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Geared to students in grades 5-9, learning is equated with thinking. Strategies such as literature circles and inquiry circles invite all students to be engaged and thoughtful by structuring high ...

Geared to students in grades 5-9, learning is equated with thinking. Strategies such as literature circles and inquiry circles invite all students to be engaged and thoughtful by structuring high expectations, scaffolding, open-ended strategies, and choice.

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    Chilliwack.thinking Chilliwack.thinking Presentation Transcript

    • Thinking to Learning in Inclusive Classrooms Chilliwack   April  4,  2014   Faye  Brownlie   Slideshare.net/fayebrownlie/chilliwack.thinking  
    • The teeter totter kids kids curriculum
    • Frameworks It’s All about Thinking (English, Humanities, Social Studies) – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009 It’s All about Thinking (Math, Science)– Brownlie, Fullerton, Schnellert, 2011
    • Universal Design for Learning MulCple  means:   -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  acCvate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   moCvaCon   -­‐to  acquire  the  informaCon  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informaCon   -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
    • Choose a lesson •  Think  of  all  the  users  at  the  point  of  design.   •  Who  mighty  not  be  able  to  do  this?   •  Think  of  the  goal,  not  the  acCvity/method.   •  Accessibility  not  accommodaCon.  
    • Backwards Design •  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?   •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
    • Approaches •  Assessment  for  learning   •  Open-­‐ended  strategies   •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility   •  CooperaCve  learning   •  Literature  circles  and  informaCon  circles   •  Inquiry   It’s All about Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
    • There is great success in engaging students with text and conversation using literature circles Literature Circles STUDENTS Within these groupings, choose their own books are never assigned roles read at their own pace engage in conversations keep journals about readings and conversations are taught comprehension strategies
    • Another Book Intro: Students  need:   •  strategies  to  hook  them  into  reading   •  mulCple  ways  into  the  books   •  an  opportunity  to  apply  the  strategies  you   have  been  teaching   •  opportuniCes  to  talk  with  others  about  their   thinking  about  their  reading   •  Cme  to  read  independently  
    • The Plan •  Distribute  5-­‐6  different  first  pages   •  Have  students  read  the  page   •  Students  sketch  what  they  ‘see’  on  the  page   •  Students  circle  powerful  words   •  Students  ask  quesCons  around  the  text   •  Students  meet  with  others  reading  the  same  page  and   compare  their  notes   •  Students  meet  with  others  not  reading  the  same  page   and  compare  their  notes   •  Students  read  independently,  in  the  novel  of  their   choosing  
    • Books used:
    • Literature Circles: Residential Schools •  A  unit  co-­‐developed  by     – Marla  Gamble,  gr.  6  Classroom  Teacher,  Prince   Rupert,  BC   – Marilyn  Bryant,  Aboriginal  EducaCon  Program   Resource  Teacher   – Raegan  Sawka,  LUCID  Support  Teacher  (Learning   for  Understanding  through  Culturally  Inclusive   ImaginaCve  Development)   •  Lesson  2:    co-­‐designed  and  co-­‐taught:    Marla  &  Faye  
    • •  1st  lesson   –  Slide  presentaCon  on  First  NaCons  background  in  the   geographic  area  with  some  reference  to  residenCal  schools   •  2nd  lesson   –  Whip  around   –  Fishbowl  on  1st  paragraph  of  Fa#y  Legs  –  C.  Jordan-­‐Fenton  &  M.   Poliak-­‐Fenton  (Annick  Press)   –  Co-­‐created  criteria  for  effecCve  group   –  Envelopes  of  5-­‐6  pictures  from  Fa#y  Legs   –  Make  a  story   –  Share  some  stories   –  Walk  and  talk   –  4  minute  write  –  story  behind  the  pictures    
    • •  My  name  is  Olemaun  Pokiak  –  that’s  OO-­‐lee-­‐ mawn  -­‐  but  some  of  my  classmates  used  to   call  me  “Fady  Legs”.    They  called  me  that   because  a  wicked  nun  forced  me  to  wear  a   pair  of  red  stockings  that  made  my  legs  look   enormous.    But  I  put  an  end  to  it.    How?    Well,   I  am  going  to  let  you  in  on  a  secret  that  I  have   kept  for  more  than  60  years:  the  secret  of  how   I  made  those  stockings  disappear.  
    • Inquiry Circles •  Choose  your  inquiry  quesCon   •  Model  how  to  ask  quesCons  from  an  image,   within  the  framework  of  the  quesCon   •  Fishbowl  an  inquiry  circle  conversaCon   •  Other  student  observe  for  ‘what  works’   •  Build  criteria  for  effecCve  group  behaviour  
    • What is the smartest adaptation for survival in their environment? How do animals adapt?
    • Vocabulary/terms   Images   Ques3ons   Key  ideas  
    • Inquiry Circles •  Select  4-­‐5  different  arCcles,  focused  on  central  topic  or   theme.   •  Present  arCcles  and  have  students  choose  the  one  they   wish  to  read.   •  Present  note-­‐taking  page.   •  Student  fill  in  all  boxes  EXCEPT  ‘key  ideas’  before   meeCng  in  the  group.   •  Students  meet  in  ‘like’  groups  and  discuss  their  arCcle,   deciding  together  on  ‘key  ideas’.   •  Students  meet  in  non-­‐alike  groups  and  present  their   informaCon  from  their  arCcle.  
    • •  Brownlie,  Fullerton,  Schnellert  –  It’s  All  about  Thinking  –   Collabora3ng  to  support  all  learners  in  Math  &  Science,  2011   •  Brownlie,  King  -­‐  Learning  in  Safe  Schools  –  Crea3ng  classrooms   where  all  students  belong,  2nd  ed,  Pembroke  Publishers,  2011   •  Brownlie,  Schnellert  –  It’s  All  about  Thinking  –  Collabora3ng  to   support  all  learners  in  English  &  Humani3es,  2009   •  Brownlie,  Feniak,  Schnellert  -­‐  Student  Diversity,  2nd  ed.,  Pembroke   Pub.,  2006   •  Brownlie,  Jeroski  –  Reading  and  Responding,  grades  4-­‐6,  2nd  ediCon,   Nelson,  2006   •  Brownlie  -­‐  Grand  Conversa3ons,  Portage  and  Main  Press,  2005   •  Brownlie,Feniak,  McCarthy  -­‐  Instruc3on  and  Assessment  of  ESL   Learners,  Portage  and  Main  Press,  2004