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Becoming Agile: Transforming with CollaborativeLifecycle Management
 

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  • ACCELERATED DELIVERY...• Need to balance speed and agility with control and governance• Mobile apps are perfect example of need for speed and agility• But mobile apps have implications for the systems they interface, which adds complexity that needs to be controlled • In recent study of IBM customers – they selected increasing speed while maintaining quality – as their largest challenge• Can no longer compromise between speed and control• We need bothThis challenge is reflected in the perspectives we have in our roles• An inherent conflict exists between engineering practitioners and governance stakeholders• Engineering practitioners need flexibility to design, create and test in most effective way possible• Governance stakeholders need visibility, transparency, predictability and risk management• Accelerated delivery demands a quid pro quo• Stephen R. Covey coined the term “Speed of Trust”• Trust is secret ingredient to accelerate delivery (integrity and competency)• Developers must embrace measurement• Managers must enable agilityCritical First Step – Cross Tool, Cross Silo Queries
  • In terms of activities – there is an entire week of great education, networking and entertainment!When most people think of Innovate, they think about the great technical education that takes place. This year – like every year – we plan on delivering over 400 technical break out sessions on all the topics that matter to you. From Requirements Management, through Agile Delivery, Quality Management and Systems Engineering to name a few – we have the best and brightest client, partner and IBM speakers delivering session after session of great technical education.We augment that with hands on labs – as it’s one thing to hear how something is done, it’s a whole other to do it!Every day we kick off with some great general sessions – with really inspirational speakers. In the past we’ve had the likes of William Shatner, Michio Kaku and the Mythbusters on hand – as well as key industry visionaries and some of our most interesting and insightful IBM leaders.Our partners are always a big part of the conference – and this year will be no exception. We plan on hosting the biggest Expo Hall we’ve ever had – where you can see what’s going on in the extended IBM family.And of course – networking – year after year, our client surveys show networking is one of the top reasons they come to Innovate. Networking with clients, industry experts and IBMers – building relationships and contacts that far outlast the one week of the event.But enough of me telling you what we do...I’ve brought a quick video, to give you a feel of how we do things at Innovate....Toni – can you roll the video for us? (90 second video)

Becoming Agile: Transforming with CollaborativeLifecycle Management Becoming Agile: Transforming with CollaborativeLifecycle Management Presentation Transcript

  • Becoming Agile: Transforming with CollaborativeLifecycle Management11:20 a.m. -12:00 p.m.Speakers include:• Michael O’Rourke, Vice President, Rational Strategy & Software Delivery, IBM
  • An IBM TransformationBecoming Agile, Avoiding Fragile Mike O’Rourke Vice President Rational Offering Strategy and Delivery Feb 2013
  • Agenda The IBM Institute of Business Value Study (IBV) A Shared Business Problem The Need for Speed: Accelerated Product and Service Delivery Agility at Scale Measuring Agile – Two Winds Blowing
  • “The software edge: How effective software development can drivecompetitive advantage ” A Market Study by the IBM Institute for Business Value  This study examined the correlation between 62% of government clients identified software delivery competency and industry software as “crucial” competitive advantage to exceptional performance More Financial Services software  Insights from 435 executives in 58 countries, Retail intensive spanning 18 industries Telecommunications Level of Software Intensity Travel & Transportation  Roles included executives at director level and Government 62% above in IT and other software organizations Pharmaceutical/L.S. Automotive  Software delivery refers to all areas of Industry Average development, operations, and support within IT and other development / engineering Professional Services organizations Consumer Products Industrial Products Less software Energy & Utilities intensive Source:IBV Study 2012 “Advanced Software Organizations” - a class of “mature” clients differentiated from their peers through their effectiveness in driving results and outcomes through software delivery. 4
  • The IBV study found that software delivery is critical to achievingmaximum performance High-level key findings:  Important technology trends are impacting how organizations compete, for which most are underprepared  Software has become crucial in determining the competitiveness of organizations, yet few can leverage it for advantage  Fundamental differences exist between what lines of business expect, and what the IT/software organization can deliver Source:IBV Study 2012 69% of the organizations that are considered outperformers are able to effectively leverage their software delivery capabilities. 5
  • From delivering government services to protection and public safetySoftware innovation helps improve the quality of life for citizens Software-driven government Complex and instrumented world Growing demand for digital government services.  F-35 is powered by 5.7 million lines of code By 2013, more Americans will access the internet (v. 1.7 in the F-22) via mobile devices than desktop PC’s  21 million smart meters are deployed in the U.S.  234 million people in the U.S. over age 13 use a  Surgical robotic systems are powered by mobile device, and 65 million own a smart phone 1.4 million lines of code Sources: whitehouse.gov digital government mandate; http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government.html The Australian Software Acquisition Management Course, Defense Systems Management College, 3/2000; http://analysis.smartgridupdate.com/industry-insight/could-us-have-universal-smart-grid; http://surgrob.blogspot.com/2009/02/da-vinci-s-robot-2.html; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_mobility_management Source:IBV Study 2012 54% of executives recognize that software delivery is crucial to achieving competitive advantage, but only 25% of software delivery organizations state they can take advantage of it.6
  • Bottom Line: Insufficient spend on strategic projects Source:IBV Study 2012 29% have insufficient budget to invest in additional software capabilities Created by David Puzas, WW Marketing Executive for IBM Enterprise Services, 2007. 7
  • Three Major Areas of Improvement Required Cost Quality Time-to- Market
  • We Needed to Do Things Differently ------- FAST!  Organize differently  Develop differently  Deliver differently  Measure differently
  • Agenda The IBM Institute of Business Value Study (IBV) A Shared Business Problem The Need for Speed: Accelerated Product and Service Delivery Agility at Scale Measuring Agile – Two Winds Blowing
  • Improving Time to Market Isn’t Just Doing Things Faster Analysis Code/test Production Design Automation Automation Automation Platform Platform Creative Behavior Procedural RigorWhere You Development In Production Are Stove-piped Tools Analysis Design Code Software Delivery Consumers Implications Users Automation Automation • Automation Across the Creative BehaviorWhere Procedural Rigor Lifecycle • Constant Planning You • Agile Testing Development In Production • Continuous DeliveryWant Common Software Delivery Automation • Agile Stakeholder Interaction • Methodologies for ScopeTo Be Collaborative Lifecycle Platform Management
  • Key challenges to accelerating software delivery Skills • 31% lack of employee skills with new software technologies Investments • 31% lack of certainty about ROI • 29% have insufficient budget to invest in additional software capabilities Alignment • 27% believe it is too much effort to maintain current applications leaving little for strategic projects • 22% have insufficient processes for defining strategic business capabilities and the needed software capabilities • 22% of software delivery programs are not aligned with business priorities Collaboration • Lack of effective communication and linkage across stakeholders/citizens, LOB/agency, development teams, and operations Source: IBV Study 2012 12
  • Key Thoughts? Can you Become Agile? TTD: TTP: Time To Development Time To Production How long from a change request How long to change a single line of to start development? code and push to production? 57% take longer than a month for 44% find that very simple deployments development to begin take 1+ week Source: Q4 2010 Global Release Management Online survey
  • For Many, the Benefits of Agile Aren’t Fully Realized Water Scrum Fall
  • For Many, the Benefits of Agile Aren’t Fully Realized We believe over 90% of all companies claiming to have adopted agile methodologies, have only transformed their development teams, minimizing their overall return…thus, our term “Water-Scrum-Fall”. Dave West, Forrester Research 2011 Continuous Development Continuous TestingContinuous Planning Continuous Integration Continuous Delivery Groomed Backlog Continuous Feedback Continuous Build
  • Continuous Delivery Required for Agile Backend An iterative set of quality checks and verifications that each piece of application code must pass during lifecycle phases before being released to production. Development Testing Staging ProductionBusiness Customers Owners Continuous DeliveryAverage Lead Time Development, Testing and Staging Cloud 2-4 months To get a new application environment up and running 50% of applications put into production are later rolled back (Gartner)Bugs Introduced By inconsistent configurations that  60% - 80% of an average company’s IT are difficult to detect and emerge budget is spent on maintaining existing 30% when moving between development, QA/Test and Production applications (Intelligent Enterprise.com)
  • Need for Speed - Avoiding Fr-Agile Potholes  Faster Iterations in Development with Faster Product Management and Testing / Deployment will Yield Little Increased Speed  Anything Manual is a Potential Bottleneck  Some Products are not Suitable for Speed Architecturally  Stakeholder Interaction Become Exponentially More Difficult in a Software Supply Chain
  • An Example from Within Rational – CLM (RQM, RTC and RRC) Lifecycle Measurements 2008 2010 2012 – Total Improvement 2013 Project Initiation 30 days 10 days 2 days 28 days Groomed Backlog 90 days 45 days 1 day 89 days Overall TTD 120 days 55 days 3 days 117 days Iteration Length 6 weeks 4 weeks 4 weeks 4 weeks Number of Iterations 6 8 3 N/A Composite Build Time 36 hours 12 hours 8 hours 400 % BVT Availability N/A 18 hours < 1hour 17 hours Iteration Test Time 5 days 2 days 4 hours 4 days Total Deployment Time 2 days 8 hours 2 hours 2 days Overall TTP 9 days 3 days 15 hours 8 days Time Between Releases 12 Months 12 Months 3 Months 9 Months
  • Agenda The IBM Institute of Business Value Study (IBV) A Shared Business Problem The Need for Speed: Accelerated Product and Service Delivery Agility at Scale Measuring Agile – Two Winds Blowing
  • Issues With Agility@Scale Team size Compliance requirement Under 10 1000’s of Critical, developers developers Low risk audited Geographical distribution Domain Complexity Straight Intricate, Co-located Global -forward emerging Disciplined Enterprise discipline Agile Organization distribution Project Enterprise Delivery (outsourcing, partnerships) focus focus Collaborative Contractual Organizational complexity Technical complexity Flexible Rigid Heterogeneous, Homogenous legacy
  • Three Fundamental Changes Were Needed Integration Increasing control tools Collaboration Optimizing how Optimization Continuously improve by integrating people work while through real-time workflows and “forcing” minimizing face-to- transparency and new habits face interactions constant steering • Integration is required for • When speed is important, • Both teams and management automation, especially tools must assist in must understand progress across disciplines and collaboration. Scrum of (or lack thereof). repositories. scrums will not suffice.
  • Productivity Reigns Supreme – Put people in right places Function & Component Performance Deployment Project Analysis Design Construction Test Test Management Agency Satellite 30% 40% 40% 20% 20% (Kansas City) On-Site / 70% Agency HQ 100% 80% 100% 60%(Washington DC)Partner Site 60% 60% 20% (McLean, VA)
  • Drive innovation in government through the delivery of higherquality products and servicesIT and mission alignment are critical to accelerated delivery Engineering Governance Practitioners Stakeholders The Speed • Design, create, test • Achieve predictable Of Trust outcomes • Reuse knowledge, best practices • Manage risk • Address uncertain • Ensure compliance things first • Improve software • Be adaptive to change economics • Provide visibility Embrace Measurement Enable Agility Source:IBV Study 2012 41% of IT executives believe they deliver projects with high value and ROI, while only 9% of line of business executives agree.2
  • Agile Governance = Removing the Illusion of Control Ten Lessons We Had to Teach Our Executives 1. Our ideas of how to improve, while interesting, don’t matter. Look outside. 2. Functional organizations aren’t functional in agile. 3. A completion date is not a point in time, it is a probability distribution. 4. “That’s the Way we’ve Always Done Business” – Probably Makes it Wrong. 5. It’s Not Just About Developers. Truly the smallest problem. 6. Scope is not a requirements document, it is a continuous negotiation. 7. Fostering Local Optimization Leads to Global Failure. 8. Evaluating and Rewarding Individual Behavior Creates Individual Thinking. 9. Silver Bullet Thinking - Equating Productivity and Agile – Bad. 10. A plan is not a prescription, it is an evolving, moving target.
  • The Planning Onion – Critical for Continued Management Support Strategy Portfolio  Agile Teams Plan at Innermost Level Product  “Required” at all levels Project  Must have ability to “view / plan” across an Iteration entire project / product Daily
  • Agility@Scale - Avoiding Fr-Agile Potholes  Transparency is the key to maintaining successful team concepts at scale  Automation and meaningful Integrations help manage project / products rather than features / components  Tools must carry additional burdens in this new “ways of working”  Collaboration  Real-time feedback  Built in measurements  Process for lightweight – heavyweight enforcement
  • Agenda The IBM Institute of Business Value Study (IBV) Our Shared Business Problem The Need for Speed: Accelerated Product and Service Delivery Agility at Scale Measuring Agile – Two Winds Blowing
  • Measuring Agile Activities, Not Business Outcomes  A Structured Approach to Adopting Agile Practices: The Agile Adoption Framework – Ahmed Sidky  Metrics and Techniques to Guide Software Development – Subhajit Datta  Agility Index Measurement – David Bock  The Agile Manifesto – M. Fowler, J. Highsmith  Agile Software Development Joins the “Would-Be” Crowd, A. Cockburn  Assessing Agility – Dr. Peter Lappo, Henry C.T. Andrew  Towards a Conceptual Framework of Agile Methods: A Study of Agile oin Different Disciplines - Kieran Conboy, Brian Fitzgerald Similar Concepts CMMI Level 5 Third Parties Delivering Poor Products Surgeon Following Textbook, But the Patient Dies
  • Two Kinds of “Good Metrics” Help Teams Do the Help Management Run Right Thing the Business 1. Transparency Across 1. Portfolio: Projects the Development and Programs Lifecycle 2. Informational 2. “Force” Best Practices Measurements for Methodologies 3. Trends and 3. Assist in Silos Checkpoints Becoming Teams 4. Distributed Team 4. Information When Performance Needed
  • Key Measurements for Helping Teams Do the Right Things  What is Done (Before Code is Written)  Team Velocity (Story / Function Points Delivered)  Running and Tested Features  Project Burndown Chart  Team Member Loading  Unit Tests per User Story  Successful Builds per Iteration  Defects Carried Over to Next Iteration Most Team Measurements are Good for Teams on Projects to Measure Progress, but should NOT be Imposed or Measured Cross-Team
  • Best Practices for Helping Management Run the Business In Planning • Reqts  Test cases • Pairwise story prioritization • Running and tested features • Groomed backlog • Risk Tracking vs Plan Items With Technical • Builds per iteration • Project progress reports Progress • Demonstrable capabilities Controlling Costs • Cost of poor quality • Variance in completion date • Defect escapes & classes • Release - release accuracy • Defect causes and ages • Stakeholder confidence • Regression test efficiency Understanding • Project’s business value Maturity Forcing Modularity • Scope creep • Change volume • Average cost of change • Scope volatility • Refactoring efforts Architected • Locality of changes • Design changes For Change • Unit tests per user story
  • Rational’s Rewards 2006 2011 Metric Goal Measurement Measurement Maintenance / Innovation 50/50 42% / 58% 31% / 69% Customer Touches / Product 100 ~10 ~ 400 ~86,000 Customer Calls -5% YoY ~ 135,000 (-14% since 2010) Customer Defect Arrivals -15% YoY ~ 6,900 ~2200 On Time Delivery 65% 47% 94% Defect Backlog 3 Months 9+ Months 3 months Enhancements Triaged 85% 3% 100% Enhancements into Release 15% 1% 21% Customer Sat Index 88% 83% 88% Beta Defects Fixed Before GA 50% 3% 85% ~ $5,600,000 Cost of Poor Quality ~ $10,000,000 (-13% since 2010)Note: Goals are either internal IBM statistics or industry benchmarks.
  • We would like to see more of you!  Come visit us and learn more about our solutions in the exhibit hall at Pedestal 9  Rational Collaborative Lifecycle Management  Quality Management  Dev Test for System z  Learn more about the Results of the IBV Study  Ask an IBM Ambassador for additional information (case study, white paper, solution brief, etc.) related to the content shared during this session.  For a follow up discussion, complete the IBM Response Card on the table in front of you.  Join the Webcast on February 19 at 2 PM ET  Realizing agility with discipline: Addressing the needs of agile adoption in a government environment http://ibm.co/agilegovwebcast  Join the Agile Community and learn about the upcoming Agile Government Virtual Roundtable http://ibm.co/beagile Software developers make innovation possible. A great opportunity, a great responsibility 3434
  • Top Five Reasons to Attend Learn how you can make the most of Agile, DevOps, Cloud, Mobile, Big Data, Social Business and other key trends to release products faster, improve processes, increase quality, and meet business objectives. Get detailed Rational technical training trough hundreds of breakouts, hands-on technical workshops, open labs and a wide variety of certification testing Explore Innovation Labs, observe interoperability in action and meet face to face with experts in a high- energy Exhibit Hall. Innovate 2013: The IBM Technical Summit is the event for software practitioners and Network with over 4000 attendees from around the world product developers. Attendees will learn to and collaborate with your peers from a wide variety of roles, improve the practices, predictability and industries and locations. economics of software delivery through Enjoy top-notch keynotes and entertainment, detailed Rational education and insights including strategic presentations, dynamic guest into key technical trends! speakers and customer success stories. Register and use code IND2013 to save up to $400! ibm.com/innovate
  • Thank You ! Mike O’Rourke IBM Vice President,Rational Offering Strategy and Delivery