Collaboration.richmond.elem teams 2013

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Collaboration.richmond.elem teams 2013

  1. 1. Frameworks for Collaboration Richmond Teams Faye Brownlie Sept. 18, 2013
  2. 2. The Class Review Process Learning in Safe Schools – Brownlie & King, 2nd ed. Pembroke Press
  3. 3.   Meet as a school-based team, with the administrator   Each classroom teacher (CT) joins the team for 45 minutes to speak of her class   TOC’s provide coverage for CTs   Follow the order of strengths, needs, goals, individuals   The CT does not do the recording or the chairing
  4. 4. Implementing Class Reviews What are the strengths of the class? What are the needs of the class as a whole? What are your main goals for the class this year? What are the individual needs in your class?
  5. 5. Teacher: Class: Classroom Strengths Classroom Needs Other  Socio-Emotional  Learning  Language  Medical   Goals   Decisions   Individual Concerns   Class Review Recording Form
  6. 6. Learning Intentions   I have a better understanding of collaboration and co-teaching.   I have a plan of how to increase the effectiveness of my collaboration and my co-teaching.   I can create a class review and use it to plan for instruction.
  7. 7. What Is Professional Collaboration?   Interactive and on-going process   Mutually agreed upon challenges   Capitalizes on different expertise, knowledge and experience   Roles are blurred   Mutual trust and respect   Create and deliver targeted instruction   GOAL: better meet the needs of diverse learners
  8. 8. Why Collaboration/Co-teaching?   Based on the belief that collaborative planning, teaching and assessing better addresses the diverse needs of students by creating ongoing effective programming in the classroom   It allows more students to be reached Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9
  9. 9.   Based on the belief that collaborative planning, teaching and assessing better addresses the diverse needs of students by creating ongoing effective programming in the classroom   It allows more students to be reached   It focuses on the ongoing context for learning for the students, not just the specific remediation of skills removed from the learning context of the classroom   It builds a repertoire of strategies for teachers to support the range of students in classes Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9
  10. 10. Why Collaboration/Co-teaching?   Based on the belief that collaborative planning, teaching and assessing better addresses the diverse needs of students by creating ongoing effective programming in the classroom   It allows more students to be reached   It focuses on the ongoing context for learning for the students, not just the specific remediation of skills removed from the learning context of the classroom   It builds a repertoire of strategies for teachers to support the range of students in classes   Imperative students with the highest needs have the most consistent program Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9
  11. 11. The Vision A  Remedial  Model   (Deficit  Model)   ‘Fixing’  the  student   Outside  the  classroom/   curriculum   A  Shi:  from…..        to   An  Inclusive  Model   (Strengths  Based)   ‘Fixing’  the  curriculum   Within  the  classroom/   curriculum   to  
  12. 12. Transforma)ons  within  the     Inclusive  Model   Pull-­‐out  Support  /  Physical  Inclusion   •  sDll  a  remedial  model  –  to  make  kids  fit   •  In  the  class,  but  o:en  on  a  different  plan   Inclusion   •  Classroom  Teacher  as  central  support   •  Resource  Teacher  –  working  together  in  a    co-­‐teaching  model  
  13. 13. No plan, No point
  14. 14. Response To Intervention: Literacy Framework [Whole Class – Small Group – Individual] [Small Group – Individual] [One-to-One]
  15. 15. Questions to Guide Co-Teaching   Are all students actively engaged in meaningful work?   Are all students participating by answering and asking questions?   Are all students receiving individual feedback during the learning sequence?   How is evidence of learning from each day’s co- teaching fueling the plan for the next day?
  16. 16. Co-Teaching Models (Teaching in Tandem – Effective Co-Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom – Wilson & Blednick, 2011, ASCD)   1 teach, 1 support   Parallel groups   Station teaching   1 large group; 1 small group   Teaming

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