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Engaging All Learners - Nov. 2010 - a 3 hour session by Faye Brownlie and Leyton Schnellert for teachers in grades K-12. First of a series of 2.

Engaging All Learners - Nov. 2010 - a 3 hour session by Faye Brownlie and Leyton Schnellert for teachers in grades K-12. First of a series of 2.

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Qualicum   engagement.novpptx Qualicum engagement.novpptx Presentation Transcript

  • Engaging All Learners Qualicum/Parksville  Faye  Brownlie  and  Leyton  Schnellert   November  16th,  2011  
  • Engagement•  Schlechty:    high  aDenEon  and  commitment  –   task  or  acEvity  has  inherent  meaning  or  value   to  the  student  •  Stuart  Shanker  –  self-­‐regulaEon;  calmly   focused  and  alert  •  Brownlie  and  Schnellert  –  voice  and  choice  
  • Highly EngagedSource:  Schlechty  Center  for  Leadership  in  School  Reform.  (2006).  Accessed  online  at  h"p://www.stlucie.k12.fl.us/includes/PDWeb/Files/Engagement.ppt  Accessed  December  2,  2007.  
  • Design  of  Engaging  Work   Clear  Goals          Product     No  Fault   &  Criteria                Focus   Prac3ce   Clear  Goals          Product     No  Fault   &  Criteria                Focus   Prac3ce   Relevant   Organiza3on  of   Relevant    Content   Authen3city   Organiza3on  of   Knowledge    Content   Authen3city   Knowledge   Novelty  &  Variety   Choice   Affilia3on/Affirma3on  Novelty  &  Variety   Choice   Affilia3on/Affirma3on  
  • Stuart Shanker: stages of arousalInhibiEon    asleep    drowsy    hypoalert    calmly  focused  and  alert  ***    hyperalert    flooded  AcEvaEon  
  • FrameworksIt’s All About Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  • Universal Design for LearningMulEple  means:  -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  acEvate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   moEvaEon  -­‐to  acquire  the  informaEon  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informaEon  -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
  •  Open-ended Multiple teaching intelligences Inquiry learning Workshop Differentiation Literature and information circles
  • Backwards Design•  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?  •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
  • Teach Content to All    Learning in Safe Schools - Brownlie, King"
  • Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application  Pearson  &  Gallagher  (1983)  
  • Essential Lesson Components•  EssenEal  quesEon/learning  intenEon/a  big  idea  •  Open-­‐ended  strategies:    connect-­‐process-­‐transform  •  DifferenEaEon  –  choice,  choice,  choice  •  Assessment  for  learning  •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility  
  • Open-Ended Learning Strategies•  Connect/acEvate  •  Process/acquire  •  Transform  and  personalize/apply  
  • Assessment for LearningPurpose   Guide  learning,  inform  instrucEon  Audience     Teachers  and  students  Timing     On-­‐going,  minute  by  minute,  day  by  day  Form     DescripEve  Feedback   ¶what’s  working?   •what’s  not?   •what’s  next?  Black  &  Wiliam,  1998   Hahe  &  Timperley,  2007  
  • Assessment for Learning•  Learning  intenEons  •  Criteria  •  DescripEve  feedback  •  QuesEoning  •  Peer  and  self  assessment  •  Ownership  
  • Examples
  • How  does  sehng  impact  what  happens?  
  • As  I  traveled  from  the  city  toward  the  country  old  age  fell  off  my  shoulders.  
  • As  I  traveled  from  the  city  toward  the  country  old  age  fell  off  my  shoulders.        Salah  Fa’iq  translated  by  Byrne  &  Jayyusi  the  flag  of  childhood    poems  from  the  middle  east  
  • Poetry  Circles  •  Choose  an  essenEal  quesEon  to  guide  your  poetry   readings.  •  Model  a  strategy  for  reading  a  poem  with  a  shared   text.    3  reads:    1  to  ques3on,  1  to  sketch,  1  how  does   seKng  impact  what  happens.  •  Ask  for  student  and/or  adult  volunteers  to  read  and   discuss  a  poem  in  a  fishbowl.  •  Observers  noEce  ‘what  makes  this  discussion  work’.  •  Create  criteria  for  an  effecEve  poetry  circle  discussion  •  Distribute  copies  of  various  poems  for  students  to   read.  
  • •  Using  a  similar  strategy  (read  and  quesEon,  read   and  sketch,  read  and  highlight  powerful   language),  students  independently  read  their   chosen  poem.  •  Form  poetry  circles  of  students  reading  the  same   poem.  •  Students  discuss  their  poems,  keeping  the  criteria   for  an  effecEve  poetry  circle  discussion  in  mind.  •  Students  self-­‐assess  with  the  criteria.  •  Students  write  in  response  to  their  poem  and  the   essenEal  quesEon.   Sample  poems  from  Nancie  Atwell’s  Naming  the  World  
  • •  ConnecEons                 •  RelaEng  self  to  poem   •  Showing  how  the  poem  changes  your  thinking  •  EmoEons   •  Explaining  why  you  feel  the  way  you  do  about  the         poem  and  how  you  think  the  author  feels  about   his/her  subject  •  image   •  CommenEng  on  the  image  formed  in                    your  mind  upon  reading  the  poem  •  Opinions   •  Expressing  likes  and  dislikes  about  poem,  with   evidence   •  Asking  quesEons  of  the  poem  or  the  poet  •  Response  style   •  Using  descripEve  words   •  Using  quotes  from  the  poem   •  SuggesEng  improvements  to  the  poem,  if  needed  
  • Personal  inquiry  within  an  inquiry  unit  •  Provide  students  with  mini  booklets  to  use  to   record  any  quesEons  that  they  have  during  a  unit.    •  This  helps  to  build  students’  own  inquiry   quesEons  and  sets  the  stage  for  more  generaEng   their  own  thinking  later  in  the  unit.    •   Once  a  week  or  so  the  class  engages  in  a   discussion  about  what  they  were  wondering,   what  they  have  learned  so  far  about  these   quesEons  and  what  new  quesEons  are  emerging.     See  Student  Diversity  (2006);  It’s  All  About  Thinking  in  Science  and  Math  (2010)  
  • Figure  10.4.    Diversity  of  Life  Unit  Overview     Science  6/7  Unit  Overview   Diversity  of  Life   1. Living  things  have  similariEes  and   differences;     Big  Ideas     2. Classifying  things  helps  us   understand  the  diversity  of  life;     3. We  are  part  of  ecosystems   Main  Ideas  &  Details  ,  Accessing  Prior   Thinking   Knowledge,  Synthesizing,  Persuading,   Strategies   QuesEoning    
  • Figure  10.8.  Wonderbook  Format     What I’ve Learned Where I Can Find the What I Wonder and/or New Questions Information that I Have
  • Figure  10.10.  Class  example:    Student-­‐Generated  Criteria   Not Quite Yet (2) Good Start (3) You did it! (4) Wow! (5) - Rarely uses - Sometimes - Uses - Uses- Information microscopes uses microscope and microscopes *relevant and equipment microscopes equipment with and equipment *accurate Accurately and equipment accuracy with precision accurately *key/important - Shares very - Makes - Makes few and/or - Notices descriptive and descriptive and inaccurate observations accurate insightful observations but may be observations observations and/or vague or lack (spoken/and (i.e.. notes questions in key details; written) and relationships) discussions or asks yes/no asks relevant and asks writing questions questions relevant questions that - Data is - Records data show an - Records some generally accurately; understanding data; may accurate; diagrams of key ideas be inaccurate diagrams include or missing key include labels relevant labels - Records data information and some and details accurately; details diagrams include relevant labels and key details Thinking Process - Does not - Proposes a - Formulates a - Formulates a *logical inferences attempt to “law” that is “law” that is “law” that is *explanation formulate a not yet fully clear and clear and *understands concept “law” developed logical logical; uses evidence to *clear justify it
  • Figure  10.11.    Student  mindmap  of  the  ways  things  can  be  organized  in  the  world.    
  • Figure  10.15.    Class  opionions   Opinion  Line   Governments  should  pass  laws  protec3ng  living  things.   What  they  said:   Rebecca:    (SA)  “Living  things  have  a  right  to  be  free.”   Caterina:    (SA)  “We  shouldn’t  kill  animals  which  might  kill  a  species.”   Angela:  (UD)  “If  you  don’t  cut  down  trees  we  won’t  have  furnitures.”   Tony:    (UD)    ESL  2  “Some  countries,  they  kill  a  lot  but  sEll  have  a  lot  and  sEll                            have  to  protect.”   Karina:  (SA)  “If  we  chop  down  trees  to  make  houses  and  furniture  it  is  affecEng                              us  because  trees  produce  oxygen  and  we  can’t  live  without  oxygen.   Alan:    (SA)  “We  need  to  protect  all  animals,  it’s  like  killing  all  of  us.”   Betsy:    (SA)  “We  shouldn’t  have  zoos  because  animals  need  freedom  too.”   Brian:    (SA)  “Gov’t.  should  protect  living  things  because  living  things  are  already                            decreasing  &  if  they  keep  decreasing  there  won’t  be  anymore.”   Angelica:    (A)  “If  we  lose  part  of  living  things,  you  lose  food,  so  laws  should  be                                      limited.”   Arian:    (SWA/UD)    “.  .  .  we  cut  down  so  many  trees  we  should  only  cut  50%  of  what  we  usually                                                            do.”   Kushan:    (SA)  “If  we  kill  trees  then  animals  don’t  have  a  habitat  &  they  will  be                                  homeless.”   Tiffany:    (SA)  “.  .  .  because  animals  are  gehng  lesser  and  lesser.”   Joshua:    (SWA/UD)  “Like  the  bald  eagles  are  almost  exEnct  &  the  more  the                                      trees  get  cut  down  our  community  won’t  be  the  same.”   Wednesday,  March  12,  2008  
  • Figure  10.16.  QualiEes  of  Persuasive  WriEng     What  Does  a  Good  Piece  of  Wri3ng  Look  Like?   Look  like?   Feel  like?   Sound  like?   • Text  features   • Convincing   • WriDen  in  3rd  person   • Visuals  (photos,  graphics…)   • Honest   • Uses  specific  words   • An  opening  statement  to  capture   • Personal  thoughts/  experiences   • Stays  on  topic   the  reader’s  aDenEon   • ExciEng  wriEng   • Convincing   • A  hook  to  keep  the  reader’s   • QuesEons  that  make  you  think   • Research  has  been  done   aDenEon   • Entertaining  but  stays  on  topic   • WriDen  in  own  words   • An  opening  quote   • Team  work   • True  facts   • Asks  quesEons  and  they  are   • Catchy  words   answered   • Accurate  informaEon   • Research  has  been  done   • Persuasive   • Facts/data   • SophisEcated  and  detailed   • Previous  knowledge   • Honest   • WriDen  in  own  words   • QuesEons  were  answered   • Incorporated  text  features   • Peoples’  opinions  based  on   • Ending  statement/  concluding  the   research/  facts   topic   • ConnecEng  words  (for  example,   • Gives  examples   addiEonally,  as  you  can  see,   • Sentence  variety   however…)  Student  Generated  Responses  2008  
  • Figure  10.24.  Student  Piece  Published  in  Local  Newspaper  
  • Next Steps Goals: What will we develop/ Goals explore/change/ refine to better engage our learners?   Rationale: Why are weRationale choosing this focus?   Plan: How will we do this?   Plan
  • Bennett, B. & Rolheiser, C. (2001). Beyond Monet: The artful science of instructional integration. Bookation.Brown, A., Cocking, R., & Bransford, J., Eds. (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, & school. National Academy Press.Brownlie, F. Feniak, C. & Schnellert, L. (2006). Student Diversity, 2nd ed., Pembroke Publishers.Brownlie, F. & Schnellert, L. (2009). It’s all about thinking: Collaborating to support all learners in Humanities, Social Studies and English., Pembroke Publishers.Brownlie, F. (2005) Grand Conversations, Portage & Main Press.Brownlie, F. & King, J. (2000). Learning in Safe Schools. Pembroke Publishers..Buehl, D. (2001). Classroom strategies for interactive learning, IRA.Daniels, H. & Bizar, M. (2005).Teaching the best practice way: Methods that matter, K-12 Pembroke Publishers.Gregory, K., Cameron, C. & and Davies, A. (2000). Setting and using criteria: For use in middle and secondary classrooms, Connections Publishing, BC, Canada.Lenz, B.K., Deschler, D.D. & Kissam, B.R. (2004). Teaching content to all: Evidence-based inclusive practices in middle and secondary schools. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Marzano, R., Pickering, D., & Pollack, J. (2001). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement ASCD.Schnellert, L., Datoo, M. Ediger, K. & Panas, J. (2009). Pulling together: Integrating inquiry, assessment and instruction in today’s English classroom, Pembroke Publishers.Tomlinson, C. & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. ASCD.Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Wilhelm, J. (2007). Engaging readers and writers with inquiry. New York: Scholastic.