Kamloops.#2.nov.2012

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2nd half day session for teams of educators from schools. Developing readers in primary classrooms: research and practice.

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Kamloops.#2.nov.2012

  1. 1. Putting the Big Literacy Ideas to Work in Primary Classrooms Kamloops   Tuesday,  October  30th,  2012   Tuesday,  November  27th,  2012   Faye  Brownlie  
  2. 2. Learning Intentions•  I  can  find  evidence  of  current  reading  research   and  the  big  ideas  of  literacy  in  my  pracEce  and   become  curious  about  incorporaEng  a  pracEce   that  is  different  to  me  •  I  can  consider  the  impact  of  my  language  on   my  learning  community  •  I  am  leaving  with  a  quesEon  and  a  plan  
  3. 3. 1.  Every  child  reads  something  he  or  she  chooses.  2.  Every  child  reads  accurately.  3.  Every  child  reads  something  he  or  she   understands.  4.  Every  child  writes  about  something  personally   meaningful.  5.  Every  child  talks  with  peers  about  reading  and   wriEng.  6.  Every  child  listens  to  a  fluent  adult  read  aloud.  
  4. 4. •  What would happen if… •  Belief •  Practice
  5. 5. We  now  have  good  evidence  that  virtually  every   child  who  enters  an  American  kindergarten   can  be  reading  on  level  by  the  end  of  first   grade  (Mathes,  et  al,  2004;  Phillips  &  Smith,   2010;  VelluEno,  et  al,  1996).    -­‐Richard  Allington,  keynote  address,  IRA,  2011  
  6. 6. 98% on grade level at year end:   Mathes,  et  al  (2004);  VelluEno,  et  al  (1996);   Phillips,  et  al  (1998)  •  Every  successful  intervenEon  study  used   either  1-­‐1  expert  tutoring  or  1-­‐3  very  small   group  expert  reading  instrucEon.    •  None  of  the  studies  used  a  scripted  reading   program.    •  All  had  students  engaged  in  reading  2/3  of  the   lesson.    
  7. 7. -­‐grades  1  and  2  –  60  minutes  reading,  30   minutes  on  skill  -­‐aim  for  your  kids  to  read  6  books  in  school  and   6  more  a`er  school  
  8. 8. High Success Reading•  99%  accuracy  •  Reading  in  phrases  •  90%  comprehension  
  9. 9. Only  1  out  of  153  beginning  reading  programs   made  a  difference  in  achievement.  *If  the  program  is  not  listed,  there  is  no  reliable   research  to  support  it.    R.  Allington,  2012  What  Works  Clearinghouse,  as  quoted  in   EducaEon  Week,  August  15,  2007  
  10. 10. The  struggling  reader,  no  mader  what  grade  the   child  is  in,  has  not  built  an  efficient  reading   process  system  to  make  meaning  from  texts  or   help  him  or  her  solve  problems  when  stuck…  For  teachers,  that  means  learning  how  to  teach   in  support  of  the  child  as  he  or  she  gains  more   control  of  strategic  acEons.            -­‐Johnson  &  Keier  
  11. 11. Did  that  make  sense?  
  12. 12. How  did  you  figure  that  out?  
  13. 13. M  –  meaning  Does  this  make  sense?  S  –  language  structure  Does  this  sound  right?  V  –  visual  informaEon   Does  this  look  right?  
  14. 14. The  best  way  to  develop  phonemic   segmentaEon  is  through  invented  spelling;   children  with  pens  and  pencils,  drawing  and   wriEng.    -­‐Marilyn  Adams,  1990  -­‐about  20%  of  children  do  not  develop   phonemic  segmentaEon  readily  
  15. 15. •  K/1  –    spend  a  maximum  of  10  minutes/day  on   phonics  –  small  impact  on  phonic  knowledge;   no  difference  on  comprehension  •  Beyond  grade  1  –  no  staEsEcal  difference  for   any  phonics    •  NaEonal  Reading  Panel  
  16. 16. Worksheets  •  Don’t  underesEmate  the  child’s  capacity.    •  How  complex  is  this  task?  •  Is  this  making  meaning  or  matching  thinking?  
  17. 17. Teach Content to All    Learning in Safe Schools, 2nd ed. - Brownlie, King, 2011"
  18. 18. Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application  Pearson  &  Gallagher  (1983)  
  19. 19. Think  Aloud:       Students  need  •  A  model  •  Guided  pracEce  in  following  the  model  •  An  opportunity  to  pracEce  the  strategy,  with   support  as  needed  •  Choice  in  the  degree  of  complexity  they  use  to   complete  the  task  
  20. 20. Sea  Oder  Pup  
  21. 21. Sea  Oder  Pup  -­‐  Victoria  Miles  (Orca)  There  is  a  forest  of  seaweed  in  the  ocean.      It  is  a  forest  of  kelp.    At  the  bodom  of  the    kelp  forest,  Mother  sea  oder  searches  for    food.  
  22. 22. High  above,  her  pup  is  waiEng.    He  is    wrapped  in  a  piece  of  kelp  so  he  can’t    dri`  away  while  Mother  is  down    below.  
  23. 23. Learning Intention: I can write and describe a small event from my morning. Gr. 3 Writing: Model – a small moment Establish criteria Kids write Descriptive feedback on criteria  Pearson  &  Gallagher  (1983)  
  24. 24. •  Choose a topic•  Write in front of the students•  Students describe ‘what works’ in your writing•  Students choose a ‘morning’ topic•  Students write•  Students self-assess•  Students meet with peers to share and provide feedback
  25. 25. All  alone,  I  stepped  into  my  car.    With  my  map  in   hand,  I  began  to  drive.    At  the  lights  I  turned   le`,  then  the  map  said  to  turn  right.    “Oh,  no!”      The  sign  said,  “Road  closed”.          “Help,”  I  thought.    “What  am  I  going  to  do?”  
  26. 26. Notices…criteria•  Mystery•  Opening•  Detailed•  Sounds like you (Voice)
  27. 27. No plan, no point
  28. 28. Professional Collaboration•  InteracEve  and  on-­‐going  process  •  Mutually  agreed  upon  challenges  •  Capitalizes  on  different  experEse,  knowledge  and   experience  •  Roles  are  blurred  •  Mutual  trust  and  respect  •  Create  and  deliver  targeted  instrucEon  •  GOAL:    beder  meet  the  needs  of  diverse  learners  
  29. 29. Goal:  to  support  students  in  working   effecEvely  in  the  classroom   environment  
  30. 30. The Class Review   What are the strengths of the class? What are your concerns about the class as a whole? What are your main goals for the class this year? What are the individual needs in your class?

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