîyIAerodromeIDesignation LIPQ TRIESTEIRonchi De Legionan RS UACC TSELINOGRAD RS LIPV VENEZIAIS. N i d o RG UASK UST-KAMENOGORSK RS LIPZ VENEZIWessera RS KYRGYZSTAN BISHKEiVManas UAFM RS LIPX VERONANillafranca RS UAFO OSHIOsh RS KAZAKHSTAN ALMA ATAIAlma Ata UAAA RS UATT AKTYUBINSKIAkiyubinsk RS LATVIA EVDA DAUGAVPILSIDaugavpils RS UAKD EVEA JELGAVAIJelgava RG RS UADD JEKABPILSIJekabpils RS RS UAII EVKA EVLA LIEPAJARiepaja RS DZHEZKAZGAN RS EVRA RIGAIRiga CHIMKENT DZHAMBUL RS UATG GURYEV RS RS UAKK UACK EWA LITHUANIA EYKA VENTSPILSNentspils RG KARAGANDA KOKCHETAV KAUNASIKaunas RS --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- RS EYPA PALANGAPalanga RS EYSA $IAULIAIISiauliai RNS EYVI UAUU VILNIUSNilnius RS KUSTANAY RS UA00 KZYL-ORDA RS UASP PAVLODAR RS UASS SEMIPALATINSK RS LUXEMBOURG ELLX LUXEMBOURGRuxembourg RS UATE SHEVCHENKO RS MALTA LMML MALTARuqa Parking RS 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 58. CityIAerodromeIDesignation CitylAerodromeIDesignation ENEV HARSTADIEvenes RNS ENKR MONACO LNMC KIRKENESIHaybuktmoen RNS ENCN KRISTIANSANDKjevik RS DEVENTERITeuge RG ENGM OSLOIGardermoen RNS GRONINGENIEelde AS ENTO SANDEFJORDITorp RS HILVERSUMIHilversum RG ENZV STAVANGEWSola RS HOOGEVEENIHocgeveen RG ENSB SVALBARDILongyear RNS LELYSTADiLelystad RG ENTC TROMS0ITromso RS MAASTRICHTIZuid-Limburg RNS, AS ENVA TRONDHEIMNaernes RS MONACOIHélipori RS NETHERLANDS AMSTERDAMISchiphol EHAM RS EHTE EHGG EHHV EHHO EHLE EHBK EHMZ MIDDELBURGIMidden-Zeeland RG EHRD ROTTERDAMIRotterdam RS EHTX POLAND EPBY TEXELITexel BYDGOSZCZISrwederowo RS EPGD GDANSWRebiechowo RS EPKT KATOWICEIPyrzowice RS EPKK KRAKOWIBaliceJP II RS EPLL LODZILublinek RS RNS EPPO POZNANRawica AS BANAWLakselv RNS EPRZ RZESZOWIJasion ka AS BERGENIFlesland RS EPSC SZCZECINIGoleniow RS RG EHBD WEERTIBudel RG NORWAY ENAL ENAT ENNA ENBR ENBO AALESUNDNigra RNS ALTAIAlta BOD0IBoda RNS 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale O
  • 59. u --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- AOP I Ill-A-13 ~~ CiiyIAerodrornelDesignation I CitylAerodromelDesignation EPSY SZCNTNOISzymany RS LRTM TIRGU MURESNidrasau RS EPWA WARSZAWAIOkecie RS RUSSIAN FEDERATION UNAA ABAKAN EPWR WROCLAWIStrachowice RS URKA ANAPANityazevo RS ZIELONA GORAIBabirnost RS UHMA ANADYWUgolny RNS FAROIFaro UMA ARKHANGELSWTalagi RS URWA ASTRAKHAN RS EPZG PORTUGAL LPFR RS LPPT LISBOAllisboa RS RS LPMA LPPR MADEIRAIllhada Madeira RS UNBB PORTOIPorto UUOB BARNAUL RS BELGOROD RS RS LPPS PORTO SANTOIllha do Porto Santo, Madeira AS BLAGOVESCHENSWlgnatyevo RNS UIBB REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA BALTIiBalti LUBL UHBB BRATSK RS AS UUBP LUKK LUCH CHAHUUChahul RNS BRYANSK CHISINAUIChisinau RS RNS UWKS uscc ROMANIA LRAR CHEBOKSARY RNS CHELABINSWBalandino RS UIAA CHITAIKadala ARADIArad RS RNS LRBS BUCURESTIBaneasa RS URWI ELISTA RS LROP BUCURESTlIOtopeni RS UIII IRKUTSK RS LRCK LRTR CONSTANTAIM. Kcgalniceanu RS UMKK KALININGRADIKhrabrovo RS TIMISOARAIGianata RS 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 60. EUR BASIC ANP Ill-A-I4 CiîylAerodromelDesignation CitylAerodromelDesignation UWGG NIZHNY NOVGORODlSttigino RS UNNT KAZAN UWKD NOVOSIBIRSWolmachevo RS RS KEMEROVO UNEE RS UHHH KHABAROVSWNovy RS UNO0 OMSWsentralny RS USRK KOGALYM uwoo ORENBURGRsenîralny RS KRASNODARPashkovsky RS UWOR ORSK UNKL KRASNOYARSWemelyanovo RS USPP PERMWolshoeSavino RS UUOK KURSK UHPP PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKYNelizovo RS RNS URKK RS RNS UHMM MAGADANISokol RS ULPB PETROZAVODSWBesovets RNS USCM MAGNITOGORSK RS UHMD PROVIDENIYA BAY AS URML MAKHACHKAWuytash RS ULOO PSKOV MAYKOP USNR URKM RS RADUZHNY RNS RS UUBW RAMENSKOE/Zhu kovskiy RNS MOSCOWIDomcdedovo RS URRR ROSTOV-NA-DONU RS MOSCOWISheremeíyevo RS UWWW SAMAMurumoch RS MOSCOWNnukovo RS ULLI SANKT-PETERBURGPUlkOVO RS MURMANSK uwss SARATOVITsenîralny MINERALNE VODY URMM RS UUEE uuw --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- UUDD ULMM RS RS URMN URSS NALCHIK UWKE NIZHNEKAMSWBegishevo RS URMT 2Ql8lO3 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS SOCHI RS RS Not for Resale STAVROPOUShpakovskoye RS l
  • 61. C Ill-A-15 AOP e CityIAerodromeiDesignation USRR I CityIAerodromeIDesignation TIVATTTivat LYTV SURGUT RS RS UUYY SYKTYVKAR RS UUEM USTR SLOVAKIA LKIB BRATISLAVNlvanka RS TVERfMigalovo RNS LKKZ KOSICE/Kosice RNS TYUMENIRoshino RS LKPP PIESTANY RNS uwuu UFA RS UIUU ULAN-UDEMukhino RS LKTT POPRADRatry RS LKSL SLIAC RNS UWLW ULYANOVSWastochny RS ZILINAiZilian LZZI RG URMO VLADIKAVKAZIBeslan RS UHWW VOLGOGRADIGumrak RS uuoo VORONEZHIChertovitskoye RS UEEE YAKUTSK LJUBLJANABmik RS VLADIVOSTOKI Knevici RS URWW a SLOVENIA LJLJ LJMB MARIBORfManbor RS LJPZ PORTOROZIPortoroz RNS SPAIN LEAL ALICANTüAlicante RS RS usss LEAM ALMERIAIAlmena RS YUZHNO-SAKHALINSWKhomutovo RS LEAS ASTURIASIAviles RS SAN MARINO No information LEBL BARCELONA/ EI Prat RS SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO LYBE BEOGRADISurcin RS LEBB BILBAOBilbao --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- YEKATERINBURGIKoltsovo RS UHSS RS LEGE m GIRONAIGirona RS LEGR LYTI GRANADAIGranada RS PODGORICAIGolubovci RNS, AS ~ ~ ~ 20/8/03 No.2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 62. I EUR BASIC ANP Ill-A-I6 , I 1 l CiiylAerodromelDesignation CiîyIAerodromeIDesignation LEIB LEVX IBIWlbiza LEJR VIGONigo RS RS LEVT JEREUJerez VITORIANitona RS ZARAGOüüZaragoza RS RS LEC0 , I A CORUfiAIA Coruiía RS LEZG LEMD MADRIDIBarajas RS SWEDEN ESSD MADRIDICuatro Vientos RG ESGG GÖTEBORGnandvetter RS MENORCA Menorca RS ESGP GÖTEBORGISäve RNS MALAGAIMalaga RS ESGJ JÖNKÖPINGIJönkÖping RS MURCIAISan Javier RNS ESMQ KALMARRalmar RS PALMA DE MALLORCAPalma de Mallorca RS ESOK KARLSTAD/Karistad RG ESNQ KIRUNAíKiruna RS SABADELUSabadell RG ESMK KRlSTIANSTADIKristianstad RS SALAMANCAIMatacan RS ESSL LINKÖPINGhnkÖping RS SAN SEBASTIANI Hondambia RS ESMS MALMöIStunip RS SANTANDERISantander RS ESSP NORRKÖPINGKungsängen RS SANTIAGOISantiago RS ESOE OREBROBofors RS ESNS SKELLEFTEkSkellefîea RS ESSA STOCKHOLMIArianda RS LECU LEMH ~ LEMG LELC LEPA LERS REUSReus RS LELL LESA LESO LEXJ LEST LEZL SEVILLAISevilla RS LEVC LEVD BORLÄNGEIDalaAirport RG VALENCIANalencia RS VALLADOLIDNillanubla RS 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 63. I Ill-A-17 AOP I I I CiíyIAerodrorneIDesignation A I I CityIAercdrornelDesignation ESSB STOCKHOLMIBrornrna RG LSZH ESKN STOCKHOLMISkavsta RS TAJIKISTAN UTDD DUSHANBEDushanbe AS ESOW STOCKHOLMNästerk RS ESNN SUNDSVALL-HÄRNÖSANDISundsvall-Härnösand RS ESGT UMEhrnea THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA OHRIDIOhrid LWOH RNS TROLLHÄTTANNänersbog RG ESNU ZÜRICHIZürich RS LWSK TURKEY LTAF SKOPJEPetrovac RS ADANA RNS RS ESMX VÄXJÖKronoberg RS LTAC ANKARAEcenboga RS ESSV VISBYNisby LTAI ANTALYAIAntalya RS LTBA ISTANBUUAtatuk RS LTBJ IZMIRIAdnan Menderes RS LTBS MUGWDalarnan RS LTFE MUGWMilasBodnirn RS LTCG TRABZONKrabzon RNS AS SWITZERLAND ALTENRHEINRorschach LSZR RS LFSB BÂLE-MULHOUSEBâle-Mulhouse RS LSZB BERNIBern-Belp RS LSGG GENhWCointrin RS LSZG GRENCHENIGrenchen RG LSGC LA CHAUX-DE-FONDSRes Eplatures RG TURKMENISTAN UTAA ASHKABADIAshkabad RS LSZA LUGANOIAgno UTAK KRASNOVODSK RS SAMEDANISarnedan RG UTAT TASHAUZ SIONISion UKRAINE UKKE RS LSZS LSGS RG RS CHERKASY AS ~~ 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 64. Ill-A-18 EUR BASIC ANP CitylAercdromelDesignation CitylAerodrorneDesignaüon UKìN UNITED KINGDOM EGPD ABERDEENIDyce CHERNIVTSI RNS RS UKDD UKCC DNIPROPETROVS'K RS EGAA BELFASTIAldergrove RS EGAC BELFASTICity DONETSK RS . RS UKOO UKìR UWF UKLU EGHH BOURNEMOUTHkium RS EGGD BRlSTOIJLulsgaîe RS EGFF CARDIFFICardiff RS EGNX EAST MIDLANDSiEaslMidlands RS EGPH EDINBURGHEdnburgh RS EGTE MTERIExeter RS EGPF GLASGOWIGlasgw RS RNS UKON BLACKPOOUEI~ RNS RS UKLL EGNH RNS UKCW BIRMINGHAM/Birmingham RS RS UKDR EGBB RNS UKKK KHARKIV/Osnova RS RNS UKBB BIGGIN HlLU8iggin Hili RG RS UKKM EGKB Rc UKHH IVANO-FRANKIVS'K AS RNS UKLI EGJB GUERNSEYiGuemsey RS EGNJ HUMBERSIDUHumberside RS EGNS ISLE OF MANRonaIdsway RS EGJJ JERSEY/Jersey RS KYIVIAntanOv KYtvIBOryspr KYIV/Zhuliany KRYWI RIH LUHANS'K CVIV MYKOLAW ODESA RIVNE SIMFEROPOL' RS UMHOROD RNS UKDE ZAPORIZHZHIA RS --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 65. Ill-A-I9 AOP CityIAerodromeDesignation I EGPA 1 CityIAerodromelDesignation EGNV KIRKWALL 1 I AS TEES-SIDEITees-Side RS UZBEKISTAN UTSB BHUKHARA EGNM LEEDS AND BRADFORDReeds and Bradford RS EGPB LERWICWSumburgh RNS UTSS SAMARKANDISamarùand RS LIVERPOOLiLiverpool RS UTTT TASHKENTNuzhny RS UTNU URGENCH EGGP EGLC LONDONICity RS RS EGKK LONDONIGaîwick RS UTST --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- RS TERME2 RS EGLL LONDONhieathrow RS EGSS LONDON/Stansted RS EGGW LUTONRuton RNS EGMD LYDDlLydd RG EGCC MANCHESTEWManchesterIntl RS EGNT NEWCASTLEhiewcastle RS EGSH NORWICHiNorwich RS EGHD PLYMOUTHRoborough RS EGPK PRESTWICWresîwick RS EGKA SHOREHAM/Shoreham RG EGHI SOUTHAMPTON RS EGMC SOUTHENDISouihend RS 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 66. . Part IV i .- COMMUNICATIONS, NAVIGATION AND SURVEILLANCE (CNS) GENERAL 1. The telecommunicationfacilitiesand services should meet the requirements of those other components of the air navigation system which they are intended to serve. Note.- The initial configuration of an improved network based on the CIDIN concept was developed by the Limited E U I U " A T COM (AFS)RANMeeting, 1979 (Doc9263, Recs. U and 2/51. Planning principles were developed by 3 the COMMET Divisional Meeting, 1982 {Doc 9367, Rec. 1.M). 2. In planning for those other components, economy and efficiency should be taken into account in order to ensure that the requirementsfor the provision of telecommunication facilities and services can be kept to a minimum. 3. Telecommunication facilities and services should fulfil multiple functions whenever this is feasible. Existing network 6. Pending future development of the EüR AFS, the current requirements should be met by the use of: a) the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunication Network (AFT")circuits and centres; b) the Meteorological Operational Telecommunications AERONAUTICAL FIXED SERVICE (AFS) circuits and centres; Network, Europe (MOTNE) c) the ATS direct speech circuits; and Basic requirements d) the ATS computer-to-computer data circuits. The aeronautical fixed service (AFS)should satisfy the point-to-point communication requirements of ATS, ATFM, AIS, MET and SAR, including specificrequirements in terms of system reliability, message integrity and transit times, with respect to printed as well as digital data and speech communications. If need be, it should, following agreement between individual States and aircraft operators, satisfy the requirements for airline operational control. [Annex 3, 11.1; Annex 11, 6.2; Annex 12, 2.4; Annex 15, Chapter 9; Annex 10, Volume II, Chapter 41 4. 5. To meet the data communication requirements, a single common carrier high-grade aeronautical network should be provided, based on the concept of the Common ICAO Data Interchange Network (CIDIN). [Annex 10, Volume III,P r I] at 7 All possible arrangements should be made to ensure . that, in case of breakdown of a communications centre, at least high-priority traffic continues to be handled by means of standby facilities. 8. Emergency procedures should be developed to ensure that, in case of a centre breakdown, all the parties concerned are promptly informed of the prevailing situation. 9. AFS planning should permit flexibility in detailed development and implementation. 10. Concurrentlywith the phased implementationof the improved AF",the existingdedicated networks and circuits should gradually be withdrawn. (i,. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 67. EUR BASIC ANP IV-2 Improved network 1 1. The improved AFTN based on CIDIN procedures should have sufficient capacity to meet the basic requirements for data communicationsfor the servicesmentioned in 4 and 5 above, including data bank access as necessary. 12. The improved network should be capable of carrying the following main types of traffic: a) all ATS telegraph and data traffic, including real-time data exchanges between ATS computers; 17. In the long term, the network should provide for interregional connexions between selected CDIN switching centres. This concept may also have to be applied in the short t r to interconnect CIDiN switching centres in the EUR em .region to designated AFTN centres in other regions, whenever this is necessary to avoid unacceptable delays to interregional traffic exchanged over existing multiple-relay AFTN circuits. 18. In planning the improved network, provisions should be made, where required, for an interface with other international networks. b) ATFMtraffic; c) AIS traffic (e.g. Class 1 NOTAM, pre-flight information bulletins); d) OPMETmessages,bulletins and areaforecasts, including upper air forecasts for grid points in digital form; e) SAR traffic; and f) possibly, point-to-point ground communications associated with air-ground data links. Note.-A requirementfor the improved network to carry speech and digitalfacsimile may have to be considered i the n long term as and when this becomes practicable and cost effective. 13. The improved network should normally be composed of dedicated circuits (leased or privately owned) commensuratewith the operationalrequirementfor reliability and transmission speed in the area for which each circuit is planned. c: ' Specific ATS requirements 19. Where ATS speech and telegraph communication links between any two points are provided, the engineering arrangements should be such as to avoid the simultaneous loss of both circuits. 20. Specialprovisions should be made to ensure arapid restoration of ATS speech circuits in case of outage. 21. The direct access speech capability provided between ATS units should permit contact to be established as rapidly as necessary commensuratewith the functions of the unit concerned. [Annex 11,621 - . .- 22. Data circuits between ATS computers, using the improved AFTN when available, to permit exchanges of flight data and related ATS information, should provide for both high capacity and message integrity. Specific MET requirements 14. The plan for the implementation of the improved network should take into account the need for cost-effective evolution in terms of both circuit and centre capacity and allow for a progressive transition from i m u d to automatic handling of communicationstraffic. 15. In order not to limit codes and message formats available to the users and to simplify data bank utilization, code and byte independent (CBI) procedures should be provided at ai1 switching centres in the improved network. 16. CIDIN switching centres should, in addition, be capable of effecting format and code conversion to enable messages to be exchanged with other networks. 23. The present distribution of OPMET data on the omnibus M O N system should be replaced by a predetennined selective AF" distribution when the improved network is implemented. This should be supplemented by the use of data banks. 24. In the transmission of operational meteorological information on the improved network the specified transit times should be met on at least 95 per cent of occasions. [Annex 3, 11.1.111 25. In planning the improved network, account should be taken of changes in the current pattern of distribution of L . --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 68. CNS ,,---. i . IV-3 meteorological information resulting from the increasing number of long-range direct flights and the trend towards centralized flight planning. Note.- Specijic requirements concerningATFMandAIS have still to be developed. AERONAUTICAL MOBILE SERVICE (AMS) 26. Air-ground communicationsfacilities should meet rapidly and reliably the agreed communication requirements of the air traffic services, as well as ail other types of communications which are acceptable on the A M s to the extent that the latter types of communications can be accommodated. These facilities should, whenever possible, employ VHF and, in the case of ATS communications, provide for direct pilot-controller communications particularly in TMAs and on ATS routes with a high density of air traffic. Whenever required, use of suitable techniques on VHF or higher frequencies should be made. [Annex 11,6.1] 27. States in the EUR region should implement, when they deem it necessary to do so, frequencies in the band 136-137 MHz for international ATC. Note.- New or retrofitted communications equipment should be capable of operating up to and including the extended A s band-edge of 137 MHz to cater for the M availability and use, since 1990, of this additional MHz. 28. Operation on HF should only be employed when use of VHF is not feasible. When HF is used, the single sideband technique should be employed. [Annex IO, Volume III, P r 11, Chapter 2.1 at 29. Aerodromes having a significant volume of IGA traffic should be provided with appropriate air-ground communication channels. this purpose. Basic elements for the determinationof the need for air-ground communication channels and their economic use are given in Attachment A to Part V.II - ATS of the EUR FASID. [Annex 11,6.1 and Attachment BI 31. In addition, uniform values of designated operational range and height of VHF air-ground communication channels should be used for identical ATS functions in accordance with the table contained in Attachment B to Part V.1- ATS of the EUR FASID. Deviations from these values at specific locations or for specific functions should only be made in those cases where adequate operational justification for such a deviation is provided by the State(s) concerned. [Annex 11,6.1 and Attachment BI 32. In order to achieve optimum economy in the use of the radio frequency spectrum used commonly for international and national ATS air-ground communications (VHF),the above criteria should also be applied to national planning in the field of VHF air-ground communications. Ground-ground communications for ATS 33. Ground-ground communications between ATS units, including ATS voice communication links and computer-to-computerlinks, should be so designed that they provide for optimum coordination between ATS units required to exchange flight data and execute coordination of air traffic directly between each other. Where necessary, the voice communicationlinks should also be designed to permit conference-type communications between more than two ATS units if this is justified in order to resolve air traffic control problems. Note.- Requirements for ground-ground communications between ATS units will be met by the integrated aeronautical f i e d services network currently being developed. Air-ground communications for ATS .. . . : ... : 30. Air-ground communications for ATS purposes should be so designed that they require the least number of frequency changes for aircraft in flight compatible with the provision of the required service. They should also provide for the minimum amount of coordination between ATS units and for optimum economy in the frequency spectra used for AERONAUTICAL RADIO NAVIGATION SERVICE 34. Radio navigation aids should meet, in a reliable manner, the agreed air navigation requirementsas outlined in Parts Iii (AOP) and IV (CNS) of the EUR FASID. --..-Y --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 69. EUR BASIC ANP IV-4 FREQUENCY ASSIGNMENT PLANNING -. . . General 40. Assignment of frequencies to satisfy airline operationai control communication requirements should be made in accordance with the criteria and method shown in Attachat ment B to P r IV -CNS of the EUR FASID. (7 39. A number of principles and criteria applicable to the practical conduct of frequency assignment are given in at Attachment A to P r IV -CNS of the EUR FASID. 35. - Frequency assignment planning in the EUR region should be canied out in accordance with the provisions of Annex 10 supplemented, as necessary, by regional recommendations and technical criteria developed for this purpose. Detailed guidance on frequency assignment planning for AMs and radio navigation aids is contained in P r 1V (CNS) of the EUR FASID. at ’ 41. Special provisions should be made, by agreement between the States concerned, for the sharing and the application of reduced protection of non-ATC frequencies in the national sub-bands, so as to obtain a more economical use of the available frequency spectrum consistent with operational requirements. AMS 36. Frequencies should be assigned to all VHF A M s facilities, taking into account: agreed geographicalseparationcriteria based on 8.33 W z interleaving between channels for the area where this channel spacing is applicable; 42. It should be ensured that no airlground frequency is utilized outside its designated operational coverage. 43. It should be ensured that the stated operational requirements for coverage of a given frequency can be met for the transmission sites concerned, taking into account terrain configuration. agreed geographical separation criteria based on 25 kHz interleaving between channels; Radio navigation aids the need for maximum economy in frequency demands and in radio spectrum utilization; and a deployment of frequencies which ensures that international services are planned to be free of interference from other services using the same band. 37. The priority order to be followed in the assignment of frequencies to service is: ATS channels serving internationalservices (ACC, APP, TWR, FIS); ATS channels serving national purposes; channels serving international VOLMET services; 44. Frequencies should be assigned to all radio navigation facilities taking into account: agreed geographical separation criteria based on assignments of 50 kHz-spaced frequencies to ILSlocalizer and VOR, and X and Y channels to DME; the need for maximum economy in frequency demands and in radio spectrum utilization; and a deployment of frequencies which ensures that international services are planned to be free of interference from other services using the same band. national channels used for other than ATS purposes. 38. The criteria used for frequencyassignment planning - for VHF AMS facilities serving -internationai requirements should, to the extent practicable, also be used to satisfy the need of national VHF AMS facilities. 46. Principles and criteria applicable to the practical conduct of frequency assignmentto VHF/UHF aids are given in Attachment C to Pr IV -CNS of tbe EUR FASID. at [Annex 10, Volume I, Attachment CI --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS q c 45. States having VORS located within interference range of a VOR in another State which is planned to operate on an adjacent 50 kHz channel should ensure that the level of harmonics of the 10 1<Hz sub-canier of the facilities concerned meets Annex IO specifications. channels serving ATIS and PAR;and i Not for Resale
  • 70. IV-5 CNS ~~ r ~~~~ ~ 47. Principles and criteria applicable to the practical conduct of frequency assignment to LF/MF aids are given in Attachment D to Part N -CNS of the EUR FASID. [Annex 10, Volume V, Attachment B I --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 48. The principles used for frequency assignment planning for radio navigation aids serving international requirements should, to the extent possible, also be used to satisfy the needs for national radio aids to navigation. 49. The followingplanning criteria for MLS frequency planning in the EUR region should be applied, aimed at allowing the maximum number of MLS-associated DME frequencies on X and Y channels so as to minimize the possible use of W and Z channels: a) the height above which guidance signal need not be protected should be 10 000 feet; Note.- Signal protection to a height greater than 10 0003 to meet special operational requirements shall be met on a case-by-case basis through technical Cfrequency) coordination among those States affected. - b) double channel pairing of ILS and MLS with the same DME channel (frequency tripling) is not required; and c) the same channel (frequency) may exceptionally be assigned to both approach directions of a dually equipped runway in those cases where this is operationally acceptable. PROVISION OF NAVIGATION MEANS General 50. Planning of navigation aids associated with the ATS route network should be done on a system basis, taking full account of the navigation capabilities as well as cost effectiveness considerations. The system of stationreferenced navigation aids should meet the needs for navigation guidance of all aircraft using the system and should form an adequate basis for the provision of air traffic services. The system should: ' b) provide flight crews with information of sufficient accuracy to enable them to remain clear of areas prohibited to all civil aircraft and areas in which civil . flight is not permitted without special authorization with the aim of reducing or eliminating the need for interception; c) meet a level of availability and reliability of performance consistent with the requirement for safety and efficiency; and d) provide for reporting and transfer of control points commensurate with the justified requirements of air traffic services units. Account should be taken of the fact that certain aircraft may be able to meet their long-range and short-range navigation needs by means of self-contained aids, thus eliminating the need for the provision of station-referencedaids along routes used by such aircraft. [Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 7; Annex 6, P r 11, Chapter 7; at Annex 6, Part 1 1 Section 1 , Chapter 5 and Section 1 1 1, 1 1, Chapter 51 Note.- The radionavigation aids associated with the basic ATS route network and TMA procedures are shown in -Table CNS 4 of the EUR FASID. 5 1. Where, within a given airspace, specific groups of users have been authorized by the competent authorities to use special aids for navigation, the respective ground facilities should, if possible, be located and aligned so as to provide for full compatibility of navigational guidance with that derived from the internationally agreed system. This applies particularly within controlled airspace. (Criteria No. 1 and 2 in Attachment J, Part N -CNS of the EUR FASID refer.) 52. Individual station-referencednavigation aids should meet a level of accuracy and reliability consistent with the role the aid concerned plays in the overall navigation system. (Cnterion No. 3 in Attachment J, Part IV -CNS of the EUR FASID refers.) 53. These aids should be operated continuously unless the frequency, type and nature of flight operations using such aids make this clearly unnecessary. a) provide flight crews with information to enable them to maintain their planned or cleared track with the required accuracy and to effect any corrections or changes required to complete the flight; 54. States should take appropriate corrective measures promptly whenever a significant degradation in the accuracy of navigation aids is detected. :. . (? 2 .' Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 71. EUR BASIC ANP IV-6 55. The primary station-referenced aid for en-route navigation on the agreed ATS route network should be the VOR. (Criteria Nos. 4,5 and 9 in Attachment J to Part IV CNS of the EüR FASID refer.) This should be supplemented by DME only where this additional aid is required to enhance the efficiency and the accuracy of the navigation system. (Criteria Nos. 11 to 13 of Attachment J to Part IV -CNS of the EUR FASID refer.) [Annex 10, Volume I, 2.2.21 56. Where DME is required it should, if practicable, be collocated with VOR. 57. Annex 11, Attachment A provides guidance on the airspace requirements for VOR defined routes. Normally the 95 per cent criteria can be used. In specific cases, to ensure that a higher proportion of traffic will remain within the boundaries prescribed, the width of the protected airspace should be increased as indicated in that guidance material. [Annex 10, Volume I, Attachment C, 3.7.3; Annex 11, Attachment A] 58. The use in specific cases of lower values for the width of protected airspace along VOR defined ATS routes should be agreed between States and operators concerned. These can be based on an assessment of the actual VOR performance instead of the 3 degree VOR radial signal error value assumed. [Annex 10, Volume I, Attachment C, 3.7.3.7; Annex 11, Attachment A refer] 59. Where traffic, terrain and airspace considerations permit, it may also be helpful to consider increasing the width of those portions of ATS routes where the distance from navigation aids and the overall system accuracy would otherwise be incompatible. 60. The designated operational range and height for each aid should be determined taking into account: a) the navigation guidance required, including an overlap in coverage with adjacent aids; and b) the need to make best use of the available frequency spectrum. Because of the many factors influencing the practical day-today service of a particular aid, it should be realised that its actual performance may not always correspond with the assigned designated Operational range andor height. (Explanationof Terms and CriteriaNos. 6 to 8 of Attachment J to Part I -C N S of the EüR FASID refer.) V P I NDB 61. L.FA4F en-route radio aids should only be provided where there is an operational requirement which cannot otherwise be met. 62. NDB or locators may be provided for specific groups or categories of users (e.g. IGA, helicopters) where it has been determinedthat this will meet their requirementsfor navigational guidance. [Annex 10, Volume I, 2.3.11 63. An NDB may be provided temporarily in place of a VOR, either because the VOR concerned has not yet been implemented or because it has to be taken out of service for technical reasons and for a substantial period of time. 64. A continuous review of the requirements for W/MF radio aids should be undertaken in order to plan the orderly withdrawal of those aids which are not required in accordance with 61 to 63. Navigation aids in TMAs 65. Radio aids in terminal areas should permit navigation during departure, holding and approach, with the required accuracy. VORS used for this purpose should be so located that they provide optimum navigational guidance along those departure and approach routes most frequently used. A co-located DME should be provided for such VOR when necessary to enhance ATC flexibility in the routing of air traffic and when improved accuracy in navigation is required. NDB should only be installed when the provision of VOR is not practicable. [PANS-OPS, Volume II, Part III, Chapter 21 66. Whenever possible, VORS should be located and operated so that they can serve the requirements for both enroute and terminal navigation guidance. However, NDB provided specifically for terminal navigation should not be planned to serve en-route navigation purposes except as specified in 61 to 64above. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- VOIUDME .. ' . ..: ., .__. . . .::, ... k.,;.. . I i Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale ._
  • 72. IV-7 CNS AREA NAVIGATION (RNAV) --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 67. Where practicable and when justified by the number of aircraft with area navigation (RNAV) capability, RNAV routes should be provided. [Annex 11, Definitions] Note.- RNA Visdefined as a method ofnavigation which permits aircraft operation on any desiredflight path within the coverage of station-referenced navigation aids or within the limits of the capability of selfcontained aids or a combination of these. contingency RNAVroute in these circumstances wouMallow suitably equipped aircraft to continue to use the afected route segment. Random RNAV routings 73. Random RNAV routings are unpublished tracks, within designated and published areas (Random RNAV areas, as described below) which can be flight planned by operators for use by aircraft with RNAV capability. Random RNAV areas 68. RNAV routes should normally be provided for aircraft meeting the basic RNAV level of navigational accuracy.Where airspace andor other requirementspreclude such provision, consideration should be given to the establishment of routes for use only by aircraft with the precision RNAV level of navigational accuracy. 69. The introduction and use of RNAV routes should not disadvantage aircraft without RNAV capabilityoperating on ATS routes aligned on point source navigation aids. 70. The specific types of RNAV routes/routings for the EUR region are defined below. Fixed RNA V routes 71. Fixed RNAV routes are permanent, published routes for use by aircraft with RNAV capability. Note.- Fixed RNA Vroutesmight typically be established in areas where the track guidance provided by point source navigation aids is insuficient to establish the same routefor aircraft without RNAV capability. Contingency RNA V routes 72. Contingency RNAV routes are published and established for specific, limited time periods (hours, days, seasons) as necessary to meet unusual, temporary requirements arising at short notice. 74. Wherever possible, randomRNAV areas should be established, laterally defined by geographical coordinates, within which random RNAV routings may be flight planned by operators and subsequently flown under radar monitoring when required. 75. The availability of random RNAV areas may be limited to specific flight level bands andor time periods depending on ATC workload, traffic conditions and other related factors. Other relevant conditions are as follows: random RNAV areas should have adequate aidground communications and, depending on traffic density, ATS radar coverage; flights operating through random RNAV areas should commence from and terminate at specified significant points; these points, as well as other significant points en-route within random RNAV areas, defined in geographical coordinates or name-codes as appropriate, should be indicated in the flight plan as required; and the operator/pilot is responsible for ensuring that the flight is planned and operated clear of airspace reservations and within the boundaries of the random RNAV area by at least 4.6 km (2.5 NM) (or other margin specified by the State concerned) after making full allowance for the navigational accuracy of the type of RNAV equipment carried. Example Note.- One typical application of contingency RNAV routes might be in the case where the unserviceability of a navigation aid on a conventional ATS route would otherwise require closure ofa segment of that route to all trafic due to insuficient navigational guidance. The establishment of a Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS A basic RNAV aircraft (accuracy plus or minus 9.3 km (5NM)) should be planned to operate not closer than 14 km (7.5 NM) from the delineations given above. In this respect, reliance must not be placed upon radar vectoring. Not for Resale
  • 73. v-1 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT (ATM) Part V.1 AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT (ASM) 1. Controlled airspace should be established so as to encompass the climb to cruising level of departing aircraft, the cruising levels on ATS routes normally used by E R flights and the descent from such levels of anhing aircraft, except in those cases where the type and density of traffic clearly do not justify the establishmentof controlled airspace. Provisions should be made to ensure that SST aircraft are able to conduct the transonic and supersonic phases of their flights within controlled airspace, regardless of density of traffic. [Annex 11, Chapter 21 Note.- Detailed provisions regarding the type of air traffic service required are highlighted in I to 7 of Part V.II -ATS. 2. The lower limit of controlled airspace should be established so that: a) 4. Airspace restrictions and/or temporary airspace reservations for specific users or purposes should only be imposed when the intended purpose cannot be met by other arrangements. If established, such restrictions and/or reservations should be kept to the minimum, both in extent and duration consistent with the purpose they serve and should be withdrawn as soon as possible. In addition, any restricted and/or reserved airspace should be made available for general use whenever the activities having led to their establishment are temporarily suspended, e.g. during weekends, at night, etc. (18, Part 11 -GEN also refers). [Annex 11, 2.171 5. Where users have specific requirements in portions of the airspace extending over the temtory of a number of States and/or over the high seas, arrangements should be made between States concerned for the coordinated use of airspace, facilities and procedures in order to ensure maximum uniformity. IFR flights requiring the provision of air traffic control service can remain within controlled airspace during the entire duration of their flight; and CML/MiLITARY COORDINATION b) flights not requiring ATC services are not unnecessarily restricted. In the vicinity of aerodromes, the establishment of the lower limit of controlled airspace should also take into account those portions of the airspace which may be required by ATC in order to vector aircraft by radar. [Annex 1 1,2.9.31 3. Controlled airspace should be established in the upper airspace up to flight level 460 and throughout the whole control area whenever area type air traffic control service is provided. [EUMNI, Rec 8/13] [Annex 11,2.16 and 2.17; Air Traffic Services Planning Manual (Doc 9426), Part U, Section 1, Chapter 2 1 6. States should aim at the creation of one single integrated system catering to both civil and military requirements. The related organization of the airspace should satisfy the requirements of ail users in an optimum way. 7 States should establish civiVmilitary coordination . bodies to ensure, at all levels, the coordination of decisions relating to civil and military problems and airspace and traffic management (paragraph 4 above refers). v- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 74. EUR BASIC ANP v-2 8. States should arrange for close liaison and coordination between civil ATS units and relevant military operational control and/or air defence units in order to ensure integration of civil and miiitary air traffic or its segregation, if required. Such arrangements would also contribute to the reduction or elimination of the need for interception of strayed or unidentified aircraft. 9. Military exercises likely to affect civil flight operations should be scheduled, whenever possible, so as not to coincide with peak periods of civil air traffic andor not to affect areas where a high density of civil air traffic occurs. 1 . Regulations governingflights of State aircraft over 0 the high seas should, to the maximum extent practicable, comply with the relevant provisions of Annex 2. Where this is not possible due to the nature of the operations involved, measures should be taken to ensure that other aircraft are not endangered by such operations. These should preferably be established in coordination with the State responsible for the provision of air traffic services over that part of the high seas affected by such operations. ESTABLISHMENTOF ATS ROUTES --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 11. By agreement between all parties concerned, a network of ATS routes (excluding SIDs and STARs) should form the basis for the determination of the airspace organization and the required air traffic services and facilities. It should be so established as to enable a majority of flights to operate along, or as near as possible to, the direct route from point of departure to destination. The basic ATS route network is shown in Table ATS 1. Note.-In addition,temporary,seasonal ordomestic ATS routes may be established which will not form part of the basic ATS route network. Provisions regarding such routes n are contained i Part V.111- ATFM of the EUR FASID. A listing of such routes established in the EUR region i s contained in Supplement 1-ARN. 12. The designation of specific ATS routes within the network should be made so that the majority of recurring flight operations can identify them in flight plans with the least number of designators. [Annex 11, Appendix I] Note.- The allocation of ATS route designators should be coordinated with the European and North Atlantic Ofice of ICAO. 13. Where necessary to cater for the requirements of specific users (e.g. aircraft with advanced navigation capability, helicopters, SST aircraft), supplementary ATS routes should be provided taking optimum account of the special characteristics of such aircraft. The conditions governingthe use of these ATS routes should be published in appropriate aeronautical information publications (AZP). - 14. Standard instrument departure (SID) and arrival (STAR) routes should be established only where justified by traffic density or environmental considerations. [Annex 11, Appendix 31 - 15. When SIDs and STARS are so established, they should be designed so that they are not difficult to fly (e.g. avoiding steep turns, climbs and descents) and not requiring a complex selection of navaids, radial intersections, etc. Part V.11 AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES (ATS) PROVISION OF ATS 1. Flight information serviceandalertingserviceshould be provided throughout the EUR region. The plan of flight information regions (FIR) should provide for the least number of such regions compatible with efficiency of service and with economy. In delineating FIR boundaries, due consideration should be given to: a) the need for adequate air-ground communications coverage throughout the designated area of use of each channel used by the FIUACC; b) the need to reduce, to the extent possible, frequency changes and position reporting by aircraft and the requirement for coordination between FICs/ACCs; and . . ,. (; j; . .. ... ,-.:Y .. % Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 75. ATM r v-3 the need to avoid, if at all possible, problems relating to climbing and descending traffic at major aerodromes located in the vicinity of FiR boundaries. [Annex 11,2.3,2.4,2.5.1,2.5.2,2.5.2.1,2.7,2.8 2.9.1 to and 2.9.41 C) 2. Aerodrome control service should be provided at all regular and alternate aerodromes. Aerodrome control service should also be provided at those aerodromes used by international general aviation aircraft, but only when the type and density of traffic so warrants. [Annex 11,2.5.1] unavoidable, it should be replaced by air traffic control service at the earliest possible time. [PANS-ATM, Part Vn, 1.41 AUTOMATIC TERMINAL INFORMATION SERVICE (ATIS) 8. In addition to the requirement to reduce air-ground communication load, the decision as to where and how to provide ATIS should take cost effectiveness considerations into account. [Annex 11,4.3.4to4.3.7andEURSUPPS,PartI,9.1] 3. At aerodromes used by internationalgeneral aviation aircraft, where the provision of aerodrome control service is not yetjustified, aerodrome flight informationservice (AFIS) should be provided by a unit located at the aerodrome. [Annex 11,2.3 and 2.41 Note.- The term AFIS is used to describe an air-ground communication service at IGA aerodromes where an aerodrome control service is not provided. 4. Approach control service should be provided at all international aerodromes where instrument approach and landing procedures are established,except where the type and density of air traffic clearly do not justify the provision of such service. If area control service is not provided, approach control service should be provided at least up to the cruising level of departing aircraft and, for arriving aircraft, from the point where descent from cruising level is commenced. [Annex 11,2.5.1] 5. Area control service should be provided for IFR flights along all ATS routes, except where the type and density of traffic clearly do not justify the provision of such service. In delineating the boundaries of areas of responsibility of specific ACCs, due account should be taken of the relevant factors listed in 1 above. [Annex 11, 2.3, 2.4,2.5.1,2.5.2.2.1, 2.5.2.2.1.1, and2.7.31 6. Where not alreadycovered by the provisions in 4 and 5 above, SST aircraft should be provided with air traffic control service at least during their subsonic and transonic phases of flight, regardless of the density of such traffic. [Annex 11,3.7.2] 7. Air traffic advisory service, because of its temporary and transient nature, should not be included in the ICAO Air Navigation Plan. Whenever its temporary provision is VHF VOLMET BROADCASTS 9. Routine aerodrome reports (with TREND if provided) for selected aerodromes should be disseminated to aircraft through VHF VOLMET broadcasts if the requestheply method of ATS air-ground communications channels is impractical to meet the requirement. The EüR VHF VOLMET broadcasts should be planned on a regional basis and in accordance with the principles contained in Attachment C to Part V.11- ATS of the EUR FASID. [Annex 3, 10.1.7 and 11.4.31 PROVISION OF INFORMATION ON HAZARDOUS WEATHER CONDITIONS 10. Arrangements should be made to ensure that ATS units can provide informationpromptly to aircraft concerning hazardous weather conditions and other available information likely to affect the safety and efficiency of flights which are operating within their areas of responsibility. [Annex 11,4.2 and Chapter 71 ATS PROCEDURES 11. Arrangements regarding the provision of air traffic services to aircraft in flight should require a minimum of contact with ATS units by pilots, either for the purpose of reporting position or for transfer of communication. [Annex 11,3.5 and 3.61 12. Whenever practicable, ATS procedures should allow aircraft capable of navigating without reference to the .. t z --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 76. EUR BASIC ANP v-4 ATS route structure, to do so subject to obtaining an air traffic control clearance when required. b) use primary and/or secondary surveillance radar for the purpose of monitoring air traffic and identifying civil aircraft in areas where they might otherwise be intercepted; and RADAR FOR ATS 13. Where justified by traffic density and/or its complexity, and taking into account relevant cost effectiveness aspects, ATS units should be provided with radar. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 14. Detailed considerationsrelevant to the provision of primary and secondary surveillanceradar for ATS purposes are contained in AttachmentG to Part IV -CNS of the EUR FASID. 15. In planning for the provision of radar, States should take account of existing or planned facilities in adjacent States in order to achieve a coherent system with adequate overlap of radar coverage in border areas. For economic reasons, planning for continuous and coherent en-route ATS radar services should allow for a maximum of shared use of radar facilities available in adjacent States. 16. From the initial stages of planning for radar facilities, due consideration should be given to radar data processing and display aspects and to possibilities for future expansion of the use of such facilities, both as regards the area covered and the degree of sophistication. c) implementor update the communicationslinks which are necessary to permit radar transfer of control between V adjacent ACC (3.8, Part I - CNS also refers). 21. For radar senices in major terminal areas and in certain en-route airspace, a complementary use of SSR and PSR coverage is needed. The requirements should be based on the nature of the traffic. 22. Planning of changes in the coverage and radar services for en-route operations should be organized on a EUR region-wide basis. 23. For the improvement of radar service based on SSR, advancetechniquescurrently available(e.g. monopulse, large vertical aperture antennae, use of multi-radar information,etc.) should be exploited. In this connexion, the requirement for existing primary radar services to en-route operations should be kept under review. 24. In planning for further improvements of the radar services, the possible use of SSR Mode S should be subject to regional air navigation agreement. 17. The radar coverage for en-route ATS purposes should be such as to permit the provision of radar services on all major ATS routes in the region, with due regard to the need to progress towards an “area control” service. 18. Planning for an optimum deployment of radar facilities for en-route ATS purposes should be based on SSR with Mode C. 19. Progressive improvementsin the treatment of SSRderived data for ATS purposes should be planned so that changes or replacement of existing SSR equipment are kept to a minimum. Relevant considerations are contained in at V f Attachment I to Pr i - CNS o the EUR FASID. 20. States whose ACCs are equipped with en-route radar should: a) arrange for a maximum use for flights in the en-route phase of the prescribed radar separation minima and/or the reduced procedural longitudinal separation minima based on radar monitoring; I AUTOMATION IN ATS 25. The decision to provide automatic data processing equipment for ATS purposes should be based on agreed criteria. These are still to be developed and will be contained in an Attachment to Part V.II -ATS of the EUR FASID in due course. [PANS-ATM, Attachment D] 26. Automatic data processing equipment should provide the controller with a display of at least the accurate position of the aircraft in the controller’s area of concern. In addition, the equipment should be such that in the event of r temporary, partial o complete failure of any of its components, the controller will be able to revert safely to other means of operation (“fail-soft” concept). Specific considerations relevant to the use of automatic data processing equipment are still under development and will be contained in an Attachment to Part V.II - ATS of the EUR FASID. Considerations on computer assisted coordination i. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale -..i
  • 77. v-5 ATM <--, processes are contained in Attachment E to P r V.II at of the EU3 FASID. [PANS-ATM ,Attachment D] -ATS 27. Computer-assisted data exchange facilities should be used between ATC units in order to automate to the extent practicable the coordinationbetween ATC units and therefore increase airspace capacity. Data exchange facilities shall be implemented in accordance with the methods of application specified in Attachment E to Part V.iI - ATS of the EUR FASID. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- PROVISIONS REGARDING VFR OPERATIONS 28. Special arrangements should be made by ATS for VER operations. Such arrangements should be compatible with those of adjacent States with the objective of obtaining regional uniformity. Specific considerations relevant to this subject are under development and will be contained in an attachment to this part in due course. PROVISIONS REGARDING HELICOPTER OPERATIONS 29. Where required by circumstances, special arrangements should be made to cater for helicopter operations.Specific considerationsrelevant to this subject are contained in the Air Traffic Services Planning Manual (Doc 9426, Part 2, Section 4, Chapter 3). Meeting. The following recommendations, the continuing validity of which has been confirmed by the Air Navigation Commission and the Council of ICAO, form an integral part of the material contained in this specific part and should therefore be considered whenever it comes under review. Study of new separation standards [LiMtEüM (RACKOM), Rec. 1.1161 32. That States, in consultation with operators, study the possibility of introducing new separation standards based on both the navigational capability of aircraft and on the use of radar in a monitoring role as a device to maintain both safety and the expeditious flow of traffic. Accuracy in flight plans and related ATS messages [LIM/EüM (RACKOM), Rec. 2.1121 33. That, in view of the progressive implementation of automatic equipment in many parts of the region and the resultant strict requirement for adherence to the format and accuracy in content of ATS messages, States take all necessary steps to ensure continued full compliance with the procedures contained in Appendix 3 of PANS-ATM regarding ATS messages. Reliubüiiy of SSR transponders and use of servo-correctedpressure sources with Mode C [LiMtEüM (RACKOM), Rec. 22/71 34. That action be taken to develop appropriate provisions ensuring: INCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION 30. States should establish a system of air traffic incident reporting in accordance with the relevant material contained in the PANS-RAC. [PANS-ATM, Appendix 41 EUR RAN MEETING RECOMMENDATIONS . ... I 31. Systematic reviews of specific parts of the EUR ANP, in accordance with the schedule of management established by the EANPG, should ensure that action has been taken to implement the recommendations of European Air Navigation Meetings held prior to the EUW7 RAN the required reliability and integrity of SSR transponders and associated height transmission equipment installed in aircraft; that only servo-corrected pressure sources are used for automaticheight transmission by the use of SSR Mode C. Use of “’requestlevel change en route” procedure without specibing a clearance limit [LiMtEüM (RAC/COM), Rec. 2.4131 35. That the procedure whereby pilots are advised to request a level change en route (“request level change en route”) should only be used by ATC if a clearance limit is specified up to which the assigned level is valid. , Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 78. EUR BASIC ANP V-6 36. That: States not having already done so designate as soon as possible, for each international aerodrome, the radio navigation aid to be used by aircraft experiencing radio communication failure; when more than one aid is designated for a particular aerodrome, no ambiguity should exist as to the aid to be used by aircraft approaching from a particular direction of arrival at that aerodrome; whenever possible, the data required should be presented in pictorial form in the appropriate aeronautical information publication. Continuity of FIR coverage in the area north of Norway and the USSR [EUMNI, Rec. 8/31 37. That Norway and the USSR develop jointly a proposal providing full FIR coverage in the area north of Norway and the USSR and submit this for inclusion in the ICAO Plan of FIRS at the earliest opportunity. Airspace organization over the Black Sea [EUMNI, Rec. 8/41 38. That Turkey and the USSR pursue their negotiations towards a more efficient airspace organization over the Black Sea with all necessary speed and present, as early as possible, the resultant joint proposal for amendment to all relevant parts of the ICAO Plan. Note.Specific terms used in air traffic flow management and their explanations are contained i n Attachment A to Part V.III -ATFM of the EUR FASID. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS / - - Establishment of controlled airspace and provision of air tra@ control service -, 1 Rec. 8/13] 39. That controlled airspace be established in the upper airspace up to flight level 460 and throughout the whole control area whenever area type air traffic control service is provided. Establishment of direct ATS speech circuits @ M I ,Rec. 8/20] 40. That States concerneddeterminebilaterally the total number of direct ATS speech circuits required for simultaneous use by each of their FiCslACCs with adjacent FiCs/ACCs, including the number of direct circuits to be used for transfer of radar control on the understanding that the latter circuits must allow a connection to be established within two seconds on 99 per cent of those occasions when a circuit is technically operational. Reduction of aidground communications ~ W IRec. 9/71 , 41. That States pursue vigorously their programmes aimed at the reduction of aidground communications by the elimination of reporting points along controlled ATS routes and in TMAs where this is possible. Part V.IU AIR TRAFFIC FLOW MANAGEMENT (ATFM) AIR TRAFFIC DEMAND r - 1. Further to the provisions contained in P r I1 at GEN, a detailed traffic forecastregarding major traffic flows in the ELJR region should be prepared on which to determine the development of airspace and traffic flow management for a period of five years ahead and in such a form that it can be Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Designation of navigation aids to be used at aerodromes by aircraft experiencing communicationfailure [LIM/EuM (RACICOM), Rec. 2.4141
  • 79. v-7 ATM ,/- used by all concerned with the planning of the air navigation system and its affected parts. 2. In order to achieve a continuous assessment of available capacity and demand, an integrated database (IDB) should provide data for strategic, pre-tactical and tactical air traffic flow management (ATFM) purposes. ATC CAPACITY 3. States should continuously review the capacity of their ATC system in order to ensure that it is adjusted to accommodate forecast traffic demands. ATFM 4. To permit the most efficient use of the airspaceby all users, measures should be taken to ensure a reasonable balance between the traffic demand and the ability of the air traffic services to accommodate that demand. 5. While accepting that provision of the ATFM service is essential, ATFM should not be an end in itself but should remain a tool to be applied when the air traffic control (ATC) system would not be able to cope with peak traffic demand. The prime effort should be aimed at the ability of the ATC system to cope with the traffic demand rather than at the ability of the ATFM service to adjust the demand. 6. When ATFM measures are necessary for certain areas, they should be applied only for the period when expected air traffic demand will exceed the capacity in those areas. 7. ATFM measures should be established and coordinated in such a way that they will not cumulatively interact with each other on the same flights. 8. Whenever ATFM measures have to be applied in the form of delays, they should be applied to aircraft on the ground rather than to aircraft in flight. Whenever application of ATFM measures in the form of delays to airborne aircraft become unavoidable, the flights concerned should be informed of that fact as soon as possible. Whenever en-route holding becomes necessary, the aircraft concerned should be held as closely as practicable to the entry point of the area causing the restrictions. 9. Demand data provided by the IDB should be used to achieve the balance between demand and capacity. Operators should therefore give maximum possible advance notice by submittingappropriate data on planned flight operations in an agreed manner. 10. Operators should adhere as closely as possible to their stated intentions. When this is not possible, they should give earliest possible notification of any change or cancellation in order to allow timely and accurate planning within the established time frames (Paragraph 3.2, Appendix 1 to Attachment B of Part V.HI- ATFM of the EUR FASID). 11. Arrangements should be made to provide for a speedy exchange between those concerned with ATFM and the aircraft operators concerned, of information on the existing and expected traffic situation, whenever it is likely that this will prevent operators from conducting their flights as planned. Such exchanges should include suggestions for alternative courses of action. 12. Havingacceptedthe responsibility forproviding the CEUs as multinational ICAO EUR air navigation facilities/ services to support the CTMO in its provision of ATFM services, the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL)and the Council on Aviation and Airspace Utilisation shall: a) implement and operate the CEU/West (EUROCONTROL)and CEUEast (the Council on Aviation and Airspace Utilisation) having regard to the general guidelines on the establishment and provision of a multinationalICAO EUR navigational facilityhervice, as acted upon by Council on 13 March 1987 (120/10 Paragraph 3.3 to the Introduction to the EUR FASID); and b) provide and maintain the ATFM service described here and in the EUR FASID. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 80. ( : v-A-1 . Appendix . TABLE ATS-1 -BASIC ATS ROUTE NETWORK IN THE LOWER AND UPPER AIRSPACE EXPLANATION OF THE TABLE Index to basic ATS routes “A’ routes “B” routes “G” routes “R’ routes “RNAV” routes “SST” routes - Table ATS-1 describes the basic ATS route network in the lower and upper airspace of the EUR region. Note.- For planning purposes, FL 245 has been used as the uniform plane of division between the lower and the upper airspacefor the description of the ATS route networks in this table. This was done in accordance with Recommendation 8.4’ of the EUM VI RAN Meeting (1971) and does not necessarily reflect the current limits of the FIRsLJIRs in the EUR region. Where a segment of a conventional lower or upper ATS route b coincident with an RNAV route, reference to the respective route is depicted in the table. The list of significant points necessary to describe the required LOWER ATS routes is given. Each significantpoint is identified by a navigation facility name or a five-letter name-code. Significant points shown are those which identify: - a change of track; - a route extremity; - a meteorological reporting point if required; andor - any other point essential to be reflected in the plan. Points where facilities complete navigational guidance along a route but which are not significant points as defined above are not included. Names shown in parentheses indicate the next significant points outside the EUR region. Notes pertinent to the inclusion of LOWER ATS routes within the ELJR Air Navigation Plan are shown against the route segment(s) to which they pertain. UPPERATS ROUTES The designator of each UPPER ATS route is shown above the route. Format of the table Routes are listed consecutively, in alphabetical order, beginning with ail of the lower ATS routes and followed by ail of the upper ATS routes. LO WER ATS ROUTES -. The designator of each LOWER ATS route is shown above the route. The list of significant points necessary to describe the required UPPER ATS routes is given. Each significant point is identified by a navigation facility name or a five-letter name-code. Significant points shown are those which identify: - a change of track; - a route extremity; a meteorological reporting point if required; and/or - any other point essential to be reflected in the plan. - --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 81. EUR BASIC ANP M-A-2 Points where facilities complete navigational guidance along a route but which are not significant points as defined above are not included. Names shown in parentheses describe the next significant points outside the EUR region. : Notes pertinent to the inclusion of UPPER ATS routes within i the EUR Ar Navigation Plan are shown against the route segment(s) to which they pertain. NOTES USED IN THE TABLE The notes reflect the views of States or operators with regard to a given ATS route or segment thereof and are shown in Table ATS-1 as required. These notes do not form part of the Plan and may be updated editorially on simple notification by their originatorsreflecting latest developments as they occur. They are therefore not subject to the procedure for the amendments of approved Regional Plans. Note 1: “Not representing the operator’s requirements” (operator’s required route andor navaids are shown in brackets.) Note 2: “Subject to further study” (including the associated navigation aid coverage) Note 3: “Subject to military agreement” Note 4:“Not acceptable at present” Note 5: “At present, implementation possible only during specific periods (e.g. weekends, nighttime, etc.) as published” Note 6: “Air traffic advisory service provided” (may be supplemented by radar monitoring later) Note 7:“At present, implementation of the RNAV route only possible above FL300,or as published” Note 8: “Unidirectional use” Whenever reference to names of States has to be made in this table in connectionwith the above notes, the following abbreviations will be used as required. ALB ALG Albania Algeria . . t Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belgium Belarus Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria CYP Cyprus CZE Czech Republic D Germany DNK Denmark E Spain EGY E m t Estonia EST F France FIN Finland G United Kingdom G E 0 Georgia GIB Gibraltar (United Kingdom) GNL Greenland (Denmark) GRC Greece HNG Hungary HOL Netherlands HRV Croatia I Italy IRL Ireland IRQ Ira¶ ISL Iceland ISR Israel KAZ Kazakhstan KGZ Kyrgyzstan LBN Lebanon LBY Libyan Arab Jama..iriya LTU Lithuania LUX Luxembourg LVA Latvia MDA Republic of Moldova ARM AUT AZE BEL .BLR BIH BUL MLT Mla at MRC NOR POL POR ROU RUS S SVK SVN Morocco Norway Poland Portugal Romania Russian FeLaation Sweden Slovakia Slovenia Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Tajikistan Turkmenistan SUI SYR TJK TKh4 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 82. V-A-3 ATM TUN --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- r TUR TYD UKR um WG Tunisia Turkey The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Ukraine Uzbekistan Yugoslavia Note.- Air navigation charges and cost recovery on routes should befully in accordance with Article 15 of the Chicago Convention and relevant Council Statements and Guidelines.Furthermore, nofees, dues or other charges shall be imposed by any Contracting State in respect solely of the right of transit. .. Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 83. 1, V-A-5 ATM LOWER ATS ROUTES A5 ............................... Glasgow New Galloway Dean Cross BARTN 5328N 00226W Honiley Midhurst BENBO 5027N O0001E - Route Break Rouen - - _ _ - Note 4 (F) Pontoise * - - _ _ - Note 4 (F) Bray Dijon Saint Prex Torino Elba Ponza Caraffa Paleohora _ _ _ _ _ Note 2 (EGYIGRC) (Alexandria) A2 --_--------_________________ Talla Dean Cross Pole Hill Trent SAPCO Lamboume Detling SANDY *-_--- 5232N 00121W 5104N 00104E Note 2 (F) Abbeville Montdidier - Route Break Bray Autun Lyon *----Note 2 (F) Nice Ajaccio Alghero Rambouillet ___-- Nevers Moulins Montélimar PERUS AMFOU Saint Tropez Note 4 (F) 4409N 00606E 4336N 00606E Note 2 (F) *__--- Bastia Ostia A4 SEGAL 5450N 01241E Trent Friedland Fürstenwalde Hermsdorí Praha Vlasim Brno ODNEM 4851N 01710E Nitra Sturovo ERGOM 4748N 01844E - Route Break Mitrovica Beograd Topola 4258N 02248E NISVA Kalotina Plovdiv 4152N 02634E ADORU 4108N 02823E GOTAN Beykoz 4052N 03040E ERSEN Cubuk Sivas Erzurum Van _ - _ -_ _ -- . --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale Spijkerboor HELEN 5114N 00352E Cambrai Montdidier - Route Break L'Aigle Angers Nantes Santiago TURON 4204N 00834W Porto Fatima Espichel Faro ORTOP 3603N 00723W *----Note 4 (E) (Tanger) _______________________________ A6 Châtillon Dijon Lyon Montélimar *----Notes 2,5 (F) Martigues PAPAS 4206N 00420E Pollensa Palma de Mallorca (Mostaganem) A7 TUSKA Eelde 5500N 00753E
  • 84. Z 'ON camz Z W --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- OCV PCV E CV dNV 3iSVû ün3 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 9-V-A Not for Resale
  • 85. ATM V-A-7 1 I I LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWERATSROUTES - - _ _ _ Note 5 (BEL) Diekirch A25 Dean Cross Wallasey Brecon Berry Head Guernsey Dinard Nantes Bordeaux Sauveterre Agen t ----ESTAT Barcelona LOWER ATS ROUTES A28 A24 Stad Nicky Bruxelles I Kyiv 'Boryspil" Stebliv Shyriaieve REMBO 4626N 03041E - - - - - - - Note 4 (BUL) SUMOL 4248N 03311E Inebolu Ankara Mut t _ _ _ _ _ Note 4 (TUR) Nicosia RASDA 3306N 03057E A33 Santiago Zamora Colmenar - Route Break Castejon Calles Valencia Palma de Mallorca Alghero Ponza Sorrento Gioia A29 Note 2 (F) 4242N 00122E Agen Reus Andraitx Palma de Mallorca *----Note 2 (E) SADAF 3748N 00220E (Cherchell) -_______________-______________ A27 ............................... Bray Moulins Clermont-Ferrand Mende AFRIC 4346N 00253E Perpignan Bagur Pollensa Palma de Mallorca (Alger) ____--____________-____________ i A34 Midhurst SITET 5006N 00000E ETRAT 4941 N 00010E L'Aigle Chartres Châteaudun Amboise Limoges Agen - Route Break ANETO 4242N 00033E Maella Valencia Alicante MAGAL 3804N 00014W (Mostaganem) --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- I A31 Castejon Alicante A35 _ _ _ - _ Notes 5, 3 (E); Note 2 (ALG) Genova Elba (Alger) A32 MERLU CALNO 4305N 00748E 4248N 00822E 2Ql8IQ3 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 86. . 1) EUR BASIC ANP V-A-8 I LOWERATSROUTES A37 LOGAN Detling 5145N 00137E I I LOWERATSROUTES I A I LOWER ATS ROUTES - A43 A48 Porto CANAR 4123N 00729W ADORO 4129N 00616W Zamora Navas del Rey Brindisi CRAYE Dubrovnik 4130N 01808E -_------------_---------------Linz vozice A39 Bekes GARS1 4701N 02141E A41 A45 A55 Irkutsk (TMA) Bolshoye Goloutsnoye TATUR 5208N 10727E Khonnsk Chita AGINO 5106N 11432E Zabaykalsk TELOK 4938N 11723E (KAGAK 4916N 11806E) Chievres Cambrai - Route Break Rouen L'Aigle LUTIL 4736N 00005E Poitiers A56 A42 --------_______________________ Nitra Sliac Kosice MALBE 4850N 02223E Ivano-Frankivs'k Nemynv Shynaieve Odesa A65 Erlangen Mansbach Lichtenau Warburg 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Dijon LISMO 4652N 00547E REVLI 4635N 00645E - Route Break FIR BDRY 4603N 00802E *----Note 5 (SUI) Saronno - Route Break Parma Pisa - Route Break Grosseto Taquina ---____________________________
  • 87. ATM V-A-9 I I LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES A87 A66 ----______-_________-__---_---Novokazalinsk TIPEN 4356N 06321E DIDOP 4339N 06330E NITNA 4330N 06336E ODIVA 4235N 06408E Tamdy-Bulak MAMAL 4107N 06519E DAKLI 4014N 06619E Samarkand Urgut Termez A67 A70 Nordlingen RIDAR Maisach München 4835N 01048E Yevlakh GIPAR Derbent AGATO BENSI PIKAN Aktau GARDU OTMAS LEPSI EPOLI KODUM BILGA KURUL KEKUN MALED MANAD LANUK TIBDA BULOG Arkalyk TUSEP OSROL APTUS Astana Ekibastuz OGRUT Pavlodar USTIL Cherniakhiv 41 13N 04735E t _ _ _ - - Note 8 Soloviivka * _ _ - - - Note 8 NIKIG 4925N 03200E Auly _---Note 8 Dnipropetrovs'k *----Note 8 Pavlivka TAMAK 4751N 03913E *----Note 8 Sambek i----Note 8 Bagaevsky Elista Biryucha Kosa AZABI 4444N 04930E Aktau BALIG 4320N 05150E INRED 4253N 05227E TIROM 4215N 05317E Askhabad 4216N 04832E 4241N 04911E 4253N 04930E 4531N 05239E 4559N 05306E 4655N 05402E 4727N 05435E 4800N 05510E 4824N 05534E 4842N 05552E 4908N 05824E 4915N 05920E 4921 N 06022E 4934N 06233E 4938N 06329E 5009N 06601E 5032N 06808E 5050N 07002E 5056N 07046E A90 5149N 07555E GILAS LAKOL Tegel GOLEV Brunkendorf A72 A83 _ _ __ _ _ _- TIBDA Zhezkazgan OBAMA MIRGA GAMBU ARBOL _ _ ------- . --_ ----- Seida VANOS Padun Murmansk 4602N 06903E 4524N 06931E 4411N 07023E 4331 N 07051E ..................... A74 5050N 02407E Chemiakhiv Soloviivka Helmiasiv Topchyne Krasnoarmiis'k DOMEK 4804N 03744E Krasnyi Luch NALEM 4757N 03949E i - - - - - (RUS) Note 2 Krasnyi Sulin *----Note 2 (RUS) Bagayevskiy *----Note 2 (RUS) Yegorlykskaya 5238N 01432E 5232N 01404E 5258N 01209E A91 ________--_____--____---__----- _____-______________---_-_----- 6925N 03002E Khanty-Mansiysk t _ _ - - - Note 2 (RUS) Novy Vasyugan *----Note 2 (RUS) Novosibirsk (TMA) Legostayevo Novokuznetsk Nizhneudinsk Osa Irkutsk Kyakhta SERNA 5019N 0628E (Uiaan Baatar) 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 88. V-A-1 O 1 EUR BASIC ANP LOWERATSROUTES ~ LOWER ATS ROUTES Al 07 A117 A95 ATBAN 5158N 06822E APTUS 5056N 07046E LIGMO 5046N 07109E BEDKA 5014N 07217E Karaganda ______-_-______---------------- Kasan Bukhara Urgench Nukus TARAM URASA 4348N 05640E 4407N 05600E A113 4247N 03405E Note 4 (RUS, BUL) 4330N 03432E Note 4 (RUS, BUL) 4351N 03435E Aktyubinsk OTKAS MANAD GEDSA SUBOL TIROK ATRUS ELSEB OBAMA PABRI Tole bi 4752N 03519E --_-- DODUR ABEKA ABGEN Syrdarya IPRAR NETAT BIGS0 Bulungur Samarkand Nagornaya Bukhara ASHGA BUROT Askhabad RIKOP 4123N 06848E 4107N 06844E 4057N 06842E 4044N 06834E 4036N 06824E 4017N 06757E ............................... A97 -______________-----_____----__ Inebolu KUGOS *-__-ARDOK _---NANIR Alushta Liubymivka Komisarivka NORTU Lykhacheve MATEG a LOWER ATS ROUTES 4937N 05928E 4921N 06022E 4838N 06241E 4751N 06445E 4725N 06551E 4653N 06707E 4633N 06755E 4602N 06903E 4515N 07043E ------___----______-___________ 3931N 06319E 3830N 05900E 3741N 05815E ___---_______-_____-___________ A118 ___---______---________________ Shymkent BAMUT DODUR DIBAD 4151N 06923E 4123N 06848E 4117N 06756E A114 4956N 03617E Note 2 (RUS) Belgorod _ _ _ - _ Note 2 (RUS) Tim Maloe Skuratovo Moskva -_____--____-__________________ Termez RASID DARMA VAMUK AKAZU Syrdarya A119 3815N 06742E 3929N 06808E 4034N 06835E 4042N 06838E DODUR ODOR1 ARSUL 4123N 06848E 4159N 06849E 4226N 06850E ---______-_________-__________A l 20 A116 ------___------____----______-_ A101 -______________________________ BUROK Leipzig GOìAT SAREN RAKIS Erlangen 5207N 01239E 5053N 01203E 5033N 01149E 4957N 01121E Nagomaya Guzar AGART RAPTA *----- 3809N 06603E 3727N 06538E Note 1 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- __-____________________________ 2Ol8103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 89. V-A-I 1 ATM LOWER ATS ROUTES Al 26 ----___________________--__---Namangan - - _ _ - Note 3 (KAZ) TULGA 4153N 07012E Shyrnkent LOWER ATS ROUTES A142 ............................... LOMTI 4902N 03113E EKTIN 4832N 03217E ELDOP 4803N 03313E Kakhovka LOWER ATS ROUTES A218 Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (RUS) A127 A152 Note 2 (RUS) Rakovnik 4157N 06911E 4147N 06905E 4123N 06848E 4054N 06805E A131 Moskva Zakharovka -__-_ Orel Kursk Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (TCH) Vozice BODAL Trebova Zabreh 4928N 01547E Note 1 (Ornolon-Mys Shmidta) Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (RUS) A l 57 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Shyrnkent DOSOR REBDA DODUR OGRIP Bukhara Notes 2,4 (RUS) 7024N 16858W Ljubljana VALLU 4620N 01514E - Route Break Abbeville Pontoise Note 2 (RUS) ..___ Rakitnoye Koviahy Topchyne Auly Kakhovka SONEP Yalta MAKUN t A l 80 A222 4502N 03359E 4350N 03411E - _ _ _ - Note 4 (BUL) ARDOK Olekminsk Kirenck Zhigalovo VATIN 5341N 1OM6E ANGUT 5309N 10436E Irkutsk (TMA) 4330N 03432E ___________-____-_____--___---A137 ________________-____-_-____--Tchervonobirka KEDUB 5024N 03027E Kyiv “Boryspil’ Yahotyn Rashivka Koviahy Kharkiv _________--___----__----------AGAM0 6309N 03116E VATAL 6514N 04023E Mezen Nizhniaya Pesha Naryan-Mar SOVAN 6829N 06751E Mys Kamenny Igarka IANSU 6507N 10212E VADAS 6358N 10700E IABOL 6153N 11221E Lensk AKATI 5954N 11725E Nerungn Bornnak MILSA 5326N 13016E UVADA 4905N 13428E Khabarovsk ____-__-________-___-_---__--_- 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 90. V-A-12 EUR BASIC ANP LOWER ATS ROUTES A227 Kaunis KELEK Padun 6830N 02828E A228 Yakutsk *___-_ Note 2 (RUS) Olenek Khatanga Ust-Tareya Dikson Amderma Naryan-Mar Mezen Arkhangelsk Petrozavodsk LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES A241 _____--_____________----------Kostanay BAVAG 5318N 06653E Kokshetau ULSET 5300N 07203E INDAR 5223N 07604E Pavlodar PIVAL 5146N 07751E ABDAM 5131N 07817E Semipalatinsk Ust-Kamenogorsk A279 ___----_---_______------------- A260 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- MIRZO LANOL DODUR A237 3932N 06955E 4111N 06855E 4123N 06848E A238 PAVEL Syrdarya OSBOR MIRZO 4300N 06647E ----------________-____--- 4100N 06831E 3932N 06955E _______________________________ A240 Askhabad MAMED Serdar KISEK AGMAL Turkmenbashi KERUL DEKUR LUMUR Aktau LONLA 4820N 02219E Verkhnie Vysots'ke LUGIR 4949N 02358E ANIRI 5145N 02543E Pinsk OGARA 5241N 02714E Osipovichi IAPKI 5437N 02934E Vitebsk 3835N 05742E 3917N 05534E 3948N 05409E 4151N 05208E 4223N 05153E 4307N 05130E A271 KIBER Lykhacheve Krasnyi Luch 5143N 03038E _____-_________________________ --_ --_ USTIL Nemyriv Kakhovka BETEG ABUKI BANUT Pot¡ TUNIS Sevan 4511N 03623E 4502N 03635E 4254N 04001E 41ION 04347E 2018l03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale A299 _--___----______---_--------__Tobolsk ROPOT 5724N 06705E Turnen (Roschino) SIKAR 5626N 06523E Kurgan NELTI 5420N 06417E Kostanay RAVNI WON
  • 91. . ATM LOWER ATS ROUTES A300 Krasnoyarsk Nazir Achinsk Tomsk Kozhevnikovo Sevemoye Svkh. Chapayev Sarna Tumen (Roshchino) Artemovsky Yekaterinburg (Koltsovo) Bisert Nedra Mamadysh KAZAN 5536N 04917E Kuzir Lyskovo Dobrynskoye Larionov0 Moskva .............................. A302 ___-_________-_---__----------Omsk OVRUS 5536N 07339E SvkhChapayev LOWER ATS ROUTES A305 _______________________________ Tumen (Roshchino) Ishim A306 Omsk Bazhenovo A307 Tomsk Kemerovo Novokuznetsk _____________-______-----_----A335 A308 Matveyevsk y Bunak Vedli Krapivincky LARNA Abakan Turan 5412N 08952E A309 A303 Tumen (Roschshino) LETIK 5512N 06832E Petropavlovsk PETOR 5354N 07132E POBUR 5338N 07214E BEGIK 5230N 07606E Pavlodar LAGMO 5150N 07915E Mikhaylovsk A304 Artemovsky Gibul Tumen (Roshchino) ............................... LOWER ATS ROUTES Vedli Kemerovo __________________------------(Ulaan Baatar) SERNA 5019N 10629E Kyakhta Irkutsk Osa KUTIR 5331N 10330E Nizhneudinsk LONKA 5445N 09640E MIKET 5426N 09204E KEDRA 5423N 09130E LARNA 5412N 08952E Novokuznetsk _____-________---___----------A345 _-_____________--____---------A310 Khanty-Mansiysk Novy Vasyugan Kolpashevo Ach insk Sorka Aginskoye LONKA 5445N 09640E Razdoly e Kyakhta SERNA 5019N 10629E (Ulaan Baatar) Irkutsk Bolshoye Goloutsnoye TATUR 5208N 10727E Khorinsk Chita AGINO 5106N 11432E Zabaykalsk TELOK 4938N 11723E (Hailar) __-_________-_______-_--__----- _____________________---_------ 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- I V-A-13
  • 92. EUR BASIC ANP V-A-14 1 LOWERATSROUTES A351 1 I LOWERATSROUTES I LOWER ATS ROUTES l A355 ------__------____________--_-- Karaganda GEDNO Ekibastuz VAVUS EKTUS PIVAL IAGMO Tole bi (Rasht) BASAN 4334N 07354E LALDA RODAM 4314N 07420E NASIL Bishkek NASAR SULET 4306N 07435E GOBUS UMLOD 4322N 07507E Baku OTARI 4333N 07528E BUNIS Akchi NAMAS UMIRO 4414N 07636E GASBI BIOTA 4421N 07642E Aktau GINDO 4501N 07722E KOLIB KONAT 4528N 07748E Atyrau LIPSI 4618N 07840E KODUM BUSAR 4709N 07935E BILGA KURUL AYWZ ---_--__---------______________ BOLGO Aktyubinsk A356 AVLOK LENTA Atyrau Kostanay LEPSI 4655N 05402E DEPIR PEMOL 4650N 05450E KOKAV TISRA 4638N 05639E Petropavlovsk ABDUN 4613N 05942E BARK1 SANUR 4557N 06125E Omsk Novokazalinsk Kyzylorda REMOL 4427N 06813E TUROK 4421N 06910E GAMBU 4411N 07023E Zhezkazgan Tole bi GORIM SUBIR 4345N 07412E Arkalyk KADAN 4355N 07550E ARPAL Akchi ATBAN UNADA 4336N 07649E Kokshetau Almaty Petropavlovsk IKANA Kurgan Kyzylorda ULMAK GENDI ARVAR ARBOL Taraz DEMAS VETIK SORAM Narynges Osh 5022N 07400E 5138N 07552E 5142N 07653E 5146N 07751E 5150N 07915E 4336N 06748E 4318N 06822E 4323N 06910E 4331N 07051E 4248N 07120E 4156N 07147E 4144N 07153E - --_ _ - _ _ _ -_ - A354 ...................... TOGDI ABMIK MALOD DESER TUKTO Akchi Uzunagash 4722N 07315E 4556N 07436E 4518N 07511E 4455N 07531E 4412N 07609E 2Qi8iQ3 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 3816N 04945E 3901N 04951E 3939N 04957E 4005N 05000E 4047N 05002E 4120N 05000E 4226N 05028E 4541N 05130E 4800N 0551OE 4824N 05534E 4842N 05552E 4941N 05642E 5058N 05836E 5149N 06023E 5402N 06624E 5422N 06739E 5452N 07100E A359 4849N 06725E 5048N 06721E 5158N 06822E 5459N 06812E --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- ____________________-----------
  • 93. ~ ATM V-A-15 LOWER ATS ROUTES A360 A367 MULTA Aktyubinsk KESOT BEKOR TIBDA UMDEM GORIM MAKUT DITKI KUROL AGAKO TOGDI Balkhash DITUR NOMBA OSNET GUDOL GINDO NALIK IDBAL EKSOM LARBA REVKI (Kuqa) 5105N 05651E 4959N 06019E 4945N 06231E 4938N 06329E 4856N 06653E 4849N 06725E 4832N 06837E 4821N 06924E 4759N 07048E 4744N 07150E 4722N 07315E 4558N 07611E 4538N 07636E 4516N 07703E 4508N 07713E 4501 N 07722E 4450N 07735E 4427N 07802E 4356N 07839E 4327N 07913E 4233N 08013E A361 Evreux L'Aigle Rennes A365 Karakol KUDAS 4150N 07944E * _ _ - _ - Note 4 (China) Tole bi ALAKO ABMIK Balkhash OBARU AGPIN LAMS ULKAP. AGINU GOBSO EKTUS Pavlodar 4421N 07359E 4556N 07436E 4729N 07513E 4840N 07542E 4900N 07550E 4907N 07554E 4948N 07611E 5056N 07635E 5142N 07653E A368 Volchanka GUTAN Uralsk SIVKO Aktyubinsk BESOL ABIRA KUSOT Arkalyk VAMRI RELGO GURPI Karaganda DIMUT ULKAP GORBO OSNER Ayaguz TOLKI AGUSA SARIN (Tacheng) 5140N 05059E A369 _____-_-___------___----------Kurgan IVOLI KOKAV Kokshetau Astana BANOS Karaganda GONEL LUKUS GIREM Balkhash MAROR LEKLU DINVO Akchi DETAK NIGET Kirbaltabay 5447N 06651E 5422N 06739E 5012N 07240E 4839N 07359E 4808N 07417E 4732N 07437E 4537N 07535E 4507N 07549E 4413N 07613E 4348N 07651E 4341 N 07711E 5019N 05435E A370 5023N 06116E 5024N 06225E 5021N 06551E 5014N 06817E 5003N 07018E 4957N 07114E 4919N 07506E 4907N 07554E 4903N 07611E 4821N 07854E 4734N 08117E 4714N 08204E 4652N 08253E (China) A366 Karaganda BODNU ODAMA GOBSO ABDAM LAGMO Mikhaylovsky Pavlovsk LOWER ATS ROUTES --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- LOWER ATS ROUTES AFGAN DARVA Urgench UBAGU NITNA MIMRI DILNA Kyzylorda GORVA ATRUS Zhezkazgan MAKUT AMIGU RELGO BASPA LIGMO Astana AMOLA ULSET POBUR DAKIN 3824N 05817E 41 19N 06025E 4302N 06251E 4330N 06336E 4338N 06348E 4415N 06449E 4625N 06647E 4653N 06707E 4832N 06837E 4917N 06925E 5003N 07018E 5022N 07040E 5046N 07109E 5239N 07156E 5300N 07203E 5338N 07214E 5410N 07224E 5024N 07509E 5034N 07535E 5056N 07635E 5131N 07817E 5150N 07915E ________________--_-____ 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 94. EUR BASIC ANP LOWER ATS ROUTES 1 LOWERATSROUTES Atyrau EPOLI ODPUT LUKET Shalkar ULRIP SUBOL Zhezkazgan 4727N 05435E 4730N 05502E 4738N 05617E 4753N 06340E 4751N 06445E 1 i LOWERATSROUTES A454 ’ A371 _______________________________ Irisu NAVUR OMELI BABAK OBURA INVAL ARTUS A483 4120N 07354E 4137N 07419E 4150N 07438E 4219N 07524E 4230N 07541E 4250N 07613E Czempin *----KORUP A484 ______________--____---__-_____ PADKA SKAVI DIBED A466 Note 8 5135N 01444E 4956N 01817E 4959N 01956E 4953N 02304E A372 ATBAN OSROL BASPA GURPI NEDRO LUTEK AGADI BAGIL Balkhash RITAB DODOK ETEDA KOSUR UMIRO DETAK BEDUR Almaty 5158N 06822E 5050N 07002E 5022N 07040E 4957N 07114E 4917N 07206E 4829N 07306E 4806N 07334E 4734N 07411E 4542N 07543E 4514N 07600E 4420N 07632E 4417N 07634E 4414N 07636E 4348N 07651E 4336N 07658E A373 Seo de Urgel Villanueva --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- I V-A-16 Tamdy-Bulak Guzar AMDAR Novotyryshkino Barabinsk A477 POGON Bukhara UVASU RAVOB Syrdarya Karakhtay SONAG 3953N 06242E 4043N 06813E 4047N 06834E 4135N 07104E ---______________-_-___________ A480 ________-_______---------____AGMAL OTBOR Urgench BORIS PAVEL KARIM GENDI 3948N 05409E 4128N 06012E 4251N 06606E 4300N 06647E 4312N 06748E 4318N 06822E A489 Belozersk Lapek PUNIT 5950N 04139E Andat Belokolunitskiy Mendeleyevo Perm Biseti Smore Yekaterinburg (Koltsovo) Takhtalym Kurgan ............................... A422 ____-_______________-__-_______ Baku PARSU (Parsabad) A487 3712N 06720E A481 3938N 04805E A491 A482 -________________________-__-_CRAYE RODON 4130N 01808E 4128N 01905E Tirana 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 1
  • 95. ATM 1 V-A-17 LOWERATSROUTES 1 A492 A869 A499 ............................... Iveka Nizhny Ufalei Yekaterinburg (Koltsovo) I LOWER ATS ROUTES I LOWER ATS ROUTES ROMOR ---_DINRO 4356N O291O E Notes 2,4 (BUL, ROU) 4342N 02849E SOVAR 4247N O0015W Zaragoza ADUXO 4031N 00204W ............................... A871 A532 MALIN STORY ~ 4808N O0017E 4836N 00127E ~~ Martin Villatobas LARDA t A575 A494 _________-_____________________ Altay (Ubs) NIDOR 5029N 09126E Novokuznetsk * - _ _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Omsk t _ - _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Yekatennburg (Koltsovo) *----Note 2 (RUS) Perm Note 2 (RUS) Vyatka - _ _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Vologda A496 _______________________________ Verkhnie Vysots'ke *----Note 2 & 3 (UKR) - Route Break lasi UNIRA 4710N 02751E KODRU 4656N 02856E _______________________________ --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- A498 ________-______________________ (Ulaan Baatar) DARN0 5021N 09818E Kyzyl Turan Novokuznetsk Legostayevo Matveyevsky Novosibirsk (TMA) Novoturyshkino RENGA 5619N 08042E * - _ - _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Novy Vasyugan _ _ - _ - Note 2 (RUS) Khanty-Mansiysk Ukhta _________________________-----A777 (Kabul) Ashgabat Kizil KAZAN 5536N 04917E Turkrnenbashi Baku _ _ _ _ _ Note 2 (GEO) Tbilisi Bacau POGAV KODRU 4647N 02810E 4656N 02856E t _ _ _ - - Note 5 (UKR) Odesa A857 Barahona KAMP0 Hinojosa _---- LATEK 4209N 00118W Notes 2,3 (E) 4252N 00037W A905 Michaelsdorí Hamburg BI _________________-------------Pampus Dortmund Germinghausen Frankfurt Main Dinkelsbuhl Walda München Viiiach Ljubljana Omarska Sarajevo Budisavci *----_ Note 3 (YUG); Note 4 (GRC) Thessaloniki Skopelos Athinai Didimon Paleohora (Benina) _________________-_____________ 3944N 00403W 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 96. n V-A-18 EUR BASIC ANP ¡ LOWERATSROUTES *----- KLONN 5360N 00554W Note 6 (G) 5824N 00250E 83 Belfast Isle of Man Wallasey Honiley Brookmans Park Dover Cambrai Châtillon Rolampont I LOWERATSROUTES DOGGA BEEN0 ELDIN Spijkerboor Rekken Hamm Arpe Fulda Hammelburg Erlangen Roding Salzburg RASTA Klagenfurt Zagreb Derventa Valjevo Aleksandrovac Vranje --___ Fiska Thessaloniki 5324N 00156E 5313N 00303E 5310N 00321E 4723N 01332E Note 2 (BUL) Sankt Peterburg (TMA) *----Note 8 (RUS) Kikerino *----Note 8 (RUS) Osmino * _ - _ - _ Note 8 (RUS) SERBI 5838N 02836E GRAD1 5657N 03007E Velikiye Luki OìAGO 5542N 03029E Vitebsk RUMIK 5428N 03032E LUBIN 5418N 03035E KOPON 5341N 03045E MAMIN 5258N 03056E Gomel LOVIK 5205N 03101E * _ - _ _ _ Note 2 (UKR) Koshany Shyriaieve BAGRI 4511N 02948E B9 GRICE 5612N O0341W Talla Pole Hill Brookmans Park ûetling - Route Break BANK0 4549N 00703E OMET0 4544N 00803E Saronno Vicenza _ _ - - - Note 4 ( i ) Pula Losinj Zadar Sarajevo Aleksandrovac Kalotina ____---______----_------------- B6 Roding Linz Graz Zagreb Ornarska Split *----Brindisi Note 3 (I) 87 --------------__--------------Katiuzy Gruda Ldz BIO cork BANBA Jedow LENOV 4920N 02101E Kosice KEKED 4831N 02118E - Route Break LOMOS 4350N 02315E Bailovo RODOP 4135N 02411E Chrisoupolis 5157N 00615W --__________________---------__ 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 1 B8 B5 B2 __________________------------Dublin GELKI Turnberry Perth Aberdeen ¡ Not for Resale v
  • 97. Y a Y 1 LOWERATSROUTES B I1 1 1 LOWERATSROUTES 1 i LOWERATSROUTES B24 BI8 --_-_____---_-___-_--------_--- ___---_____________----_------_ Southampton ELDER 5040N 0012OW FAWBO 5000N O0119W - Route Break Nantes _ _ _ _ _ Note 2 (F) Bilbao Vitoria Domingo Arbancon Madrid Villatobas Bailen Malaga GALT0 3550N 00509W (Tetouan Porto Espichel NARTA 3603N 01234W RULET 3415N 01455W Porto Santo BIMBO 3126N 01602W Gran Canaria BI2 BI9 CLARA Chartres VILRO Amboise *----Cognac Bordeaux ENSAC Biarritz 4909N 00056E 4741N 00112E Notes 2,3 (F) 4412N 00041W Montdidier Boulogne Saint Inglevert 825 SINPO 4620N 00317E Lyon - Route Break FIR BDRY 4514N 00650E Tonno Genova Firenze Ancona Split Mostar Gacko Budisavci _________-_-------_------__---- Sitia (EI Daba) B26 _-----___------___---___----_-__-_-------_--_____------___--- Luki Velikie 820 e BI3 Châtillon ARSIL Rolampont 1 4834N 00404E - _ - _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Subi DenkoGruda Mravo Suwalki Chudovo - - _ _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Sankt Peterburg t 821 827 B I6 Martigues Passeiry La Tour du Pin Montélimar Avignon Martigues LUMAS 4144N 00440E Menorca (Zemmoun) *---__ Note 2 (i); Notes 2,5(F) Alghero Carbonara Gozo (Benina) -__-_____--____________________ Varna MATEL ANGOL *-_--_ NARAN UDROS Inebolu Samsun Erzurum 823 BI7 Nicosia (Ben Gunon) O Vicenza Chioggia Ancona Vieste Brindisi *----Note 4 (i) NOSTO 3949N 01900E Araxos -__-------_-----____---_-_-_--- --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 4258N 02847E 4257N 02900E Note 4 (ROU) 4249N 03000E 4244N 03036E
  • 98. EUR BASIC ANP V-A-20 LOWERATSROUTES I I I LOWER ATS ROUTES B28 ____________________----------Passeity TIBOT 4529N 00556E - Route Break Barcelona Valencia Yeste Malaga PIMOS 3609N 00454W (Tanger) _____________________---------B29 _____________________---------Lambourne ERING t -_--- SASKI Costa Nicky *---Kleine Brogel ROMIN Lima Bottrop Osnabruck Leine - 5136N 00137E Note 2 (G) 5133N 00230E Note 5 (BEL) Ostia GIANO (Tunis) LOWER ATS ROUTES 838 B32 ---____________________________ 3852N 01227E _______--______________________ FIR BDRY Gerona Sabadell 839 B33 RUMUK 4802N 0232îE Baia Mare Ciuj Sibiu Curtea de Arges Floresti KOMAN 4359N 02613E - Route Break Vama Burgas _ _ _ - - Note 4 (TUR) ADEL1 Istanbul 4129N 02848E (EUM VI REC 814) ___------_______----_---___---_ Dublin TOLKA CHELT *--___ MALBY 5311N 00530W 5152N 00223W Note 5 (G) 5136N 00204W 841 BAVOK Katowice Jedow keszow DIBED --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 1 5000N 01812E 4953N 02304E _--_-_________-________________ 5113N 00558E 834 ____-_---___-_____-_--_-__-____ Araxos Didimon Milos Rodos Note 1 (Araxos-Milos) B31 Pampus Nicky Chievres Châtillon - Route Break Pithiviers VEROS 4720N 00212E -Route Break La Châtre Note 4 (F) Gaillac Sabadell PUMAL 4222N 00159E Barcelona Palma de Mallorca (Zemmoun) 836 845 --________-------___------_---GOSOT Chociwel Denko PNEWY Czempin Trebni EKTiL Sliac 5233N 01612E 5001N 01800E - - - - - Note 5 (SVK) -___________---_-____-----_---- ---____________________________ 2OI8103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 5449N 01451E Not for Resale
  • 99. ATM V-A-21 1 LOWERATSROUTES B46 Hochwald * ----Note 5 (SUI) Saint Prex COLNA 4546N 00621E - Route Break Palma de Mallorca Ibiza Alicante INDIG Chociwel TEBLU 5413N 01704E Kartuzy Krniecin GOMED 5427N 01939E PRAMA 5436N 01959E Kaliningrad (TMA) RUSNE 5514N TITAK *----- 4616N 02106E 4426N 02107E B58 Madrid Barahona LARDA SOVAR 5124N 01050E _____-_________________________ B53 *----- __--LUMOK Zaborowek 5200N 01800E Note 8 5212N 01928E Note 8 5215N 01953E 864 Ibiza Andraib Pollensa 865 4209N O0118W 4247N 00015W B51 Warburg NENSA Gotem Leipzig 863 5346N 01417E Note 5 (POL) BINKA 848 4514N 02119E LOWER ATS ROUTES B56 -----__________________________ TEGRI Arad Timisoara MAVIT Pozarevac POZAR I B60 Lisboa PORTA 3920N 00718W Caceres Navas del Rey Colmenar Arbancon Calamocha Maella Lenda Sabadell Bagur PAPAS 4206N 00420E TIGNU DOXON LARMA 5536N 01950E 5527N 01810E 5516N 01630E ............................... 866 _______________-_______________ Terrnez AMDAR (Kandahar) 3713N 06721E B67 ---__------------___-___-_____Reserved for Sweden B70 B61 Sauveterre - _ - - - Note 2 (F) BELPA 4500N O0157E *----Note 2 (F) Clermont Ferrand t ERGON ALUKA Denko 5254N 01409E 5254N 01418E - - _ _ _ Note 5 & 8(POL) DODEK --_-Zaborowek 5223N 01940E Note 8 872 Sauveterre _____ BELPA _---MURRO Note 2 (F) 4500N 00157E Note 2 (F) 4519N 00423E ~~ 20/8/03 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale ,
  • 100. V-A-22 EUR BASIC ANP LOWER ATS ROUTES 873 RANOK TIGNU 5455N 01858E 5536N 01950E I LOWER ATS ROUTES ____________-_______--_--_----- BI02 Siedlce MOTKA 5207N 02333E - Route Break BARVU 5430N 03105E Yukhnov Tamdy-Bulak ROGAV 4153N 06352E Urgench München Klagenfurt Ljubljana Reus - _ - _ _ Note 2 (E) Lerida MOPAS B I04 4225N 00102E 692 Neckar Luburg AALEN 4836N 01007E ____________________-------____ B I 08 696 ............................... Hemisdorf Dresden Leipzig Magdeburg POVEL Leine LOWER ATS ROUTES __-_-------_________------__--_ BI03 691 i Anadyr Tilichiki Ust-Karnchatsk Petropavlovsk-Karnchatsky BI14 _________________-_____________ Shyrnkent KOMM 4237N 07025E Taraz Tole bi RIVUN 4401N 07412E DESER 4455N 07531E LEKLU 4507N 07549E DODOK 4514N 07600E NOMBA 4538N 07636E UDEKA 4553N 07700E GENGA 4616N 07738E . AGAR0 4711N 07909E Ayaguz GOMIR 501I N 08442E 8117 5208N 01050E Tarndy-Bulak REPKA Nukus BI11 ____________________--------___ Sinop GERZE SarnsunlCnn Trabzon Kars ANARA SEVAN KEDAB Yevlakh Baku AKDIN Turkrnenbashi 4150N 03510E 4034N 04339E 4033N 04456E 4036N 04602E 4014N 05130E -_________--________--_----_-__ 2Of8IO3 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 4144N 06353E
  • 101. ATM V-A-23 LOWER ATS ROUTES I 1 LOWERATSROUTES BI19 LOWER ATS ROUTES BI44 BI24 ----___________________________ TAMAK 4751N 03913E Rostov-na-Donu Yegoriykskaya Mineralnye Vody Kizlar Makhachkala (Uytash) AGATO 4216N 04832E BUMAR 4202N 04855E OMAKI 4149N 04916E NAMAS 4120N 05000E ASIAN 4105N 05037E MAMEX 4055N 05103E METKA 4043N 05130E Turkmenbashi Vladivostok SESUR (Seoul) LONìA 4820N 02219E Ivano-Frankivs'k Soloviivka KEDUB 5024N 03027E KUROS 5045N 03148E 4218N 13042E BI40 TALIK t ----REMKA TABAN *--___ BI45 4215N 03346E Note 4 (BUL) 4232N 03630E 4249N 04002E Note 4 (GEO) ODIRA Kutaisi Tbilisi 4243N 03655E Sukhumi --______-______________________ BI46 Kaliningrad (Khrabrovo) BOLUK 5454N 02105E KRAK1 5457N 02244E Sankt Peterburg (Pulkovo) * - - - _ _ Note 8 Kotly *---_Note 8 RANVA 5927N 02806E ._ MAKUN *----- NANIR *----ORLAN KIMBA *_____ BI21 Tabriz MEGRI Sisian Sevan SADLA Mukhrani BI42 ___________________________ 3853N 04615E 4115N 04448E ----------_____________-___-__- BI22 ............................... Ekirnchan Ayan Okhotsk Balagannoye BI23 Nikolayevsk-naAmure Note 2 (RUS) Ayan _____ SIVKO BOLGO KEKUN Shalkar IDROS AVìAK Novokazalinsk Kyzylorda POKAT KARIM RELRU ARSUL Shymkent BARAR ARBOL Tole bi BERVI OTARI Uzunagash Aimaty Kirbaltabay KERUP ROGON REVKI (KW) 5019N 05435E 4941N 05642E 4908N 05824E 4634N 06117E 4612N 06143E 4329N 06723E 4312N 06748E 4249N 06818E 4226N 06850E 4350N O3411E Note 4 (BUL) 4351N 03435E Note 4 (BUL) 4351 N 03505E Note 4 (BUL) 4345N 03630E Note 4 (BUL) Sochi BI47 4348N 02930E Note 4 (BUL) 4345N 03022E Note 4 (BUL) 4315N 03630E Note 4 (BUL) 4249N 04002E 4251N 07003E 4331N 07051E 4340N 07412E 4333N 07528E --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- BI20 BI41 ___________________-________ 4329N 07746E 4305N 07849E 4233N 08013E ~ 2018103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 102. EUR BASIC ANP V-A-24 1 LOWERATSROUTES I LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES BI70 B225 BI56 PRONA 3931N 07053E Kyzyl-Kiya Osh Irisu IDIRA 4128N 07416E MEDAS 4147N 07452E Balvi MAMIR 4255N 07637E LAKEL 4312N 07655E Almaty Kirbaltabay DESOK 4416N 07755E IDBAL 4427N 07802E MAKEK 4619N 07917E GOMAL 4708N 07952E Ayaguz Ust-Karnenogorsk BOKIS 5058N 08333E Biysk Novokuzneîzk (Spichenkovo) Sankt Peterbui'g (Pulkovo) 5951N 03037E NEVOD 5959N 03031E SEGON 6003N 03027E BADUN 6009N 03031E TOBAM 6024N 03021E VASOK 6040N 02945E DAREK 6056N 02910E RATAR 6051N 02821E NUVRO Dublin BEPAN DIMUS BANBA 5231N 00614W 5214N 00615W 5157N 00614W __-------____-----_____-----___ B226 Talla ANGUS 5642N 00303W BI71 8227 Vilrnas NUVRO 6051N 02821E RATAR 6056N 02910E ----_ Note 2 (RUS) TOBAM 6009N 03031E t - - _ - _ Note 4 (RUS) Sankt Peterburg BI59 Petrozavodsk Murmansk Note 2 (RUS) + - - - - - Medveziy Island __------____------____------__- BI90 Toledo Somosierra Domingo San Sebastian B229 8205 4043N 05130E Note 2 (RUS) Kirkenes AAAAA Murmansk XXXXNXXXXXE DIXON METKA --__Petrovskoe 7331N 08025E * _ _ - _ - Note 2 (RUS) 8206 -----____-_----_______----_-___ (Fukang) GOPTO 4905N 08728E VIGAR 4915N 08729E Aktash Biysk Novokuznetsk Novosibirsk (TMA) Kirkenes AAAAA Munansk *----Arnderma 8231 XXXXNXXXXXE Note 2 (RUS) ----_______----________________ 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 103. ATM I V-A-25 LOWERATSROUTES 1 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 8237 8232 Ali TUNIS Gumn Talin OKUDA Yerevan Chaybukha t - - - - - Note 2 (RUS) ANIMO 411O 04347E N LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES . 4509N 14338E _____________________--------__ 8243 ____________________----------KOTLY LEDUN PON00 5937N 02ô47E 5959N 02607E ____________________----------- 4009N 04402E 8238 (Barrow) ---__ 8233 ----__________________--------(Barrow) Mys Shrnidta Note 2 (RUS) Pevek Cherskiy * _ _ _ _ - Note 2 (RUS) - - _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Ornolon *----Note 2 (RUS) Tahkhtayamsk ODORA 5600N 14931E t - - _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Shakhtersk *----Note 2 (RUS) Innokentievsky _ - _ _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Yedinka VELTA 4529N 13710E TEKUK 4241N 13527E NULAR 4059N 13411E Kangwon (Seoul) --_-- Note 2 (RUS) Zytyanka ----_ Oymyakon *----Chagda ----Magdagachi Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (RUS) Note 2 (RUS) 8246 __________------_-_----------Stebliv PESON Parutyne NITOK Dobrushyn Mykolaivka _ _ _ _ _ Note 4 (CHINA) (China) ____________-____-_____________ 4703N 03155E 4608N 03255E t B239 ............................... Selikhino " _ - _ _ _ Note 2 (RUS) VELTA 4529N 13710E 8247 RASIL 4522N 03128E - _ - - _ Note 4 (RUS, BUL) SUBAN --_-- INGUR ----_ 4511N 03208E Note 4 (RUS, BUL) 4500N 03245E Note 4 (RUS, BUL) 4459N 03304E SKALA Mykolaivka SONEP 4502N 03359E Chervonolissya Alushta 8234 8248 8236 8242 Gambell Benngovsky *----- ___________________________--__ Note 2 (RUS) Chaybukha _______________________________ BESAT t 5945N 17925E _ - _ _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Tilichiki BUKOV LURIK ABRAD DIBRO Pinsk GANVI Ivenets MOLOD KUREN *----- DUBIN -__ __ _ _ _ - . 4757N 02557E 4816N 02558E 5037N 02608E 5142N 02607E 5257N 02624E 5414N 02646E 5443N 02650E Note 2 (LTA) 5549N 02659E ..................... 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 104. V-A-26 LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWERATSROUTES I 8363 8327 -________--_________--___------ (Cape Newenham) BAMOK 5625N 17249E *----Note 2 (RUS) Nikolskoe _ _ _ - _ Note 2 (RUS) 8275 IRKAN Termez Nagomaya Tamdy-Bulak Zelenga BABUR Aktau NEPIL MEDOL KUNAS Nukus Tamdy-Bulak OGOLI DIBAD ABEKA Toyiepa Karakhtay Andizhan 5520N 16256E 8337 Tahkhtayamsk *----- 8281 ROMEM e----- GEANT Gerona I ~ 4225N 00213E PAKLI *_---- ANIMO (Asahikawa) Note 2 (RUS) 5327N 14700E Note 2 (RUS) 4646N 14508E Note 2 (RUS) 4509N 14338E 4523N 04930E 4342N 05225E 4334N 05317E 4309N 05600E 4129N 06636E 4117N 06756E 4107N 06844E ______________________--------8364 8293 8351 Germinghausen Warburg Hehlingen 8365 Chaldovar _--_____---______-------------MIKDA 4246N 07330E KOKED 4230N 07317E VANAT 4213N 07302E 8299 ______-____________________---TAKUL 4153N 07245E KUSEV 4141N'07235E Nicky *----Note 2 (D, HOL) Narynges Osh Frankfurt Main _________________--------______ *_---Note 5 (BEL, D) _______________________-------Reserved for RUS --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 1 EUR BASIC ANP 8366 8368 8353 8315 Spijkerboor LEKKO 5155N 00446E ______________________--_------ _______________________________ Reserved for RUS Chaldovar ANAKO TUMKO OBADA VEGUS RUDAN Dzhalal-abad ________________________------- 4230N 07327E 4225N 07326E 4208N 07320E 4158N 07317E 4115N 07304E 8369 Reservedfor RUS Osh RATOR 8370 3923N 07136E ' ____________________-_--------Tamdy-Bulak MOMUL BUGEB OGRIP ABEVO Syrdarya 4115N 06640E 4108N 06708E 4054N 06805E 4050N 06834E ____________________----------- 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 105. Y " V-A-27 ATM I LOWERATSROUTES 1 I I LOWER ATS ROUTES --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 8372 Saint Prex --_-_ OMET0 8479 LOWER ATS R I 8490 _______________________________ _---_ Tim t 8373 1 l DIBED Shepetivka Koshany Reserved for RUS Note 5 (SUI) 4544N 00803E F 4953N 02304E Note 4 (RUS) _ _ _ - _ Note 4 (RUS) Petrovskoe Moulins Troyes Note4(RUS) Russky Kameshkir + - - - - - 8481 . ____________-_______________--- Reserved for RUS B491 8384 ____________________----------- Perpignan Gerona, 8483 8403 Ashgabat Turkmenbashi 8451 Dongshan Qiqihar Harbin ASUKI 4318.0N 12946.0E BISUN 4314.0N 13111.8E Vladivostok (TMA) Lazo TEKUK 4241N 13527E _ _ - - - Note 2 (RUS) IGROD 4139N 13647E (Niigata) 8485 Reserved for RUS 8486 8493 DIBED ELDOP VILUR t -_--- 4953N 02304E 4803N 03313E 4640N 03725E Note 4 (RUS) Yegorlykskaya 8467 Yedinka VELTA TEKUK NUìAR (KANSU UNIRA 4710N 02751E KODRU 4656N 02856E TURBA 4ô42N 02947E Odesa 4511N 03623E BETEG PALER 4509N 03633E Anapa (Vityazervo) _ _ - _ _ Note 2 (RUS) Smolenskaya _ _ _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Peredovaya _ _ _ _ - Note 2 (RUS) Kislovdsk Derbent 88 48 8494 Reserved for RUS 4529N 13710E 4241N 13527E 4059N 13411E 3830N 13228E) 8495 Soloviika Nemynv KODRU IRMAL 4656N 02856E 4519N 02849E 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 106. V-A-28 EUR BASIC ANP LOWER ATS ROUTES 8499 LOWER ATS ROUTES 8713 I LOWERATSROUTES I 8824 _____________--_________------_ ______________________-----_-_- ____________________--_-___--_- NORTU KODRU POGAV NURSA DERKI Kasan Nagornaya BIGS0 ODIVA BOLNA MILS0 ABDUN DOKAM KURUL GERLI Uralsk ............................... 3721N 06343E 3831N 06506E 4017N 06757E 8505 8810 Frankfurt Main Arpe 6545 BEKIR BALUN Tole bi 4235N 06408E 4338N 06257E 4225N 06046E 4613N 05942E 4701N 05833E 4842N 05552E 4953N 05352E ___--_______-_______----____-_- 4104N 04753E 4201N 05127E 6901 -__-____------____--------__--Kaliningrad RUSNE Afyon Mut (Beirut) 5514N 02126E - Route Break PIRUS SERB1 Osmino GORKA Belozersk ............................... 8700 _________________________-_-___ 5820N 02731E 5838N 02836E --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 471I N 02940E 4656N 02856E 4647N 02810E 5949N 03221E Bailen Almena 8950 Chaldovar SOMUS NAVUR KURUM 8707 ............................... MAMED 3835N 05742E KENER 4122N 05130E LASKA 4214N 04916E ----Note 2 (RUS) Makhachkala (Uyiach) ___--_-___-___-__________---___ 6822 ---____--------_____-____-___-AMIGU MIMKA DAKIN 4917N 06925E 5024N 07003E 5410N 07224E . 8823 TUSEP LIGMO Ekibastuz 5032N 06808E 5046N 07109E GI ___________--_______----____-_Shannon Clonmel SIANY Stnimble Bran Compton Biggin Dover Koksy Dender Olno Nattenheim 5210N 00551W *----Note 1 (Olno-Frankfurt) RUDUS 5003N 07757E Frankfurt Main Hammelburg Erlangen MOOCE 4925N 01158E Roding Freistadt 8712 2018103 No.2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS 4203N 07346E 4120N 07354E 4006N 07407E Not for Resale
  • 107. V V-A-29 ATM LOWER ATS ROUTES - Route Break DINRO MATEL RIXEN ADEL1 Istanbu1 64 4342N 02848E 4304N 02848E 4205N 02846E 4129N 02848E 62 APLON VELOX (Beirut) LOWER ATS ROUTES 3352N 03204E 3349N 03405E --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- 6 3 -_______-________________-----OPOKA 5645N 02754E Velikie Luki AMDOR 5618N 03100E Bely Gagann Venev Oktyabrsky Algasovo Zemetchino Penza Russky Kameshkir BATUR 5215N 04808E ABARO 5207N 04834E ARISA 5129N 05033E Uralsk MAGOL 5037N 05505E Aktyubinsk KEKUN 4908N 05824E Shalkar IDROS 4634N 06117E AVLAK 4612N 06143E Novokazalinsk BADAS 4422N 06437E DILNA 4415N 06449E BEKAS 4404N 06507E RILOK 4314N 06625E PAVEL . 4300N 06647E MIKNO 4202N 06812E DODUR 4123N 06848E RODRO 4114N 06900E Toytepa Dalverzin _______________________________ 1 LOWERATSROUTES 1 G6 ________________-_-_---------__ ............................... Shannon cork ' 5117N 00730W TIVLI Lands End LIZAD 4935N 00420W Jersey Caen Evreux Mantes - Route Break Bray Rolarnpont Luxeuil Hericourt Hochwald Trasadingen SAFFA 4742N 00ô48E Kempten Eurach Salzburg Mende Montpellier RHONE Martigues G5 4323N 00451E ______________________---_----Gl Espichel ELVAR Caceres Toledo Castejon Maella Barcelona Bagur Martigues Saint Tropez Nice Albenga Genova Bologna *-__-_ 3914N 00713W Note 4 (I) Chioggia (Casablanca) KORIS 3550N 00614W Vejer de la Frontera Martin Bailen Castejon SEGRE 4056N 00226W - Route Break Gaillac Mende Lyon Passeiry Saint Prex Fribourg Willisau Trasadingen RALIX 4804N 00833E Tango Dinkelsbuhl Würzburg Fulda Lichtenau Leine Hamburg Lübeck ________--------------_-__----G8 ............................... Teano Pomigliano Sorrento - Route Break Crotone Araos Konnthos Athinai Karistos Lesvos Biga Istanbul Yalova Ankara Gernerek Elazig siirt ALRAM 3743N 04437E (Uromiyeh) ________---__-___________-_-___ 2018103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 108. EUR BASIC ANP V-A-30 LOWERATSROUTES 5222N 00351E Kyzylorda TIMKA TISIT ARBOL 4409N 06815E 4403N 06839E 4331N 07051E G14 Ostia Carbonara *----- Note 4 (i,TUN) (Constantine) *----- Note 5 (POL) Zaborowek *----Suwalki I Gia 5208N 01050E 5207N 01239E 5220N 01409E LOWERATSROUTES GI3 G9 ____________________-__-------TULIP Pampus Rekken Osnabrück Leine POVEL Magdeburg BUROK GORIG Subi Czempin Lodz I I Note 5 (POL) ___________-----_-_--_____----- Valjevo Budisavci -Route Break Fiska +GRC Mesta +GRC LARK1 3724N 02650E Rodos (Ben Gunon) +GRC: At present, implementationis possible only during specific periods as published in aeronaut-¡cal information publications of Greece. Outside these periods and until full implement-ation of this route segment, ATC will be provided on a routing Fiska-LimosMesta in accordance with ICA0 Council Decision 114115. --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- ~ G21 Saarbrücken Grostenquin Epinal Rolampont Moulins Limoges Zamora Gll * _____ Viseu e Notes 2,3 (E) -__--______-________----------- GI2 (Cap Bon) Trapani Palermo Carafía Crotone Kerkira Thessaloniki Alex Tekirdag Yalova Note 6 (I) Note 6 (I) Note 6 (I) Note 6 (I) GI7 -_--___--_-----_--_____________ 20/8103 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 109. V -A-31 ATM LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES PATEL Bilbao Pamplona Barcelona Alghero Ostia Pescara Split Sarajevo Valjevo Topola VELIP Floresti Mizil BIKAR Odesa PESON ELDOP Auly 4416N 00347W 636 Limoges Gaillac Perpignan 4446N 02132E 631 4528N 02812E 4704N 03156E 4803N 03313E _______________-------------- Cola Taunus Frankfurt-Main Luburg Jablonka *----- + - - - - - Note 1 (Frankfurt-Tango) Tango G25 _______________________________ Barcelona LUMAS *----- 4144N 00440E Note 2 (F) G32 Passeity Tonno _-_-- Note 5 (F) Ostia G33 G27 Lydd NEVIL ANGLO NORDA Jersey 5000N 00022W 4957N 00027W 4947N 00106W Sollenau Graz Klagenfurt Villach SOLNI Bolzano Saronno Note 2 (SLK) 4645N 1225E G38 _______________________________ Ajaccio t G37 _-__________________----------- G34 _______________________________ Porvoo GOGiA 6006N 02627E t - _ - - _ Note 8 (RUS) MARIM 6007N 02952E t - _ - _ - Note 8 (RUS) GOTAL 5958N 03003E Sankt Peterburg Skopje VELBA Vakarel Bailovo Golyama SOMOV Floresti Mizil Galati SORET KOMAK KODRU DUBOS LANDA 4158N 02253E 4342N 02451E 4547N 02809E 4629N 02838E 4656N 02856E 4723N 02855E 4819N 02853E 2018lO3 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 110. P V-A-32 If EUR BASIC ANP I I --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- LOWER ATS ROUTES I- LOWERATSROUTES I LOWER ATS ROUTES o G63 G40 ____________________--__---_--- --------______-----_----------- Abbeville Reims ARSIL Troyes Autun Tango SEGMA Zürich East AGERI 4834N 00404E 4758N 00916E 4707N 00836E ________i___________-_--------- G41 ~ ATLEN 4430N 00457W Asturias BARK0 4212N 00657W CANAR 4123N 00729W Viseu Fatima Espichel _______________________________ G43 ____________________---_------ALBIX HochwaI d *----MOROK 4715N 00834E LATEK Pamplona Domingo Zamora RIVRO EspicheI 4252N 00037W G67 4037N 00643W _----_____-----_____----------653 La Tour du Pin Mende Castejon Yeste t ----- Note 5 (E) Almena Note 2 (F) 4722N 00634E _---______-----_____----------- G44 65 4 ............................... Zurich East BODAN FUSSE TEGAD Eurach 680 ______________----__----------- 4735N 00927E 4734N 01029E 4739N 01053E ADORU Tekirdag Biga Izmir RodOs Karpathos Sitia --_____-_______________________ 20/8/03 ' No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 4152N 02634E
  • 111. u ATM a V-A33 LOWER ATS ROUTES 681 Elazig Van BONAM (Uromiyeh) 3803N 04418E 685 Korinthos Didimon G91 a MIRZO Ura-Tyube 3932N 06955E LOWER ATS ROUTES LOWER ATS ROUTES G96 ............................... G102 ............................... Makhachkala (Uytash) KAVIL 4324N 04930E Aktau BODS1 4450N 05419E MASAV 4505N 05511E DIVNO 4544N 05740E ABDUN 4613N 05942E IDROS 4634N 06117E ARKAM 4712N 06432E TIROK 4725N 06551E Zhezkazgan DITKI 4821N 06924E INTAL 4844N 07029E NEDRO 4917N 07206E Karaganda EKTAB 4946N 07507E AGINU 4948N 07611E Semipalatinsk VIDAN 5047N 08153E *----Note 2 (RUS) Biysk Weser Hamburg Friedland Diekirch Kim Ried König WÜRbUrg Allersberg Linz _____--_________--------------6107 G98 _______________________________ G93 Ajaccio TEREZ POZZO RAMEN Decimomannu SARD1 Tabarka Sidi Ben Aoun 1 4120N 00902E 4057N O0916E 3948N 00856E Leine LARET Leipzig ABLOX 5144N 01053E 5125N 01418E G99 Constanta Tulcea IRMAL 4519N 02849E Odesa GONUS 4640N 03230E RITET 4646N 03253E Kakhovka Dnipropetrovs'k 3831N 00853E Michaelsdorf TOSPA IRKIS DIRBO Hehlingen LARET G109 5408N 01059E 5315N 01053E 5249N 01051E Koksy 5144N 01053E Diekirch Note 5 (BEL) GI10 GlOO G95 Magdeburg RISOK Warburg Kirn Rudesheim FERDI DENUT 5055N 00338E 5114N 00340E 5153N O 108E 1 O 2Ol8IO3 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale
  • 112. V-A34 EUR BASIC ANP LOWER ATS ROUTES 1 LOWERATSROUTES G128 G111 _____________________---------Magnitogorsk TITUR Kostanay ìATKO ATNON ATBAN Astana 5324N 06109E 5225N 06644E 5212N 06734E 5158N 06822E ____________________--__------- SONAG VETIK BASIB BEKMU DODER Chaldovar Bishkek Kalinovka Balvi 4135N 07104E 4157N 07146E 4207N 07206E 4232N 07257E 4248N 07330E 'GI34 1 I I LOWERATSROUTES Zhezkazgan AGAKO BAGIL GIREM DONUR OBARU MADEV ORGUK AGAR0 BUSAR GOMAL BURID GILAK SARIN (Tacheng) I 4744N 07150E 4734N 07411E 4732N 07437E 4730N 07501E 4729N 07513E 4719N 07704E 4715N 07813E 4711N 07909E 4709N 07935E 4708N 07952E 4703N 08101E 4658N 08156E 4652N 08253E ______-______------_____--_____ GI61 Yevlakh BEKIR NAVIG OMAKI RALED GASBI AKUKU LUMUR BALIG NEPIL BODSI MASAV G120 Bruxelles HELEN 5114N 00352E G121 Akchi ETEDA OSNET AKIRA GENGA ORGUK IBDAS OSNER UVTOK Semipalatinsk VOTIL Rubtsovsk MATAM Pavlovsk 4104N 04753E 4144N 04907E 4149N 04916E 4200N 04937E 4226N 05028E 4251N 05105E 4307N 05130E 4320N 05150E 4342N 05225E 4450N 05419E 4505N 05511E ............................... 4420N 07632E 4516N 07703E 4543N 07719E 4616N 07738E 4715N 07813E 4734N 07825E 4821N 07854E 4939N 07945E 5114N 08055E 5146N 08120E ----_ _- . -- Baku BULUD ASLAN IBRUT BALUN DEKUR INRED MEDOL MASAV DIVNO ABDUN IDROS ARKAM TIROK 4042N 05015E 4105N 05037E 4135N 05104E 4201N 05128E 4223N 05153E 4253N 05227E 4334N 05317E 4505N 05511E 4544N 05740E 4613N 05942E 4634N 06117E 4712N 06432E 4725N 06551E 20/8/03 No. 2 Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale Aktau AKUKU RUTIL IBRUT MAMEX AMIRU ULDUS ----_ __ __ . G167 ..................... 4251N 05105E 4211N 05105E 4135N 05104E 4055N 05103E 4017N 05102E 3800N 05101E ..................... --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- __--________-------___----____-
  • 113. ATM V-A-35 LOWER ATS ROUTES 1 LOWERATSROUTES 1 LOWER ATS ROUTES ~ GI79 G226 ............................... LUSAL IALDA --_-- 4035N 04757E 3816N 04945E Note 2 (IRN) (Noshahr) G212 ___-____-_____-________________ (Nome) VALTA 6424N 17105W Provideniya Bay Anadyr Markov0 Chaybukha Tahkhtayamsk Magadan Balagannoye Troitskoye Khabarovsk ARGUK 4753.5N 13439.4E Haiqing Jiarnusi Harbin Tongliao Gubeikou Qinbakou Nanchengzi Taiyuan Yijun Sanyuan Xiaoyanzhuang Ningshan Wufengxi Fujiachang Weining Maguohe Kunming ____----_______________________ (Gambeli) OLTON 6353N 17234E DUKAR 6437N 17943E Anadyr Keperveyem Cherskiy Chokurdakh Nizneyansk Tiksy Tairnylyr MyS-KOSiSty Ust-Tareya Dikson ___-___________________________ G229 _-_________-----_______----____ G243 ____________________----------LUTAR VARAN NONIK AGMAL Turkmenbashi 3953N 05921E 3953N 05753E 3954N 05606E 3848N 05549E G248 Dalverzin Karakhtay G253 ISTER Menorca 4004N 00440E Belozyorsk Kinshi + - - - - - Note 2 (RUS) G255 Osmino -_--- PIRUS Note 2 (RUS) 5820N 02731E Santiago Domingo G230 REBDA NIMAG ARSUL 4148N 06905E 4158N 06901E 4226N 06850E G313 Kempten Rattenberg Villach G235 G346 (Kimchaek) NUìAR IGROD 4059.2N 13411.OE 4139.0N 13647.0E G350 SARPI Kars 4133N 04127E AMDOR t ---_- ABAGA 5618N 03100E Note a 5629N 02809E ----___________--____---------_ G225 G351 Nurata OGRIP 4055N 06805E Reserved for RUS 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale I
  • 114. V-A-36 EUR BASIC ANP I LOWERATSROUTES 1 LOWER ATS ROUTES G362 Lampedusa RALAK Djerba G373 3432N O1130E Villach ROKSI 4628N 1324E Note 6 (i) Ronchi dei Legionan _____ _______---______-___-_-------__ G365 Reserved for RUS ............................... G374 BELPA 6354 *----- AULON 4500N 00157E Note 2 (F) 4423N 00139E Reserved for RUS 6366 6355 G368 G400 Reserved for RUS Sitia KUMBI (Baltim) 6370 6361 Gozo REPTA Lampedusa BIRSA Sfax 3542N 01311E G372 3503N O 130E 1 2018103 No. 2 --`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`--- Copyright International Civil Aviation Organization Provided by IHS under license with ICAO No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale 3343N 02845E
  • 115. . ATM V-A-37 LOWER ATS ROUTES 1 LOWERATSROUTES G475 Padun Arkhangelsk Kuzomen Ukhta Khanty-Mansiysk Novy Vasyugan Kolpashevo Aginskoye Razdolye Kyakhta (Mongolia, China) _______________________________ ............................... CubuWBuk SamsunlCrm Kyiv "Boryspil" LAKTA GOMAD BEREG BABOK Vitebsk DIBED Chemiakhiv *----ODIRA RABIT + - - - - - Note 2 (RUS) 4243N 03655E 4309N 03727E Note 2 (RUS) Note 4 (BUL) 4409N 03732E + ----TITAL Anapa t ----Note 2 (RUS) VILUR 4640N 03725E ----Note 2 (RUS) Manupol Note 2 (RUS) Valuiki t ----Note 2 (RUS) Moskva _ _ - - - Note 2 (RUS) Cherepovez ' - - - - - 2 (RUS) Note Petrozavodsk *----Note 2 (RUS) Murmansk *----Note 2 (RUS) Medveziy Island *----Note 2 (RUS) (Notih America) + - - - - - 4953N 02304E Note 2 (RUS) Koshany *----Tim Note 2 (RUS) ----- Note 2 (RUS) t Petrovckoe _ _ _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Russky Kameshkir * _ _ _ - - Note 2 (RUS) Novosibirsk (Mongolia, China) _______________________________