Learning Strategies + assessment for learning + differentiation + metacognition = powerful learning for all

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What are the elements that have the greatest impact on improving student learning for 11-18 years olds? How do they work together? The session presents each of the elements and explains their …

What are the elements that have the greatest impact on improving student learning for 11-18 years olds? How do they work together? The session presents each of the elements and explains their significance, then gives examples of these elements in humanities, English and social studies classrooms.

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  • 1. Strategic Teaching + Assessment for  Learning + Differen6a6on +  Metacogni6on = powerful learning  for all students  Faye Brownlie, Vancouver, BC, Canada  Mehj Datoo, Richmond, BC, Canada  Kris6 Johnson, Mission, BC, Canada  IRA, Minneapolis, 2009  www.slideshare.net  
  • 2. Learning Inten6ons  •I can iden6fy powerful learning prac6ces for all  students  •I can iden6fy the 6 AFL strategies   •I can begin to make a plan to use a powerful  literacy prac6ce and an AFL strategy 
  • 3. Powerful Learning  Engagement &  Meaning Making 
  • 4. Strategic Teaching  •connect  •process  •personalize &   transform  •self‐assess 
  • 5. Assessment FOR Learning  Purpose:    guide instruc6on, improve           learning  Audience:  teacher and student  Timing:    at the beginning, day by           day, minute by minute  Form:      descrip6ve feedback 
  • 6. Assessment FOR Learning  Purpose:  guide instruc6on and learning  •The Grand Event  •Ongoing in the Class 
  • 7. Assessment FOR Learning  •  Descrip6ve scoring  •  Coding in teams  •  Class/grade profile of strengths and areas of  need   •  Ac6on plans developed ‐ what’s next?  •  Individual students iden6fied for further  assessment 
  • 8. Standard Reading Assessment  Choose a common piece of text.  •  Build background for the reading.  •  Have students respond to common prompts.  •  Have students read a short sec6on aloud and answer several  •  interview ques6ons.  •  Code using the Reading Performance Standards  OR  •  •  DART, fall assessment FOR learning 
  • 9. •  Connec7ons:  How does what you read connect  with what you already knew?  •  Summarizing:  Choose a way to show the main  ideas and details in what you read.  •  Inferencing:  Read between the lines to find  something that you believe to be true, but that  isn’t actually said.  Explain your reasoning.  •  Vocabulary:  Here are 3 challenging words from  the text.  Explain what you think they mean.  •  Reflec7ng:  Was this easy or hard to understand?   How did you help your self understand?        (SD, p.23) 
  • 10. Moscrop Secondary, Burnaby  •  Literacy teacher pulled 40/70 students who  were iden6fied at risk in fall assessment  •  1:1 assessment, Standard Reading Assessment  •  Read text orally  •  Looked for paherns 
  • 11. Moscrop Secondary, Burnaby  •  Encouraged kids to mark the text  •  Predic6ng from 6tle, picture, cap6on –  average of 4 seconds  •  Comprehension – analyzed 3 samples,  students ranked by performance standard  rubric  •  Inference – adding your thinking, not  summarizing ‐ prac6ced 
  • 12. The Class Review  What are the strengths of the class? What are your concerns about the class as a whole? What are your main goals for the class this year? What are the individual needs in your class?
  • 13. Class Review Learning in Safe Schools (Brownlie & King, 2000)  Class Review Recording Form Classroom Strengths Classroom Needs Teacher: Class: Goals Decisions Individual Concerns Other Socio-Emotional Medical Language Learning
  • 14. From Assessment to Instruction 1 Assess (against criteria) 2 Set a Goal (target) 3 Plan/ Teach (with the goal in mind) 4 Reassess Brownlie, Feniak, Schnellert, 2006
  • 15. Bill Juhasz K-7 Tait Richmond 4-5 formative assessments/year Block out 4-5 weeks in school calendar All non-enrolling teachers & admin co-assess with CT Coding in teams at pro d or in- school collab time
  • 16. Bill Juhasz K-7 Tait Richmond Sept: Class Review Meetings Optional Jan. class review One week later: now what meetings Non-categorical resource model
  • 17. Bill’s Year at a Glance‐Sept. 
  • 18. Bill’s Year at a Glance‐Oct. 
  • 19. Instructional Considerations Try to differentiate through…
  • 20. Teach Content to All   Learning in Safe Schools - Brownlie, King
  • 21. Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application Pearson & Gallagher (1983) 
  • 22. Shabash – Ann Walsh  •  Whole class novel – gr. 6/7  •  Goals:    –  Build community  –  Highlight, acknowledge, respect diversity  –  Teach double‐entry journals as a strategy for  deepening understanding   –  Build and apply criteria for success 
  • 23. Connecting: –  Gallery wall  –  Quick write  Processing: – S6cky notes  – Double‐entry journals  – Criteria  Transforming and personalizing: ‐Author’s message 
  • 24. The Six Big AFL Strategies  1.    Inten6ons  2.    Criteria  3.    Descrip6ve feedback  4.    Ques6ons  5.    Self and peer assessment  6.    Ownership 
  • 25. Mehjabeen Datoo  McMath Secondary, Richmond  Gr. 8  Humani6es ‐ China  3 months 
  • 26. The Context  Grade 8 Humani6es class  combined English Language Arts and Social Studies  teacher sees class every day for 75 minutes  SCHOOL  CLASS  •  1250 students, Grades 8‐12  27 students  •  •  French Immersion and  18 male, 9 female  •  English streams  Diversity of needs  •  •  Fully inclusive classrooms  6 receiving support   •  •  In a suburb south of  2 at risk  •  Vancouver, BC with high ELL  popula6on 
  • 27. Performance Based Reading Assessment (PBA) 1.  Predicting: What do you think this passage will be about? How do you know? 2. Summarizing : Using a web, words, diagrams, and/or drawings, show that you can identify the key ideas and details from this passage (use the other side of this page). 3.  Connections : How does what you read connect with what you already know? 5.  Vocabulary : Define each of the following words. Explain how you figured out what they meant. Word Definition How I figured out its meaning a. Manor b. medieval c. Heiress d. commodity e. ancestral 5. Inferring : Read between the lines to find something that you believe to be true, but that isn’t actually said. Explain your reasoning. 6.  Reflecting: Was this reading easy or hard to understand? How did you help yourself understand? (If this was easy, what do you do to help yourself understand something more difficult?)
  • 28. Conference Sheet: Humanities 8 Ask, after reading, the following questions: 7. When you come to a challenging word, how do you figure it out? Word strategies: _____ reread it _____ sound it out _____ look it up in the dictionary _____ skip it _____ ask someone _____ try and figure out what makes sense in the sentence Other: ________________________  8. If your reading does not make sense, what do you do? Sense strategies: _____ reread it _____ skip it _____ try another book _____ make a picture in my mind _____ make notes on what I’ve read _____ make a connection between the text, yourself, the world, another text Other: ______________________________  9. What was the main idea of the whole passage that you read?
  • 29. Scoring Rubric:  Reading for Informa6on (Gr. 8 )  Rating Scale: Grade 8 Reading for Information Student achievement in reading for information by March-April of Grade 8 can generally be described as shown in this scale.* Aspect Not Yet Within Expectations Meets Expectations (Minimal Level) Fully Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations Snapshot Note: the snapshot The student may need help to read brief, The student is able to read information and The student is able to read information and procedures with The student is able to read elaborated information and procedures can be used alone as straightforward information and procedures and to procedures with some complexity, specialized some complexity, specialized language, and graphics (as that include specialized language and graphics, as well as complex a holistic scale for complete required tasks. May provide limited accurate language, and graphics (as described in the chart on described in the chart on page 260). Work is accurate and relationships. Work is thorough and may be insightful, providing marking some information for some direct, concrete tasks. Work is page 250) with basic understanding. Work is complete, providing specific relevant details and examples as well-chosen details and examples as required. assignments. often vague, incomplete, inaccurate, or irrelevant. generally accurate but may be vague or omit some required. required detail. STRATEGIES ! ! makes logical predictions about content and structure by anticipates content and structure by recalling prior knowledge and ! ! ! predictions has difficulty making logical predictions about makes simple logical predictions about content by recalling prior knowledge and looking at the text features looking at the text features (e.g., heading, diagrams); shows insight content; may offer illogical guesses recalling prior knowledge and looking at the text (e.g., heading, diagrams) features ! ! uses context clues, word structure, diagrams, and classroom draws on a wide vocabulary; figures out unfamiliar words and ! ! ! word skills tends to rely on sounding out and context to deal relies on context clues, word structure, and resources to figure out unfamiliar words or technical terms technical terms independently using a variety of strategies with unfamiliar language; often unsuccessful classroom resources to figure out unfamiliar words or technical terms; sometimes inefficient ! ! checks for understanding and adjusts comprehension checks for understanding; independently selects from a growing ! ! ! checks may check for understanding but have limited checks for understanding and adjusts strategies to deal with challenging and unfamiliar material; repertoire of comprehension strategies, making adjustments as understanding repertoire of comprehension strategies; often comprehension strategies when needed; may need may need some guidance needed; often rereads to clarify quickly frustrated by challenging material; may specific direction to select appropriate strategies give up for unfamiliar types of material ! ! uses text features (e.g., headings, diagrams) to preview, uses text features (e.g., headings, diagrams) effectively and ! ! ! text features may need assistance to use text features (e.g., uses text features (e.g., headings, diagrams) to support understanding, and locate information efficiently to preview, support understanding, navigate the headings, diagrams) to preview or locate preview and locate information, but may be selection, and locate information information inefficient COMPREHENSION ! ! responses to comprehension questions or tasks are accurate, responses to comprehension questions or tasks are precise and ! ! ! accuracy and responses to comprehension questions or tasks are responses to comprehension questions or tasks clear and complete thorough, and often include insights or interpretations completion often inaccurate, vague, or incomplete are generally accurate, but may be somewhat vague, with parts incomplete ! ! accurately restates main ideas in own words accurately restates main ideas in own words; may attempt to ! ! ! main ideas may identify some main ideas; often has difficulty identifies most main ideas; may have difficulty synthesize the information distinguishing between main ideas and supporting restating them in own words details ! ! locates specific, relevant details (including those in locates specific, relevant details (including those in graphics such ! ! ! details may locate some relevant supporting details locates some specific details (including those in graphics such as illustrations and charts) to respond to as illustrations and charts) as needed; may use quotations and (including those in graphics such as illustrations and graphics such as illustrations and charts) to questions or tasks references as appropriate charts); omits important information respond to questions or tasks ! ! makes accurate notes in appropriate detail using categories makes accurate and detailed notes, using effective formats and ! ! ! note-making needs a template or given categories to make simple makes notes using logical categories or headings; or headings that reflect the main ideas or topics; may categories or headings notes; notes often incomplete or inaccurate may include too little or too much information choose an appropriate format (e.g., mind map, outline) ! ! makes some general inferences or interpretations supported makes logical inferences and interpretations supported by specific ! ! ! inferences needs specific direction to make simple inferences makes some simple inferences and by specific evidence from the text evidence from the text and interpretations; may be illogical or unsupported interpretations; provides some specific evidence by evidence from the text from the text if prompted ANALYSIS ! ! ! connection to needs prompting and help to see how new makes simple, obvious comparisons of new ! ! makes some logical connections between new information makes thoughtful and insightful connections between new prior information connects to prior knowledge or beliefs information with prior knowledge and beliefs and prior knowledge and beliefs information and prior knowledge and beliefs that may go outside knowledge of the reader’s immediate experiences (e.g., social issues) ! ! ! evaluation/ offers simple reactions or judgements; may be offers simple reaction or judgements; may be able ! ! offers simple judgements or evaluations and offers some makes and explains logical judgements or evaluations based on reflections vague or unsupported (or may offer no reaction) to give some reasons (may be illogical) reasons prior knowledge; provides reasons or examples * Student performance that falls within the wide range of expectations for Grade 8 by March-April generally matches the “Purposeful” description in Evaluating Reading Across Curriculum. ! Saanich additions as per grades 6/7 Performance Standards for Middle School Consistency
  • 30. Grade 8 COMPREHENSION Male Group: Male/Female Assessment: Fall 07 Category: All Class: Humanities DG Female ALL M F Data (Ac6vity)  Accuracy and IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6 4 Not Yet Meets Completion IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 15 Not Yet Meet /Meets IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 26 Meets 44 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 15 Meets/Fully Meets 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 26 Fully Meets 33 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 4 Fully Meets/Exceeds 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6 4 Exceeds ALL M F Main Ideas IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 15 Not Yet Meets 1.  Look over the data  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 11 Not Yet Meet /Meets IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6 22 Meets 56 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 28 30 Meets/Fully Meets 33 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 11 Fully Meets 2.  What do you no6ce?  4 Fully Meets/Exceeds 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Exceeds ALL M F Details IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 39 26 Not Yet Meets IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 11 15 Not Yet Meet /Meets 3.  What are the  22 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 33 Meets 67 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Meets/Fully Meets IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 15 Fully Meets strengths of this  Fully Meets/Exceeds 4 Exceeds 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ALL M F Note-making IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 44 30 Not Yet Meets class?  4 Not Yet Meet /Meets 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 33 Meets 56 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6 7 Meets/Fully Meets 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 15 Fully Meets 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 4.  What areas can be  4 Fully Meets/Exceeds 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Exceeds ALL M F Inferences IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 22 22 Not Yet Meets 22 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII worked on as a class?  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 17 11 Not Yet Meet /Meets IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 33 30 Meets 22 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 11 22 Meets/Fully Meets 44 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6 4 Fully Meets Fully Meets/Exceeds 4 Exceeds 11 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII What are some instruc6onal goals that you could set  based on what you learn from the data and also taking  into considera6on the aims of the content area?  Student Total = 27 18 Male 9 Female 11/6/2007 Robert Alexander McMath Secondary
  • 31. Instruc6onal Goals  •  Social Studies content   –  Development and decline of civilisa6ons  –  How geography influences civilisa6on  –  World religions  •  Thinking Strategies  –  Note‐making   •  Dis6nguishing Main Idea and Detail  –  Visualisa6on  •  Note‐making  •  Paragraph wri6ng 
  • 32. September‐October  Visualisa6on with Novels  1.  Teacher reads a shared text aloud, models  strategy of recording images that come to  mind as she reads  2.  Teacher con6nues to read aloud the shared  text, students read novels in groups and  record the images they see as they read in  their journals  3.  Teacher provides feedback on images (do  they iden6fy a main idea? Are they symbolic? 
  • 33. October‐November  Visualisa6on with Myth and Non‐fic6on  1.  Students read a crea6on myth from China  and record images summarizing the main  ideas in the margins  2.  As students con6nue to learn about Chinese  beliefs, they con6nue to use this strategy to  make sense of abstract concepts in non‐ fic6on text 
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  • 35. September – October  Note‐making using fic6on  1.  Students take notes on “Character” as they are  reading their novels.  2.  Teacher models the note‐taking on post‐its with a  shared “read‐aloud” text, students prac6ce  independently as they read their novels, receiving  constant feedback.  3.  The class also watches a movie and takes notes on  character.  Together, led by the teacher, the class  creates a mind‐map on the character in the movie.  4.  When they complete the novel, they make a mind‐ map about their character using the informa6on from  their post‐its. 
  • 36. Class‐created mind‐map on character 
  • 37. October‐November  Note‐making using non‐fic6on  1.  Class develops a generic mind‐map on  aspects of civiliza6on  2.  Teacher models the note‐taking using the  informa6on text on the Shang dynasty and  with a think‐aloud.  3.  The class par6cipates in this crea6on of a  mind‐map and then students create their  own on the Zhou Dynasty. 
  • 38. Govern ‐ment  People  Transpor‐ ta6on  Civilisa6on  Tech‐ Arts/ nology  Culture  Beliefs 
  • 39. October‐November  Note‐taking using non‐fic6on  Read pages 77-80 and take notes on the mind-map below: Read pages 80 and 82 and take notes on the mind-map below: What did the Zhou say about the Shang?_______________________________________ Upper Class Upper Class People Govern- ment People Govern- ment Lower Class Lower Class Shang Zhou Dynasty Dynasty _______________ _______________ Arts/ Culture Arts/ •  Turn to a person beside and discuss what you  Culture Beliefs Beliefs see as important and/or interes6ng in this  process?  How were the Shang Kings defeated?__________________________________________________________________ __
  • 40. Test!!! 
  • 41. Part C: Comparing Dynasties 15. Fill out the table below on the Shang and Zhou Dynasties: SHANG ZHOU Government (2 marks) (write at least 2 points per column) People (2 marks) (write at least 2 points per column) Arts/Culture/Technology (4 marks) (write at least 2 points per column) 16. Transfer the above information into the VENN diagram below (3 marks) Shang Zhou Both Datoo – Hum 8 China Test
  • 42. November‐December  Note‐taking using non‐fic6on  1.  Class con6nues to take notes on Chinese  dynas6es using the aspects of civilisa6on –  focusing on how each one develops from the  other  2.  Teacher models the note‐taking using a table  format by transferring informa6on from the  Shang and Zhou and then adding in the  informa6on on Government and Beliefs, then  the class con6nues to take notes on each  following dynasty on the remaining aspects of  civilisa6on 
  • 43. ZHOU DYNASTY  Shang Zhou Qin Han Sui Tien Shang-ti Many gods Many Ancestor Worship gods Religion Ancestor Mandate of Worship Heaven Taoism Confucianism Legalism Feudal Feudal land Govern- land divided divided into regions into ment and ruled by regions nobles and ruled by nobles
  • 44. QIN DYNASTY  Shang Zhou Qin Han Sui Tien Tien Shang-ti Many gods Many gods Many Ancestor Ancestor Worship Worship gods Mandate of Religion Ancestor Mandate of Heaven Worship Heaven Taoism Taoism Confucianism Confucianism Legalism Legalism Feudal land divided in to Feudal regions and ruled land Govern- by officials land divided divided appointed by into regions into ment emperor and ruled by regions Legalism nobles and ruled by nobles
  • 45. HAN DYNASTY  Shang  Zhou  Qin  Han  Sui  Tien  Tien  Tien  Many gods   Shang‐6  Many gods   Many gods   Ancestor  Many gods   Ancestor Worship  Ancestor Worship  Worship  Mandate of  Mandate of Heaven  Ancestor  Religion  Mandate of  Worship  Heaven  Taoism  Heaven  Taoism  Confucianism  Taoism  Confucianism  Legalism  Confucianism  Legalism  Buddhism  Legalism  land divided in to  Feudal  become an  regions and ruled  Feudal  land  Govern‐ by officials  official based on  divided into  land divided  appointed by  “MERIT” by  ment  regions and  into regions and  emperor  ruled by nobles  ruled by  wri6ng exams  Legalism  nobles 
  • 46. SUI DYNASTY  Shang  Zhou  Qin  Han  Sui  Tien  Tien  Tien  Tien  Many gods   Shang‐6  Many gods   Many gods   Many gods   Ancestor  Many gods   Ancestor Worship  Ancestor Worship  Ancestor Worship  Worship  Mandate of  Mandate of Heaven  Mandate of Heaven  Ancestor  Religion  Mandate of  Worship  Heaven  Taoism  Taoism  Heaven  Taoism  Confucianism  Confucianism  Taoism  Confucianism  Legalism  Legalism  Confucianism  Legalism  Buddhism  Buddhism  Legalism  land divided in to  Feudal  become an  con6nued  regions and ruled  Feudal  land  Govern‐ by officials  official based on  exam system  divided into  land divided  appointed by  “MERIT” by  ment  regions and  into regions and  emperor  of Han  ruled by nobles  ruled by  wri6ng exams  Legalism  nobles 
  • 47. November‐December  Note‐taking using non‐fic6on  1.  Class con6nues to take notes on Chinese dynas6es using the  aspects of civilisa6on – focusing on how each one develops  from the other  2.  Teacher models the note‐taking using a table format by  transferring informa6on from the Shang and Zhou and then  adding in the informa6on on Government and beliefs, then  the class con6nues to take notes on each following dynasty  on the remaining aspects of civilisa6on  3.  This process is repeated for following unit in January‐ February.  4.  By March, students are quite proficient at note‐making  (using images, mind‐maps, tables, etc.) and are beginning to  show evidence of deep inference and synthesis as they note‐ make.  They are selec6ng their own categories and using  mul6ple texts. 
  • 48. Paragraph wri6ng  1.  Teacher models paragraph wri6ng using  content (Chinese beliefs)  2.  Students prac6ce with a second paragraph  3.  Students receive feedback from teacher and  peers and set a goal for the next paragraph –  using specific criteria 
  • 49. Paragraph sample  Consider the paragraph in your package.  With reference to  the criteria on the rubric, provide the following feedback to  the student:  1.  What is working (what he/she did well)  2.  What is not working (what needs to be improved) and how  it can be improved 
  • 50. Paragraph wri6ng  1.  Teacher models paragraph wri6ng using content  (Chinese beliefs)  2.  Students prac6ce with a second paragraph  3.  Students receive feedback from teacher and peers  and set a goal for the next paragraph  4.  Students con6nue to write incorpora6ng feedback  and goals, receive more feedback and set new goals  5.  Students are summa6vely assessed on one final  paragraph   6.  Students have to do one paragraph on demand on the  China test  
  • 51. Test!!!  Part E: Paragraph Writing (5 marks) Choose ONE of the topics below and write a PARAGRAPH on it. Make sure you have a topic sentence, at least three points and a concluding sentence. Explain in detail ONE of the beliefs from the Shang and Zhou Dynasties (Mandate of Heaven, Ancestor Worship or Confucianism). What did you think was the most interesting thing that we learned about in this unit so far? Explain what it is and why it is interesting.
  • 52. Kris6 Johnson & Tracey Snipstead  Heritage Park Secondary, Mission  Gr. 8  ‐ Middle Ages  5‐7 classes of co‐teaching 
  • 53. Day 1‐ teacher  •  Give students ‘I statements’ for library  and content targets  •  Give students research ques6on 
  • 54. Day 2 ‐ teacher  Same big ques6on (goal)  •  Choose learning targets for the day  •  Access prior knowledge (facts remembered)  •  Individually ask 3 ques6ons and take notes  •  Reflect on accomplishments  •  Meet as a class to check off learning targets  •  that have been accomplished 
  • 55. Day 3 ‐ teacher  •  Same process as day 2  •  Conference with students, highligh6ng in  colour, areas of targets that students  needs to work on  •  Use different colour highlighter each day  
  • 56. Teacher Reflec6ons  Students more focused in the library  Students more able to take effec6ve  notes  Students crea6ng best projects ever!  Tweaking an exis6ng structure with  very posi6ve learning results  Next challenge:  move from criteria to rubrics 
  • 57. Resources  •  Learning in Safe Schools – Brownlie & King  •  Student Diversity, 2nd ed – Brownlie, Feniak, Schnellert  Stenhouse/Pembroke  •  Assesssment and Instruc6on of ESL Learners – Brownlie, Feniak, McCarthy  •  Grand Conversa6on, Thoughwul Responses – a unique approach to  literature circles – Brownlie  •  It’s All about Thinking – Humani6es & English Language Arts – Brownlie,  Schnellert (in press, fall, 2009)  Portage and Main Press  •  Reading and Responding – grades 4,5,&6 – Brownlie, Jeroski  Nelson Canada  •  Adolescent Literacy – Field Tested – Parris, Fisher, Headley, ed.  “Finding out what we need to know” – Brownlie  IRA