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BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011
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BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011

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  • 1. Building  Elementary  Secondary   Teams  2010-­‐2011,   a  facilitated  conversa<on   Richmond   February  16th,  2011   Faye  Brownlie  
  • 2. Learning  Inten<ons  •  I  have  a  beEer  understanding  of  how  to  use   Universal  Design  for  Learning  and  Backwards   Design  to  guide  my  teaching.  •  I  have  determined  something  to  let  go  of  and   something  to  do  more  of.  •  I  know  ‘what  counts’  in  my  teaching.  •  I  have  made  or  deepened  a  contact  with   someone  outside  my  school.  
  • 3. How  the  world’  best  performing   school  systems  come  out  on  top  –   Sept.  2007,  McKinsey  &  Co.  1.  GeUng  the  right  people  to  become  teachers  2.  Developing  them  into  effec<ve  instructors  3.  Ensuring  that  the  system  is  able  to  deliver  the   best  possible  instruc<on  for  every  child  
  • 4. McKinsey  Report,  2007  •  The  top-­‐performing  school  systems  recognize   that  the  only  way  to  improve  outcomes  is  to   improve  instruc<on:    learning  occurs  when   students  and  teachers  interact,  and  thus  to   improve  learning  implies  improving  the  quality   of  that  interac<on.  
  • 5. •  Coaching  classroom  prac<ce  •  Moving  teacher  training  to  the  classroom  •  Developing  stronger  school  leaders  •  Enabling  teachers  to  learn  from  each  other  
  • 6. Individual  teachers:  •  Become  aware  of  areas  to  grow  in  their  prac<ce  •  Gain  an  understanding  of  best  prac<ce  –  most   effec<ve  when  demonstrated  in  an  authen<c   seUng  •  Are  mo<vated  to  improve   –  Teachers  have  high  expecta<ons   –  Share  a  common  purpose   –  Have  a  collec<ve  belief  in  their  ability  to  make  a   difference  
  • 7. FrameworksIt’s All about Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  • 8. Universal Design for LearningMul<ple  means:  -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  ac<vate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   mo<va<on  -­‐to  acquire  the  informa<on  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informa<on  -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
  • 9. Backwards Design•  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?  •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
  • 10. Approaches•  Assessment  for  learning  •  Open-­‐ended  strategies  •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility  •  Coopera<ve  learning  •  Literature  circles  and  informa<on  circles  •  Inquiry  It’s All about Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  • 11. Essential Lesson Components•  Essen<al  ques<on/learning  inten<on/a  big  idea  •  Open-­‐ended  strategies:    connect-­‐process-­‐transform  •  Differen<a<on  –  choice,  choice,  choice  •  Assessment  for  learning  •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility  
  • 12. Assessment for Learning•  Learning  inten<ons  •  Criteria  •  Descrip<ve  feedback  •  Ques<oning  •  Peer  and  self  assessment  •  Ownership  
  • 13. Grade 9 Science – Starleigh Grass & Mindy Casselman Electricity•  The  Challenge:  •  Many  of  the  students  are  disengaged  and  dislike   ‘book  learning’.    They  acquire  more  knowledge,   concept  and  skill  when  they  are  ac<ve,   collabora<ve  and  reading  in  chunks.  •  Starleigh  and  Mindy  in  It’s  All  about  Thinking  (Math  and  Science)-­‐  Brownlie,   Fullerton,  Schnellert  in  press.  
  • 14. Essential Question•  If  we  understand  how  materials  hold  and   transfer  electric  charge,  can  we  store  and   move  electric  charge  using  common   materials?    
  • 15. •  Individually,  brainstorm  what  you  can  recall   about  the  characteris<cs  of  an  atom.  •  Meet  in  groups  of  3  to  add  to  and  revise  your   list.  •  Compare  this  list  to  the  master  list.  •  …(word  deriva<ons,  label  an  atom…)  •  Exit  slip:    2  characteris<cs  you  want  to   remember  about  atoms.  
  • 16. The  Atom  •  All  maEer  is  made  of  atoms.    •  Atoms  have  electrons,  neutrons,  and  protons.    Electrons   move,  protons  and  neutrons  do  not  move.  •  Atoms  have  nega<ve  and  posi<ve  charges.    •  Electrons  have  a  nega<ve  charge;  protons  have  a  posi<ve   charge.  •  Protons  and  neutrons  are  located  at  the  centre  of  the  atom,   in  the  nucleus.  •  Electrons  orbit  around  the  outside  of  the  nucleus,  in  energy   “shells.”  •  An  object  can  be  nega<vely  or  posi<vely  charged,   depending  on  the  ra<o  of  protons  and  neutrons.  
  • 17. Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application  Pearson  &  Gallagher  (1983)  

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