Going green: congregations lead the wayAl Gore’s movie spurs faith groups to                                      Light, a...
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www.edow.org                        September 2006   WASHINGTON WINDOW   11Campers begin each day with vocal warm up exerc...
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor
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Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor

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Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor

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Transcript of "Going green: congregations use Roof Top Gardening to Fight Global Warming and Feed the Poor"

  1. 1. Going green: congregations lead the wayAl Gore’s movie spurs faith groups to Light, a nonprofit that helps congregations and individuals signed up to show the audience members will be able to seetake action to fight global warming take steps to reduce their contri- bution to global warming, has movie. And as part two movies: "The Great Warming,"By Lucy Chumbley tion involving extreme weather, taken up the cause. of this effort, and "An floods, droughts, epidemics and The national organization will Greater Inconvenient"Humanity is sitting on a tick- killer heat waves beyond any- be showing "An Inconvenient Washington Truth." GWIPLing time bomb," proclaims a thing we have ever experi- Truth" at partner congregations Interfaith representativestrailer on the Web site ofthe recent film, "An SEE ALSO: enced." up call, to Its a wake across the country during a Power and also will be on weeklong event, "Spotlight on Light is hand to pass outInconvenient Truth," fea- Review be sure, and leaving Global Warming," set for Oct. sponsoring a educational mate-turing former vice presi- the theater after the 1-8. double fea- rial and offerdent Al Gore (climatecri- Page 12 credits roll, audience At press time six parishes in the ture matinee some suggestionssis.org). "If the vast members moved by the Diocese of Washington - Christ, from 1-4 about what can bemajority of the worlds scientists movies message can choose to Georgetown, Ascension, Silver p.m. Sept. done.are right, we have just 10 years ignore its warning or to act. Spring, St. Thomas, D.C., St. 30 at In addition, theto avert a major catastrophe that But for those who choose Johns, Lafayette Square, St. Washington Rev. Samuel T.could send our entire planet action: where to begin? Marks, Capitol Hill and St. National Cathedral. Lloyd, dean of Washingtoninto a tailspin of epic destruc- Now Interfaith Power and Dunstans, Bethesda - had For a suggested donation of $8, see CLIMATE CRISIS, page 16 Rooftop garden No space for a garden? Epiphany’s parishioners find room on the roof By Lucy Chumbley In time, the five-member team hopes the garden will bear both Up on the roof of the down- literal and spiritual fruit, pro- town Church of the Epiphany, ducing vegetables for green things are taking root. Epiphanys meal program and In two round garden plots enabling parishioners from all fashioned from plastic wading walks of life to till the soil pools cucumbers and carrots, together. tomatoes and potatoes, zucchi- Additional benefits - and there ni, radishes and beans are ripen- are many - include countering ing in the hot sun. the urban heat island effect - an While its off to a small start, increase in temperature of up to there are big plans for the bud- 8 degrees Fahrenheit caused by ding rooftop garden, a pilot dark roofs and lack of vegeta- project of the churchs tion - lowering levels of carbon Environmental Ministry monoxide, reducing the chemi- Stewardship Team, said James cal runoff into local rivers, serv- Rogers, who chairs the group ing as additional insulation for Photo by Anne-Marie Jeffery with fellow parishioner Jennifer the building and reducing ener- McCarthy. see ROOFTOP on page 6Epiphany’s parishioners enjoy their new rooftop garden after church on a recent Sunday. inTHEwindow RENEWAL AFRICAN MUSIC LIVING OF FAITH: PARTNERS: CAMP: WATERS: Page 3 Page 5 Page 10 Page 18 Diocese’s second African Anglicans How can they A water aerobics annual revival set for work to combat keep from class becomes a Oct. 19-20 poverty, AIDS singing? route to renewal
  2. 2. 2 WASHINGTON WINDOW September 2006 www.edow.orgReflections on the 75th General ConventionThe 75th General Convention was moving forward and would my opinion, was a vote that wasof the Episcopal Church in win the election-which she did, unexpected and affirmed our “Columbus, Ohio, is now early on the fifth ballot. theology that the Holy Spirit issummer history, yet I wanted to The reaction in the House of clearly involved in the election I believe with all my heartshare some personal reflections Bishops was probably less ani- of anyone called to serve Christabout the experience. mated than was the reaction in in Holy Orders. What I will that episcopal elections are This was a convention that was the House of Deputies. The lack never forget was the response ofcharged with the election of a of wild animation had nothing the female bishops when the nurtured and blessed by the ”new Presiding Bishop for the voting was announced. ThereEpiscopal Church. Such an elec-tion occurs every nine years, was great joy and much weep- ing. Many said they never gift of the Holy Spirit.and so for me it was a new and thought that such an eventexciting experience. would occur in their lifetime, Prior to the convention, during and it was for them a reaffir- was drafted the night before the purpose of bishops with juris-a meeting of the House of mation of their episcopacy that final session of General diction consenting to the elec-Bishops in North Carolina, each has been denied them for too Convention and was an attempt tion of other bishops is to con-nominee was given the opportu- long. How did I vote? I voted to respond in a positive manner firm that the proper electoralnity to address the assembled for Katharine on the first bal- to the request of the Windsor and canonical procedures havebishops by answering questions lot and on every ballot there- Report. It was presented in a been followed and that the bish-authored by their colleagues. In after. joint session of both houses, op so elected is qualified, aseach case, the nominees did a The rest of the convention with the bishops then retiring to defined by the canons of thefine job of responding. It was was highlighted by the passing their chamber to discuss and Episcopal Church. The canonsinteresting, though, that there of a resolution calling on the then vote on the measure. were not written to be used as aseemed no effort within the churches of the dioceses of the Regrettably, there was little time litmus test for second guessing aHouse to twist arms of bishops Episcopal Church to move (30 minutes) for the debate dioceses theology or for chal-for votes or for that matter to toward a cumulative giving ofeven engage in the "backroom" Bishop John .07 percent of all financial needed to address the resolu- lenging the personal life and tion. However, it was clear from sexual orientation of the bishoppolitics that too often go hand Bryson Chane resources to achieving the statements made by our elected.in hand with episcopal elec- Millennium Development Presiding Bishop and Presiding Finally, a great disappointmenttions. Things in North Carolina to do with disappointment or Goals that have been raised up Bishop-Elect that they believed for me was that because thewere pretty quiet. for that matter disagreement, in the One Campaign (one.org). the convention needed to convention was shortened by On the Sunday of the election, but rather it was clear that we The resolution also called upon approve the resolution for the one day, and because we spentthe bishops were whisked away had experienced, in our com- the Episcopal Church to extend good of our relationships with too much time on issues involv-after the morning Eucharist to munity, the breath of the Holy its giving, which is currently at the larger communion and to ing human sexuality and theTrinity Episcopal Church in Spirit. Most were elated, some .07 percent, to an additional .07 keep us at the table for further Windsor Report, many resolu-downtown Columbus, where we were disappointed; but in truth percent over the next three discussions and healing. tions centered on public policy -were to be quartered until such the bishops vote was truly years. Regrettably, in my view, the dealing with vulnerable women,time as we had elected a new inspired by the Spirit. There is Other resolutions can be found phrase "any candidate to the children, health care, the elderly,Presiding Bishop and that elec- no other way for me to describe online at http://episco- episcopate whose manner of life addictions, poverty, violencetion was ratified by the House it. It was not a politically moti- palchurch.org/documents/Sum presents a challenge to the wider and domestic policies definedof Deputies. It was a long day. vated vote, nor was it a vote maryofActions_v2.pdf. I recom- church and will lead to further by the Federal Budget - wereIt was clear, I think, to most of taken to send a message to the mend that you study this docu- strains on communion" was a never passed, thus leaving thesethe bishops that by the third rest of the Anglican ment. It contains information euphemistic way of saying "gay important issues on the backballot Katharine Jefferts Schori Communion. What it was, in on some very important resolu- and lesbian persons." Gays and burner. For me, the call of Jesus tions. There were many other lesbians are already used as to care for the least among us important resolutions that did scapegoats by some provinces in and to feed and clothe the poor not pass or never made it to a our communion, and they are and be reconcilers and peace- final vote because we ran out of not fully supported in their makers was lost in the ongoing time. Christian vocation by our own hysteria about human sexuality. Perhaps the most controversial church. We "talk the talk," but When will all end? When will and highly publicized resolution we fail to "walk the walk." For we as an Episcopal Church Volume 75, No. 9, September 2006 was B-033, which calls for bish- this reason, I didnt vote for the finally have the courage to move Newspaper of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington ops with jurisdiction and resolution. beyond theological backbiting (formerly Washington Diocese) ISSN 1545-1348 Standing Committees to exer- I believe with all my heart that and reaffirm that all persons are cise restraint by not consenting episcopal elections are nurtured created in the image of God, Bishop John Bryson Chane to the consecration of any can- and blessed by the gift of the and that all are equal in the eyes didate to the episcopate whose Director of communications, Jim Naughton Holy Spirit. Therefore, I will, as of God? When will we treat manner of life presents a chal- Editor, Lucy Chumbley the Bishop of Washington, con- those who have been rejected by lenge to the wider church and Assistant editor, Amy Elliott sent to the election of any bish- the church with as much love as will lead to further strains in the op duly elected by any we seem to have love for our- communion. This resolution POSTMASTER Episcopal diocese. The broad selves and our own agendas? Washington Diocese Church House Permit # 99291 Periodicals postage paid at Washington, D.C. and additional mailing offices. Send address changes to Washington Window, Episcopal Church House, Mount Saint Alban, Washington, BISHOP’S D.C. 20016-5094 visitations To correct an address, send previous and current address to Bishop John B. Chane: newspaper@edow.org or to the above address. Sept. 10 – Christ Church, Capitol Hill Advertising rates available at www.edow.org Sept. 17 – Trinity, Hughesville (a.m.); Christ Church, Accokeek (p.m.) Calendar submissions due Sept. 15. Call 202/537-6560 or Sept. 24 – Washington National Cathedral (Cathedral Day) e-mail lchumbley@edow.org with story ideas.
  3. 3. www.edow.org September 2006 WASHINGTON WINDOW 3Diocese gears up for a second fall revival‘Word to the City’ revival set for 20. The Rev. Donald Robinson,Oct. 19-20 at National Cathedral assistant pastor of the First Baptist Church on RandolphBy Paul Donnelly congregations from other Street NW, said revivals are an denominations," she added. essential part of the ChristianOn the evenings of Oct. 19-20, "Well have good preaching and journey.Washington National Cathedral prayer and Scripture and good "Sometimes weve worked sowill host the second annual music." hard, were confronted with soWord to the City revival. Like This years featured preacher is many challenges, we feel over-the revival last November, it the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., whelmed," said Robinson, whopromises to be considerably live- of Trinity United Church of will help lead the devotions onlier than the style of worship Christ in Chicago. After a six- Oct. 20. "Thats when we needthat is typically, and perhaps year military career, Wright revival, literally. It renews us;unfairly, associated with became pastor of Trinity in thats what the word means. ItEpiscopalians. 1972 when the church had just restores our energies, resets our "Its just a different experience 87 adult members and was near- spiritual dynamics and gives usfor people, especially ly broke. Today the community the reason to press on.Episcopalians," said the Rt. Rev. exceeds 8,000, runs a federally- "So Im going to help reviveBarbara C. Harris, the dioceses backed credit union, a day care people, and be revived, myself."assisting bishop, who coordi- center and two senior housing Robinson praised the Cathedralnates the annual services. "It is facilities. It contributed nearly for its openness to a variety ofless formal. People are free to half a million dollars to hurri- styles of worship. "What wereexpress themselves in song and cane relief after Katrina. dealing with is an Episcopaltestimony and prayer. Youre Among its more prominent body that is open and inclu-not bound to a prayer book." members is Sen. Barack Obama sive," he said. "And part of that Last years two-night revival (D-Ill.), who thanked Wright openness and inclusion is thatdrew an average of 500 people and his fellow parishioners in God is speaking relevantly to aeach evening, and Harris expects his 2004 victory speech. lot of different people at differ-a larger crowd this year. "It is The revival also will feature ent times in different ways."certainly a way for people who music by St. Augustines Roman To which Bishop Harris offereddont normally attend services at Catholic Church Gospel Choir her Amen: "We are learning thatthe National Cathedral to come and the Rev. Christine Wiley of to do evangelism, we sometimesto worship here," she said. Covenant Baptist Church on vary our usual form of worship "We not only invite churches of Oct. 19, and PAUL (Performing and incorporate other forms -the diocese but we also invite Artists Under the Lord) on Oct. and this is one of them." Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.African-American story closer to being toldBy Lucy Chumbley sor the Rev. Carleton Hayden Episcopal Church," Hayden out." Johns, Lafayette Square, who that he be engaged as the pro- said. "Were one of the only To bring things back into the made a presentation to councilThe story of the African jects principal researcher and denominations that doesnt, so I black, he suggested that dioce- members.American experience in the author. see this as being very publish- san staff continue to manage Appointed the following peo-Diocese of Washington is a step When the group began to dis- able and very readable. expenses, while council mem- ple to the new task Force oncloser to being set down, the cuss the project, Hayden said, "I see it really as a missionary bers promote the annual Affordable Housing, which isDiocesan Council heard at its "there were two broad streams document that tells the story of Bishops Appeal and follow up chaired by council memberJuly 11 meeting. of thought; one, a book that the church; people who have with parishes that are late with Janice Booker: council members In his address to the 2006 would have a logical coherence formed and shaped and loved their pledge. John Miers, Anthony MooreDiocesan Convention, Bishop as a book, written to be accessi- the church." In addition, he said, Bishop and Michael Whitson; JohnJohn B. Chane asked that the ble with photographs and pic- At present, the diocese does Chane has asked that council More of St. Johns, Lafayettehistory of the dioceses black tures, and two, a study guide on not have the money to fund the members serve as a model for Square; Carol Graves of St.congregants to be told. In CD with pictures for use in proposed research work, the rest of the diocese by mak- Lukes, D.C.; Lynn Kneedler ofresponse, the African American Christian Formation." Cooney said. ing a contribution to the St. Marks, D.C.; the Rev.History Project was formed in "One of the things we were But council members expressed Bishops Appeal. He asked that Jennifer McKenzie of St.February, with Susan Stonesifer interested in was that it would their enthusiasm for the project, the amount pledged by council Davids, D.C.; Joe Howell ofas the convener. be a usable document that and voted to approve it in prin- members be made available at All Souls, D.C.; Linda Artman "It immediately became clear would be useful to congrega- ciple, with plans for funding to the September meeting. of St. Columbas; Tom Cooketo me what a vast undertaking tions," said the Rev. Canon Nan be discussed at a future date. "We might find as a council of St. Johns, Georgetown;this could be," Paul Cooney, Peete, who also serves on the Funding for new projects and were going to spend a lot more Doug Ryan of St. Dunstans,canon to the ordinary, said. He steering committee. initiatives is scarce, Finance time on the fundraising side," Edith Bartley of St. Barnabas,asked the group to come up But what form this work Committee chairman John Welch said. Leeland; Bob Zdenek of St.with "not a proposal, but some- would take is still not entirely Welch said, reporting that the In other matters the council: Dunstans, the Rev. Emilything more than a nebulous idea clear, group members said, diocese is currently facing a fis- Voted to grant the Diocesan Guthrie and the Rev. Kayof what shape the project might explaining that the material cal shortfall. Retreat Committee full commit- Johnson.take." could be presented in pamphlet "Right now were looking at a tee status. To avoid potential conflicts of Members of the groups steer- form or as a study guide, online deficit," he said. "If we expect "We have the mission, the interests, "we have used peopleing committee presented their or on a compact disc, or in any to continue the same number of vision, the money and many connected but not employed bythoughts, along with a $67,000 combination of those mediums. services and we keep adding prepared to serve," said Beth affordable housing institutions,”proposal from council member "We dont really have a good projects on, were going in the Frank, the committees chair- Cooney said.and Howard University profes- history of blacks in the wrong direction. Were tapped woman and a parishioner of St.
  4. 4. 4 WASHINGTON WINDOW September 2006 www.edow.org Body Christ OF Body of Christ aims to introduce readers WW: How did you come to be vicar only to St. Barnabas. The thing to take istry. Theres a great need at this time to a different parish in the church fami- of St. Barnabas? note of is that not all deaf persons want for more priests to serve deaf congrega- ly of the Diocese of Washington each ALLEN: I was a nurse for 30 years a signed service; some want an inter- tions. As far as we know, there are no month. This month, writer Diane Ney and a certified sign language interpreter preted ministry, which means it goes deaf people in seminary right now or speaks with the Rev. Barbara Allen, from 1974, before being ordained a from the priest to the interpreter to the hearing persons interested in deaf min- rector of St. Barnabas’ Church of the priest in 2001. I was serving as a hos- congregation. This is an individual istry. We are very concerned that both Deaf, to learn more about the life, his- pice chaplain when I met the then vicar choice. And this is another thing to deaf and hearing persons seek to discern tory, plans and character of that congre- of St. Barnabas at an Episcopal remember: You cannot lump all deaf their call to ministry with deaf people. gation. Conference of the Deaf Convention. people together, anymore than you can WW: Well, I guess to be called to that WW: I understand St. Barnabas his- When she became ill, I was invited to lump all hearing people together. There ministry means you have to have a real tory is associated with Gallaudet are so many different kinds of needs in understanding of the deaf community. University? the deaf community. There are people ALLEN: And you need to understand ALLEN: The Rev. Thomas Gallaudet, who have been deaf since birth; those that deaf people have a culture all their the son of the Rev. Thomas Hopkins who are hard of hearing; those who own. They are truly an ethnic group Gallaudet, a Congregational minister, became deaf through an illness or an with a language and culture. You cant came to Washington in 1859 to hold injury and those who experience age assume that the deaf culture is just like the first service for deaf people here. onset deafness. the hearing culture. The service was held at St. Johns, WW: There are so many variables WW: What kind of programs do you Lafayette Square, with six deaf persons determining whats needed in your con- have planned for St. Barnabas? attending among the hearing congrega- gregation. ALLEN: We tried something in tion. That service was interpreted by ALLEN: And thats a major part of March that was very successful. Gallaudet. He later held services and my ministry - determining those needs Montgomery Hospice was offering Bible studies, signing them himself. In and finding ways to fulfill them. Were information on hospice, so we arranged 1909 the group was given the name St. very lucky in that we have a bishop who with the bishop that they would make Barnabas Mission to the Deaf. In 2004, is tremendously aware of and responsive their presentations during our four Diocesan Council approved changing St. Barnabas’ Episcopal to the deaf ministry in this diocese. Lenten services, and we had a very posi- the name from mission to church Church of the Deaf Bishop Chanes interest has opened a tive response to that. Hospice is some- because St. Barnabas is a diocesan-sup- 6701 Wisconsin Avenue, lot of doors. And Im really gratified thing deaf people need to understand as Chevy Chase, Md., 20815 ported congregation. with the responsiveness from the much as hearing people, but its always Phone/fax: 301/907-9740 WW: And at some point St. Barnabas Web site: www.stbarnabasdeaf.edow.org Cathedral and the Cathedral College. a question of whether theyll be able to began having its services at St. Johns, Established 1859; 50 members For instance, both are working on pro- communicate with the staff, whether Norwood? The Rev. Barbara Allen, Vicar viding more interpreters and making the service will be adequate, things like ALLEN: St. Barnabas has been host- (pictured) more events accessible for deaf people, that. (And thats an example of how the ed by several parishes in the diocese. In including the fall Nave lectures. And needs of deaf people can be similar and 1978 it moved to St. Johns, Norwood Ive asked them to start now to get at the same time different from those of from St. Marks, Capitol Hill. We have supply for a Sunday and I felt immedi- ready for the Presiding Bishops installa- hearing people.) We are planning a pro- a service every Sunday morning at 10. ately that I belonged here. And the fol- tion in November. gram in the fall that will present the We also have office space in the base- lowing Wednesday they decided to call WW: Are you still involved with the PBS program Three Faiths, One God ment. me as their vicar. Episcopal Conference for the Deaf? over a period of several Sundays. We are WW: Now, you yourself are not deaf. WW: St. Barnabas is the only church ALLEN: Yes, Im the first vice presi- still in the planning stage. We will use ALLEN: No, Im not. I voice with my for deaf people in this diocese, isnt it? dent of the ECD, which has about 200 the DVD and teaching resource sent signing at the service, if there are people ALLEN: Im happy to say there is an members nationwide. Its a very active out by the diocese. (We are so pleased attending who do not know sign lan- interpreted deaf ministry at St. organization. We publish a quarterly that the DVD is closed captioned.) The guage. I sign at all of our services and Georges, Glenn Dale, which means newsletter, The Deaf Episcopalian, and leader will be a retired Gallaudet profes- any events that we have, and we do hire deaf people in the diocese have a provide a strong network for deaf peo- sor of U.S. History, Dr. Mary interpreters on occasion. choice. Theyre not limited to coming ple and for those involved in deaf min- Malzkihn. Senior send-off at St. Columba’s Photo by Jessie Murray Twenty graduating seniors from St. Columba’s were honored during a special service at the church on May 21. After the sermon, they were called forward and prayed for as their parents stood beside them, said Emily Gowdy Canady, director of youth ministry. “It’s a sending off -- a reminder of where they came from,” she said. The seniors also were present- ed with an annotated Bible.
  5. 5. www.edow.org September 2006 WASHINGTON WINDOW 5African Anglicans fight AIDS and povertyBy Lucy Chumbley The church provides prevention education, food and ahead. … They are moving to action."An ocean stands between theEpiscopal Diocese of care to patients and orphans, often on a shoestring The churches are deeply involved in the welfare of theirWashington and the Anglican communities, the Browns said,Province of Southern Africa, but they are carrying a heavyand the six time zone-difference burden and are in need of bothmeans morning in Maryland is solidarity and support.afternoon in Africa. "When we spoke to the clergy, But time and tide are just the they werent responsible for onemost obvious obstacles faced by church," Annie Brown said,the two entities, who entered explaining that in addition tointo partnership at the dioceses running their own programs,2004 convention, as they most parishes also support threeattempt to deepen their rela- or four outstations in surround-tionship. ing communities. In addition to To strengthen the connection, offering worship, these outsta-Annie and Bob Brown, parish- tions provide a range of services,ioners at Ascension, Silver from meals to medical care,Spring, recently spent two-and- orphanages and education.a-half months visiting churches, Despite their meager resources,colleges, hospices and orphan- both church communities andages in South Africa and individuals in Swaziland manageSwaziland. Annie, a member of to keep giving to those in need,the dioceses Southern Africa she said, often at great personalPartnership Committee, was on sacrifice.a working sabbatical. An associ- There is the Rev. Patrickate professor at the Howard Mphatha, for example - retiredUniversity School of Social headmaster and rector of St.Work, she is researching the Augustines, Mpaka, who usedAnglican Churchs response to his retirement package to startthe AIDS crisis in Africa. Photos courtesy of Annie and Bob Brown the Mpaka Orphan Care "I teach family and child wel- Project, which is staffed entirelyfare and with AIDS comes the The Rev. Nancy Tshabalala, rector of Holy Trinity Church, Mblango, Swaziland, visits by volunteers. The homewhole issue of welfare," she said. Ascension Church, one of her parishs three outstations. Mphatha had planned to buildSo she set out to learn "How are for himself upon his retirement Shell be sharing her insights at inspire some new parishes to churches who might be interest-people responding? How is the stands unfinished in a field near a special meeting of the enter into partnerships with ed in partnership is that peoplechurch responding?" and to the church, his money and ener- Southern Africa Partnership churches in Southern Africa. are not sitting and waiting,"begin to answer the question, gy diverted. Committee at St. Columbas on "I guess the thing that I really Annie Brown said. "They might"Whats going on?" see AFRICA on page 6 Sept. 18, which she hopes will want to get across to our be praying, but they are moving Swaziland churches in need of partnerships, Ndungane says As the third anniversary of the sider partnering with churches So sometimes, Brown said, its dioceses partnership with the in Swaziland, a country where best to just go. Anglican Church of Southern poverty is rife and more than 33 He and his wife Annie recently Africa approaches, the diocese is percent of the adult population made a return trip to South focusing renewed energy on are living with AIDS. Africa. "You go back and it was establishing companion parish Members of the diocese can as if you were there yesterday," relationships, and encouraging learn more about partnerships Annie Brown said. "Theres Washingtonians to visit Africa. and pilgrimages at a 7 p.m Sept. singing, and theres a celebra- Educational "I think whats most impor- 18 meeting at St. Columbas tion and a special lunch that posters tant-its not just signing a with Bishop John Bryson Chane youre brought into." about AIDS check-its building relation- and the Southern Africa While some of the dioceses ships," said Archbishop Partnership Committee. larger parishes are actively are Njongonkulu Ndungane, pri- Bob Brown of Ascension, Silver involved in partnerships with omnipresent in mate of the Church of Southern Spring, says visiting Africa is parishes in Southern Africa, Anglican Africa, during a July visit to essential in establishing a rela- there are plenty of opportunities churches Washington, D.C., to attend tionship. "The average person for smaller congregations and throughout the the Interfaith Summit on Africa. [in Africa] doesnt have every- even individuals to get involved Province of "People benefit more from pro- day access to e-mail - even the and make a difference, Annie Southern grams of exchange. When peo- average parish. And they dont Brown said. Africa. “We ple visit they learn what the culturally write letters the way "I dont want them to be put never heard a needs are and learn how they we did before e-mail, and the off by thinking they have to sermon where could better meet those needs." mail itself takes so long, and its have a lot of money and a large AIDS wasn’t Archbishop Ndungane has par- so much more expensive for budget," she said. "They can mentioned,” ticularly asked that churches in them to call us than it is for us have a small relationship." Annie Brown the Diocese of Washington con- to call them." -- Lucy Chumbley said.
  6. 6. 6 WASHINGTON WINDOW September 2006 www.edow.org AFRICA from page 5Facing adversity with amandala And there is the Rev. Orma "The medicine is toxic, like Photos courtesy of Bob and Annie BrownMavimbela, rector of St. chemotherapy," Bob Brown Ascension, Silver Spring parishioner AnnieMargarets, Manzini, and its two said. "So if you dont have goodoutstations, who also gave up nutrition, you could die from Brown (left) spent two-and-a-half months in Southernher retirement to start a pro- taking the medicine." Africa this spring studying the Anglican Church’s effortsgram for 70 AIDS orphans. In "We never heard a sermon to combat AIDS. She and her husband, Bob, traveledaddition to this, she is currently where AIDS wasnt mentioned," extensively, visiting churches, hospices and schools.preparing to build another out- Annie Brown said. And dis- Below, children take part in an AIDS support group.station in an isolated communi- played prominently on the wallsty. of every church, poster after And then there is the Rev. poster silently answered herNancy Tshabalala, rector of question: "Are Anglican church-Holy Trinity Church, Mblango, es educating people aboutwho travels for miles on erratic AIDS?"public transport and on foot to The Browns say they camevisit her churchs three outsta- back from Africa with ations, carrying food packages. renewed sense of amandala - aHoly Trinitys own foundations Swahili concept that means "theare crumbling, yet its parish- power of people."ioners dig deep to give to oth- "People from the churches thaters, often tithing tangible goods have gone see what people arelike bags of corn. trying to do," she said. "People "To me, this is faith," Annie there can see that you are stand-Brown said. ing in solidarity with them. I Everywhere they went, the think its good to go over andBrowns noted the emphasis on see them and share in the wor-providing food. Most churches ship and feel the power."have kitchen gardens, they said, Money is always needed, shegrowing cabbages, carrots and said, but it is the sharing of timebeets that are cooked by volun- that really brings the partner-teers and distributed to AIDS ship between north and south,patients and orphans. east and west to life. ROOFTOP from page 1 of Agriculture, she says she is not an been very positive." experienced gardener. To get some prac- The parish children have especiallygy costs. er, to water the plants each day, and has tice, she has planted a wading pool plot enjoyed their trips to the roof, she said. The genesis of the garden was a conver- since rigged up an irrigation system - a in her own backyard, and is experiment- While the team hopes that the newsation Rogers and McCarthy had after a hose pipe on a timer. ing with eggplants. parish roof will eventually support a fullsermon on environmental stewardship at The first harvest - "tiny little zucchinis" McCarthy usually checks on the rooftop rooftop garden, theres still room for theEpiphanys Creation Sunday last - came in July, followed by lots of green garden during the coffee hour after the current garden to expand, McCarthyOctober. beans. The carrots were less successful Sunday service, and often takes a curious said. "Obviously, we dont have any room for "we had neglected to thin them out," parishioner or two up with her. But for She thinks the current roof could sup-a community garden at Epiphany," Rogers said, and the tomatoes got off to port six to eight more wading pool plots,McCarthy said. "But we have a roof. We and hopes to get some more accom-thought, wouldnt it be great if when we plished gardeners involved with the proj-renovated the parish house we could ect.have a garden on the roof?" "With all the [environmental] problems The current roof is not strong enough that are facing us its important to beto support a whole garden or safe enough really inventive," Rogers said. "What weto allow unmonitored access, Rogers do we have going for us? What are wesaid, but the church recently engaged an called to do and how do we respond toarchitect to discuss renovations which that? Its going to take a lot of very cleverwill eventually include a green roof. people a lot of thinking and a lot of time While this prospect is several years off, to find solutions to the problems wethe team decided to create a demonstra- face. Thats what were trying to starttion garden right away to develop its doing."green fingers and get a sense of the possi- Environmental stewardship aside,bilities. McCarthy sees the rooftop garden prima- Fellow parishioners were skeptical at rily as a place where the churchs com-first, but the team persevered and pushed munity can grow and flourish.forward with its plan. "I see it as really people from all walks Team members purchased two wading Photo by Lucy Chumbley of life working side by side, digging inpools for $11 each, punched holes in The Rev. Anne-Marie Jeffery waters Epiphany’s new rooftop plot in mid-June. the soil, watching things grow," she said.them and hauled them up to the roof, "I think its empowering - it really givesalong with topsoil and coconut fiber - a slow start, but everyone involved has those who dont want to make the climb, people a sense of connection to the earthmore environmentally friendly than peat been gratified by the plots progress. updates are posted on a bulletin board in and to each other and to God. I think itmoss, which is not a renewable resource. "This is really trial and error for all of the parish hall. just fits so many goals that we as a "I just got seeds from the local hardware us," Rogers said. "Were sort of watching "Most of the time when people see it, church and we as Christians shouldstore," McCarthy said. it unfold." even if theres skepticism at first, its just have." The team recruited the Rev. Anne- While McCarthy works as a natural so interesting and cool," McCarthy said. For more information about green roofs,Marie Jeffery, the parishs urban mission- resources specialist with the Department "The reactions Ive been getting have visit www.greenroofs.net
  7. 7. www.edow.org September 2006 WASHINGTON WINDOW 7APPRECIATION:Edgar Romig rememberedBy Frederick Quinn Leigh was at the next table. part of his pastoral gift. Romigs with a hymn or two, always months earlier, he required Romig called himself a verbal interventions were mini- including "Epiphany" which he around-the-clock hospice care.Each Good Friday, the Rev. "Protestant, evangelical, liberal," mal, never invasive and always wrote in the great tradition of "I feel fine but I could go at anyEdgar Romig stood for three each word distinctly pro- gently encouraging, leaving the leading clergy leaving a signa- minute," he said, matter-of-fact-hours in the pulpit of nounced as it was carefully door open for a hopeful next ture hymn as part of their lega- ly. "I like living, of course I do,Washingtons historic Church of defined for him. He was deeply step. Clergy often came to him cy. but if I go on living like this Ithe Epiphany, where he was rec- influenced by Jürgen Moltmans with tricky pastoral problems Shortly after he had left will exhaust my lifes savings intor from 1964 to 1992 and The Crucified God. The and Epiphany in Romigs era Massachusetts for Epiphany, two years. I will have nothing topreached seven different ser- Atonement was the concept he was known as a "clergy church," Washingtons downtown went leave my sister," a 75-year-oldmons on the Seven Last Words spoke of most often as influenc- where clerics with a Sunday off up in flames during the 1968 widow.of Christ. Tall, with a strong, ing his own religious life. came to hear a thoughtful ser- riots. Epiphany was never theclear voice and minimal ges- "Gods willingness to suffer for mon and to interact with col- same. A core of older WASP His voice became the reflectivetures, his 20-minute (that was humanity makes all else possi- leagues. parishioners stayed on, and a pastors: "I do not fear death,"the gold standard) sermons were ble," he remarked when I visited Humor was essential to his dis- small number of middle class each word was pronouncedhand-lettered on long, thick him shortly before his death. course: David Booth Beers, African Americans added to the thoughtfully, "but I wondersheets of manuscript paper with "How else could you allow for longtime diocesan chancellor core membership, but its critical what comes next." His remarksa careful balance of expository the senseless death of children?" and friend, recalled leading a mass was no longer there, and drifted in and out like soundmaterial and illustrations. A redoubtable intellectual, he conference with Romig at a des- the parish drew deeply on its bites from a distant radio sta- Romig, who died in also was a caring pastor, and olate, threadbare church center. once-substantial endowment for tion. "What was I saying?" heWashington in June, was a for- since few of his churchs mem- On the way home Romig said survival. asked intently.midable figure, even in his bers lived within Epiphanys the place resembled "an Albany, Romigs leadership remained "About what comes afteryouth. He left college to serve in parish bounds, he was constant- N.Y. mens club after they had constant. He was both a moral death," I reminded him. RomigEurope during World War II, ly on the road with one good sold off the good stuff." voice in the city and a major tossed his head back, laughing.and was severely wounded in eye and one fully functioning Perhaps the most hospitable of contributor to diocesan life. He "The Atonement is the key tothe leg during heavy fighting in leg, visiting and revisiting hospi- Washingtons cardinal rectors, was always a few years ahead of everything," he mused again, "ItFrance. A highly-decorated tals, nursing homes, and the Romig entertained frequently other voices as an outspoken makes the rest possible." Then,combat veteran, he earned three elderly in the District of and well. At one end of the advocate for racial equality, in a voice filled with tenderness,silver stars, a bronze star and a Columbia, Virginia and heavy wooden Romig family womens ordination, and the "Jesus was special."Purple Heart. While thanking Maryland. During one of his dining room table was a silver full inclusion of gays and les- It was time to leave. I squeezedthe soldier who hauled him to several bouts with cancer he vat of Bishop Duns lethal bians in the churchs life and his gnarled hand. "Stay withsafety he sensed an affinity, and asked me to take Easter com- punch surrounded by crystal ministry. me," he said, "And I will staysaid, "Im Princeton." "Im munions to shut ins; despite a punch cups and rows of elegant Shortly before his death, I visit- with you."Dartmouth," came the tank dri- clear map it took much of the china plates beside which were ed Romig. In shorts and a by- The Rev. Frederick Quinn was avers reply. An earlier wartime day to drive through traffic, find cards lettered in Romigs dis- now too large white shirt, he sat clergy associate at the Church ofassignment had taken him to parking, etc. to complete a few tinctive script "Baltic caviar, in his usual chair, telephone the Epiphany in Romigs time,Cairo where he invited friends visits. cheap stuff!" "Please place olive with large keyboard nearby. and is the author of numerousfor a birthday sundowner on the Intuitive empathy with all sorts pits here," and "Middle East Since commencing daily radia- books on law, history, and reli-roof of Shepherds Hotel. Vivian and conditions of people was dish. Hot!" Gatherings ended tion treatments for cancer a few gion. REGIONAL ASSEMBLIES 2006 Region 1: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 28 at St. Matthews, Bethesda Region 6: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 14 at Christ, LaPlata Hyattsville Region 4: 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at Christ, Election schedule for each region and information on sub- Region 2: 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 28 at St. Lukes, Kensington mitting nominations and resolutions can be found at Bethesda Region 5: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 28 at St. Matthews, www.edow.org or by contacting Ann Talty at Region 3: 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 28 at St. Lukes, Hyattsville atalty@edow.org or 202/537-6548. SCHEDULE OF ELECTIONS AND NOMINATIONS: (Note: elections at Regional Assemblies term (2010) Trial Court, 5 year term (2012) Region 3: Patricia Snowden, 5145 are for regional representatives. Ballotting Region 6: Clerical Representative to Note: For At-Large member of Westbard Ave, Bethesda, MD 20816- will also be done to select the region’s Diocesan Council - 3 year term (2010) Diocesan Council only, you may nomi- 1413, or at postscript2@comcast.net, nominations for elections held at the Clergy, wardens and convention delegates nate across regions. All other nomina- or by phone at (301) 229-2170 by Diocesan Convention. All terms of office are entitled to vote and should plan to tions must be from within your region. Sept. 27, 2006. begin after the convention and end with come. Other parishioners are encouraged Region 4: The Rev. Kathy Corbett- the convention of the year listed.) to come as well to participate in discus- Submit nominations and Welch, PO Box 131, Brookeville, MD sions. resolutions to: 20833-0131, or at frkec@aol.com, or Elections: Region 1: DOniece Dillard, 5437 phone at (301)570-3834 by September Region 1: Clerical Representative to Nominations by each region: Connecticut Ave NW Apt 506, 22, 2006. Diocesan Council - 3 year term (2010) (elect nominees to run at Convention) Washington, DC 20015-2710, or at Region 5: The Rev. Noreen Seiler- Region 2: Regional Convener - 3 year 1 clerical and 1 lay nominee for dodillard@cathedral.com or by phone Dubay, 5901 36th Ave, Hyattsville, term (2010) Member of Standing Committee, 2- at (202)537-6385 by Sept. 27, 2006. MD 20782-2925, or at Region 3: Lay Representative to year term (2009) Region 2: Martha Jenkins, 601 revnoreen@aol.com, or by phone at Diocesan Council - 3 year term (2010) 1 clerical and 1 lay nominee for At- Pennsylvania Ave NW Apt 412, (301)559-8686 by Sept. 27, 2006. Region 4: Lay Representative to Large Member of Diocesan Council, 3- Washington, DC 20004-2610, or at Region 6: The Rev. Jessee Neat, PO Diocesan Council - 3 year term (2010) year term (2010) mjenkins108@aol.com, or by phone at Box 8, Chaptico, MD 20621-0008, or Region 5: Regional Convener - 3 year 1 Clerical nominee for Ecclesiastical (202)249-9438 by Sept. 27, 2006. at fatherjessee@aol.com, or by phone at (301) 884-3451 by Sept. 18, 2006.
  8. 8. 8 WASHINGTON WINDOW September 2006 www.edow.org
  9. 9. www.edow.org September 2006 WASHINGTON WINDOW 9 Corrections: In a story in the July/August issue of the Window titled, "Church passes $152 million 3- year budget," the name of Anna Julia Haywood Cooper was mis- spelled. Cooper, an educator, was approved for commemoration in Laborers in the Harvest the Calendar of the Church Year by the 75th General ConventionThe Episcopal Diocese of Washingtons Location: Saint Pauls, Rock Creek Register online at edow.org/youth. of the Episcopal Church.Youth Leader Training Retreat Dates: Sept. 29 - 30 Registration Deadline: Sept. 15 Cost: The Rev. Paul Abernathys sab-An outstanding training opportunity for Friday night only: $30 For more information: batical dates were incorrectly listedanyone who works with 6th - 12th graders Saturday only: $55 Contact Paul Canady, Deputy for Youth in the July/August issue of the- lay and ordained, paid and volunteer, Friday & Saturday together: $70 Ministry atyouth group leaders and Sunday School Register for the whole weekend, save $15! (202)537-6524; pcanady@edow.org. Window: Abernathy will be awayteachers! on sabbatical from Aug. 1 through Jan. 31 2007.
  10. 10. 10 WASHINGTON WINDOW September 2006 www.edow.orgSing a song of summerCampers at the Bethesda Church of the Redeemer learnto express themselves using instruments and their voicesBy Lucy Chumbley After leading the group dren. through a series of vocal warm- And they do.I ts the last day of up exercises, Smith strikes the The Friday morning session is Summer Music Camp at keys and the children burst into a dress rehearsal for the after- the Church of the "How Can I Keep From noons main event - a concert Redeemer, Bethesda, and Singing?" in two-part harmony. for the parents featuring the 18 campers - ages 6 Next comes a song called singing, drumming, xylophonethough 13 - are eager to get "Inscription of Hope" with and tambourine playing. not good stage presence for churchs after-school tutoringstarted. upbeat lyrics to match: "I "All I ask is that you do your when our parents are here." program, the camp has been They pound up the wooden believe in the sun/Even when it best," Smith says. "That when The camp, which also included especially beneficial.stairs from the parish hall, past isnt shining/And I believe in you do it for your parents you activities like water balloon toss- Redeemer offered these chil-the quilted wall hanging of the God/Even when he is silent." give it 100 percent." es, making and floating boats dren from the District ofthree wise men arriving in "Ooo Ooo Woo Ooo" the chil- Just a week ago many of the fashioned from egg cartons and Columbia a full scholarship, andBethlehem, and into the pine- dren sing, with increasing assur- children had never sung at all, a hike in Glen Echo Park, is the parishioners picked them upsmelling nave. ance. "Ooo Ooo Ooo Ooo." he says. "But now theyre first of its kind at Redeemer, and drove them home again at "Lets start singing," says "I liked where you placed the singing in two parts." says Smith, who is already plan- the end of each session.Redeemers music director, Tom emphasis on that last note," Theyre also making remarks to ning another, longer camp for While they have had less for-Smith, from behind the piano as Smith says. "That sounded like each other like, "This room has next year. mal musical training than thethe children bound into the a college-level choir. Now lets great acoustics," and learning While all the campers have others, these children quicklypews. "Lots of energy. I need sound like a big adult profes- about concepts such as stage gained confidence from the dis- caught up, Smith says, and haveyou to sing very confidently, sit- sional choir." presence: "Lets not play with cipline of making music, he relished the opportunity toting up straight." "Well try," chorus the chil- our [percussion] tubes; thats says, for six scholars from the express themselves. Photos by Lucy Chumbley Four drummers in Jenna Dugan’s group practice their rhythm before the music camp’s final concert, (above), while John Barnes’ group runs through a number on the xylophones (right and above).
  11. 11. www.edow.org September 2006 WASHINGTON WINDOW 11Campers begin each day with vocal warm up exercises andsinging in the church’s nave (bottom right, with music director TomSmith at the piano), before separating into smaller groups to workon rhythm using instruments like xylophones and plastic pipes(below, with instructor John Barnes). "I really noticed it in the times, keeping their instrumentsdrumming and the work with silent when they arent playing,xylophones," he says. "The chil- remembering to smile and pro-dren expressed themselves in a viding dramatic flourishes whereway they are not often able to required.do." After a near-flawless perform- After the morning singing and ance, Barnes has one finalwarm up, the children spilt into announcement to make.two groups to work on rhythm "At the end of the day, whenusing a variety of percussive you leave the stage, take yourinstruments with John Barnes drums with you," he says.and Jenna Dugan, both former "Theyre going to be yours."classmates of Smiths who are Two of the campers exchangenow music teachers in the D.C. high-fives, while others expressarea. One group remains in the disbelief and delight.nave with Barnes to work on the "We can take them home?"xylophones, while others head "Theyre going to be ours?"downstairs with Dugan to form For the six campers from thean African drum circle. tutoring program, there was an "At first they had to work on a additional treat: One of thestructure, a rhythmic pattern," parishioners had bought themSmith says. Once they mastered the instrument of their choice -that, some were encouraged to one chose a saxophone, anotherimprovise while others provided a drum set, a third, a guitar -a steady backbeat. and Smith is setting them up "The outcome was just amaz- with private tutors.ing," he says. "It was literally a "Its my hope that we can addsymphony orchestra of different a musical component to thesounds. I really had never seen tutoring program at Redeemerthat - to see all those children so some aspects of the musictogether playing different camp can be carried out all yearinstruments. I couldnt believe round," he says. "Were buildingthey had achieved that level of this music program - thats whymusicianship in such a short I was hired - and this, alongspace of time." with our concert series, is a Coming together again for a form of outreach for us.final rehearsal before the per- "Were trying to create a musicformance, the children run program thats not just for us."through their repertoire several Redeemer’s concert series will run from October to May. For details, visit www.redeemerbethesda.org

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