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OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler
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OpenSim and Content - Shenlei Winkler

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Fashion Research Institute CEO, Shenlei Winkler, speaking at the Professional Virtua Designer Society October 8th, 2010 on the topic of OpenSim and Content

Fashion Research Institute CEO, Shenlei Winkler, speaking at the Professional Virtua Designer Society October 8th, 2010 on the topic of OpenSim and Content

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  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Apparel is a 1.7 trillion USD global industry, and I am proud to say that I do my bit to contribute to it. I am what is called a ‘technical designer’, and I specialize in handwear – gloves, mittens and so on. My Fall 2008 collection sold about $36 million dollars. My product can be found in most mass market outlets, including Walmart, Kohl’s, Mervyn’s, amongst others, as well as most of the grocery and drug store chains. Getting my product developed in the current system is time-consuming, expensive, and horribly wasteful. For my Fall 07 season, I estimated that I personally used about 100 barrels of oil just for the raw materials used in my product samples. I have no idea what the multiplier effect is, but I am sure that ultimately with the oil and energy required to dye, construct, and ship my samples, that that number probably doubled. If I had had virtual worlds and the appropriate technological tools to develop my samples, I would have conserved a minimum of 35 barrels of oil for my samples, and I would also have saved several cubic yards of landfill. I am one designer. There are appreciably more than that in New York City alone. Think of how much we waste getting our product developed and ready for mass production. One of the very real value propositions in using virtual worlds for product design in the apparel industry is in reducing the actual number of physical samples created. By using the very real power of virtual worlds, I have spent the last year collaborating with IBM to figure out not only how to restructure how the apparel industry develops its product, but how to do it in a way that uses virtual worlds to cut time to market, save costs, and reduce the carbon footprint of our old, traditional and wasteful industry. And this is what we’ll be talking about today and this is where I see the true value of leveraging the deep and rich power of virtual worlds to enable product design for the 1.7 trillion dollar apparel industry.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Licensing, Development, Standardization & More Shenlei E. Winkler
    • 2. <ul><li>Past (IBM: Shengri La Spirit) </li></ul><ul><li>Present (Intel Corporation: ScienceSim) </li></ul><ul><li>Future (Many Others: Avatar Content) </li></ul>
    • 3. <ul><li>Avatars (Orientation, Representation, Evolution) </li></ul><ul><li>Content Delivery and Movement </li></ul><ul><li>Content Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Content Development Methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Considerations </li></ul>
    • 4. <ul><li>Orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Representation </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution </li></ul>
    • 5. <ul><li>Walled Gardens </li></ul><ul><li>Federated Metaverse </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Future Possibilities </li></ul>
    • 6. <ul><li>Textures/Images </li></ul><ul><li>Primitive-based Meshes </li></ul><ul><li>Sculpted Meshes </li></ul>
    • 7. <ul><li>Originality </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Tracking and Digital Asset Management </li></ul>
    • 8. <ul><li>Copyrights, Patents, and Marks, Oh My! </li></ul><ul><li>Registration </li></ul><ul><li>Protection </li></ul><ul><li>The Digital Millennium Copyright Act </li></ul>
    • 9. <ul><li>May 2009-October 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons 3.0 Legal Templates </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Primer for Content Creators </li></ul>
    • 10. <ul><li>What is Virtua? </li></ul><ul><li>Why a Professional Organization? </li></ul><ul><li>What sort of benefits? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical/Dental/Retirement/Discounts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content Standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Job Referrals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conferences &amp; Education </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. <ul><li>Delivery Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Diaspora of Users </li></ul><ul><li>Content Management </li></ul><ul><li>Content Standards Codified </li></ul>

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