PRODUCT MARKETING IN A WEB 2.X WORLD Haas Business School April 23, 2009 Marketing in web 2.X
Product Marketing in the wrong hands…
Eight to great <ul><li>Category and Target Definition –  customer insights, segments, verticals. </li></ul><ul><li>Value P...
<ul><li>Find a first (and second target) customer </li></ul><ul><li>Listen well and gain insights </li></ul><ul><li>Keep t...
Gain access to deep insights  (and let your customers help you)
Who’s your second target customer?  What does the data say?
<ul><li>Create something worthwhile </li></ul><ul><li>Base it on an insight </li></ul><ul><li>Hold it sacred in all produc...
Keep   the value proposition simple
OXO:  base the value prop on an observed insight <ul><li>Why do ordinary kitchen tools hurt your hands?  </li></ul><ul><li...
2.X value props inspired by the times (and the community)
Refine your Value Prop <ul><li>User Findings :   It’s all about productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Consumers had specific task...
<ul><li>Nail your positioning based on value prop and  competition </li></ul><ul><li>Understand direct and indirect compet...
Position against a category And what it takes to deliver on it in a 2.x world…
Position yourself as the alternative
Counter-positioning:  Tap the power of the majority
<ul><li>A good story is one that anyone can tell (and is true!) </li></ul><ul><li>Your brand  becomes  this story </li></u...
The power of storytelling <ul><li>[play]   </li></ul>
Have a story for your product <ul><li>Characters </li></ul><ul><li>Insight/context </li></ul><ul><li>Plot (Problem/Solutio...
Refresh your story
Enable the community to enhance your story
Can you control the story?
Get the story back on track
<ul><li>Understand the whole product wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Have it drive your product/partner priorities </li></ul>Know ...
Think through the entire consumer experience
Study feedback to understand user experience
Timbuk2:  what it takes to build an authentic bag…
<ul><li>Focus on function not form </li></ul><ul><li>Delight your users! </li></ul><ul><li>Let them help you make it bette...
Make the hard   product decisions to create competitive separation
Add the Consumer’s Voice to Decision-making <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable more informed decision-making by...
Seek feedback on your service levels
Follow product buzz
Seek deep feedback (especially at launch)
Use strong data platform to track experience over time
Listen and respond…
Invite help on new sites
Let your customers help you innovate
Follow the fans for inspiration
Allow users to allow you to personalize the experience
<ul><li>What’s your business model? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s your base price? </li></ul><ul><li>How many SKUs? </li></ul>P...
New business models
Let consumers set the prices in a 2.x world
Enable community to gain market power
<ul><li>Communication and distribution channels </li></ul><ul><li>Funnel management </li></ul><ul><li>KPIs </li></ul>Chann...
Diet Coke:  Building a communications program
Fun with funnels <ul><li>Consumer marketing funnel </li></ul>Online marketing funnel
<ul><li>Identify key audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Simplify:  answer question, “what do you want user to do?” </li></ul>Make...
Make it simple; point the user
thisMoment:  lead the witness…
thisMoment:  lead the witness
Adopt a Product Group  Exercise
Evaluating the new user experience  <ul><li>Before you get started: </li></ul><ul><li>See it as they see it: clear cookies...
Evaluating the overall product experience  Now that you are settled in, is it still as good? What has changed? <ul><li>Key...
Evaluating the Product Marketing  Reverse engineer! <ul><li>Key Questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Who would the assets make you...
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Haas 2009 Riemer Weigend

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Marketing Strategy in a Web 2.0 world

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  • SKU: Stock-Keeping Unit
  • Target customer: best products have a customer in mind. Facebook vs. most other social networks 2 nd Target customer: Honda CRV (women first, environmentally conscious second) Customer intimacy: companies that “get” their customer win Ask yourself: who is this for? What are my key segments? What is their life like? What are their motivations? How do customers differ by segment? How can you maintain an ear to the ground (constantly)? What research still needs to be done?
  • Good Grips kitchen tools grew out of one man&apos;s desire to build a better potato peeler for his arthritic wife.
  • What motivates your key customers? Don’t ask what technology can do… ask what it can do for a user? Have I thought about benefits and end benefits? Am I keeping it simple?
  • OXO began with a few simple questions - Why do ordinary kitchen tools hurt your hands? Why can&apos;t there be wonderfully comfortable tools that are easy to use? The man who asked these questions was Sam Farber. Sam, who had recently retired as the founder of a successful housewares company, first questioned the effectiveness of kitchen gadgets in response to his wife Betsey&apos;s difficulty in gripping ordinary kitchen tools, due to a slight case of arthritis in her hands. Seeing an opportunity to help not only people with arthritis but also to create more comfortable kitchen tools for everyone to use, Sam came out of retirement and approached the design firm Smart Design with that challenge. As part of the initial research that included talking with consumers, chefs and retailers, Patricia Moore, a noted gerontologist, was brought on board to help understand the needs of the users with special needs.
  • * To help recessionistas cope in this economy, apparel rental services are coming to the rescue. * Dress Vault facilitates the lending, borrowing, buying and selling of frocks. Members put pics of their dresses into their virtual closet and include a rental or purchase price. Borrowers cover shipping costs, but not the cleaning bill. * Over in London, Girl Meets Dress is helping women look their best on a budget by loaning high-end dresses from designers like Diane Von Furstenberg, 3.1 Phillip Lim and Stella McCartney. The shopper designates her loaner length — from two nights to a month —and returns the dress in the package it was delivered in.
  • See what is resonating with your segment. Find an insight that rings true. Find a truth in your product that REALLY addresses the segment. Insure that you can own this competitively.
  • See what is resonating with your segment. Find an insight that rings true. Find a truth in your product that REALLY addresses the segment; Insure that you can own this competitively. Example: Southwest. The happy airline. Herb Kelleher empowered everyone to innovate by saying, “just do what you need to do to make the customers happy.” Airline travel sucks. No one seems to like it (even the crew). Southwest will change that. Staff wears shorts, they smile, they crack jokes. Their planes are sometimes painted like killer whales. The fares are cheap. Planes are on time. Flying is fun again and they make it possible to deliver the ultimate end benefit: Mobility (you’re now free to move about the country). Brand masters: brands that sweat tone, style, language, names, built on a story What are the qualities of the brand/product? What visual language: mnemonics, images, colors represent the brand? Who are the characters in the story and what challenges do they have to overcome (and how does the product make this possible?)
  • What was the “idea” in this case? The product a wheel shaped slide tray. What was the innovation and the imperative that the Agency came up with? Pictures are about nostalgia, a place to go back to. Imperative: use an emotional not a technical sell. What elements comprised the “how”. The name: Carousel. The story: Greek copywriter story, the images of the family, the yearning to go back. The visual: carousel image. Why do we need to inspire innovation ? Why can’t an idea sell itself?
  • Stories protect and transport ideas Characters and “Customer Insights” – it’s hard to have a story without central characters. Pinpoint key customers for the idea and describe the insights must relevant to this problem. Context – what is the environment – global, local, competitive, etc. – that helps us understand the customer issues. Problem – what problem does our customer face that needs to be addressed? S olution (idea as hero) – how does our idea solve the problem that we have defined? Mnemonics/key visuals – how can we make the story more memorable with a key visual(s) or mnemonic device that helps bring more meaning to our story and make it more memorable? Illustration of great storytelling: we’ll illustrate the power of a story with either a children’s story a movie or both (e.g. Cinderella); we’ll then compare that to a business innovation story (e.g. the Blackberry). Main characters in the Blackberry story was the strapped “in-meetings-from-8-to-5” executive. Problem was she was out of the loop during the day and unresponsive to his/her team and the boss as well. A huge sense of powerlessness. Solution was this amazing device with a cool name, a big screen and cool keyboard that was great for reading and sending e-mail. Well, you’re tempted if you are running for president or building a product or selling a service, to tell different stories to different people because if you tell each person the story that they need to hear, you’ll make more sales. The problem is people talk to each other now. The problem now is your speech gets recorded and put on YouTube and everyone gets to see it. The problem is that you can’t say you’re against sweatshops and then have one in India because people will discover it. And so in a world where everyone is talking behind the scenes, you have to live your story. Your story actually has to be true. What we find is that companies that really care about what they do and live their story have no trouble keeping their story straight because they just tell the truth all the time.
  • Insight: Insight – even amateurs see themselves as competitors Story: it came from “the swamp” Gatorade helps maximize “performance” Keeps athletes at the top of their game.
  • Not just the product itself. Whole product – who delivers an experience not just a product Whole product analysis today (what elements beyond obvious) Buying, provisioning Partners
  • The Tao of Timbuk2 Timbuk2 is more than a bag. It’s more than a brand. Timbuk2 is a bond. To its owner, a Timbuk2 bag is a dependable, everyday companion. We see fierce, emotional attachments form between Timbuk2 customers and their bags all the time. A well-worn Timbuk2 bag has a certain patina– the stains and scars of everyday urban adventures. Many Timbuk2 bags are worn daily for a decade, or more, accompanying the owner through all sorts of defining life events. True to our legend of “indestructibility”, it’s not uncommon for a Timbuk2 bag to outlive jobs, personal relationships, even pets. This is the Tao of Timbuk2. City-Born and Street-Tough Timbuk2 has been a San Francisco original since 1989. Stitch-by-stitch, bag-by-bag, we’ve built a solid reputation and a loyal following among real-life, hard-working bicycle messengers and cycling enthusiasts. Over the years, our messenger bag emerged from its working-class roots — adopted by a growing number of urbanites, students, and young professionals as a stylish alternative to the ubiquitous two-strap daypack and the formal black briefcase. Products To Delight Our Customers As we move forward, we remain faithful to our working-class urban roots, while expanding our city-bred sensibilities to a broader range of products and a wider audience. All of our new products share the same sense of style, toughness, attention to detail and dedication to quality that have made our Classic Messenger Bag a true classic.
  • A marketers most powerful weapon Element owners LOVE their cars, because they deliver on the value proposition and every detail is done with it (and them) in mind
  • Competitive separation is huge! To do so in the laptop space, Jobs had to be radical Imagine the conversations Jobs head with his staff: There&apos;s only one USB port, no FireWire, no Ethernet port, no microphone in port for audio enthusiasts, no ExpressCard slot for expansion purposes, no SD card slot, and no dedicated docking port on the bottom of the notebook. Integrated battery is a big challenge No ethernet port? No disc drive? No USB ports?
  • Setup daily searches on Twitter and Google to see who is talking about your brand, industry keywords, and competitor keywords. Optional, if you have budget, look at tools from Techrigy, Scoutlabs, Radian6, or Visible Technologies. Setup a process internally with your customer support, marketing, product management, and pr before you start communicating Since you are starting social media within your company, you need to start educating those around you. Setup brown-bags teaching them on the tools you use and the data you see. Teach them a whole new way of communicating in a honest, truthful, &amp; personable way.
  • A marketers most powerful weapon Element owners LOVE their cars, because they deliver on the value proposition and every detail is done with it (and them) in mind
  • Funnel businesses: understanding the acquisition model Review and assess funnel Discuss KBIs (Key Business Indicators) Channel discussion: Current customers Direct sales Resellers SEM/SEO/affiliate Other: Events, viral (customers of customers), advertising, unattributed site traffic Prioritize channels Assess key points of leverage Identify testing/optimization platform
  • Sites that say what they mean: Reference UI review Key audiences (prospects, customers, partners, press, investors) Desired actions for key audiences Answer the question “what do we want you to do on this page?” Messaging prioritization Overall By audience Navigation discussion Role of phone number vs. other calls-to-action Wireframe brainstorm for key audiences
  • Sites that say what they mean: Reference UI review Key audiences (prospects, customers, partners, press, investors) Desired actions for key audiences Answer the question “what do we want you to do on this page?” Messaging prioritization Overall By audience Navigation discussion Role of phone number vs. other calls-to-action Wireframe brainstorm for key audiences
  • Make sure you break your habits to change the way you see and do things: different room, setting, IE 6, 800x600, time of day, PC, etc. there might be a few ways to perform an action and WE usually know the easiest and fastest… Getting started is different from getting engaged = e.g. starting with Mail is getting a Y!ID. Getting engaged is adding contacts and sharing you new email address.
  • Settle in. Use the Product for a t least 2 weeks. Point there is not to focus on all features and aspects, the Mkg Manager should know them, instead try and focus on peaks and valleys. Hesitation point example: where is the Gmail ‘reply’ button? Your hand gets stuck on your mouse not knowing where to go for more than 5 secs? Report it!
  • 1. Reverse engineer the Marketing: based on what you see, reconstruct the foundation of their product marketing (target segment and positioning). 2. Also: Does marketing reinforce the product? Is it in line with the positioning and style of the product? e.g. Disconnect of Y! Msgr today: sign-up for a new one and you will feel that it’s a Voice product (Voice is only one of many features now, the product is about letting you instantly connect with friends)
  • Haas 2009 Riemer Weigend

    1. 1. PRODUCT MARKETING IN A WEB 2.X WORLD Haas Business School April 23, 2009 Marketing in web 2.X
    2. 2. Product Marketing in the wrong hands…
    3. 3. Eight to great <ul><li>Category and Target Definition – customer insights, segments, verticals. </li></ul><ul><li>Value Proposition -- core benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Positioning – capabilities, value proposition, competition </li></ul><ul><li>Brand/Naming/Marketing Communications– brand values; product/feature names; advertising/PR approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Whole Product Analysis – product delivery, customer service, critical partners </li></ul><ul><li>Product Road Map – priorities to meet value proposition and maintain edge. </li></ul><ul><li>Pricing and Product Enhancements – biz model, base price, SKUs </li></ul><ul><li>Channels and Metrics – Current customers, Direct sales, Resellers, Events, Viral (customers of customers), SEM/SEO; marketing funnel, KPIs and testing platform. </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Find a first (and second target) customer </li></ul><ul><li>Listen well and gain insights </li></ul><ul><li>Keep the conversation going </li></ul>Pick a target and get to know them 1.
    5. 5. Gain access to deep insights (and let your customers help you)
    6. 6. Who’s your second target customer? What does the data say?
    7. 7. <ul><li>Create something worthwhile </li></ul><ul><li>Base it on an insight </li></ul><ul><li>Hold it sacred in all product decisions </li></ul>Have a reason to exist (a value proposition) 2.
    8. 8. Keep the value proposition simple
    9. 9. OXO: base the value prop on an observed insight <ul><li>Why do ordinary kitchen tools hurt your hands? </li></ul><ul><li>Why can’t there be wonderfully comfortable tools that are easy to use? </li></ul>Where does OXO go in 2.0?
    10. 10. 2.X value props inspired by the times (and the community)
    11. 11. Refine your Value Prop <ul><li>User Findings : It’s all about productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Consumers had specific tasks in mind when using their mobile phone for non-voice purposes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Check Email ─ Check out bus/train/flight schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Check Weather ─ Find a nearby restaurant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read News headline ─ Get driving directions, traffic incidents, parking spots </li></ul></ul>Current Experience Wish List “ I lookup stock values daily on my phone; I then call the broker when I want to buy or sell, because timely action is important .” “ Movies are amazing. I only need the movie function on my phone,…the ability to find a movie theater close to me and what’s playing and what times and the description of those. It should be quick, simple and easy. That would be a ten “ <ul><li>Focus on functionalities </li></ul><ul><li>Right-at-the-moment info </li></ul><ul><li>Accurate results </li></ul><ul><li>Easy navigation </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum clicks/scrolling </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Nail your positioning based on value prop and competition </li></ul><ul><li>Understand direct and indirect competitors </li></ul>See where you fit. 3.
    13. 13. Position against a category And what it takes to deliver on it in a 2.x world…
    14. 14. Position yourself as the alternative
    15. 15. Counter-positioning: Tap the power of the majority
    16. 16. <ul><li>A good story is one that anyone can tell (and is true!) </li></ul><ul><li>Your brand becomes this story </li></ul>Tell a story 4.
    17. 17. The power of storytelling <ul><li>[play] </li></ul>
    18. 18. Have a story for your product <ul><li>Characters </li></ul><ul><li>Insight/context </li></ul><ul><li>Plot (Problem/Solution) </li></ul><ul><li>Mnemonics & Visuals </li></ul>
    19. 19. Refresh your story
    20. 20. Enable the community to enhance your story
    21. 21. Can you control the story?
    22. 22. Get the story back on track
    23. 23. <ul><li>Understand the whole product wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Have it drive your product/partner priorities </li></ul>Know what the “ whole product ” looks like 5.
    24. 24. Think through the entire consumer experience
    25. 25. Study feedback to understand user experience
    26. 26. Timbuk2: what it takes to build an authentic bag…
    27. 27. <ul><li>Focus on function not form </li></ul><ul><li>Delight your users! </li></ul><ul><li>Let them help you make it better </li></ul>Get the product right 6.
    28. 28. Make the hard product decisions to create competitive separation
    29. 29. Add the Consumer’s Voice to Decision-making <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable more informed decision-making by collecting & synthesizing consumer insights for product and executive team </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why do it? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decisions based on data vs. intuition balances internal biases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catalyst for product improvements/bug fixes, as it is impossible to simulate in house all real world use cases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify new product features & prioritizes product roadmaps based on market demand </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Things to think about </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Automate feedback for quality and scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include in business metrics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share with entire product team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hold weekly insights meeting </li></ul></ul>Consumer Insights Website feedback Customer Care Reports SDS-usage data, DYC UER- usability testing etc GMR survey, Focus Group etc Help Section on website Internal QA M-metrics and other industry reports 3 rd party research User groups - Wired Moms - Young adults Opinion leaders-blogs, articles
    30. 30. Seek feedback on your service levels
    31. 31. Follow product buzz
    32. 32. Seek deep feedback (especially at launch)
    33. 33. Use strong data platform to track experience over time
    34. 34. Listen and respond…
    35. 35. Invite help on new sites
    36. 36. Let your customers help you innovate
    37. 37. Follow the fans for inspiration
    38. 38. Allow users to allow you to personalize the experience
    39. 39. <ul><li>What’s your business model? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s your base price? </li></ul><ul><li>How many SKUs? </li></ul>Pricing and Product Enhancements 7.
    40. 40. New business models
    41. 41. Let consumers set the prices in a 2.x world
    42. 42. Enable community to gain market power
    43. 43. <ul><li>Communication and distribution channels </li></ul><ul><li>Funnel management </li></ul><ul><li>KPIs </li></ul>Channel and metrics 8.
    44. 44. Diet Coke: Building a communications program
    45. 45. Fun with funnels <ul><li>Consumer marketing funnel </li></ul>Online marketing funnel
    46. 46. <ul><li>Identify key audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Simplify: answer question, “what do you want user to do?” </li></ul>Make sure the site works One Louder
    47. 47. Make it simple; point the user
    48. 48. thisMoment: lead the witness…
    49. 49. thisMoment: lead the witness
    50. 50. Adopt a Product Group Exercise
    51. 51. Evaluating the new user experience <ul><li>Before you get started: </li></ul><ul><li>See it as they see it: clear cookies, get a new ID. Change PC, screen res... </li></ul><ul><li>If you can, start by clicking on a banner, or run a web search or the FP </li></ul><ul><li>Pay attention to tools / experience provided to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>get you to convert / try </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>get you started smoothly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>get you engaged quickly </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bonus points: watch someone else (a prospect) do it </li></ul><ul><li>Key questions </li></ul><ul><li>Was it quick? Easy? Clear? Engaging? Different? </li></ul><ul><li>Was it simple, unique, daring, innovative, authentic and fun? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you remember? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you feel? </li></ul><ul><li>What made you stay? (or leave?) </li></ul>
    52. 52. Evaluating the overall product experience Now that you are settled in, is it still as good? What has changed? <ul><li>Key questions </li></ul><ul><li>What do you feel is the product’s competitive advantage and differentiator? </li></ul><ul><li>What are its strengths and weaknesses? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify “hesitation” points vs. “obvious” points. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>After 1 week without using it, what do you remember most? (the ‘highs’ and the ‘lows’) </li></ul><ul><li>Is it in line with Yahoo!’s 6 brand attributes? What is, what’s not? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you feel now ? </li></ul>
    53. 53. Evaluating the Product Marketing Reverse engineer! <ul><li>Key Questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Who would the assets make you think they are targeting? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think their positioning is? </li></ul><ul><li>How do the product and marketing fare against it? </li></ul><ul><li>Was the Mkg and the promise in line with the actual product experience? Did they over promise or over deliver? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Do the Mkg Assets reinforce the brand? </li></ul><ul><li>Are in-product / education assets clear and helpful? </li></ul><ul><li>Are they consistent with the “acquisition” assets? </li></ul>

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